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The Info List - Ken Rosewall





Kenneth Robert Rosewall AM, MBE (born 2 November 1934) is a former world top-ranking amateur and professional tennis player from Australia. He won a record 23 tennis Majors including 8 Grand Slam singles titles and, before the Open Era, a record 15 Pro Slam titles; overall, he reached a record 35 Major finals. He won the Pro Grand Slam in 1963. Rosewall won 9 slams in doubles with a career double grand slam. He is considered to be one of the greatest tennis players of all time.[2][3] He had a renowned backhand and enjoyed a long career at the highest levels from the early 1950s to the early 1970s. Rosewall was one of the two best male players for about nine years and was the World No. 1 player for a number of years in the early 1960s. He was ranked among the top 20 players, amateur or professional, every year from 1952 through 1977. Rosewall is the only player to have simultaneously held Pro Grand Slam titles on three different surfaces (1962–1963). At the 1971 Australian Open
Australian Open
he became the first male player during the open era to win a Grand Slam tournament without dropping a set. A natural left-hander, he was taught by his father to play right-handed. He developed a powerful and effective backhand but never had anything more than an accurate but relatively soft serve. He was 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) tall, weighed 67 kg (148 lb) and was ironically nicknamed "Muscles" by his fellow-players because of his lack of them. He was, however, fast, agile, and tireless, with a deadly volley. His sliced backhand was his strongest shot, and, along with the very different backhand of former player Don Budge, has generally been considered one of the best, if not the best, backhands yet seen.[4] The father of Brett and Glenn Rosewall, and grandfather of five, Rosewall now lives in northern Sydney.

Contents

1 Early life and tennis 2 Tennis career

2.1 Amateur career: 1950 through 1956 2.2 Professional career: 1957 through March 1968

2.2.1 1957 2.2.2 1958 2.2.3 1959 2.2.4 1960 2.2.5 1961 2.2.6 1962 2.2.7 1963 2.2.8 1964 2.2.9 1965 2.2.10 1966 2.2.11 1967

2.3 Open-closed career: April 1968 through July 1972

2.3.1 1968 2.3.2 1969 2.3.3 1970 2.3.4 1971 2.3.5 1972

2.4 True open career: August 1972 through 1980

2.4.1 1972 2.4.2 1973 2.4.3 1974–1982

3 Rivalries 4 Playing style and assessment 5 Career statistics

5.1 Grand Slam tournament finals

5.1.1 Performance timeline

5.2 Pro-Slam tournament finals

5.2.1 Performance timeline

6 Records

6.1 All-time records 6.2 Open Era
Open Era
records

7 Personal life 8 Honours 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References

11.1 Sources

12 External links

Early life and tennis[edit] Rosewall was born on 2 November 1934 in Hurstville, Sydney. His father, Robert Rosewall, was a grocer at Penshurst, New South Wales and when Ken was one year old they moved to the Rockdale where his father bought three clay tennis courts.[5] Ken started playing tennis at age three with a shortened racket and using both hands for forehand and backhand shots.[6] They practiced early in the morning, focusing on playing one type of shot for a period of weeks. He was a natural left-hander but was taught to play right-handed by his father. He played his first tournament when he was nine and lost to the eventual winner. At age eleven Rosewall won the Metropolitan Hardcourt Championships for under fourteen.[7] In 1949 at age 14 he became the junior champion at the Australian Hardcourt Championships in Sydney, the youngest player to win an Australian title.[8][9] Tennis career[edit] Amateur career: 1950 through 1956[edit] In October 1950 at the age of 15 and still a junior player, Rosewall reached the semifinals of the 1950 New South Wales Metropolitan Championships (not to be confused with the New South Wales Championships), where he was defeated by the world-class adult player Ken McGregor.[10] The following year, he won his first men's tournament in Manly.

Ken Rosewall, as a 12 year old at White City, Sydney
Sydney
(1946)

In 1952, still only 17, Rosewall reached the quarterfinals of the U.S. Championships, upsetting the top-seeded Vic Seixas
Vic Seixas
in the fourth round 3–6, 6–2, 7–5, 5–7, 6–3 before losing to Gardnar Mulloy in five sets.[11] In his end-of-year rankings, the British tennis expert Lance Tingay ranked Rosewall and Lew Hoad, his equally youthful doubles partner, jointly as the tenth best amateur players in the world.[12] Rosewall was only 18 years old when, in 1953, he won his first singles title at a Grand Slam event after defeating compatriot Mervyn Rose
Mervyn Rose
at the Australian Championships.[13] He also won the French Championships and the Pacific Southwest Championships. He was the top seed at Wimbledon but lost the quarterfinal match to Kurt Nielsen.[14] Rosewall reached the semifinals at the U.S. Championships, where he was defeated by Tony Trabert
Tony Trabert
in straight sets.[15] He lost again to Trabert in the Challenge Round of the Davis Cup
Davis Cup
in Melbourne 6–3, 6–4, 6–4. Rosewall, however, won the fifth and deciding rubber of that tie, defeating Seixas in four sets.[16] At the end of the year, Tingay placed Trabert first and Rosewall second in his annual amateur rankings. In 1954, Rosewall defeated Trabert in a five-set semifinal at Wimbledon but lost the final to crowd-favorite Jaroslav Drobný 13–11, 4–6, 6–2, 9–7.[17] Rosewall won the singles title at the Australian Championships
Australian Championships
for the second time in 1955, defeating Hoad in the final 9–7, 6–4, 6–4. At the U.S. Championships, Trabert defeated Rosewall in the final 9–7, 6–3, 6–3. In 1956, Rosewall and Hoad captured all the Grand Slam men's doubles titles except at the French Championships, from which Rosewall was absent. For several years in their youthful careers, Rosewall and Hoad were known as "The Gold-dust Twins." In singles, Rosewall lost to Hoad in the final of two Grand Slam tournaments. At the Australian Championships, Hoad defeated Rosewall 6–4, 3–6, 6–4, 7–5 and at Wimbledon, Hoad won 6–2, 4–6, 7–5, 6–4. Rosewall, however, prevented Hoad from winning the Grand Slam when Rosewall won their final at the U.S. Championships 4–6, 6–2, 6–3, 6–3. During his amateur career, Rosewall helped Australia
Australia
win three Davis Cup Challenge Rounds (1953, 1955 and 1956). Rosewall won 15 of the 17 Davis Cup
Davis Cup
singles rubbers he played those years, including the last 14 in a row. Professional career: 1957 through March 1968[edit]

Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
(front) and Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
in the 1954 final of the Eastern Grass Court Championships in South Orange, N.J., USA.

Promoter and former tennis great Jack Kramer
Jack Kramer
tried unsuccessfully to sign the "Whiz Kids" ( Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
and Rosewall) to professional contracts in late 1955. But one year later, Rosewall accepted Kramer's offer. Rosewall, during the Challenge Round of the Davis Cup, tried to convince his partner Hoad to do the same, but he rejected the proposition.[18] 1957[edit] Rosewall played his first professional match on 14 January 1957, at Kooyong Stadium
Kooyong Stadium
in Melbourne against the reigning king of professional tennis, Pancho Gonzales
Pancho Gonzales
who won after a close five-set match.[19] The following day Rosewall defeated Gonzales in straight sets.[20] Rosewall explained later that there was a huge gap between the amateur level and the professional level. In their series of head-to-head matches in Australia
Australia
and the U.S. (until May), Gonzales won 50 matches to Rosewall's 26. During this period, Rosewall also entered two tournaments, the Australian Pro at Sydney
Sydney
in February and the U.S. Pro at Cleveland, Ohio
Cleveland, Ohio
in April. At both events he was defeated in the semifinal in straight-sets by Frank Sedgman
Frank Sedgman
(second best pro in 1956) and Pancho Segura
Pancho Segura
(third best pro in 1956), respectively.[21] At the Tournament of Champions, a round robin event held at Forest Hills in New York, Rosewall defeated Segura and Hoad but lost to Gonzales, Sedgman and Trabert to finish in joint third place.[21] In September, Rosewall won the Wembley title, beating Segura in a five-set final. This was a significant victory for Rosewall because, of the top professional players, only Sedgman and Tony Trabert
Tony Trabert
did not play. At the end of the year, Rosewall won an Australian tour featuring Lew Hoad, Sedgman, and Segura.[22] 1958[edit] Rosewall was the runner-up at the Forest Hills Pro in June. Both he and Gonzales won five round robin matches and lost one but Gonzales claimed the title as he won their head-to-head encounter. Rosewall tied for second (with Pancho Gonzales
Pancho Gonzales
and Sedgman) behind an undefeated Segura in the Masters Round Robin Pro in Los Angeles in July. Those tournaments were among the most important of the year.[23] In September, Rosewall had the opportunity to show that he was still one of the best players on clay. The previous year, no French Professional Championships (also known as the "World Pro Championships on Clay" when organised at Stade Roland Garros) had been held. This tournament returned in 1958, and Rosewall beat Jack Kramer, Frank Sedgman to reach the final in which he defeated an injured Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
in four sets to claim the title.[24] 1959[edit] In the AMPOL points standings in February, based on a five tournament Australian circuit, Rosewall finished second with 12 points behind Hoad with 13.[25][26] For the first time since he turned professional, Rosewall had a favourable 6–4 win-loss record against Pancho Gonzales for the year. Rosewall won both editions of the Queensland Pro Championships in Brisbane, defeating Tony Trabert
Tony Trabert
in the January final 6–2, 4–6, 3–6, 7–5, 6–1 and Gonzales in the December final 1–6, 7–5, 8–6, 8–6.[27] 1960[edit]

Rosewall (right) and Hoad playing doubles at the Wimbledon Championships in the mid-fifties

The following year Rosewall was incorporated in a new World Pro tour, from January to May, featuring Gonzales, Segura and new recruit Alex Olmedo. This tour was perhaps the peak of Gonzales's entire career. The finals standings were: 1) Gonzales 49 matches won – 8 lost, 2) Rosewall 32–25, 3) Segura 22–28, 4) Olmedo 11–44. Rosewall was therefore far behind Gonzales on this tour, the American having won almost all their direct confrontations (16 wins for Gonzales to 5 wins for Rosewall). Halfway through the North American part of the tour the standings were Gonzales 23–1 (his only match lost 6–4, 4–6, 13–11 to Olmedo in Philadelphia) and Rosewall 11–13.[28] Just after Gonzales played and won a minor tournament on 16 May 1960 he decided to retire (as often it was temporary because rapidly needing money Gonzales was back on 30 December 1960). In the absence of Gonzales, Rosewall became the leader, winning six tournaments including the two main tournaments of the year, the French Pro at Roland Garros, defeating Hoad in the final in four sets, and Wembley Pro, defeating Segura.[29][30] Hoad won four tournaments making him second to Rosewall. 1961[edit] After ten years of World touring, Rosewall decided to take several long breaks in order to spend time with his family and entered no competitions in the first half of 1961. He trained his long-time friend Hoad when the pros toured in Australia
Australia
where Gonzales, back to the courts after a ​7 1⁄2-month retirement, won another World tour featuring Hoad, Olmedo (replacing Rosewall), Gimeno and the two new recruits MacKay and Buchholz (Segura, Trabert, Cooper and Sedgman sometimes replaced the injured players). In the summer Rosewall returned to the circuit and won the two biggest events (all the best players participating): the French Pro at Roland Garros (clay) and Wembley Pro (wood). At Roland Garros the Australian captured the title by beating Gonzales in the final in four sets, and at Wembley he defeated Hoad in the final.[31] After having won on clay and on wood Rosewall ended the season by winning on grass at the New South Wales Pro Championships in Sydney, defeating Butch Buchholz in the final, cementing his status as the best all-court player that year.[32] Robert Roy of L'Équipe, Kléber Haedens and Philippe Chatrier of Tennis de France, Michel Sutter (who has published "Vainqueurs 1946–1991 Winners"), Christian Boussus
Christian Boussus
(1931 Roland Garros amateur finalist), Peter Rowley, Robert Geist, Tony Trabert, John Newcombe, Rod Laver
Rod Laver
and also the New York Times and World Tennis magazine considered Rosewall as the new no. 1 in the world.[citation needed] 1962[edit]

Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
at an exhibition in Noordwijk
Noordwijk
in July 1956.

