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John the Baptist
John the Baptist
(Hebrew: יוחנן המטביל‎, Ancient Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτιστής, Iōánnēs ho baptistḗs or Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτίζων, Iōánnēs ho baptízōn,[5][6][7][8][9], Coptic: ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ ⲡⲓⲡⲣⲟⲇⲣⲟⲙⲟⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ ⲡⲓⲣϥϯⲱⲙⲥ[10], Arabic: يحيى‎, translit. Yaḥyā[11]) was a Jewish
Jewish
itinerant preacher[12] in the early first century AD. John is revered as a major religious figure[13] in Christianity, Islam, the Bahá'í Faith,[14] and Mandaeism. He is called a prophet by all of these traditions, and is honored as a saint in many Christian
Christian
traditions. Other titles for John include John the Forerunner in Eastern Christianity
Christianity
and "the prophet John" (Yaḥyā) in Islam. To clarify the meaning of "Baptist", he is sometimes alternatively called John the Baptizer.[15][16][17] John used baptism as the central symbol or sacrament[18] of his messianic movement. Most scholars agree that John baptized Jesus.[19][20] Some scholars believe Jesus
Jesus
was a follower or disciple of John.[21][22][23] This idea is strongly controverted, however, by John the Baptist's own words in scripture, although several New Testament accounts report that some of Jesus' early followers had previously been followers of John.[24] John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is also mentioned by the Jewish
Jewish
historian Josephus.[25] Some scholars maintain that John was influenced by the semi-ascetic Essenes, who expected an apocalypse and practiced rituals corresponding strongly with baptism,[26] although no direct evidence substantiates this.[27] According to the New Testament, John anticipated a messianic figure greater than himself.[28] Christians commonly refer to John as the precursor or forerunner of Jesus,[29] since John announces Jesus' coming. John is also identified as the spiritual successor of the prophet Elijah.[30]

Contents

1 Gospel
Gospel
narratives

1.1 In Mark 1.2 In Matthew 1.3 In Luke and Acts 1.4 In the Gospel
Gospel
of John 1.5 Comparative analysis

2 In Josephus's Antiquities of the Jews 3 Relics 4 Religious views

4.1 Christianity

4.1.1 Influence on Paul 4.1.2 Catholic Church 4.1.3 Eastern Christianity 4.1.4 The Church of Jesus
Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints

4.2 Gnosticism

4.2.1 Syrian-Egyptian Gnosticism 4.2.2 Mandaeans

4.3 Islam

4.3.1 Qur'an 4.3.2 Name

4.4 Bahá'í view 4.5 Unification Church

5 In art

5.1 In poetry 5.2 In music 5.3 In film and television

6 Commemoration 7 See also 8 References

8.1 Citations 8.2 Sources

9 External links

Gospel
Gospel
narratives[edit] See also: Baptism
Baptism
of Jesus
Jesus
and Beheading of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is mentioned in all four canonical Gospels and the non-canonical Gospel
Gospel
of the Nazarenes. The Synoptic Gospels
Synoptic Gospels
(Mark, Matthew, and Luke) describe John baptising Jesus; in the Gospel
Gospel
of John it is implied in John 1:32–1:34. In Mark[edit]

The Preaching of St. John the Baptist
John the Baptist
by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

The Gospel
Gospel
of Mark introduces John as a fulfilment of a prophecy from the Book of Isaiah
Book of Isaiah
(in fact, a conflation of texts from Isaiah, Malachi
Malachi
and Exodus)[31] about a messenger being sent ahead, and a voice crying out in the wilderness. John is described as wearing clothes of camel's hair, living on locusts and wild honey. John proclaims baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sin, and says another will come after him who will not baptize with water, but with the Holy Spirit. Jesus
Jesus
comes to John, and is baptized by him in the river Jordan. The account describes how; as he emerges from the water, the heavens open and the Holy Spirit descends on him 'like a dove'. A voice from heaven then says, "You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased." (Mark 1:1–8) Later in the gospel there is an account of John's death. It is introduced by an incident where the Tetrarch Herod Antipas, hearing stories about Jesus, imagines that this is John the Baptist
John the Baptist
raised from the dead. It then explains that John had rebuked Herod for marrying Herodias, the ex-wife of his brother (named here as Philip). Herodias
Herodias
demands his execution, but Herod, who 'liked to listen' to John, is reluctant to do so because he fears him, knowing he is a 'righteous and holy man'. The account then describes how Herod's daughter Herodias
Herodias
(NRSV; other translations refer to the girl as the daughter of Herodias) dances before Herod, who is pleased and offers her anything she asks for in return. When the girl asks her mother what she should request, she is told to demand the head of John the Baptist. Reluctantly, Herod orders the beheading of John, and his head is delivered to her, at her request, on a plate. John's disciples take the body away and bury it in a tomb.(Mark 6:17–29) There are a number of difficulties with this passage. The Gospel wrongly identifies Antipas as 'King'[32] and the ex-husband of Herodias
Herodias
is named as Philip, but he is known to have been called Herod.[33] Although the wording clearly implies the girl was the daughter of Herodias, many texts describe her as "Herod's daughter, Herodias". Since these texts are early and significant and the reading is 'difficult', many scholars see this as the original version, corrected in later versions and in Matthew and Luke.[33][34][35] Josephus says that Herodias
Herodias
had a daughter by the name of Salome. Scholars have speculated about the origins of the story. Since it shows signs of having been composed in Aramaic, which Mark apparently did not speak, he is likely to have got it from a Palestinian source.[36] There is a variety of opinions about how much actual historical material it contains, especially given the alleged factual errors.[37] Many scholars have seen the story of John arrested, executed, and buried in a tomb as a conscious foreshadowing of the fate of Jesus.[38]

John the Baptist
John the Baptist
in The Gospel
Gospel
of Mark

John and his baptism of Jesus
Jesus
(Mark 1)

As it is written in Isaiah
Isaiah
the prophet, "Behold, I send my messenger before your face, who will prepare your way, the voice of one crying in the wilderness: ‘Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight,’" John appeared, baptizing in the wilderness and proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. And all the country of Judea and all Jerusalem
Jerusalem
were going out to him and were being baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins. Now John was clothed with camel’s hair and wore a leather belt around his waist and ate locusts and wild honey. And he preached, saying, "After me comes he who is mightier than I, the strap of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and untie. I have baptized you with water, but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit." In those days Jesus
Jesus
came from Nazareth of Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. And when he came up out of the water, immediately he saw the heavens being torn open and the Spirit descending on him like a dove. And a voice came from heaven, "You are my beloved Son, with you I am well pleased."

Death of John (Mark 6)

King Herod heard of it, for Jesus’ name had become known. Some said, " John the Baptist
John the Baptist
has been raised from the dead. That is why these miraculous powers are at work in him." But others said, "He is Elijah." And others said, "He is a prophet, like one of the prophets of old." But when Herod heard of it, he said, "John, whom I beheaded, has been raised." For it was Herod who had sent and seized John and bound him in prison for the sake of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because he had married her. For John had been saying to Herod, "It is not lawful for you to have your brother’s wife." And Herodias had a grudge against him and wanted to put him to death. But she could not, for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and he kept him safe. When he heard him, he was greatly perplexed, and yet he heard him gladly. But an opportunity came when Herod on his birthday gave a banquet for his nobles and military commanders and the leading men of Galilee. For when Herodias’s daughter came in and danced, she pleased Herod and his guests. And the king said to the girl, "Ask me for whatever you wish, and I will give it to you." And he vowed to her, "Whatever you ask me, I will give you, up to half of my kingdom." And she went out and said to her mother, "For what should I ask?" And she said, "The head of John the Baptist." And she came in immediately with haste to the king and asked, saying, "I want you to give me at once the head of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
on a platter." And the king was exceedingly sorry, but because of his oaths and his guests he did not want to break his word to her. And immediately the king sent an executioner with orders to bring John’s head. He went and beheaded him in the prison and brought his head on a platter and gave it to the girl, and the girl gave it to her mother. When his disciples heard of it, they came and took his body and laid it in a tomb. (English Standard Version)

In Matthew[edit]

St. John the Baptist
John the Baptist
Preaching, c. 1665, by Mattia Preti

The Gospel
Gospel
of Matthew account begins with the same modified quotation from Isaiah,[39] moving the Malachi
Malachi
and Exodus material to later in the text, where it is quoted by Jesus.[40] The description of John is taken directly from Mark ("clothing of camel’s hair with a leather belt around his waist, and his food was locusts and wild honey"), along with the proclamation that one was coming who would baptise with the Holy Spirit "and fire".(Matthew 3:1–12) Unlike Mark, Matthew describes John as critical of Pharisees
Pharisees
and Sadducees
Sadducees
and as preaching "the kingdom of heaven is at hand" and a "coming judgment". Matthew shortens the account of the beheading of John, and adds two elements: that Herod Antipas
Herod Antipas
wants John dead, and that the death is reported to Jesus
Jesus
by his disciples.[41] Matthew's approach is to shift the focus away from Herod and onto John as a prototype of Jesus. Where Mark has Herod killing John reluctantly and at Herodias' insistence, Matthew describes him as wanting John dead.[42]

John the Baptist
John the Baptist
in the Gospel
Gospel
of Matthew

John and his baptism of Jesus
Jesus
(Matthew 3)

In those days John the Baptist
John the Baptist
came preaching in the wilderness of Judea, "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand." For this is he who was spoken of by the prophet Isaiah
Isaiah
when he said, "The voice of one crying in the wilderness: ‘Prepare the way of the Lord; make his paths straight.’" Now John wore a garment of camel’s hair and a leather belt around his waist, and his food was locusts and wild honey. Then Jerusalem
Jerusalem
and all Judea and all the region about the Jordan
Jordan
were going out to him, and they were baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins. But when he saw many of the Pharisees
Pharisees
and Sadducees
Sadducees
coming to his baptism, he said to them, "You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come? Bear fruit in keeping with repentance. And do not presume to say to yourselves, ‘We have Abraham
Abraham
as our father,’ for I tell you, God
God
is able from these stones to raise up children for Abraham. Even now the axe is laid to the root of the trees. Every tree therefore that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. "I baptize you with water for repentance, but he who is coming after me is mightier than I, whose sandals I am not worthy to carry. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. His winnowing fork is in his hand, and he will clear his threshing floor and gather his wheat into the barn, but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire." Then Jesus
Jesus
came from Galilee to the Jordan
Jordan
to John, to be baptized by him. John would have prevented him, saying, "I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?" But Jesus
Jesus
answered him, "Let it be so now, for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness." Then he consented. And when Jesus
Jesus
was baptized, immediately he went up from the water, and behold, the heavens were opened to him, and he saw the Spirit of God
God
descending like a dove and coming to rest on him; and behold, a voice from heaven said, "This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased."

John questions Jesus
Jesus
(Matthew 11)

Now when John heard in prison about the deeds of the Christ, he sent word by his disciples and said to him, "Are you the one who is to come, or shall we look for another?" And Jesus
Jesus
answered them, "Go and tell John what you hear and see: the blind receive their sight and the lame walk, lepers are cleansed and the deaf hear, and the dead are raised up, and the poor have good news preached to them. And blessed is the one who is not offended by me." As they went away, Jesus
Jesus
began to speak to the crowds concerning John: "What did you go out into the wilderness to see? A reed shaken by the wind? What then did you go out to see? A man dressed in soft clothing? Behold, those who wear soft clothing are in kings’ houses. What then did you go out to see? A prophet? Yes, I tell you, and more than a prophet. This is he of whom it is written, "‘Behold, I send my messenger before your face, who will prepare your way before you.’ Truly, I say to you, among those born of women there has arisen no one greater than John the Baptist. Yet the one who is least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he. From the days of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
until now the kingdom of heaven has suffered violence, and the violent take it by force. For all the Prophets and the Law prophesied until John, and if you are willing to accept it, he is Elijah
Elijah
who is to come. He who has ears to hear, let him hear. "But to what shall I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the marketplaces and calling to their playmates, "‘We played the flute for you, and you did not dance; we sang a dirge, and you did not mourn.’ For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon.’ The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Look at him! A glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’ Yet wisdom is justified by her deeds."