In 1962 Rosewall completely dominated the pro circuit; not only did he retain his Wembley and Roland Garros crowns, still the two biggest events by far in 1962, but he also won five (Adelaide, Melbourne, Geneva, Milan and Stockholm) of the next six biggest tournaments (in 1962 there were only small tours of lesser importance). He thus captured seven of the eight biggest events that year, the only one he lost was Zurich where he was defeated in the semifinals by Segura who in his turn left the title to Hoad. Rosewall also won two small tournaments in New Zealand and one more, the Australian TV Series (in the last one he was the player who won the most matches). It seems that Rosewall lost only 8 matches in 1962 : Hoad twice (in the Adelaide Professional Indoor Tournament and in the Australian TV series tournament), Gimeno, Ayala, Buchholz, Segura, Anderson and Robert Haillet. 1963[edit] In an Australasian tour ( Australia
Australia
and New Zealand) played on grass Rosewall defeated Laver 11 matches to 2. A US tour followed with Rosewall and Laver, Gimeno, Ayala and two Americans: Butch Buchholz and Barry MacKay (Hoad was not chosen because there would have been too many Australians). In the first phase of this tour, lasting two and a half months, each player faced each other about eight times. Rosewall ended first (31 matches won – 10 lost in front of Laver (26–16), Buchholz (23–18), Gimeno (21–20), MacKay (12–29) and Ayala (11–30)). In this round-robin phase Rosewall beat Laver in the first 5 meetings, ensuring thus a 13-match winning streak (in counting the last 8 matches in Australasia) and Laver won the last 3. Then a second and final phase of the tour opposed the first (Rosewall) and the second (Laver) of the first phase to determine the final winner (the third (Buchholz) met the fourth (Gimeno)). In 18 matches Rosewall beat Laver 14 times to conquer the US tour first place (Gimeno beat Buchholz 11–7). In mid-May the tournament season started. In those occasions Rosewall only beat Laver 4–3 and won 5 tournaments (the same as Laver), but in particular he won the three main tournaments of the year 1963: chronologically the U.S. Pro at Forest Hills (without Gimeno and Sedgman) on grass where he defeated Laver in three straight sets,[33] the French Pro at Coubertin on wood where his opponent in the final was again Laver who later praised his victor: "I played the finest tennis I believe I've ever produced, and he beat me",[34] The Wembley Pro on wood (Hoad finalist). In those tournaments Rosewall won 3 times while Laver reached 2 finals and 1 quarterfinal (Wembley), "Rocket" (Laver's nickname) becoming thus the second player in the world. Rosewall then beat Laver 34 matches to 12. The fact that Rosewall also won the major events clearly indicates that he was the number one in 1963 but also that the best pros were almost certainly the best players in the world during the previous years. 1964[edit] In 1964 Rosewall won one major pro tournament: the French Pro over Laver on wood (at Coubertin). At the end of the South African tour, Rosewall also beat Laver in three straight sets in a Challenge Match considered by some as a World Championship match, held in Ellis Park, Johannesburg. In the official pro points rankings (7 points for the winner, 4 points for the finalist, 3 points for third, 2 for fourth place and 1 point to each quarterfinalist) taking into account 19 pro tournaments, Rosewall ended No. 1 in 1964 with 78 points beating No. 2 Laver (70 points) and No. 3 Gonzales (48 points). Nevertheless, that ranking a) brushed aside at least 10 tournaments because McCauley has traced at least 29 pro tournaments played by the touring pros (plus some minor tournaments) and several short tours and b) granted each tournament the same points and then was unfair to the big events where Laver was globally superior to Rosewall. The majority of tennis observers (Joe McCauley, Robert Geist, Michel Sutter) and the players themselves agreed this points rankings for they considered Rosewall the number one in 1964. Rod Laver
Rod Laver
himself after his triumph over Rosewall at Wembley said "I’ve still plenty of ambitions left and would like to be the World's No.1. Despite this win, I am not there yet – Ken is. I may have beaten him more often than he has beaten me this year but he has won the biggest tournaments except here. I’ve lost to other people but Ken hasn’t.".[35] Laver made a great season and could too claim the top rank. He captured two of the major pro tournaments, a) the U.S. Pro (outside Boston) over Rosewall (suffering from food poisoning) and Gonzales and b) Wembley pro over Rosewall in one of their best match ever (Gonzales has won the probably fourth greatest tournament of that year, the U.S. Pro Indoors, at White Plains, defeating in succession Anderson, Laver, Hoad and Rosewall). Laver was equal to Rosewall in big direct confrontations, 2 all (Coubertin and Johannesburg for Rosewall, US Pro and Wembley for Laver). Rosewall had the edge over Laver if we consider their clashes against their greatest rival, Gonzales : that year Rosewall has beaten Gonzales 11 times out of 14 while Laver was beaten by Gonzales 8 times out of 13. But Laver won one more tournament (including small 4-man events) than Rosewall (11 to 10) and he was superior to Rosewall in minor direct confrontations, defeating Rosewall 13 times out of 15 making thus a 1964 Laver-Rosewall win-loss record of 15–4. So the pros leadership began to change. 1965[edit] Next year until mid-September Rosewall and Laver were quite equal, the latter winning more tournaments including the US Pro Indoors at New York City and the Masters Pro at Los Angeles but Rosewall struck two great blows during the summer of 1965 by winning very easily the U.S. Pro on the Longwood C.C. (outside Boston) grass courts crushing Gonzales, 6–3 6–2 6–4, and Laver, 6–4 6–3 6–3, in the last rounds and again Laver, 6–3 6–2 6–4, in the French Pro on the fast wooden courts at Coubertin. But from Wembley to the end of the year, Laver became irresistible and Rosewall had to recognise Laver's supremacy. 1966[edit] 1966 was the year of the greatest rivalry between the two Australians who dominated tennis. They shared all the titles and the finals of the five greatest tournaments. Rosewall won the Madison Square Garden (the biggest prize money ever to date) and his cherished French Pro tournaments over Laver, the latter capturing Forest Hills Pro, the U.S. Pro (outside Boston) and Wembley Pro with Rosewall finalist (or second) each time. Of the main tournaments contested by the troupe, Laver won 9, Rosewall 8 and Gimeno 3. If we include lesser tournaments Laver won 15, Rosewall 9 and Gimeno 6. In head-to-head matches between Rosewall and Laver, both player won 7 each. Rosewall was then the clear undisputed vice-king of the courts. 1967[edit] Rosewall's decline began in 1967. Not only did Laver—almost invincible on fast courts and at that time the undisputed professional tennis king—reach the apogee of his career, but Gimeno threatened Rosewall's second place. The 20 main tournaments of the year were shared by a) Laver, ten titles including the five biggest ones, all played on fast courts (U.S. Pro, French Pro, Wembley Pro, Wimbledon Pro, Madison Square Garden, World Pro in Oklahoma, Boston Pro (not to be confused with the U.S. Pro), Newport R.R., Johannesburg Ellis Park, Coubertin Pro in April (not to be confused with the French Pro at Coubertin in October), b) Rosewall, six titles (Los Angeles, Berkeley, U.S. Pro Hardcourt in St Louis, Newport Beach, Durban and Cape Town), c) Gimeno, three titles (Cincinnati, East London, Port Elizabeth) and d) Stolle, one tournament (Transvaal Pro). Including lesser tournaments Laver's supremacy was even more obvious: 1) Laver 18 tournaments plus two small tours, 2) Rosewall seven tournaments, 3) Stolle four tournaments and 4) Gimeno three tournaments. In head-to-head matches Rosewall trailed Laver 5–8 and was equal with Gimeno 7–7. Before 1967 Gimeno always trailed Rosewall in direct confrontations but that year they split their matches. Rosewall defeated Gimeno in Los Angeles, Madison Square Garden, St Louis, Newport, Johannesburg (challenge match), Durban and Wembley whereas Gimeno won in Cincinnati, U.S. Pro, East London, Port Elizabeth, Johannesburg (tournament), Marseille, French Pro. Having won more tournaments than Gimeno, Rosewall deserved nevertheless the second place behind Laver, the latter being for the first year the #1 by far after the 1964–1966 close rivalry between the two Australians. Forbidden to contest the greatest traditional events, Davis Cup
Davis Cup
and Grand Slams, during nearly eleven and a half years from 1957 to 30 March 1968, Rosewall reached his best level during this period, in particular from 1960 to 1966, by winning at least 62 tournaments (including 16 less-than-eight-man events) and seven small tours. Open-closed career: April 1968 through July 1972[edit] 1968[edit] During the 1968 season several categories of players coexisted:

Amateur players, dependent on their national and international federations, allowed to play the amateur events and open events but forbidden to receive official prize money Registered players, also dependent on their national and international federations, eligible to play the Davis Cup
Davis Cup
and forbidden to play pro events as an amateur, but authorised to take prize money in the open events (e.g. Okker) Professionals under contract with the National Tennis League (NTL) Professionals under contract with the World Championship Tennis (WCT) Freelance professionals (e.g. Hoad, Ayala, Owen Davidson
Owen Davidson
and Mal Anderson).

Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
(1970)

In 1968 there were a) an amateur circuit including the Davis Cup (closed to any "contract" professional until 1973) and the Australian Championships, b) two pro circuits: WCT and NTL, which met at four tournaments, and c) an open circuit (with a little more than 10 tournaments). At the beginning of the open era WCT founder Dave Dixon did not allow his players to enter tournaments where NTL players were present: there were no WCT players at the first two open tournaments, the British Hard Court Championships and French Open, while all the NTL players were present. The first tournament where NTL and WCT players competed against each other, was the U.S. Pro, held at Longwood in June. Several events were still reserved to the amateur players between 1968 and 1972. Two tournaments were at the top in 1968: Wimbledon (a 128-man field), and the US Open (a 100-man field), both played on grass, where all the best players competed. Other notable tournaments that year were the Queen's Club tournament and the greatest pro tournaments where all the NTL and WCT pros competed (but without amateur or registered players) as the U.S. Pro (outside Boston, on grass), the French Pro (coming back to Roland Garros after the 5-edition interlude at Coubertin), the first Pacific Southwest Open in Los Angeles (64-man field) with all the best players present, the Jack Kramer
Jack Kramer
Tournament of Champions at Wembley in November and the Madison Square Garden Pro in December with the four best pros of each organisation. In this context Rosewall played almost all NTL pro tournaments in 1968, the four "NTL-WCT" tournaments and some open tournaments. He entered his first open tournament at 33 years at Bournemouth on clay (the WCT players did not take part) and defeated Gimeno and Laver to win the first open tennis title. At the French Open, the first Grand Slam tournament of the Open Era, Rosewall confirmed his status of best claycourt player in the world by defeating Laver in the final in four sets.[36] Defeats followed against some of the upcoming 1967 amateur players (Roche twice on grass at the US Pro and at Wimbledon, Newcombe on clay at the French Pro and Okker on grass at the U.S. Open) but his end of the year was better. He reached the semifinals of the US Open, was finalist to Laver at the Pacific Southwest Open, defeating the new US Open winner, Arthur Ashe, and in November captured the Wembley Pro tournament over WCT player, John Newcombe. At age 34 Rosewall was still ranked No. 3 in the world behind Laver and Ashe according to Lance Tingay and Bud Collins. 1969[edit] His true decline, having begun in 1967, was confirmed in 1969. Rosewall was no longer the best claycourt player as Laver had stolen his crown in the final of the French Open
French Open
at Roland Garros. Rosewall was ranked No. 4 that year by Collins and Tingay and won three tournaments (Bristol, Chicago, Midland). At age 35 he had won almost all the great events except for Wimbledon, and subsequently this tournament became Rosewall's priority. The Wimbledon crown had eluded him during his 11-year professional career (1957–1967), when he was excluded from entering the event, at a time when he was at his best—particularly between 1961 and 1965 (except 1964) when he was arguably the best grasscourt player in the world. Realizing that if he reached the last rounds of the French Open
French Open
he could be too tired to play well at Wimbledon (as had happened in 1968 and 1969, when he lost in the fourth and third rounds respectively), Rosewall decided not to play the French Open
French Open
any more in the seventies in order to be in optimal condition for Wimbledon. 1970[edit] Being an NTL player at the beginning of 1970 he didn't play the Australian Open
Australian Open
held at the White City Stadium
White City Stadium
in Sydney
Sydney
in January because NTL boss, George McCall, and his players thought that the prize money was too low for a Grand Slam tournament. In March, a tournament, sponsored by Dunlop, was organised at the same site, with a higher quality field because of better prize-money and a better date. The same class players as in the Australian Open
Australian Open
were present and in addition not only the NTL pros participated but also some independent pros, such as Ilie Năstase, who usually did not make the trip to Australia. Laver won the tournament after defeating Rosewall in a five-set final watched by a crowd of 8,000.[37] As both the NTL and the WCT boycotted the Roland Garros tournament because it refused to pay guarantees Rosewall also missed the second Grand Slam tournament of the year.[38][39] All the best players met again at Wimbledon. This time a rested Rosewall reached the final and took the Newcombe, his ​9 1⁄2-year-old junior, to five sets but ultimately succumbed.[40] In July Rosewall became a WCT player after that organization took over the NTL and its players.[41] Two months later at the U.S. Open, one of the two 1970 Grand Slams with all the best players, Rosewall took revenge in their semifinal match in three straight sets before defeating Tony Roche
Tony Roche
in the final to win his sixth Grand Slam tournament.

Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
in Scheveningen (1970)

To fight against the WCT and NTL promoters, who controlled their own players and did not allow them to compete where they wanted, Kramer introduced the Grand Prix tennis circuit in December 1969, open to all players. The first Grand Prix circuit was held in 1970 and comprised 20 tournaments from April to December. These tournaments gave points according to their categories and the players' performances with the top six ranked players invited to a season-ending tournament called the Masters. All the amateurs and independent pros fully invested themselves in this circuit while the contract pros firstly played their own circuit and eventually played in some Grand Prix tournaments. Rosewall and Laver performed well in both circuits. Rosewall was ranked third in the Grand Prix standings and finished third in the Masters behind winner Stan Smith
Stan Smith
and his 1970 nemesis Laver.[42] Rosewall earned $140,455 in prize money. After his 1967–1969 steady decline, 1970 saw a rejuvenated Rosewall who was just one set short of winning the Wimbledon and U.S. Open double. 1970 was a year where no player dominated the circuit, the seven leading tournaments were won by seven different players, and different arguments were given to designate the World No. 1. Some, among them Newcombe and the panel of journalists which made the 1971 WCT draw, considered Laver the best player because he won most tournaments (15), earned the most prize money and had a dominantly positive head-to-head record against both Rosewall (5–0) and Newcombe (3–0). But Laver failed at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, the two big tournaments, losing each time in the round of 16. Other tennis pundits, as Joe McCauley (World Tennis) or Lance Tingay (Daily Telegraph), narrowly ranked Newcombe first because he won the most prestigious tournament, Wimbledon with Rosewall second and Laver third or (McCauley) fourth (Tingay). Judith Elian of the French sports paper L'Équipe
L'Équipe
ranked Rosewall as the number one player ahead of Newcombe and the panel of experts for the 'Martini and Rosso' Cup also had Rosewall first, narrowly over Laver. Meanwhile, in his book (see above) Robert Geist ranked the three Australians equal number ones. 1971[edit] After his runner-up finishes at Sydney
Sydney
and Wimbledon and his victory at the US Open in 1970, Rosewall continued his good performances in 1971 in the great grass court tournaments. One year after the first Dunlop Open was held in Sydney, Rosewall was back in Sydney
Sydney
in March, this time for the Australian open held on the White City Courts. Because it was sponsored by Dunlop in 1971, all the World Championship Tennis (WCT) players (including the National Tennis League players since spring 1970) entered (John Newcombe, Rosewall, Rod Laver, Tony Roche, Tom Okker, Arthur Ashe) as well as some independent pros. Only Stan Smith
Stan Smith
(Army's service), Cliff Richey, Clark Graebner, and the not-yet-good-on-grass players Ilie Năstase
Ilie Năstase
and Jan Kodeš
Jan Kodeš
were missing. Rosewall won the tournament, his second consecutive Grand Slam win and his seventh overall Grand Slam title, without losing a set and defeated Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
and Okker before beating Ashe in the final in straight sets. Rosewall and most other WCT players did not play the French Open; yet, Rosewall still tried to reach his seventies goal by winning Wimbledon. In the quarterfinals, Rosewall needed about four hours to defeat Richey in five sets whereas Newcombe quickly defeated Colin Dibley. In the semifinals, the older Rosewall was no match for the fitter Newcombe and lost in straight sets. Later in the summer, Rosewall and some other WCT players (Laver, Andrés Gimeno, Emerson, Cliff Drysdale, Fred Stolle, and Roche) did not play the US Open because of the growing conflict between the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF) and the WCT. His children's illnesses was an additional reason for Rosewall not playing this tournament. As a contract pro, Rosewall was not allowed to play the Davis Cup
Davis Cup
and thus concentrated mainly on the WCT circuit organised similarly to the Grand Prix circuit which was the equivalent for the independent pros: 20 tournaments (including the Australian Open), each giving the same points amount. The top eight players in ranking points were invited to the WCT Finals, an eight-man tournament, equivalent of the Grand Prix Masters for the WCT players, played in November in Houston
Houston
and Dallas, USA. When the WCT players were off they could play tournaments on the Grand Prix circuit. Some tournaments such as Berkeley, which had a stronger field than the US Open, were organized by both organisations. But the war between the ILTF and WCT climaxed in a ban by the ILTF beginning on 1 January 1972, of the WCT players from the Grand Prix circuit. Rosewall ended third on the 1971 WCT circuit behind Laver and Okker and qualified for the WCT Finals. He won the title, taking his revenge over Newcombe for his Wimbledon defeat, in the quarterfinal, defeating Okker in the semifinals and beating Laver in a four-sets final in what was considered at the time as the best match, with their 1970 Sydney final, between the two rivals since their 1968 French Open final.[43][44] As a WCT player Rosewall played few Grand Prix tournaments but he had earned enough points to play the Grand Prix Masters held about ten days after his WCT Finals. He refused the invitation as he was tired after a long season and took his holidays at the end of the year. In 1971 Rosewall won eight tournaments and 76 out of 97 matches (78%) and in direct confrontations trailed Newcombe 1–3, Laver 2–3 but led Smith 1–0. Collins and Elian ranked Rosewall third after Newcombe and/or Smith. Tingay ranked Rosewall 4th, Rino Tommasi 1st, and the Martini-Rossi award was given jointly to Smith and Newcombe. Geist ranked Rosewall co-No. 1 tied with Newcombe and Smith. That year, as in 1970, there was no clear undisputed World No. 1. 1972[edit] 1972 saw a return to separate circuits because all traditional ILTF events held from January to July were forbidden to the WCT players. This included the Davis Cup
Davis Cup
but also Roland Garros and Wimbledon. The 1972 Australian Open
Australian Open
organizers used a trick to avoid the ban of the WCT players. They held the tournament from 27 December 1971, four days before the ban could be applied, to 3 January 1972. Thus all contract as well as independent pros could enter but few were interested because it was held during Christmas and New Year's Day period. The draw included only eight non-Australian players. Rosewall reached the final in which he defeated Mal Anderson
Mal Anderson
to win his fourth Australian title and the eight, and last, Grand Slam title of his career.[45][46] A fragile agreement in the spring of 1972 let the WCT players come back to the traditional circuit in August (in Merion, WCT players Okker and Roger Taylor played). The US Open, won by Ilie Năstase, was the greatest event of the year as only in this tournament were all the best players present with the exception of Tony Roche
Tony Roche
who suffered from a tennis elbow. Later that year two other tournaments had good fields with WCT and independent pros: the Pacific Southwest Open at Los Angeles and, to a lesser extent, Stockholm, both won by Stan Smith. In many 1972 rankings there were six or seven WCT players in the world top 10 (the three or four independent pros were Smith, Năstase, Orantes and sometimes Gimeno) so the $100,000 season-ending WCT Finals held in May in Dallas
Dallas
were considered as one of the major events of the year. The final, played between Rosewall and Laver, was considered one of the two best matches played in 1972, the other being the Wimbledon final, and the best Rosewall-Laver match of the open era. It was broadcast nationally in the U.S., viewed by twenty-three million people, and became known as the "match that made tennis in the United States." Rosewall won the last major title of his long career by defeating Laver in an epic five-set match which was decided by a tiebreak.[47][48][49] (Laver wrote that the two Australians had played better matches between them in the pre-open days, citing their 1963 French Pro final as the pinnacle; McCauley considered their 1964 Wembley final). Because of the ILTF's ban once again Rosewall could not enter Wimbledon. True open career: August 1972 through 1980[edit] 1972[edit] From August 1972 players could enter almost all the tournaments they wanted and the real open era began (at Forest Hills they created the ATP) Rosewall won seven tournaments in 1972, including the depleted Australian Open
Australian Open
and became the oldest Grand Slam male singles champion (37 years and 2 months old) in the open era,[a] and was ranked, by Judith Elian or Tingay or McCauley, No. 3 behind Smith and Ilie Năstase ( Bud Collins
Bud Collins
permuting Năstase and Rosewall). He lost in the second round of the 1972 U.S. Open against Mark Cox. 1973[edit] For Rosewall the beginning of 1973 was identical to the second half of 1972: a desert. He recorded possibly his worst defeat in his whole career at the 1973 Australian Open
Australian Open
(again with a weak field because as in 1972 among the Top 20 only Rosewall and Newcombe participated) when seeded first he was defeated by German Karl Meiler in his first match (second round) in straight sets: 2–6, 3–6, 2–6. Between May 1972 (victory at Dallas) and April 1973 (victory at Houston, River Oaks) Rosewall captured only two minor titles, Tokyo WCT (not giving points for the WCT Finals) and Brisbane
Brisbane
(in December 1972) where he was the only Top 20 player. If 1967 has been the first year of a relative decline with however many highlights, 1973 (and more accurately his "after- Dallas
Dallas
1972") has been the real start of Rosewall's true decline : admittedly he was still one of the best players but not one fighting for the first place. Rosewall did not play Wimbledon that year as the edition was boycotted by the ATP players. After an absence of 17 years Rosewall returned to Davis Cup
Davis Cup
play in November when he played a doubles match with Rod Laver in the interzonal final against Czechoslovakia.[50] His best performances in 1973 were firstly his semifinal at the US Open (as in 1972 the greatest event of the year) and secondly his third place at the WCT Finals (he was beaten by Ashe in the semifinals and defeated Laver for 3rd place). He also won at Houston
Houston
WCT, Cleveland WCT, Charlotte WCT, Osaka and Tokyo. He was still ranked in the top 10. Tommasi ranked Rosewall 4, Tingay 6, ATP 6, Collins 5, and McCauley 7. 1974–1982[edit] 1974 was the first year since 1952 that Rosewall did not win a single tournament. However, he entered nine tournaments (the one at Hong Kong not finished because of rain) and reached three finals including Wimbledon and US Open. This was his last Wimbledon final, at the age of 39. Despite the strong support of the crowd, who were eager to see him finally claim a Wimbledon title, he lost to the 18 years younger Jimmy Connors.[51][52] Due to the two last strong performances he was ranked between second (Tingay) and the seventh place (Collins) by many tennis journalists. He ranked only 8th in the ATP rankings because he played too few tournaments knowing that he succumbed to the charms of the World Team Tennis "organisation". Rosewall coached the Pittsburgh Triangles team in 1974. He still stayed in the Top 10 (ATP, Collins, Tommasi) or the Top 15 in 1975 winning 5 tournaments (Jackson, Houston-River Oaks, Louisville, Gstaad, Tokyo Gunze Open) and his two singles in Davis Cup
Davis Cup
against New Zealand (this event has been finally open to contract pros in 1973 : that year Rosewall was selected by Neale Fraser
Neale Fraser
for the semifinals doubles). Rosewall made his last attempt at Wimbledon, at over 40, and as in his first Wimbledon Open (in 1968) he lost in the same round (4th) and against the same player (Tony Roche). In 1976 Rosewall dropped out of the Top 10 but stayed in the Top 20 as he won three tournaments: Brisbane, Jackson WCT and Hong Kong (over Năstase then the 3rd player in the world). 1977 was Rosewall's last year in the Top 20, which means he was one of the best players for 26 years (in the Top 20 from 1952 to 1977). In January he reached the semifinal of the 1977 Australian Open, losing in four sets to eventual champion Roscoe Tanner.[53] He won his last two tournaments titles in Hong Kong and Tokyo (Gunze Open) respectively at the age of 43.[54][55] Rosewall played in the Sydney Indoor Tournament in October 1977. Approaching his 43rd birthday he beat the No. 3 in the world Vitas Gerulaitis
Vitas Gerulaitis
in a straight-sets semifinal and put in a credible performance losing to Jimmy Connors
Jimmy Connors
in the final in three straight sets. The following year he lost in the semifinals at 44 years of age. Afterwards, he gradually retired. In October 1980 at the Melbourne indoor tournament, at nearly 46 years of age, Rosewall defeated American Butch Walts, ranked World No. 49, in the first round before losing to Paul McNamee. Rosewall made a very brief comeback at 47 years of age in a non-ATP tournament, the New South Wales Hardcourt Championships in Grafton in February, where he reached the final, losing to Brett Edwards 6–4, 6–2. Rivalries[edit] Main articles: Laver–Rosewall rivalry
Laver–Rosewall rivalry
and Gonzales–Rosewall rivalry Gonzales and Laver are the two players that Rosewall most often met. His meetings with Laver are better documented and detailed than those with Gonzales. Except the first year (1963) and the last year they played (1976), the statistics of their meetings show a domination by Laver; but they are biased before when Rosewall was the better of the two Australians in 1963. In the Open Era
Open Era
a match score of 23–9 in favour of Laver can be documented, overall a score of 80–64. Including tournaments and one-night stands, Rosewall and Gonzales played at least 182 matches, all of them as professionals, with some results from the barnstorming pro tours either lost or partially recorded. A match score of 107–75 in favor of Gonzales can be documented. Playing style and assessment[edit] In his 1979 autobiography, Kramer wrote that "Rosewall was a backcourt player when he came into the pros, but he learned very quickly how to play the net. Eventually, for that matter, he became a master of it, as much out of physical preservation as for any other reason. I guarantee you that Kenny wouldn't have lasted into his forties as a world-class player if he hadn't learned to serve and volley." His one-handed backhand which he usually played with backspin was rated as one of the best backhand shots in the history of the game.[56][57][58] Kramer included the Australian in his list of the 21 greatest players of all time.[b] During his long playing career he remained virtually injury-free, something that helped him to still win tournaments at the age of 43 and remain ranked in the top 15 in the world. Although he was a finalist 4 times at Wimbledon, it was the one major tournament that eluded him. Rosewall was a finalist at the 1974 US Open at 39 years 310 days old, making him the oldest player to participate in two Grand Slam finals in the same year. Before that, in 1972 Rosewall won the Australian Open final at age 37 and 2 months making him the oldest male player to win a Grand Slam singles title as of 2017. In 1995 Pancho Gonzales
Pancho Gonzales
said of him: "He became better as he got older, more of a complete player. With the exception of me and Frank Sedgman, he could handle everybody else. Just the way he played, he got under Hoad's skin, but he had a forehand weakness and a serve weakness." In 182 matches against Gonzales he won 75 and lost 107. In 70 matches against Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
he won 45 and lost 25. Career statistics[edit] Main article: Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
career statistics Grand Slam tournament finals[edit] Singles: 16 (8 titles, 8 runners-up)