Death of John (Matthew 14)

At that time Herod the tetrarch heard about the fame of Jesus, and he said to his servants, "This is John the Baptist. He has been raised from the dead; that is why these miraculous powers are at work in him." For Herod had seized John and bound him and put him in prison for the sake of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because John had been saying to him, "It is not lawful for you to have her." And though he wanted to put him to death, he feared the people, because they held him to be a prophet. But when Herod’s birthday came, the daughter of Herodias
Herodias
danced before the company and pleased Herod, so that he promised with an oath to give her whatever she might ask. Prompted by her mother, she said, "Give me the head of John the Baptist here on a platter." And the king was sorry, but because of his oaths and his guests he commanded it to be given. He sent and had John beheaded in the prison, and his head was brought on a platter and given to the girl, and she brought it to her mother. And his disciples came and took the body and buried it, and they went and told Jesus. (English Standard Version)

In Luke and Acts[edit] Main article: Nativity of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist

John the Baptist
John the Baptist
(right) with child Jesus, in the painting The Holy Children with a Shell by Bartolomé Esteban Perez Murillo

The Gospel
Gospel
of Luke adds an account of John's infancy, introducing him as the miraculous son of Zechariah, an old man, and his wife Elizabeth, who was past the menopause and therefore unable to have children.[43][44] According to this account, the birth of John was foretold by the angel Gabriel
Gabriel
to Zechariah, while he was performing his functions as a priest in the temple of Jerusalem. Since he is described as a priest of the course of Abijah and Elizabeth as one of the daughters of Aaron,[45] this would make John a descendant of Aaron on both his father's and mother's side.[46] On the basis of this account, the Catholic as well as the Anglican and Lutheran liturgical calendars placed the feast of the Nativity of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
on June 24, six months before Christmas.[47] Elizabeth is described as a "relative" of Mary, the mother of Jesus
Jesus
in Luke 1:36. There is no mention of a family relationship between John and Jesus
Jesus
in the other Gospels, and Raymond E. Brown has described it as "of dubious historicity".[48] Géza Vermes has called it "artificial and undoubtedly Luke's creation".[49] The many similarities between the Gospel
Gospel
of Luke story of the birth of John and the Old Testament
Old Testament
account of the birth of Samuel
Samuel
suggest that Luke's account of the annunciation and birth of Jesus
Jesus
are modeled on that of Samuel.[50]

Post-nativity

Unique to the Gospel
Gospel
of Luke, John the Baptist
John the Baptist
explicitly teaches charity, baptizes tax-collectors, and advises soldiers. The text briefly mentions that John is imprisoned and later beheaded by Herod, but the Gospel
Gospel
of Luke lacks the story of a step-daughter dancing for Herod and requesting John's head. The Book of Acts
Book of Acts
portrays some disciples of John becoming followers of Jesus
Jesus
Acts 18:24–19:6 a development not reported by the gospels except for the early case of Andrew, Simon Peter's brother John 1:35–42

John the Baptist
John the Baptist
in the Gospel
Gospel
of Luke and Acts

Nativity of John (Luke 1)