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent Score

Winner 1953 Australian Championships Grass Mervyn Rose 6–0, 6–3, 6–4

Winner 1953 French Championships Clay Vic Seixas 6–3, 6–4, 1–6, 6–2

Runner-up 1954 Wimbledon Grass Jaroslav Drobný 11–13, 6–4, 2–6, 7–9

Winner 1955 Australian Championships Grass Lew Hoad 9–7, 6–4, 6–4

Runner-up 1955 U.S. Championships Grass Tony Trabert 7–9, 3–6, 3–6

Runner-up 1956 Australian Championships Grass Lew Hoad 4–6, 6–3, 4–6, 5–7

Runner-up 1956 Wimbledon Grass Lew Hoad 2–6, 6–4, 5–7, 4–6

Winner 1956 U.S. Championships Grass Lew Hoad 4–6, 6–2, 6–3, 6–3

Open Era
Open Era

Winner 1968 French Open Clay Rod Laver 6–3, 6–1, 2–6, 6–2

Runner-up 1969 French Open Clay Rod Laver 4–6, 3–6, 4–6

Runner-up 1970 Wimbledon Grass John Newcombe 7–5, 3–6, 2–6, 6–3, 1–6

Winner 1970 US Open Grass Tony Roche 2–6, 6–4, 7–6, 6–3

Winner 1971 Australian Open Grass Arthur Ashe 6–1, 7–5, 6–3

Winner 1972 Australian Open Grass Malcolm Anderson 7–6, 6–3, 7–5

Runner-up 1974 Wimbledon Grass Jimmy Connors 1–6, 1–6, 4–6

Runner-up 1974 US Open Grass Jimmy Connors 1–6, 0–6, 1–6

Performance timeline[edit]

Grand Slam Tournament Amateur Pro Open Era Titles / Played Career Win-Loss Career Win %

1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957–1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978

Australian 1R QF W SF W F banned 3R A W W 2R A A SF SF QF 3R 4 / 14 47–10 82.46

French A 2R W 4R A A banned W F A A A A A A A A A 2 / 5 24–3 88.89

Wimbledon A 2R QF F SF F banned 4R 3R F SF A A F 4R A A A 0 / 11 47–11 81.03

U.S. A QF SF SF F W banned SF QF W A 2R SF F A A 3R A 2 / 12 57–10 85.07

Total: 8 / 42 175–34 83.73

Pro-Slam tournament finals[edit] * Singles : 15 titles, 4 runners-up

Result Year Tournament Surface Opponent Score

Winner 1957 Wembley Championship Indoor Pancho Segura 1–6, 6–3, 6–4, 3–6, 6–4

Winner 1958 French Pro Championship Clay Lew Hoad 3–6, 6–2, 6–4, 6–0

Winner 1960 French Pro Championship Clay Lew Hoad 6–2, 2–6, 6–2, 6–1

Winner 1960 Wembley Championship Indoor Pancho Segura 5–7, 8–6, 6–1, 6–3

Winner 1961 French Pro Championship Clay Pancho Gonzales 2–6, 6–4, 6–3, 8–6

Winner 1961 Wembley Championship Indoor Lew Hoad 6–3, 3–6, 6–2, 6–3

Winner 1962 French Pro Championship Clay Andrés Gimeno 3–6, 6–2, 7–5, 6–2

Winner 1962 Wembley Championship Indoor Lew Hoad 6–4, 5–7, 15–13, 7–5

Winner 1963 U.S. Pro Championship Grass Rod Laver 6–4, 6–2, 6–2

Winner 1963 French Pro Championship Wood (i) Rod Laver 6–8, 6–4, 5–7, 6–3, 6–4

Winner 1963 Wembley Championship Indoor Lew Hoad 6–4, 6–2, 4–6, 6–3

Winner 1964 French Pro Championship Wood (i) Rod Laver 6–3, 7–5, 3–6, 6–3

Runner-up 1964 Wembley Championship Indoor Rod Laver 5–7, 6–4, 7–5, 6–8, 6–8

Winner 1965 U.S. Pro Championship Grass Rod Laver 6–4, 6–3, 6–3

Winner 1965 French Pro Championship Wood (i) Rod Laver 6–3, 6–2, 6–4

Winner 1966 French Pro Championship Wood (i) Rod Laver 6–3, 6–2, 14–12

Runner-up 1966 Wembley Championship Indoor Rod Laver 2–6, 2–6, 3–6

Runner-up 1966 U.S. Pro Championship Grass Rod Laver 4–6, 6–4, 2–6, 10–8, 3–6

Runner-up 1967 Wembley Championship Indoor Rod Laver 6–2, 1–6, 6–1, 6–8, 2–6

* other events (Tournament of Champions, Wimbledon Pro – important professional tournaments – 2 runners-up)

Performance timeline[edit]

Pro Slam Tournament Professional Titles / Played Career Win-Loss Career Win %

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967

U.S. Pro SF A A A A A W SF W F SF 2 / 6 12–4 75.00

French Pro NH W SF W W W W W W W SF 8 / 10 30–2 93.75

Wembley Pro W SF SF W W W W F SF F F 5 / 11 29–6 82.86

Total: 15 / 27 71–12 85.54

Other events

Wimbledon Pro NH NH NH NH NH NH NH NH NH NH F 0 / 1 2–1 66.67

Records[edit]

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All-time records[edit]

Championship Years Record accomplished Player tied

Pro Slam 1963 Won the calendar year Professional Grand Slam [59][60] Rod Laver

Pro Slam and Grand Slam 1953–1974 23 combined Major titles overall [61] Stands alone

Pro Slam and Grand Slam 1953–1974 35 combined Major finals overall Stands alone

Pro Slam and Grand Slam 1953–1974 52 combined Major semifinals overall Stands alone

Pro Slam and Grand Slam 1953–1974 57 combined Major quarterfinals overall Stands alone

Pro Slam tournaments 1957–67 27 appearances overall Stands alone

Pro Slam tournaments 1957–66 15 titles overall [62] Stands alone

Pro Slam tournaments 1957–67 19 finals overall Stands alone

Pro Slam tournaments 1957–67 27 semifinals overall Stands alone

Pro Slam tournaments 1957–67 27 quarterfinals overall Stands alone

Pro Slam tournaments 1957–67 85.54% 71-12 match win percentage overall Stands alone

Australian Championships 1953 Youngest singles champion 18 years, 2 months.[63] Stands alone

Grand Slam 1953–55 Youngest player to reach each Grand Slam final [64] Stands alone

Grand Slam 1953–72 Only player to win a Grand Slam title in three different decades [65] Stands alone

Australian Championships 1953–1972 19 year gap between first and last singles title [66] Stands alone [67]

Australian Championships 1971 Won title without losing set [68] Don Budge John Bromwich Roy Emerson Roger Federer

French Championships 1953–1968 15 year gap between first and last singles title [69] Stands alone

French Pro-Championship 1958–1966 8 titles overall [70] Stands alone

French Pro-Championships 1960–1966 7 consecutive titles [71] Stands alone

French Pro-Championships 1958–1967 93.75% 30-5 match win percentage Stands alone

U.S. Championships 1956–1970 14 year gap between first and last singles title [72] Stands alone

Wembley Pro-Championships 1960–1963 4 consecutive titles Rod Laver

All tournaments 1951–1970 20 wood court titles Stands alone

Career 1951–77 25 non-consecutive 1+ singles title seasons Stands alone

Career 1953–73 21 consecutive 1+ singles title seasons Stands alone

Career 1952–76 25 consecutive years in the top 10 [73] Stands alone

Career 1949–82 Most matches played 2282 [74] Stands alone

Career 1949–82 Most matches won 1665 [75] Stands alone

Open Era
Open Era
records[edit]

These records were attained in Open Era
Open Era
of tennis.

Championship Years Record accomplished Player tied

Australian Open 1971 Won title without losing a set Roger Federer

Australian Open 1972 Oldest singles champion (37 years, 2 months)[63] Stands alone

US Open 1970 Oldest singles champion (35 years, 10 months) Stands alone

US Open 1974 Oldest player in a Grand Slam final (39 years, 5 months) Stands alone

WCT Finals 1971–1972 2 consecutive titles John McEnroe

WCT Finals 1971–1973 87.50% (7–1) winning percentage Stands alone

Note: The draw of Pro majors was significantly smaller than the traditional Grand Slam tournaments; usually they only had 16 or even fewer professional players. Though they were the top 16 ranked players in the world at the time, this meant only four rounds of play instead of the modern six or seven rounds. Personal life[edit] Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
married Wilma McIver at St. John's Cathedral, Brisbane, Queensland on 6 October 1956. It was described in press reports as Brisbane's society wedding of the year with over 2000 people in attendance outside the church, and 800 guests in the Cathedral.[76] The couple then moved to Turramurra, New South Wales
Turramurra, New South Wales
and have lived there ever since. Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
was a non Executive Director of the failed stockbroking firm BBY and his son, Glenn Rosewall, was the company's Executive Director.[77] Honours[edit] In the Queen's Birthday Honours of 1971, he was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire
Order of the British Empire
(MBE).[78] In the Australia
Australia
Day Honours of 1979, he was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM). Rosewall was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island, in 1980. In 1985 he was inducted into the Sport Australia
Australia
Hall of Fame.[79] He is an Australian Living Treasure. See also[edit]

Tennis portal

Tennis male players statistics Overall tennis records – Men's Singles Tennis records of the Open Era
Open Era
– men's singles

Notes[edit]

^ Arthur Gore won Wimbledon at the age of 41 years in the year 1909 and is the oldest Grand Slam singles winner in the history of tennis. ^ Writing in 1979, Kramer considered the best ever to have been either Don Budge
Don Budge
(for consistent play) or Ellsworth Vines
Ellsworth Vines
(at the height of his game). The next four best were, chronologically, Bill Tilden, Fred Perry, Bobby Riggs, and Pancho Gonzales. After these six came the "second echelon" of Rod Laver, Lew Hoad, Ken Rosewall, Gottfried von Cramm, Ted Schroeder, Jack Crawford, Pancho Segura, Frank Sedgman, Tony Trabert, John Newcombe, Arthur Ashe, Stan Smith, Björn Borg, and Jimmy Connors. He felt unable to rank Henri Cochet
Henri Cochet
and René Lacoste accurately but felt they were among the very best.

References[edit]