In the reign of Herod, king of Judea, there was a priest named Zechariah, who belonged to the division called after Abijah. His wife, whose name was Elizabeth, was also a descendant of Aaron. They were both righteous people, who lived blameless lives, guiding their steps by all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord. But they had no child, Elizabeth being barren; and both of them were advanced in years. One day, when Zechariah was officiating as priest before God, during the turn of his division, it fell to him by lot, in accordance with the practice among the priests, to go into the Temple of the Lord and burn incense; and, as it was the Hour of Incense, the people were all praying outside. And an angel of the Lord appeared to him, standing on the right of the Altar of Incense. Zechariah was startled at the sight and was awe-struck. But the angel said to him: "Do not be afraid, Zechariah; your prayer has been heard, and your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, whom you will call by the name John. He will be to you a joy and a delight; and many will rejoice over his birth. For he will be great in the sight of the Lord; he will not drink any wine or strong drink, and he will be filled with the Holy Spirit from the very hour of his birth, and will reconcile many of the Israelites
Israelites
to the Lord their God. He will go before him in the spirit and with the power of Elijah, ‘to reconcile fathers to their children’ and the disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous, and so make ready for the Lord a people prepared for him." "How can I be sure of this?" Zechariah asked the angel. "For I am an old man and my wife is advanced in years." "I am Gabriel," the angel answered, "who stand in the presence of God, and I have been sent to speak to you and to bring you this good news. And now you will be silent and unable to speak until the day when this takes place, because you did not believe what I said, though my words will be fulfilled in due course." Meanwhile, the people were watching for Zechariah, wondering at his remaining so long in the Temple. When he came out, he was unable to speak to them, and they perceived that he had seen a vision there. But Zechariah kept making signs to them, and remained dumb. And, as soon as his term of service was finished, he returned home. After this his wife, Elizabeth, became pregnant and lived in seclusion for five months. "The Lord has done this for me," she said, "he has shown me kindness and taken away the public disgrace of childlessness under which I have been living." Six months later the angel Gabriel
Gabriel
was sent from God
God
to a town in Galilee called Nazareth, to a maiden there who was engaged to a man named Joseph, a descendant of David. Her name was Mary. Gabriel
Gabriel
came into her presence and greeted her, saying: "You have been shown great favor – the Lord is with you." Mary was much disturbed at his words, and was wondering to herself what such a greeting could mean, when the angel spoke again: "Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found favor with God. And now, you will conceive and give birth to a son, and you will give him the name Jesus. The child will be great and will be called ‘Son of the Most High,’ and the Lord God
God
will give him the throne of his ancestor David, and he will reign over the descendants of Jacob
Jacob
for ever; And to his kingdom there will be no end." "How can this be?" Mary asked the angel. "For I have no husband." "The Holy Spirit will descend on you," answered the angel, "and the Power of the Most High will overshadow you; and therefore the child will be called ‘holy,’ and ‘Son of God.’ And Elizabeth, your cousin, is herself also expecting a son in her old age; and it is now the sixth month with her, though she is called barren; for no promise from God
God
will fail to be fulfilled." "I am the servant of the Lord," exclaimed Mary; "let it be with me as you have said." Then the angel left her. Soon after this Mary set out, and made her way quickly into the hill-country, to a town in Judah; and there she went into Zechariah’s house and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child moved within her, and Elizabeth herself was filled with the Holy Spirit, and cried aloud: "Blessed are you among women, and blessed is your unborn child! But how have I this honor, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? For, as soon as your greeting reached my ears, the child moved within me with delight! Happy indeed is she who believed that the promise which she received from the Lord would be fulfilled." And Mary said: "My soul exalts the Lord, my spirit delights in God
God
my Savior; for he has remembered his humble servant girl; And from this hour all ages will count me happy! Great things has the Almighty done for me; And holy is his name. From age to age his mercy rests On those who honor him. Mighty are the deeds of his arm; He scatters the proud with their own devices, he casts down princes from their thrones, and the humble he uplifts, the hungry he loads with gifts, and the rich he sends empty away. He has stretched out his hand to his servant Israel, Ever mindful of his mercy (As he promised to our forefathers) For Abraham
Abraham
and his race for ever." Mary stayed with Elizabeth about three months, and then returned to her home. When Elizabeth’s time came, she gave birth to a son; and her neighbors and relations, hearing of the great goodness of the Lord to her, came to share her joy. A week later they met to circumcise the child, and were about to call him ‘Zechariah’ after his father, when his mother spoke up: "No, he is to be called John." "You have no relation of that name!" they exclaimed; and they made signs to the child’s father, to find out what he wished the child to be called. Asking for a writing-tablet, he wrote the words – ‘His name is John.’ Everyone was surprised; and immediately Zechariah recovered his voice and the use of his tongue, and began to bless God. All their neighbors were awe-struck at this; and throughout the hill-country of Judea the whole story was much talked about; and all who heard it kept it in mind, asking one another – "What can this child be destined to become?" For the Power of the Lord was with him. Then his father Zechariah was filled with the Holy Spirit, and, speaking under inspiration, said: "Blessed is the Lord, the God
God
of Israel, Who has visited his people and wrought their deliverance, and has raised up for us the Strength of our salvation In the house of his servant David
David
– As he promised by the lips of his holy prophets of old – salvation from our enemies and from the hands of all who hate us, showing mercy to our forefathers, And mindful of his sacred covenant. This was the oath which he swore to our forefather Abraham
Abraham
– That we should be rescued from the hands of our enemies, and should serve him without fear in holiness and righteousness, In his presence all our days. And you, child, will be called prophet of the Most High, For you will go before the Lord to make ready his way, to give his people the knowledge of salvation In the forgiveness of their sins, through the tender mercy of our God, Whereby the Dawn will break on us from heaven, to give light to those who live in darkness and the shadow of death, And guide our feet into the way of peace." The child grew and became strong in spirit; and he lived in the Wilds until the time came for his appearance before Israel.

John and his baptism of Jesus, Imprisonment of John (Luke 3)

In the fifteenth year of the reign of the Emperor Tiberius, when Pontius Pilate
Pontius Pilate
was Governor of Judea, Herod Ruler of Galilee, his brother Philip Ruler of the territory comprising Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias Ruler of Abilene, and when Annas
Annas
and Caiaphas
Caiaphas
were high priests, a command from God
God
came to John, the son of Zechariah, while he was in the wilderness. And John went through the whole district of the Jordan, proclaiming baptism on repentance, for the forgiveness of sins. This was in fulfillment of what is said in the writings of the prophet Isaiah
Isaiah
– ‘The voice of one crying aloud in the wilderness: "Make ready the way of the Lord, Make his paths straight. Every chasm will be filled, Every mountain and hill will be leveled, The winding ways will be straightened, The rough roads made smooth, and everyone will see the salvation of God."’ And John said to the crowds that went to be baptized by him: "You children of snakes! Who has prompted you to seek refuge from the coming judgment? Let your lives, then, prove your repentance; and do not begin to say among yourselves ‘ Abraham
Abraham
is our ancestor,’ for I tell you that out of these stones God
God
is able to raise descendants for Abraham! Already, indeed, the axe is lying at the root of the trees. Therefore, every tree that fails to bear good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire." "What are we to do then?" the people asked. "Let anyone who has two coats," answered John, "share with the person who has none; and anyone who has food do the same." Even tax-gatherers came to be baptized, and said to John: "Teacher, what are we to do?" "Do not collect more than you have authority to demand," John answered. And when some soldiers on active service asked "And we – what are we to do?" he said: "Never use violence, or exact anything by false accusation; and be content with your pay." Then, while the people were in suspense, and were all debating with themselves whether John could be the Christ, John, addressing them all, said: "I, indeed, baptize you with water; but there is coming one more powerful than I, and I am not fit even to unfasten his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and with fire. His winnowing-fan is in his hand so that he may clear his threshing-floor, and store the grain in his barn, but the chaff he will burn with a fire that cannot be put out." And so with many different appeals John told his good news to the people. But Prince Herod, being rebuked by John respecting Herodias, the wife of Herod’s brother, and for all the evil things that he had done, crowned them all by shutting John up in prison. Now after the baptism of all the people, and when Jesus
Jesus
had been baptized and was still praying, the heavens opened, and the Holy Spirit came down on him in the form of a dove, and from the heavens came a voice – "You are my dearly loved son; you bring me great joy."