^ Garcia, Gabriel. "Ken Rosewall: Career match record". thetennisbase.com. Madrid, Spain: Tennismem SL. Retrieved 19 November 2017.  ^ Greatest Player Of All Time: A Statistical Analysis by Raymond Lee, Friday Archived 28 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine., 14 September 2007 ^ "Ray Bowers on Tennis Server (2000)". Tennisserver.com. Retrieved 17 May 2011.  ^ Greatest Shots in Tennis History, The Backhand: Ken Rosewall[permanent dead link] ^ Rosewall & Rowley 1976, p. 15 ^ Rosewall & Rowley 1976, p. 1 ^ Rosewall & Rowley 1976, p. 2 ^ "Tennis Title to N.S.W." The News. Adelaide. 3 September 1949. p. 7 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "Lawn Tennis". The West Australian. Perth. 25 October 1949. p. 14 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "Straight Sets Win To Worthington". Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate. 12 October 1950. p. 14 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "Bright Australian Future". TIME. 15 September 1952. Retrieved 17 May 2011.  ^ Collins, Bud (2010). The Bud Collins
Bud Collins
History of Tennis (2nd ed.). New York: New Chapter Press. pp. 717, 718. ISBN 978-0942257700.  ^ "Singles Title To Rosewall". The Advocate. Burnie, Tas. 19 January 1953. p. 5 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "A Carnation for Victor". TIME. 13 July 1953. Retrieved 17 May 2011.  ^ "Melbourne Preview?". TIME. 14 September 1953. Retrieved 17 May 2011.  ^ "Davis Cup, World Group Challenge Rounds, 1953". Daviscup.com. Retrieved 17 May 2011.  ^ "Old Drob". TIME. 12 July 1954. Retrieved 17 May 2011.  ^ Hoad & Pollack 1958, p. 184 ^ "He starts a bit shakily, but then... our Ken gives US star fight of his life". The Argus. Melbourne. 15 January 1957. p. 16 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "A fighting Ken makes it one-all". The Argus. Melbourne. 16 January 1957. p. 22 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ a b McCauley (2003), p. 206 ^ McCauley (2003), p. 207 ^ McCauley (2003), p. 209 ^ McCauley (2003), p. 211 ^ McCauley (2003), pp. 90–91, 211 ^ "Sedgman Leads Professionals". The Canberra Times. 28 January 1959. p. 20 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ McCauley (2003), pp. 211, 215 ^ McCauley (2003), p. 99 ^ McCauley (2003), pp. 102, 218 ^ "Rosewall Gets £1,300 For Tennis Wins". The Canberra Times. 27 September 1960. p. 23 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ ""Wonder Kids" At It Again". The Canberra Times. 19 September 1961. p. 20 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "Easy Singles Win For Ken Rosewall". The Canberra Times. 11 December 1961. p. 16 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "Laver Loses To Rosewall". The Canberra Times. 2 July 1963. p. 24 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ The Education of a Tennis Player, by Rod Laver, page 151 ^ The History of Professional Tennis, by Joe McCauley, page 128 ^ "Rosewall takes French title". The Canberra Times. 10 June 1968. p. 10 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "Tennis thriller – Layer wins 'greatest game ever'". The Canberra Times. 23 March 1970. p. 20 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ John Barrett, ed. (1971). World of Tennis '71 : a BP yearbook. London: Queen Anne Press. p. 79. ISBN 978-0-362-00091-7.  ^ "European men dominate tennis". The Canberra Times. 3 June 1970. p. 32 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "It almost came up roses for Rosewall". Sports Illustrated. 13 July 1970.  ^ "Tennis takeover". The Canberra Times. 30 July 1970. p. 28 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ John Barrett, ed. (1971). World of Tennis '71 : a BP yearbook. London: Queen Anne Press. p. 135. ISBN 978-0-362-00091-7.  ^ John Barrett, ed. (1972). World of Tennis '72. London: Queen Anne Press. pp. 147–148, 152. ISBN 9780362001037. OCLC 86035663.  ^ "Winner Takes $50,000 Loser, $1 Million". Sports Illustrated. 6 December 1971.  ^ "Rosewall is still champion". The Canberra Times. 4 January 1972. p. 16 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ Dave Seminara (16 January 2012). "A Surprising Victory in 1972 Stands the Test of Time". The New York Times.  ^ "Rosewall at 37 Still Has Enough Tennis". The Milwaukee Journal. 15 May 1972. p. 12.  ^ John Barrett, ed. (1973). World of Tennis '73 : a BP and Commercial Union yearbook. London: Queen Anne Press. pp. 45–51. ISBN 9780671216238.  ^ Steve Tignor (12 March 2015). "1972: The Rod Laver
Rod Laver
vs. Ken Rosewall WCT Final in Dallas". www.tennis.com. Tennis.com.  ^ "Rosewall set for Davis Cup". The Canberra Times. 1 December 1972. p. 20 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ Jon Henderson (7 January 2007). "Connors blows away graceful Rosewall". The Observer.  ^ "Connors Tops Rosewall For Wimbledon Crown". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. AP. 7 July 1974. p. 1C.  ^ "Tanner, Vilas In Finals Of Australian Tourney". Times Daily. UPI. 9 January 1977. p. 24.  ^ "ATP player profile – Ken Rosewall". www.atpworldtour.com. ATP.  ^ "$13,000 win to veteran Ken". The Age. 14 November 1977. p. 29.  ^ Peter Burwash (17 September 2013). "Learning from the Past: Ken Rosewall's Backhand". www.tennis.com. Tennis.com.  ^ Clay Iles (20 June 2004). "A slice of history". www.telegraph.co.uk. The Telegraph.  ^ Steve Tignor (10 October 2012). "Catching the Tape: The Artist Known as Muscles". www.tennis.com. Tennis.com.  ^ Geist, Robert (1999). Ken Rosewall: Der Grosse Meister. Austria. p. 137.  ^ Lee, Raymond (September 2007). "Greatest Player of All Time: A Statistical Analysis". Tennis Week Magazine.  ^ Lee, Raymond (11 October 2010). "Rafael Nadal: A Historical Perspective". www.tennisnow.com. NY, USA. Retrieved 13 December 2017.  ^ "Kenneth Robert Rosewall set the standard for enduring excellence in men's tennis". The Daily Dose. Daily Dose Sports Publications. 3 January 2017. Retrieved 14 December 2017.  ^ a b "Great AO Champions". AustralianOpen.com. Archived from the original on 30 November 2012. Retrieved 4 February 2012.  ^ Lord, David (17 October 2017). "Can Roger Federer
Roger Federer
emulate the longevity of Ken Rosewall?". The Roar. The Roar, 17 October 2017. Retrieved 14 December 2017.  ^ "Ken Rosewall". International Tennis Hall of Fame. International Tennis Hall of Fame. Retrieved 13 December 2017.  ^ "Ken Rosewall". International Tennis Hall of Fame. International Hall of Fame. Retrieved 13 December 2017.  ^ Pearce, Linda (13 January 2003). "Ken Rosewall, a professional gentleman". Sydney
Sydney
Morning Herald. Retrieved 21 January 2015.  ^ "Kenneth Robert Rosewall set the standard for enduring excellence in men's tennis". The Daily Dose. Daily Dose Sports Publications. 3 January 2017. Retrieved 14 December 2017.  ^ "Kenneth Robert Rosewall set the standard for enduring excellence in men's tennis". The Daily Dose. Daily Dose Sports Publications. 3 January 2017. Retrieved 14 December 2017.  ^ Staff Writer, Anders. "Ken Rosewall: The Real GOAT? What About Roger Federer or Rod Laver?". Bleacher Report (8 March 2008). Retrieved 13 December 2017.  ^ "Kenneth Robert Rosewall set the standard for enduring excellence in men's tennis". The Daily Dose. Daily Dose Sports Publications. 3 January 2017. Retrieved 14 December 2017.  ^ "Ken Rosewall". International Tennis Hall of Fame. International Tennis Hall of Fame.  ^ Seminara, Dave. "A Surprising Victory in 1972 Stands the Test of Time". 16 January 2012. NY Times Newspaper. Retrieved 21 January 2015.  ^ Gracia, Gabriel. "Tennis records book. MOST MATCHES PLAYED". thetennisbase.com. Madrid. Spain: Tennismem SL. Retrieved 13 December 2017.  ^ Garcia, Gabriel. "Record: Most Matches Won Career". thetennisbase.com. Madrid, Spain: Tennismem SL. Retrieved 13 December 2017.  ^ The Sun Herald. (Sydney) 7 October 1956. ^ Elysse Morgan, Michael Janda and Ian Verrender (19 May 2015). "BBY administration leaves brokers, investors and staff in limbo". ABC News.  ^ "Is new knights and two Dames". The Canberra Times. 12 June 1971. p. 1 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ " Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
AM MBE". Sport Australia
Australia
Hall of Fame. Retrieved 18 December 2013. 

Sources[edit]

Hoad, Lew; Pollack, Jack (1958). The Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
Story. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall. OCLC 398749.  Rosewall, Ken; Rowley, Peter T. (1976). Ken Rosewall: Twenty Years at the Top. London: Cassell. ISBN 0-304-29735-6.  Jack Kramer
Jack Kramer
with Frank Deford (1981). The Game : My 40 Years in Tennis. London: Deutsch. ISBN 0233973079. OCLC 59152557. OL 17315708M.  Naughton, Richard (2012). Alexander, Helen, ed. Muscles. Richmond, Vic.: Slattery Media Group. ISBN 9781921778568. OCLC 810217024.  McCauley, Joe (2000). The History of Professional Tennis. Windsor: The Short Run Book Company Limited. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Ken Rosewall.

Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
at the International Tennis Hall of Fame Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
at the International Tennis Federation Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
at the Association of Tennis Professionals Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
at the Davis Cup

v t e

Grand Slam / non-calendar year / career Grand Slam-winning singles/doubles tennis players

Grand Slam

Men's singles

1938: Don Budge 1962: Rod Laver 1969: Rod Laver

Women's singles

1953: Maureen Connolly 1970: Margaret Court 1988: Steffi Graf

Men's doubles

1951: Ken McGregor/ Frank Sedgman

Women's doubles

1960: Maria Bueno 1984: Martina Navratilova/ Pam Shriver 1998: Martina Hingis

Mixed doubles

1963: Margaret Court/ Ken Fletcher 1965: Margaret Court 1967: Owen Davidson

Non-calendar year Grand Slam

Men's singles

2015–16: Novak Djokovic

Women's singles

1983–84: Martina Navratilova 1993–94: Steffi Graf 2002–03: Serena Williams 2014–15: Serena Williams

Men's doubles

2012–13: Bob Bryan/ Mike Bryan

Women's doubles

1949–50: Louise Brough 1986–87: Martina Navratilova/ Pam Shriver 1992–93: Gigi Fernández/ Natasha Zvereva 1996–97: Natasha Zvereva 2009–10: Serena Williams/ Venus Williams

Mixed doubles

1967–68 Billie Jean King

Career Grand Slam

Men's singles

1933-34-35: Fred Perry 1937-38: Don Budge 1960-61-62: Rod Laver 1961-63-64: Roy Emerson 1992-94-95-99: Andre Agassi 2003-04-09: Roger Federer 2005-08-09-10: Rafael Nadal 2008-11-16: Novak Djokovic

Women's singles

1951-52-53: Maureen Connolly 1949-50-51-54: Doris Hart 1951-56-57: Shirley Fry Irvin 1960-62-63: Margaret Court 1966-67-68-72: Billie Jean King 1974-75-82: Chris Evert 1978-81-82-83: Martina Navratilova 1987-88: Steffi Graf 1999-2002-03: Serena Williams 2004-06-08-12: Maria Sharapova

Men's doubles

1935-36-39: Adrian Quist 1948-50-51 Frank Sedgman 1951: Ken McGregor 1953–56: Lew Hoad/ Ken Rosewall 1957-58-59: Neale Fraser 1959-60-62: Roy Emerson 1965–67: John Newcombe/ Tony Roche 1962-64-67-77: Bob Hewitt 1982-84-86-89: John Fitzgerald 1983-87-89: Anders Järryd 1994-95-98: Jacco Eltingh/ Paul Haarhuis 1989-92–93-2000: Mark Woodforde 1992–93-95-2000: Todd Woodbridge 1998-2002-03-05: Jonas Björkman 2003-05-06: Bob Bryan/ Mike Bryan 2002-04-07-08: Daniel Nestor 1999-2006-12: Leander Paes

Women's doubles

1942-46-50: Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp 1947-48-50-51: Doris Hart 1950-51-57: Shirley Fry Irvin 1956–1957: Althea Gibson 1958–60: Maria Bueno 1961–64: Lesley Turner Bowrey 1961-63-64: Margaret Court 1964-66-69-70: Judy Tegart Dalton 1980–81: Kathy Jordan/ Anne Smith 1975-76-77-80: / Martina Navratilova 1981-82-83-84: Pam Shriver 1989-90-93: Helena Suková 1988–90-91-92: Gigi Fernández 1989-90-91-93: / Natasha Zvereva 1989-90-94: Jana Novotná 1996-97-98: Martina Hingis 1999-2000-01: Serena Williams/ Venus Williams 2000-01-06: Lisa Raymond 2012-13-14: Sara Errani/ Roberta Vinci

Mixed doubles

1925-26-27-28 Jean Borotra 1949–51: Doris Hart/ Frank Sedgman 1961-1963: Margaret Court 1962-1963: Ken Fletcher 1965-66-67: Owen Davidson 1967–68: Billie Jean King 1969–75: Marty Riessen 1961-70-77-79: Bob Hewitt 1992–93-95: Mark Woodforde 1990-93-94-95: Todd Woodbridge 1974-85-2003: Martina Navratilova 2001-02-05: Daniela Hantuchová 1997-99-2005-06: Mahesh Bhupathi 2002-04-08-10: Cara Black 1999-2003-08-16: Leander Paes 2006-15-16: Martina Hingis

v t e

Men's tennis players who won two or more Grand Slam singles titles in one calendar year

Four wins

1938: Don Budge 1962: Rod Laver 1969: Rod Laver

Three wins

1933: Jack Crawford (AC&FC&WI) 1934: Fred Perry
Fred Perry
(AC&WI&US) 1955: Tony Trabert
Tony Trabert
(FO&WI&US) 1956: Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
(AO&FO&WI) 1958: Ashley Cooper (AC&WI&US) 1964: Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
(AC&WI&US) 1974: Jimmy Connors
Jimmy Connors
(AO&WI&US) 1988: Mats Wilander
Mats Wilander
(AO&FO&US) 2004: Roger Federer
Roger Federer
(AO&WI&US) 2006: Roger Federer
Roger Federer
(AO&WI&US) 2007: Roger Federer
Roger Federer
(AO&WI&US) 2010: Rafael Nadal
Rafael Nadal
(FO&WI&US) 2011: Novak Djokovic
Novak Djokovic
(AO&WI&US) 2015: Novak Djokovic
Novak Djokovic
(AO&WI&US)

Two wins

1903: Laurence Doherty
Laurence Doherty
(WI&US) 1920: Bill Tilden
Bill Tilden
(WI&US) 1921: Bill Tilden
Bill Tilden
(WI&US) 1925: René Lacoste
René Lacoste
(FC&WI) 1927: René Lacoste
René Lacoste
(FC&US) 1928: Henri Cochet
Henri Cochet
(FC&US) 1932: Ellsworth Vines
Ellsworth Vines
(WI&US) 1935: Fred Perry
Fred Perry
(FC&WI) 1936: Fred Perry
Fred Perry
(WI&US) 1937: Don Budge
Don Budge
(WI&US) 1939: Bobby Riggs
Bobby Riggs
(WI&US) 1947: Jack Kramer
Jack Kramer
(WI&US) 1950: Budge Patty
Budge Patty
(FC&WI) 1951: Dick Savitt (AC&WI)) 1952: Frank Sedgman
Frank Sedgman
(WI&US) 1953: Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
(AC&FO) 1959: Alex Olmedo (AC&WI) 1960: Neale Fraser
Neale Fraser
(WI&US) 1961: Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
(AC&US) 1963: Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
(AC&FC) 1965: Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
(AC&WI) 1967: Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
(AC&FC) 1967: John Newcombe
John Newcombe
(WI&US) 1973: John Newcombe
John Newcombe
(AO&US) 1977: Guillermo Vilas
Guillermo Vilas
(FO&US) 1978: Björn Borg
Björn Borg
(FO&WI) 1979: Björn Borg
Björn Borg
(FO&WI) 1980: Björn Borg
Björn Borg
(FO&WI) 1981: John McEnroe
John McEnroe
(WI&US) 1982: Jimmy Connors
Jimmy Connors
(WI&US) 1984: John McEnroe
John McEnroe
(WI&US) 1986: Ivan Lendl
Ivan Lendl
(FO&US) 1987: Ivan Lendl
Ivan Lendl
(FO&US) 1989: Boris Becker
Boris Becker
(WI&US) 1992: Jim Courier
Jim Courier
(AO&FO) 1993: Pete Sampras
Pete Sampras
(WI&US) 1994: Pete Sampras
Pete Sampras
(AO&WI) 1995: Pete Sampras
Pete Sampras
(WI&US) 1997: Pete Sampras
Pete Sampras
(AO&WI) 1999: Andre Agassi
Andre Agassi
(FO&US) 2005: Roger Federer
Roger Federer
(WI&US) 2008: Rafael Nadal
Rafael Nadal
(FO&WI) 2009: Roger Federer
Roger Federer
(FO&WI) 2013: Rafael Nadal
Rafael Nadal
(FO&US) 2016: Novak Djokovic
Novak Djokovic
(AO&FO) 2017: Roger Federer
Roger Federer
(AO&WI) 2017: Rafael Nadal
Rafael Nadal
(FO&US)