John's disciples and fast (Luke 5 33)

"John’s disciples," they said to Jesus, "Often fast and say prayers, and so do the disciples of the Pharisees, while yours are eating and drinking!"

John questions Jesus
Jesus
(Luke 7)

All these events were reported to John by his disciples. So he summoned two of them, and sent them to the Master to ask – "Are you ‘the coming one,’ or are we to look for some one else?" When these men found Jesus, they said: " John the Baptist
John the Baptist
has sent us to you to ask – ‘Are you ‘the coming one,’ or are we to look for somebody else?’" At that very time Jesus
Jesus
had cured many people of diseases, afflictions, and wicked spirits, and had given many blind people their sight. So his answer to the question was: "Go and report to John what you have witnessed and heard – the blind recover their sight, the lame walk, the lepers are made clean, and the deaf hear, the dead are raised to life, the good news is told to the poor. And blessed is the person who finds no hindrance in me." When John’s messengers had left, Jesus, speaking to the crowds, began to say with reference to John: "What did you go out into the wilderness to look at? A reed waving in the wind? If not, what did you go out to see? A man dressed in rich clothing? Why, those who are accustomed to fine clothes and luxury live in royal palaces. What then did you go to see? A prophet? Yes, I tell you, and far more than a prophet. This is the man of whom scripture says – ‘I am sending my messenger ahead of you, and he will prepare your way before you.’ There is, I tell you, no one born of a woman who is greater than John; and yet the least in the kingdom of God
God
is greater than he." (All the people, when they heard this, and even the tax-gatherers, having accepted John’s baptism, acknowledged the justice of God. But the Pharisees
Pharisees
and the students of the law, having rejected John’s baptism, frustrated God’s purpose in regard to them.)

In the Gospel
Gospel
of John[edit] The fourth gospel describes John the Baptist
John the Baptist
as "a man sent from God" who "was not the light", but "came as a witness, to bear witness to the light, so that through him everyone might believe".[51] John clearly denies being the Christ or Elijah
Elijah
or 'the prophet', instead describing himself as the "voice of one crying in the wilderness".[52] Upon literary analysis, it is clear that John is the "testifier and confessor par excellence", particularly when compared to figures like Nicodemus.[53]

Matthias Grünewald, detail of the Isenheim Altarpiece

Jesus's baptism is implied but not depicted. Unlike the other gospels, it is John himself who testifies to seeing "the Spirit come down from heaven like a dove and rest on him". John explicitly announces that Jesus
Jesus
is the one "who baptizes with the Holy Spirit" and John even professes a "belief that he is the Son of God" and "the Lamb of God". The Gospel
Gospel
of John reports that Jesus' disciples were baptizing and that a debate broke out between some of the disciples of John and another Jew about purification.[54] In this debate John argued that Jesus
Jesus
"must become greater," while he (John) "must become less"[55] ( Latin
Latin
Vulgate: illum oportet crescere me autem minui). The Gospel
Gospel
of John then points out that Jesus' disciples were baptizing more people than John.[56] Later, the Gospel
Gospel
relates that Jesus
Jesus
regarded John as "a burning and shining lamp, and you were willing to rejoice for a while in his light".[57]

John the Baptist
John the Baptist
in the Gospel
Gospel
of John

John 1

There appeared a man sent from God, whose name was John; he came as a witness – to bear witness to the light so that through him everyone might believe. He was not the light, but he came to bear witness to the light. When the religious authorities in Jerusalem
Jerusalem
sent some Priests and Levites to ask John – "Who are you?", he told them clearly and simply: "I am not the Christ." "What then?" they asked. "Are you Elijah?" "No," he said, "I am not." "Are you ‘the prophet’?" He answered, "No." "Who then are you?" they continued; "tell us so that we have an answer to give to those who have sent us. What do you say about yourself?" "I," he answered, "am – ‘The voice of one crying aloud in the wilderness – "make a straight road for the Lord"’, as the prophet Isaiah
Isaiah
said." These men had been sent from the Pharisees; and their next question was: "Why then do you baptize, if you are not the Christ or Elijah
Elijah
or ‘the prophet’?" John’s answer was – "I baptize with water, but among you stands one whom you do not know; he is coming after me, yet I am not worthy even to unfasten his sandal." This happened at Bethany, across the Jordan, where John was baptizing. The next day John saw Jesus
Jesus
coming towards him, and exclaimed: "Here is the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world! I was taking about him when I said ‘After me there is coming a man who ranks ahead of me, because before I was born he already was.’ I did not know who he was, but I have come baptizing with water to make him known to Israel." John also said: "I saw the Spirit come down from heaven like a dove and rest on him. I myself did not know him, but he who sent me to baptize with water, he said to me ‘He on whom you see the Spirit descending, and remaining on him – he it is who baptizes with the Holy Spirit.’ This I have seen myself, and I have declared my belief that he is the Son of God." The next day, when John was standing with two of his disciples, he looked at Jesus
Jesus
as he passed and exclaimed: "There is the Lamb of God!" The two disciples heard him say this, and followed Jesus.

John 3

John, also, was baptizing at Aenon near Salim, because there were many streams there; and people were constantly coming and being baptized. (For John had not yet been imprisoned). Now a discussion arose between some of John’s disciples and a fellow Jew on the subject of ‘purification;’ and the disciples came to John and said: "Rabbi, the man who was with you on the other side of the Jordan, and to whom you have yourself borne testimony – he, also, is baptizing, and everybody is going to him." John’s answer was – "A person can gain nothing but what is given them from heaven. You are yourselves witnesses that I said ‘I am not the Christ,’ but ‘I have been sent before him as a messenger.’ It is the groom who has the bride; but the groom’s friend, who stands by and listens to him, is filled with joy when he hears the groom’s voice. This joy I have felt to the full. He must become greater, and I less." He who comes from above is above all others; but a child of earth is earthly, and his teaching is earthly, too. He who comes from heaven is above all others. He states what he has seen and what he heard, and yet no one accepts his statement. They who did accept his statement confirm the fact that God
God
is true. For he whom God
God
sent as his messenger gives us God’s own teaching, for God
God
does not limit the gift of the Spirit. The Father loves his Son, and has put everything in his hands. The person who believes in the Son has eternal life, while a person who rejects the Son will not even see that life, but remains under ‘God’s displeasure.’

Comparative analysis[edit] Simon J. Joseph
Joseph
has argued that the Gospel
Gospel
demotes the historical John by painting him only as a prophetic forerunner to Jesus
Jesus
whereas his ministry actually complemented Jesus'.[58]

The prophecy of Isaiah

Although Mark's Gospel
Gospel
implies that the arrival of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is the fulfilment of a prophecy from the Book of Isaiah, the words quoted ("I will send my messenger ahead of you, who will prepare your way – a voice of one calling in the wilderness, ‘Prepare the way for the Lord, make straight paths for him.’") are actually a composite of texts from Isaiah, Malachi
Malachi
and the Book of Exodus. (Matthew and Luke drop the first part of the reference.)[31]

Baptism
Baptism
of Jesus

The gospels differ on the details of the Baptism. In Mark and Luke, Jesus
Jesus
himself sees the heavens open and hears a voice address him personally, saying, "You are my dearly loved son; you bring me great joy". They do not clarify whether others saw and heard these things. Although other incidents where the "voice came out of heaven" are recorded in which, for the sake of the crowds, it was heard audibly, John did say in his witness that he did see the spirit coming down "out of heaven". John 12:28–30, John 1:32 In Matthew, the voice from heaven does not address Jesus
Jesus
personally, saying instead "This is my beloved son, in whom I am well pleased." In the Gospel
Gospel
of John, John the Baptist
John the Baptist
himself sees the spirit descend as a dove, testifying about the experience as evidence of Jesus's status.

John's knowledge of Jesus

John's knowledge of Jesus
Jesus
varies across gospels. In the Gospel
Gospel
of Mark, John preaches of a coming leader, but shows no signs of recognizing that Jesus
Jesus
is this leader. In Matthew, however, John immediately recognizes Jesus
Jesus
and John questions his own worthiness to baptize Jesus. In both Matthew and Luke, John later dispatches disciples to question Jesus
Jesus
about his status, asking "Are you he who is to come, or shall we look for another?" In Luke, John is a familial relative of Jesus
Jesus
whose birth was foretold by Gabriel. In the Gospel of John, John the Baptist
John the Baptist
himself sees the spirit descend like a dove and he explicitly preaches that Jesus
Jesus
is the Son of God.

John and Elijah

See also: Matthew 3:4 The Gospels vary in their depiction of John's relationship to Elijah. Matthew and Mark describe John's attire in a way reminiscent of the description of Elijah
Elijah
in 2 Kings 1:8, who also wore a garment of hair and a leather belt. In Matthew, Jesus
Jesus
explicitly teaches that John is " Elijah
Elijah
who was to come" (Matt. 11:14 – see also Matt. 17:11–13); many Christian
Christian
theologians have taken this to mean that John was Elijah's successor. In the Gospel
Gospel
of John, John the Baptist
John the Baptist
explicitly denies being Elijah.[59] In the annunciation narrative in Luke, an angel appears to Zechariah, John's father, and tells him that John "will turn many of the sons of Israel
Israel
to the Lord their God," and that he will go forth "in the spirit and power of Elijah
Elijah
(Luke 1:16–17)." In Josephus's Antiquities of the Jews[edit] An account of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is found in all extant manuscripts of the Antiquities of the Jews
Antiquities of the Jews
(book 18, chapter 5, 2) by Flavius Josephus (37–100):[60]

Now some of the Jews
Jews
thought that the destruction of Herod's [Antipas’s] army came from God, and that very justly, as a punishment of what he did against John, that was called the Baptist: for Herod slew him, who was a good man, and commanded the Jews
Jews
to exercise virtue, both as to righteousness towards one another, and piety towards God, and so to come to baptism; for that the washing [with water] would be acceptable to him, if they made use of it, not in order to the putting away [or the remission] of some sins [only], but for the purification of the body; supposing still that the soul was thoroughly purified beforehand by righteousness. Now when [many] others came in crowds about him, for they were very greatly moved [or pleased] by hearing his words, Herod, who feared lest the great influence John had over the people might put it into his power and inclination to raise a rebellion, (for they seemed ready to do any thing he should advise,) thought it best, by putting him to death, to prevent any mischief he might cause, and not bring himself into difficulties, by sparing a man who might make him repent of it when it would be too late. Accordingly he was sent a prisoner, out of Herod's suspicious temper, to Macherus, the castle I before mentioned, and was there put to death. Now the Jews
Jews
had an opinion that the destruction of this army was sent as a punishment upon Herod, and a mark of God's displeasure to him.[61]

According to this passage, the execution of John was blamed for the defeat Herod suffered. Some have claimed that this passage indicates that John died near the time of the destruction of Herod's army in 36 AD. However, in a different passage, Josephus states that the end of Herod's marriage with Aretas' daughter (after which John was killed) was only the beginning of hostilities between Herod and Aretas, which later escalated into the battle.[62] Divergences between the passage's presentation and the biblical accounts of John include baptism for those whose souls have already been "purified beforehand by righteousness" is for purification of the body, not general repentance of sin (Mark 1:4).[63] Biblical
Biblical
scholar John Dominic Crossan
John Dominic Crossan
differentiates between Josephus's account of John and Jesus, saying, "John had a monopoly, but Jesus
Jesus
had a franchise." To get baptized, Crossan writes, you went only to John; to stop the movement one only needed to stop John (therefore his movement ended with his death). Jesus
Jesus
invited all to come and see how he and his companions had already accepted the government of God, entered it and were living it. Such a communal praxis was not just for himself, but could survive without him, unlike John's movement.[64] Relics[edit] See also: Beheading of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
§ Relics

Nabi Yahya Mosque, the traditional burial site in Sebastia, near Nablus, the West Bank, the Levant.