AC=Australasian/Australian Championships, AO=Australian Open, FC=French Championships, FO=French Open, WI=Wimbledon, US=U.S. National Championships/US Open

Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
in the Grand Slam Tournaments

v t e

Australasian and Australian Championships
Australian Championships
men's singles champions

(1905) Rodney Heath (1906) Anthony Wilding (1907) Horace Rice (1908) Fred Alexander (1909) Anthony Wilding (1910) Rodney Heath (1911) Norman Brookes (1912) James Parke (1913) Ernie Parker (1914) Arthur O'Hara Wood (1915) Gordon Lowe (1916–1918) No competition (due to World War I) (1919) Algernon Kingscote (1920) Pat O'Hara Wood (1921) Rhys Gemmell (1922) James Anderson (1923) Pat O'Hara Wood (1924) James Anderson (1925) James Anderson (1926) John Hawkes (1927) Gerald Patterson (1928) Jean Borotra (1929) John Colin Gregory (1930) Edgar Moon (1931) Jack Crawford (1932) Jack Crawford (1933) Jack Crawford (1934) Fred Perry (1935) Jack Crawford (1936) Adrian Quist (1937) Vivian McGrath (1938) Don Budge (1939) John Bromwich (1940) Adrian Quist (1941–1945) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) John Bromwich (1947) Dinny Pails (1948) Adrian Quist (1949) Frank Sedgman (1950) Frank Sedgman (1951) Dick Savitt (1952) Ken McGregor (1953) Ken Rosewall (1954) Mervyn Rose (1955) Ken Rosewall (1956) Lew Hoad (1957) Ashley Cooper (1958) Ashley Cooper (1959) Alex Olmedo (1960) Rod Laver (1961) Roy Emerson (1962) Rod Laver (1963) Roy Emerson (1964) Roy Emerson (1965) Roy Emerson (1966) Roy Emerson (1967) Roy Emerson (1968) William Bowrey

v t e

French Championships
French Championships
men's singles champions

(1891) H. Briggs (1892) Jean Schopfer (1893) Laurent Riboulet (1894) André Vacherot (1895) André Vacherot (1896) André Vacherot (1897) Paul Aymé (1898) Paul Aymé (1899) Paul Aymé (1900) Paul Aymé (1901) André Vacherot (1902) Michel Vacherot (1903) Max Decugis (1904) Max Decugis (1905) Maurice Germot (1906) Maurice Germot (1907) Max Decugis (1908) Max Decugis (1909) Max Decugis (1910) Maurice Germot (1911) André Gobert (1912) Max Decugis (1913) Max Decugis (1914) Max Decugis (1915–1919) No competition (due to World War I) (1920) André Gobert (1921) Jean Samazeuilh (1922) Henri Cochet (1923) François Blanchy (1924) Jean Borotra (1925) René Lacoste (1926) Henri Cochet (1927) René Lacoste (1928) Henri Cochet (1929) René Lacoste (1930) Henri Cochet (1931) Jean Borotra (1932) Henri Cochet (1933) Jack Crawford (1934) Gottfried von Cramm (1935) Fred Perry (1936) Gottfried von Cramm (1937) Henner Henkel (1938) Don Budge (1939) Don McNeill (1940–1945) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Marcel Bernard (1947) József Asbóth (1948) Frank Parker (1949) Frank Parker (1950) Budge Patty (1951) Jaroslav Drobný (1952) Jaroslav Drobný (1953) Ken Rosewall (1954) Tony Trabert (1955) Tony Trabert (1956) Lew Hoad (1957) Sven Davidson (1958) Mervyn Rose (1959) Nicola Pietrangeli (1960) Nicola Pietrangeli (1961) Manuel Santana (1962) Rod Laver (1963) Roy Emerson (1964) Manuel Santana (1965) Fred Stolle (1966) Tony Roche (1967) Roy Emerson

v t e

US Open men's singles champions

(1968) Arthur Ashe (1969) Rod Laver (1970) Ken Rosewall (1971) Stan Smith (1972) Ilie Năstase (1973) John Newcombe (1974) Jimmy Connors (1975) Manuel Orantes (1976) Jimmy Connors (1977) Guillermo Vilas (1978) Jimmy Connors (1979) John McEnroe (1980) John McEnroe (1981) John McEnroe (1982) Jimmy Connors (1983) Jimmy Connors (1984) John McEnroe (1985) Ivan Lendl (1986) Ivan Lendl (1987) Ivan Lendl (1988) Mats Wilander (1989) Boris Becker (1990) Pete Sampras (1991) Stefan Edberg (1992) Stefan Edberg (1993) Pete Sampras (1994) Andre Agassi (1995) Pete Sampras (1996) Pete Sampras (1997) Patrick Rafter (1998) Patrick Rafter (1999) Andre Agassi (2000) Marat Safin (2001) Lleyton Hewitt (2002) Pete Sampras (2003) Andy Roddick (2004) Roger Federer (2005) Roger Federer (2006) Roger Federer (2007) Roger Federer (2008) Roger Federer (2009) Juan Martín del Potro (2010) Rafael Nadal (2011) Novak Djokovic (2012) Andy Murray (2013) Rafael Nadal (2014) Marin Čilić (2015) Novak Djokovic (2016) Stan Wawrinka (2017) Rafael Nadal

v t e

Australasian and Australian Championships
Australian Championships
men's doubles champions

1905: Randolph Lycett / Tom Tachell 1906: Rodney Heath
Rodney Heath
/ Anthony Wilding 1907: Bill Gregg / Harry Parker 1908: Fred Alexander
Fred Alexander
/ Alfred Dunlop 1909: J. P. Keane / Ernie Parker 1910: Ashley Campbell / Horace Rice 1911: Rodney Heath
Rodney Heath
/ Randolph Lycett 1912: James Parke / Charles Dixon 1913: A. Hedeman / Ernie Parker 1914: Ashley Campbell / Gerald Patterson 1915: Horace Rice
Horace Rice
/ C. V. Todd 1916–1918: No competition (due to World War I) 1919: Pat O'Hara Wood
Pat O'Hara Wood
/ Ronald Thomas 1920: Pat O'Hara Wood
Pat O'Hara Wood
/ Ronald Thomas 1921: S. H. Eaton / Rhys Gemmell 1922: John Hawkes / Gerald Patterson 1923: Pat O'Hara Wood
Pat O'Hara Wood
/ Bert St. John 1924: James Anderson / Norman Brookes 1925: Pat O'Hara Wood
Pat O'Hara Wood
/ Gerald Patterson 1926: John Hawkes / Gerald Patterson 1927: John Hawkes / Gerald Patterson 1928: Jean Borotra
Jean Borotra
/ Jacques Brugnon 1929: Jack Crawford / Harry Hopman 1930: Jack Crawford / Harry Hopman 1931: Charles Donohoe / Roy Dunlop 1932: Jack Crawford / Edgar Moon 1933: Keith Gledhill / Ellsworth Vines 1934: Pat Hughes / Fred Perry 1935: Jack Crawford / Vivian McGrath 1936: Adrian Quist
Adrian Quist
/ Don Turnbull 1937: Adrian Quist
Adrian Quist
/ Don Turnbull 1938: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Adrian Quist 1939: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Adrian Quist 1940: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Adrian Quist 1941–1945: No competition (due to World War II) 1946: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Adrian Quist 1947: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Adrian Quist 1948: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Adrian Quist 1949: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Adrian Quist 1950: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Adrian Quist 1951: Frank Sedgman
Frank Sedgman
/ Ken McGregor 1952: Frank Sedgman
Frank Sedgman
/ Ken McGregor 1953: Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
/ Ken Rosewall 1954: Mervyn Rose
Mervyn Rose
/ Rex Hartwig 1955: Vic Seixas
Vic Seixas
/ Tony Trabert 1956: Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
/ Ken Rosewall 1957: Neale Fraser
Neale Fraser
/ Lew Hoad 1958: Ashley Cooper / Neale Fraser 1959: Rod Laver
Rod Laver
/ Bob Mark 1960: Rod Laver
Rod Laver
/ Bob Mark 1961: Rod Laver
Rod Laver
/ Bob Mark 1962: Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Neale Fraser 1963: Bob Hewitt
Bob Hewitt
/ Fred Stolle 1964: Bob Hewitt
Bob Hewitt
/ Fred Stolle 1965: John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Tony Roche 1966: Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Fred Stolle 1967: John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Tony Roche 1968: Dick Crealy / Allan Stone

v t e

French Championships
French Championships
men's doubles champions

(1891) B. Desjoyau / T. Legrand (1892) Diaz Albertini / J. Havet (1893) J. Goldsmith / Jean Schopfer (1894) Gérard Brosselin / J. Lesage (1895) André Vacherot / Christian Winzer (1896) Francky Wardan / Wynes (1897) Paul Aymé / Paul Lebreton (1898) Xenophon Casdagli / Michel Vacherot (1899) Paul Aymé / Paul Lebreton (1900) Paul Aymé / Paul Lebreton (1901) André Vacherot / Michel Vacherot (1902) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Jacques Worth (1903) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Jacques Worth (1904) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1905) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Jacques Worth (1906) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1907) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1908) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1909) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1910) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1911) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1912) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1913) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1914) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1915 – 1919) No competition (due to World War I) (1920) Max Decugis
Max Decugis
/ Maurice Germot (1921) André Gobert
André Gobert
/ William Laurentz (1922) Jacques Brugnon
Jacques Brugnon
/ Marcel Dupont (1923) Jean- François Blanchy / Jean Samazeuilh (1924) Jean Borotra
Jean Borotra
/ René Lacoste (1925) Jean Borotra
Jean Borotra
/ René Lacoste (1926) Vincent Richards
Vincent Richards
/ Howard Kinsey (1927) Henri Cochet
Henri Cochet
/ Jacques Brugnon (1928) Jean Borotra
Jean Borotra
/ Jacques Brugnon (1929) René Lacoste
René Lacoste
/ Jean Borotra (1930) Henri Cochet
Henri Cochet
/ Jacques Brugnon (1931) George Lott / John Van Ryn (1932) Henri Cochet
Henri Cochet
/ Jacques Brugnon (1933) Pat Hughes / Fred Perry (1934) Jean Borotra
Jean Borotra
/ Jacques Brugnon (1935) Jack Crawford / Adrian Quist (1936) Jean Borotra
Jean Borotra
/ Marcel Bernard (1937) Gottfried von Cramm
Gottfried von Cramm
/ Henner Henkel (1938) Bernard Destremau
Bernard Destremau
/ Yvon Petra (1939) Don McNeill / Charles Harris (1940-1945) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Marcel Bernard / Yvon Petra (1947) Eustace Fannin / Eric Sturgess (1948) Lennart Bergelin
Lennart Bergelin
/ Jaroslav Drobný (1949) Pancho Gonzales
Pancho Gonzales
/ Frank Parker (1950) Bill Talbert / Tony Trabert (1951) Ken McGregor
Ken McGregor
/ Frank Sedgman (1952) Ken McGregor
Ken McGregor
/ Frank Sedgman (1953) Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
/ Ken Rosewall (1954) Vic Seixas
Vic Seixas
/ Tony Trabert (1955) Vic Seixas
Vic Seixas
/ Tony Trabert (1956) Don Candy / Bob Perry (1957) Malcolm Anderson
Malcolm Anderson
/ Ashley Cooper (1958) Ashley Cooper / Neale Fraser (1959) Nicola Pietrangeli
Nicola Pietrangeli
/ Orlando Sirola (1960) Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Neale Fraser (1961) Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Rod Laver (1962) Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Neale Fraser (1963) Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Manuel Santana (1964) Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Ken Fletcher (1965) Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Fred Stolle (1966) Clark Graebner / Dennis Ralston (1967) John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Tony Roche