Matthew 14:12 records that "his disciples came and took away [John's] body and buried it". Theologian Joseph Benson
Joseph Benson
refers to a belief that "it seems that [the body] had been thrown over the prison walls, without burial, probably by order of Herodias.[65] The burial-place of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
was traditionally said to be at the Nabi Yahya Mosque
Nabi Yahya Mosque
( Saint
Saint
John the Baptiste Mosque) in Sebaste in current Palestinian territories, and mention is made of his relics being honored there around the middle of the 4th century. The historians Rufinus and Theodoretus record that the shrine was desecrated under Julian the Apostate
Julian the Apostate
around 362, the bones being partly burned. A portion of the rescued relics were carried to Jerusalem, then to Alexandria, where on 27 May 395, they were laid in the basilica newly dedicated to the Forerunner on the former site of the temple of Serapis. The tomb at Sebaste continued, nevertheless, to be visited by pious pilgrims, and Saint
Saint
Jerome
Jerome
bears witness to miracles being worked there. What became of the head of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is difficult to determine. Nicephorus[66] and Symeon Metaphrastes say that Herodias
Herodias
had it buried in the fortress of Machaerus
Machaerus
(in accordance with Josephus). Other writers say that it was interred in Herod's palace at Jerusalem; there it was found during the reign of Constantine I, and thence secretly taken to Emesa
Emesa
where it was concealed, the place remaining unknown for years, until it was manifested by revelation in 453. However, the decapitation cloth of Saint
Saint
John is kept at the Aachen Cathedral. The Coptic Christian
Christian
Orthodox Church also claim to hold the relics of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist. These are to be found in a monastery in Lower Egypt
Egypt
between Cairo and Alexandria. It is possible, with permission from the monks, to see the original tomb where the remains were found.

Shrine
Shrine
of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
in the Umayyad Mosque.

Several different locations claim to possess the severed head of John the Baptist. The current official place for the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
is the Shrine
Shrine
of Saint
Saint
John the Baptiste (Nabi Yahya in Arabic) inside the Umayyad Mosque
Umayyad Mosque
in Damascus.[67] The place was visited by Pope
Pope
John Paul II in 2001 who "paused for a minute's silent meditation at the tomb of St John the Baptist".[68] Previous to that the catholic Church used to believe that it was kept in the San Silvestro in Capite
San Silvestro in Capite
in Rome;[69] and then that it was held by the Knights Templar
Knights Templar
at Amiens Cathedral in France (brought home by Wallon de Sarton from the Fourth Crusade in Constantinople), at Antioch
Antioch
in Turkey (fate uncertain). Other traditions assume that it was in Residenz Museum in Munich, Germany (official residence of the Wittelsbach
Wittelsbach
rulers of Bavaria from 1385 to 1918).[69] or even the parish church at Tenterden in Kent, where it was preserved up until the Reformation.

A Calcutta Armenian kisses the hand of a priest of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist, Chinsurah

The saint's right hand, with which he baptised Jesus, is claimed to be in the Serbian Orthodox Cetinje monastery
Cetinje monastery
in Montenegro; Topkapi Palace in Istanbul;[69] and also in the Romanian skete of the Forerunner on Mount Athos. The saint's left hand is allegedly preserved in the Armenian Apostolic Church of St. John at Chinsurah, West Bengal, where each year on " Chinsurah
Chinsurah
Day" in January it blesses the Armenian Christians of Calcutta.[70] A crypt and relics said to be John's and mentioned in 11th- and 16th-century manuscripts, were discovered in 1969 during restoration of the Church of St. Macarius at the Monastery
Monastery
of Saint
Saint
Macarius the Great in Scetes, Egypt;[71] Additional relics are claimed to reside in Gandzasar Monastery's Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, in Nagorno Karabakh.

Another obscure claim relates to the town of Halifax in West Yorkshire, United Kingdom, where, as patron saint of the town, the Baptist's head appears on the official coat-of-arms.[72] One legend (among others) bases the etymology of the town's place-name on "halig" (holy) and "fax" (face), claiming that a relic of the head, or face, of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
once existed in the town.[73] Also, in 2010, bones were discovered in the ruins of a Bulgarian church in the St. John the Forerunner Monastery
Monastery
(4th–17th centuries) on the Black Sea
Black Sea
island of St. Ivan and two years later, after DNA and radio carbon testing proved the bones belonged to a Middle Eastern man who lived in the 1st century AD, scientists said that the remains could conceivably have belonged to John the Baptist.[74][75] The remains, found in a reliquarium are presently kept in the Sts. Cyril and Methodius Cathedral in Sozopol.[74][76] Religious views[edit] Christianity[edit]

John the Baptist, by Juan de Juanes (es), c. 1560

John the Baptist, Archbasilica of St. John Lateran, Rome

Christians believe that John the Baptist
John the Baptist
had a specific role ordained by God
God
as forerunner or precursor of Jesus, who was the foretold Messiah. The New Testament
New Testament
Gospels speak of this role. In Luke 1:17 the role of John is referred to as being "to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; to make ready a people prepared for the Lord." In Luke 1:76 as "...thou shalt go before the face of the Lord to prepare his ways" and in Luke 1:77 as being "To give knowledge of salvation unto his people by the remission of their sins." There are several passages within the Old Testament
Old Testament
which are interpreted by Christians as being prophetic of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
in this role. These include a passage in the Book of Malachi
Book of Malachi
(Malachi 3:1) that refers to a prophet who would prepare the way of the Lord:

"Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me: and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts." — Malachi
Malachi
3:1[77]

and also at the end of the next chapter in Malachi
Malachi
4:5–6 where it says,

"Behold, I will send you Elijah
Elijah
the prophet before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the LORD: And he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse."