v t e

Pre Open Era
Open Era
Wimbledon gentlemen's doubles champions

1884: William Renshaw
William Renshaw
/ Ernest Renshaw 1885: William Renshaw
William Renshaw
/ Ernest Renshaw 1886: William Renshaw
William Renshaw
/ Ernest Renshaw 1887: Herbert Wilberforce / Patrick Bowes-Lyon 1888: William Renshaw
William Renshaw
/ Ernest Renshaw 1889: William Renshaw
William Renshaw
/ Ernest Renshaw 1890: Joshua Pim
Joshua Pim
/ Frank Stoker 1891: Wilfred Baddeley
Wilfred Baddeley
/ Herbert Baddeley 1892: Ernest Lewis
Ernest Lewis
/ Harry S. Barlow 1893: Joshua Pim
Joshua Pim
/ Frank Stoker 1894: Wilfred Baddeley
Wilfred Baddeley
/ Herbert Baddeley 1895: Wilfred Baddeley
Wilfred Baddeley
/ Herbert Baddeley 1896: Wilfred Baddeley
Wilfred Baddeley
/ Herbert Baddeley 1897: Reginald Doherty
Reginald Doherty
/ Laurence Doherty 1898: Reginald Doherty
Reginald Doherty
/ Laurence Doherty 1899: Reginald Doherty
Reginald Doherty
/ Laurence Doherty 1900: Reginald Doherty
Reginald Doherty
/ Laurence Doherty 1901: Reginald Doherty
Reginald Doherty
/ Laurence Doherty 1902: Sydney
Sydney
Smith / Frank Riseley 1903: Reginald Doherty
Reginald Doherty
/ Laurence Doherty 1904: Reginald Doherty
Reginald Doherty
/ Laurence Doherty 1905: Reginald Doherty
Reginald Doherty
/ Laurence Doherty 1906: Sydney
Sydney
Smith / Frank Riseley 1907: Norman Brookes
Norman Brookes
/ Anthony Wilding 1908: Anthony Wilding
Anthony Wilding
/ Major Ritchie 1909: Arthur Gore / Herbert Barrett 1910: Anthony Wilding
Anthony Wilding
/ Major Ritchie 1911: André Gobert
André Gobert
/ Max Decugis 1912: Herbert Barrett / Charles Dixon 1913: Herbert Barrett / Charles Dixon 1914: Norman Brookes
Norman Brookes
/ Anthony Wilding 1915–18: No competition (due to World War I) 1919: R. V. Thomas / Pat O'Hara Wood 1920: R. Norris Williams
R. Norris Williams
/ Chuck Garland 1921: Randolph Lycett / Max Woosnam 1922: James Anderson / Randolph Lycett 1923: Leslie Godfree / Randolph Lycett 1924: Francis Hunter
Francis Hunter
/ Vincent Richards 1925: Jean Borotra
Jean Borotra
/ René Lacoste 1926: Jacques Brugnon
Jacques Brugnon
/ Henri Cochet 1927: Francis Hunter
Francis Hunter
/ Bill Tilden 1928: Jacques Brugnon
Jacques Brugnon
/ Henri Cochet 1929: Wilmer Allison / John Van Ryn 1930: Wilmer Allison / John Van Ryn 1931: George Lott / John Van Ryn 1932: Jean Borotra
Jean Borotra
/ Jacques Brugnon 1933: Jean Borotra
Jean Borotra
/ Jacques Brugnon 1934: George Lott / Lester Stoefen 1935: Jack Crawford / Adrian Quist 1936: Pat Hughes / Raymond Tuckey 1937: Don Budge
Don Budge
/ Gene Mako 1938: Don Budge
Don Budge
/ Gene Mako 1939: Elwood Cooke
Elwood Cooke
/ Bobby Riggs 1940–45: No competition (due to World War II) 1946: Tom Brown / Jack Kramer 1947: Bob Falkenburg / Jack Kramer 1948: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Frank Sedgman 1949: Pancho Gonzales
Pancho Gonzales
/ Frank Parker 1950: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Adrian Quist 1951: Ken McGregor
Ken McGregor
/ Frank Sedgman 1952: Ken McGregor
Ken McGregor
/ Frank Sedgman 1953: Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
/ Ken Rosewall 1954: Rex Hartwig
Rex Hartwig
/ Mervyn Rose 1955: Rex Hartwig
Rex Hartwig
/ Lew Hoad 1956: Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
/ Ken Rosewall 1957: Budge Patty
Budge Patty
/ Gardnar Mulloy 1958: Sven Davidson / Ulf Schmidt 1959: Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Neale Fraser 1960: Rafael Osuna / Dennis Ralston 1961: Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Neale Fraser 1962: Bob Hewitt
Bob Hewitt
/ Fred Stolle 1963: Rafael Osuna / Antonio Palafox 1964: Bob Hewitt
Bob Hewitt
/ Fred Stolle 1965: John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Tony Roche 1966: Ken Fletcher
Ken Fletcher
/ John Newcombe 1967: Bob Hewitt
Bob Hewitt
/ Frew McMillan

v t e

U.S. National Championships men's doubles champions

(1881) Clarence Clark / Frederick Winslow Taylor (1882) Richard Sears / James Dwight (1883) Richard Sears / James Dwight (1884) Richard Sears / James Dwight (1885) Richard Sears / Joseph Clark (1886) Richard Sears / James Dwight (1887) Richard Sears / James Dwight (1888) Oliver Campbell
Oliver Campbell
/ Valentine Hall (1889) Henry Slocum / Howard Taylor (1890) Valentine Hall / Clarence Hobart (1891) Oliver Campbell
Oliver Campbell
/ Bob Huntington (1892) Oliver Campbell
Oliver Campbell
/ Bob Huntington (1893) Clarence Hobart
Clarence Hobart
/ Frederick Hovey (1894) Clarence Hobart
Clarence Hobart
/ Frederick Hovey (1895) Malcolm Greene Chace
Malcolm Greene Chace
/ Robert Wrenn (1896) Carr Neel
Carr Neel
/ Sam Neel (1897) Leo Ware
Leo Ware
/ George Sheldon (1898) Leo Ware
Leo Ware
/ George Sheldon (1899) Holcombe Ward
Holcombe Ward
/ Dwight F. Davis (1900) Holcombe Ward
Holcombe Ward
/ Dwight F. Davis (1901) Holcombe Ward
Holcombe Ward
/ Dwight F. Davis (1902) Reginald Doherty
Reginald Doherty
/ Laurence Doherty (1903) Reginald Doherty
Reginald Doherty
/ Laurence Doherty (1904) Holcombe Ward
Holcombe Ward
/ Beals Wright (1905) Holcombe Ward
Holcombe Ward
/ Beals Wright (1906) Holcombe Ward
Holcombe Ward
/ Beals Wright (1907) Fred Alexander
Fred Alexander
/ Harold Hackett (1908) Fred Alexander
Fred Alexander
/ Harold Hackett (1909) Fred Alexander
Fred Alexander
/ Harold Hackett (1910) Fred Alexander
Fred Alexander
/ Harold Hackett (1911) Raymond Little
Raymond Little
/ Gus Touchard (1912) Maurice E. McLoughlin
Maurice E. McLoughlin
/ Tom Bundy (1913) Maurice E. McLoughlin
Maurice E. McLoughlin
/ Tom Bundy (1914) Maurice E. McLoughlin
Maurice E. McLoughlin
/ Tom Bundy (1915) Clarence Griffin
Clarence Griffin
/ Bill Johnston (1916) Clarence Griffin
Clarence Griffin
/ Bill Johnston (1917) Fred Alexander
Fred Alexander
/ Harold Throckmorton (1918) Vincent Richards
Vincent Richards
/ Bill Tilden (1919) Norman Brookes
Norman Brookes
/ Gerald Patterson (1920) Clarence Griffin
Clarence Griffin
/ Bill Johnston (1921) Vincent Richards
Vincent Richards
/ Bill Tilden (1922) Vincent Richards
Vincent Richards
/ Bill Tilden (1923) Brian Norton
Brian Norton
/ Bill Tilden (1924) Howard Kinsey
Howard Kinsey
/ Robert Kinsey (1925) Vincent Richards
Vincent Richards
/ R. Norris Williams (1926) Vincent Richards
Vincent Richards
/ R. Norris Williams (1927) Francis Hunter
Francis Hunter
/ Bill Tilden (1928) George Lott / John F. Hennessey (1929) George Lott / Johnny Doeg (1930) George Lott / Johnny Doeg (1931) Wilmer Allison / John Van Ryn (1932) Ellsworth Vines
Ellsworth Vines
/ Keith Gledhill (1933) George Lott / Lester Stoefen (1934) George Lott / Lester Stoefen (1935) Wilmer Allison / John Van Ryn (1936) Don Budge
Don Budge
/ Gene Mako (1937) Gottfried von Cramm
Gottfried von Cramm
/ Henner Henkel (1938) Don Budge
Don Budge
/ Gene Mako (1939) John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Adrian Quist (1940) Jack Kramer
Jack Kramer
/ Ted Schroeder (1941) Jack Kramer
Jack Kramer
/ Ted Schroeder (1942) Gardnar Mulloy / Bill Talbert (1943) Jack Kramer
Jack Kramer
/ Frank Parker (1944) Bob Falkenburg / Don McNeill (1945) Gardnar Mulloy / Bill Talbert (1946) Gardnar Mulloy / Bill Talbert (1947) Jack Kramer
Jack Kramer
/ Ted Schroeder (1948) Gardnar Mulloy / Bill Talbert (1949) John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Bill Sidwell (1950) John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Frank Sedgman (1951) Ken McGregor
Ken McGregor
/ Frank Sedgman (1952) Mervyn Rose
Mervyn Rose
/ Vic Seixas (1953) Rex Hartwig
Rex Hartwig
/ Mervyn Rose (1954) Vic Seixas
Vic Seixas
/ Tony Trabert (1955) Kosei Kamo / Atsushi Miyagi (1956) Lew Hoad
Lew Hoad
/ Ken Rosewall (1957) Ashley Cooper / Neale Fraser (1958) Alex Olmedo / Ham Richardson (1959) Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Neale Fraser (1960) Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Neale Fraser (1961) Chuck McKinley / Dennis Ralston (1962) Rafael Osuna / Antonio Palafox (1963) Chuck McKinley / Dennis Ralston (1964) Chuck McKinley / Dennis Ralston (1965) Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Fred Stolle (1966) Roy Emerson
Roy Emerson
/ Fred Stolle (1967) John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Tony Roche

v t e

U.S. National Championships mixed doubles champions

(1892) Mabel Cahill
Mabel Cahill
/ Clarence Hobart (1893) Ellen Roosevelt
Ellen Roosevelt
/ Clarence Hobart (1894) Juliette Atkinson / Edwin P. Fischer (1895) Juliette Atkinson / Edwin P. Fischer (1896) Juliette Atkinson / Edwin P. Fischer (1897) Laura Henson / D.L. Magruder (1898) Carrie Neely
Carrie Neely
/ Edwin P. Fischer (1899) Elizabeth Rastall / Albert Hoskins (1900) Margaret Hunnewell / Alfred Codman (1901) Marion Jones / Raymond Little (1902) Elisabeth Moore
Elisabeth Moore
/ Wylie Grant (1903) Helen Chapman / Harry Allen (1904) Elisabeth Moore
Elisabeth Moore
/ Wylie Grant (1905) Augusta Schultz Hobart / Clarence Hobart (1906) Sarah Coffin / Edward Dewhurst (1907) May Sayers / Wallace Johnson (1908) Edith Rotch / Nathaniel Niles (1909) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Wallace Johnson (1910) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Joseph Carpenter, Jr. (1911) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Wallace Johnson (1912) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ R. Norris Williams (1913) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Bill Tilden (1914) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Bill Tilden (1915) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Harry Johnson (1916) Eleonora Sears
Eleonora Sears
/ Willis E. Davis (1917) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Irving Wright (1918) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Irving Wright (1919) Marion Jessup
Marion Jessup
/ Vincent Richards (1920) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Wallace Johnson (1921) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Bill Johnston (1922) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Bill Tilden (1923) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Bill Tilden (1924) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
/ Vincent Richards (1925) Kathleen McKane Godfree
Kathleen McKane Godfree
/ John Hawkes (1926) Elizabeth Ryan
Elizabeth Ryan
/ Jean Borotra (1927) Eileen Bennett Whittingstall
Eileen Bennett Whittingstall
/ Henri Cochet (1928) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
/ John Hawkes (1929) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
Shoemaker / George Lott (1930) Edith Cross / Wilmer Allison (1931) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
Shoemaker / George Lott (1932) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Fred Perry (1933) Elizabeth Ryan
Elizabeth Ryan
/ Ellsworth Vines (1934) Helen Jacobs
Helen Jacobs
/ George Lott (1935) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Enrique Maier (1936) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Gene Mako (1937) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Don Budge (1938) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Don Budge (1939) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Harry Hopman (1940) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Bobby Riggs (1941) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Jack Kramer (1942) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Ted Schroeder (1943) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1944) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1945) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1946) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1947) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / John Bromwich (1948) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Tom Brown (1949) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Eric Sturgess (1950) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Ken McGregor (1951) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Frank Sedgman (1952) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Frank Sedgman (1953) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Vic Seixas (1954) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Vic Seixas (1955) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Vic Seixas (1956) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Ken Rosewall (1957) Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
/ Kurt Nielsen (1958) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Neale Fraser (1959) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Neale Fraser (1960) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Neale Fraser (1961) Margaret Smith / Bob Mark (1962) Margaret Smith / Fred Stolle (1963) Margaret Smith / Ken Fletcher (1964) Margaret Smith / John Newcombe (1965) Margaret Smith / Fred Stolle (1966) Donna Floyd Fales / Owen Davidson (1967) Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
/ Owen Davidson

v t e

Australian Open
Australian Open
men's singles champions

(1969) Rod Laver (1970) Arthur Ashe (1971) Ken Rosewall (1972) Ken Rosewall (1973) John Newcombe (1974) Jimmy Connors (1975) John Newcombe (1976) Mark Edmondson (1977 (Jan)) Roscoe Tanner (1977 (Dec)) Vitas Gerulaitis (1978) Guillermo Vilas (1979) Guillermo Vilas (1980) Brian Teacher (1981) Johan Kriek (1982) Johan Kriek (1983) Mats Wilander (1984) Mats Wilander (1985) Stefan Edberg (1986) Not Held (1987) Stefan Edberg (1988) Mats Wilander (1989) Ivan Lendl (1990) Ivan Lendl (1991) Boris Becker (1992) Jim Courier (1993) Jim Courier (1994) Pete Sampras (1995) Andre Agassi (1996) Boris Becker (1997) Pete Sampras (1998) Petr Korda (1999) Yevgeny Kafelnikov (2000) Andre Agassi (2001) Andre Agassi (2002) Thomas Johansson (2003) Andre Agassi (2004) Roger Federer (2005) Marat Safin (2006) Roger Federer (2007) Roger Federer (2008) Novak Djokovic (2009) Rafael Nadal (2010) Roger Federer (2011) Novak Djokovic (2012) Novak Djokovic (2013) Novak Djokovic (2014) Stanislas Wawrinka (2015) Novak Djokovic (2016) Novak Djokovic (2017) Roger Federer (2018) Roger Federer

v t e

French Open
French Open
men's singles champions

(1968) Ken Rosewall (1969) Rod Laver (1970) Jan Kodeš (1971) Jan Kodeš (1972) Andrés Gimeno (1973) Ilie Năstase (1974) Björn Borg (1975) Björn Borg (1976) Adriano Panatta (1977) Guillermo Vilas (1978) Björn Borg (1979) Björn Borg (1980) Björn Borg (1981) Björn Borg (1982) Mats Wilander (1983) Yannick Noah (1984) Ivan Lendl (1985) Mats Wilander (1986) Ivan Lendl (1987) Ivan Lendl (1988) Mats Wilander (1989) Michael Chang (1990) Andrés Gómez (1991) Jim Courier (1992) Jim Courier (1993) Sergi Bruguera (1994) Sergi Bruguera (1995) Thomas Muster (1996) Yevgeny Kafelnikov (1997) Gustavo Kuerten (1998) Carlos Moyá (1999) Andre Agassi (2000) Gustavo Kuerten (2001) Gustavo Kuerten (2002) Albert Costa (2003) Juan Carlos Ferrero (2004) Gastón Gaudio (2005) Rafael Nadal (2006) Rafael Nadal (2007) Rafael Nadal (2008) Rafael Nadal (2009) Roger Federer (2010) Rafael Nadal (2011) Rafael Nadal (2012) Rafael Nadal (2013) Rafael Nadal (2014) Rafael Nadal (2015) Stan Wawrinka (2016) Novak Djokovic (2017) Rafael Nadal

v t e

US Open men's singles champions

(1968) Arthur Ashe (1969) Rod Laver (1970) Ken Rosewall (1971) Stan Smith (1972) Ilie Năstase (1973) John Newcombe (1974) Jimmy Connors (1975) Manuel Orantes (1976) Jimmy Connors (1977) Guillermo Vilas (1978) Jimmy Connors (1979) John McEnroe (1980) John McEnroe (1981) John McEnroe (1982) Jimmy Connors (1983) Jimmy Connors (1984) John McEnroe (1985) Ivan Lendl (1986) Ivan Lendl (1987) Ivan Lendl (1988) Mats Wilander (1989) Boris Becker (1990) Pete Sampras (1991) Stefan Edberg (1992) Stefan Edberg (1993) Pete Sampras (1994) Andre Agassi (1995) Pete Sampras (1996) Pete Sampras (1997) Patrick Rafter (1998) Patrick Rafter (1999) Andre Agassi (2000) Marat Safin (2001) Lleyton Hewitt (2002) Pete Sampras (2003) Andy Roddick (2004) Roger Federer (2005) Roger Federer (2006) Roger Federer (2007) Roger Federer (2008) Roger Federer (2009) Juan Martín del Potro (2010) Rafael Nadal (2011) Novak Djokovic (2012) Andy Murray (2013) Rafael Nadal (2014) Marin Čilić (2015) Novak Djokovic (2016) Stan Wawrinka (2017) Rafael Nadal

v t e

Australian Open
Australian Open
men's doubles champions

1969 Rod Laver
Rod Laver
/ Roy Emerson 1970 Bob Lutz / Stan Smith 1971 John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Tony Roche 1972 Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
/ Owen Davidson 1973 John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Malcolm Anderson 1974 Ross Case / Geoff Masters 1975 John Alexander / Phil Dent 1976 John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Tony Roche 1977 (Jan) Arthur Ashe
Arthur Ashe
/ Tony Roche 1977 (Dec) Ray Ruffels
Ray Ruffels
/ Allan Stone 1978 Wojciech Fibak
Wojciech Fibak
/ Kim Warwick 1979 Peter McNamara
Peter McNamara
/ Paul McNamee 1980 Mark Edmondson / Kim Warwick 1981 Mark Edmondson / Kim Warwick 1982 John Alexander / John Fitzgerald 1983 Mark Edmondson / Paul McNamee 1984 Mark Edmondson / Sherwood Stewart 1985 Paul Annacone
Paul Annacone
/ Christo van Rensburg 1987 Stefan Edberg
Stefan Edberg
/ Anders Järryd 1988 Rick Leach
Rick Leach
/ Jim Pugh 1989 Rick Leach
Rick Leach
/ Jim Pugh 1990 Pieter Aldrich / Danie Visser 1991 Scott Davis / David Pate 1992 Todd Woodbridge
Todd Woodbridge
/ Mark Woodforde 1993 Danie Visser / Laurie Warder 1994 Jacco Eltingh / Paul Haarhuis 1995 Jared Palmer / Richey Reneberg 1996 Stefan Edberg
Stefan Edberg
/ Petr Korda 1997 Todd Woodbridge
Todd Woodbridge
/ Mark Woodforde 1998 Jonas Björkman
Jonas Björkman
/ Jacco Eltingh 1999 Jonas Björkman
Jonas Björkman
/ Patrick Rafter 2000 Ellis Ferreira / Rick Leach 2001 Jonas Björkman
Jonas Björkman
/ Todd Woodbridge 2002 Mark Knowles
Mark Knowles
/ Daniel Nestor 2003 Fabrice Santoro
Fabrice Santoro
/ Michaël Llodra 2004 Fabrice Santoro
Fabrice Santoro
/ Michaël Llodra 2005 Wayne Black / Kevin Ullyett 2006 Bob Bryan
Bob Bryan
/ Mike Bryan 2007 Bob Bryan
Bob Bryan
/ Mike Bryan 2008 Jonathan Erlich
Jonathan Erlich
/ Andy Ram 2009 Bob Bryan
Bob Bryan
/ Mike Bryan 2010 Bob Bryan
Bob Bryan
/ Mike Bryan 2011 Bob Bryan
Bob Bryan
/ Mike Bryan 2012 Leander Paes
Leander Paes
/ Radek Štěpánek 2013 Bob Bryan
Bob Bryan
/ Mike Bryan 2014 Łukasz Kubot
Łukasz Kubot
/ Robert Lindstedt 2015 Simone Bolelli
Simone Bolelli
/ Fabio Fognini 2016 Jamie Murray
Jamie Murray
/ Bruno Soares 2017 Henri Kontinen
Henri Kontinen
/ John Peers 2018 Oliver Marach
Oliver Marach
/ Mate Pavić

v t e

French Open
French Open
men's doubles champions

(1968) Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
/ Fred Stolle (1969) John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Tony Roche (1970) Ilie Năstase
Ilie Năstase
/ Ion Țiriac (1971) Arthur Ashe
Arthur Ashe
/ Marty Riessen (1972) Bob Hewitt
Bob Hewitt
/ Frew McMillan (1973) John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Tom Okker (1974) Dick Crealy / Onny Parun (1975) Brian Gottfried / Raúl Ramírez (1976) Fred McNair / Sherwood Stewart (1977) Brian Gottfried / Raúl Ramírez (1978) Gene Mayer
Gene Mayer
/ Hank Pfister (1979) Gene Mayer
Gene Mayer
/ Sandy Mayer (1980) Victor Amaya / Hank Pfister (1981) Heinz Günthardt
Heinz Günthardt
/ Balázs Taróczy (1982) Sherwood Stewart / Ferdi Taygan (1983) Anders Järryd
Anders Järryd
/ Hans Simonsson (1984) Henri Leconte
Henri Leconte
/ Yannick Noah (1985) Mark Edmondson / Kim Warwick (1986) John Fitzgerald / Tomáš Šmíd (1987) Anders Järryd
Anders Järryd
/ Robert Seguso (1988) Andrés Gómez
Andrés Gómez
/ Emilio Sánchez (1989) Jim Grabb / Patrick McEnroe (1990) Sergio Casal / Emilio Sánchez (1991) John Fitzgerald / Anders Järryd (1992) Jakob Hlasek / Marc Rosset (1993) Luke Jensen
Luke Jensen
/ Murphy Jensen (1994) Byron Black / Jonathan Stark (1995) Jacco Eltingh / Paul Haarhuis (1996) Yevgeny Kafelnikov
Yevgeny Kafelnikov
/ Daniel Vacek (1997) Yevgeny Kafelnikov
Yevgeny Kafelnikov
/ Daniel Vacek (1998) Jacco Eltingh / Paul Haarhuis (1999) Mahesh Bhupathi
Mahesh Bhupathi
/ Leander Paes (2000) Todd Woodbridge
Todd Woodbridge
/ Mark Woodforde (2001) Mahesh Bhupathi
Mahesh Bhupathi
/ Leander Paes (2002) Paul Haarhuis / Yevgeny Kafelnikov (2003) Bob Bryan
Bob Bryan
/ Mike Bryan (2004) Xavier Malisse
Xavier Malisse
/ Olivier Rochus (2005) Jonas Björkman
Jonas Björkman
/ Max Mirnyi (2006) Jonas Björkman
Jonas Björkman
/ Max Mirnyi (2007) Mark Knowles
Mark Knowles
/ Daniel Nestor (2008) Pablo Cuevas
Pablo Cuevas
/ Luis Horna (2009) Lukáš Dlouhý
Lukáš Dlouhý
/ Leander Paes (2010) Daniel Nestor
Daniel Nestor
/ Nenad Zimonjić (2011) Max Mirnyi
Max Mirnyi
/ Daniel Nestor (2012) Max Mirnyi
Max Mirnyi
/ Daniel Nestor (2013) Bob Bryan
Bob Bryan
/ Mike Bryan (2014) Julien Benneteau
Julien Benneteau
/ Édouard Roger-Vasselin (2015) Ivan Dodig
Ivan Dodig
/ Marcelo Melo (2016) Feliciano López
Feliciano López
/ Marc López (2017) Ryan Harrison / Michael Venus

v t e

US Open men's doubles champions

(1968) Bob Lutz / Stan Smith (1969) Ken Rosewall
Ken Rosewall
/ Fred Stolle (1970) Pierre Barthès / Nikola Pilić (1971) John Newcombe
John Newcombe
/ Roger Taylor (1972) Cliff Drysdale
Cliff Drysdale
/ Roger Taylor (1973) Owen Davidson
Owen Davidson
/ John Newcombe (1974) Bob Lutz / Stan Smith (1975) Jimmy Connors
Jimmy Connors
/ Ilie Năstase (1976) Tom Okker
Tom Okker
/ Marty Riessen (1977) Bob Hewitt
Bob Hewitt
/ Frew McMillan (1978) Bob Lutz / Stan Smith (1979) Peter Fleming / John McEnroe (1980) Bob Lutz / Stan Smith (1981) Peter Fleming / John McEnroe (1982) Kevin Curren
Kevin Curren
/ Steve Denton (1983) Peter Fleming / John McEnroe (1984) John Fitzgerald / Tomáš Šmíd (1985) Ken Flach / Robert Seguso (1986) Andrés Gómez
Andrés Gómez
/ Slobodan Živojinović (1987) Stefan Edberg
Stefan Edberg
/ Anders Järryd (1988) Sergio Casal / Emilio Sánchez (1989) John McEnroe
John McEnroe
/ Mark Woodforde (1990) Pieter Aldrich / Danie Visser (1991) John Fitzgerald / Anders Järryd (1992) Jim Grabb / Richey Reneberg (1993) Ken Flach / Rick Leach (1994) Jacco Eltingh / Paul Haarhuis (1995) Todd Woodbridge
Todd Woodbridge
/ Mark Woodforde (1996) Todd Woodbridge
Todd Woodbridge
/ Mark Woodforde (1997) Yevgeny Kafelnikov
Yevgeny Kafelnikov
/ Daniel Vacek (1998) Sandon Stolle / Cyril Suk (1999) Sébastien Lareau / Alex O'Brien (2000) Lleyton Hewitt
Lleyton Hewitt
/ Max Mirnyi (2001) Wayne Black / Kevin Ullyett (2002) Mahesh Bhupathi
Mahesh Bhupathi
/ Max Mirnyi (2003) Jonas Björkman
Jonas Björkman
/ Todd Woodbridge (2004) Mark Knowles
Mark Knowles
/ Daniel Nestor (2005) Mike Bryan
Mike Bryan
/ Bob Bryan (2006) Martin Damm
Martin Damm
/ Leander Paes (2007) Simon Aspelin
Simon Aspelin
/ Julian Knowle (2008) Mike Bryan
Mike Bryan
/ Bob Bryan (2009) Lukáš Dlouhý
Lukáš Dlouhý
/ Leander Paes (2010) Mike Bryan
Mike Bryan
/ Bob Bryan (2011) Jürgen Melzer
Jürgen Melzer
/ Philipp Petzschner (2012) Mike Bryan
Mike Bryan
/ Bob Bryan (2013) Leander Paes
Leander Paes
/ Radek Štěpánek (2014) Mike Bryan
Mike Bryan
/ Bob Bryan (2015) Pierre-Hugues Herbert
Pierre-Hugues Herbert
/ Nicolas Mahut (2016) Jamie Murray
Jamie Murray
/ Bruno Soares (2017) Jean-Julien Rojer
Jean-Julien Rojer
/ Horia Tecău

v t e

WCT year end championship winners singles

(1971) Ken Rosewall (1972) Ken Rosewall (1973) Stan Smith (1974) John Newcombe (1975) Arthur Ashe (1976) Björn Borg (1977) Jimmy Connors (1978) Vitas Gerulaitis (1979) John McEnroe (1980) Jimmy Connors (1981) John McEnroe (1982) Ivan Lendl (1983) John McEnroe (1984) John McEnroe (1985) Ivan Lendl (1986) Anders Järryd (1987) Miloslav Mečíř (1988) Boris Becker (1989) John McEnroe

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 116884701 LCCN: n50047433 NDL: 00454690 SN

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