The Jews
Jews
of Jesus' day expected Elijah
Elijah
to come before the Messiah; indeed, some present day Jews
Jews
continue to await Elijah's coming as well, as in the Cup of Elijah
Elijah
the Prophet
Prophet
in the Passover Seder. This is why the disciples ask Jesus
Jesus
in Matthew 17:10, 'Why then say the scribes that Elias must first come?' The disciples are then told by Jesus
Jesus
that Elijah
Elijah
came in the person of John the Baptist,

" Jesus
Jesus
replied, "To be sure, Elijah
Elijah
comes and will restore all things. But I tell you, Elijah
Elijah
has already come, and they did not recognize him, but have done to him everything they wished. In the same way the Son of Man is going to suffer at their hands." Then the disciples understood that he was talking to them about John the Baptist". — Matthew 17:11–13

(see also 11:14: "...if you are willing to accept it, he is Elijah
Elijah
who was to come.") These passages are applied to John in the Synoptic Gospels.[78][79][80] But where Matthew specifically identifies John the Baptist as Elijah's spiritual successor (Matthew 11.14, 17.13), the gospels of Mark and Luke are silent on the matter. The Gospel
Gospel
of John states that John the Baptist
John the Baptist
denied that he was Elijah.

"Now this was John's testimony when the Jews
Jews
of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
sent priests and Levites to ask him who he was. He did not deny, but confessed freely, "I am not the Christ." They asked him, "Then who are you? Are you Elijah?" He said, "I am not." "Are you the Prophet?" He answered, "No." — John 1:19–21

Influence on Paul[edit] Many scholars believe there was contact between the early church in the Apostolic Age
Apostolic Age
and what is called the "Qumran-Essene community".[81] The Dead Sea Scrolls
Dead Sea Scrolls
were found at Qumran, which the majority of historians and archaeologists identify as an Essene settlement.[82] John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is thought to have been either an Essene
Essene
or "associated" with the community at Khirbet Qumran. According to the Book of Acts, Paul met some "disciples of John" in Ephesus.[83] Due to influence of Qumranic terminology and ideas in Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians, some scholars believe that the "disciples" mentioned in Acts 19:1–7 were disciples of John the Baptist.[dubious – discuss] This view, which assumes that John was an Essene[dubious – discuss], is debated by scholars. While John the Baptist
John the Baptist
practiced baptism, the Essenes
Essenes
used ritual washing, also called ablution, as a form of spiritual purification.[81] Catholic Church[edit]

A 'Head of St John', in Rome

Tomb of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
at a Coptic monastery in Lower Egypt. The bones of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
were said to have been found here.

The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
commemorates Saint
Saint
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
on two feast days:

24 June – Nativity of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist 29 August – Beheading of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist

Some Catholics have held to a belief that John the Baptist
John the Baptist
never sinned,[citation needed] although this has never been a point of doctrine[citation needed] and is not binding in belief upon any adherent as is the sinlessness of Mary.[citation needed] In her Treatise of Prayer, Saint
Saint
Catherine of Siena
Catherine of Siena
includes a brief altercation with the Devil
Devil
regarding her fight due to the Devil attempting to lure her with vanity and flattery. Speaking in the first person, Catherine responds to the Devil
Devil
with the following words:

... humiliation of yourself, and you answered the Devil
Devil
with these words: 'Wretch that I am! John the Baptist
John the Baptist
never sinned and was sanctified in his mother's womb. And I have committed so many sins ... — Catherine of Siena, A Treatise of Prayer, 1370.[84][85]

Eastern Christianity[edit]

Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
icon John the Baptist
John the Baptist
– the Angel of the Desert (Stroganov School, 1620s) Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

The Eastern Catholic Churches
Eastern Catholic Churches
and Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
faithful believe that John was the last of the Old Testament
Old Testament
prophets, thus serving as a bridge between that period of revelation and the New Covenant. They also teach that, following his death, John descended into Hades and there once more preached that Jesus
Jesus
the Messiah
Messiah
was coming, so he was the Forerunner of Christ in death as he had been in life. Eastern Catholic and Orthodox churches will often have an icon of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist in a place of honor on the iconostasis, and he is frequently mentioned during the Divine Services. Every Tuesday throughout the year is dedicated to his memory. The Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
remembers Saint
Saint
John the Forerunner on six separate feast days, listed here in order in which they occur during the church year (which begins on September 1):

23 September – Conception of Saint
Saint
John the Forerunner[86] 7 January – The Synaxis
Synaxis
of Saint
Saint
John the Forerunner. This is his main ml day, immediately after Theophany on January 6 (January 7 also commemorates the transfer of the relic of the right hand of John the Baptist from Antioch
Antioch
to Constantinople
Constantinople
in 956) 24 February – First and Second Finding of the Head of Saint
Saint
John the Forerunner 25 May – Third Finding of the Head of Saint
Saint
John the Forerunner 24 June – Nativity of Saint
Saint
John the Forerunner 29 August – The Beheading of Saint
Saint
John the Forerunner, a day of strict fast and abstinence from meat and dairy products and foods containing meat or dairy products

In addition to the above, 5 September is the commemoration of Zechariah and Elizabeth, Saint
Saint
John's parents. The Russian Orthodox Church observes 12 October as the Transfer of the Right Hand of the Forerunner from Malta
Malta
to Gatchina
Gatchina
(1799). The Church of Jesus
Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints[edit] The Church of Jesus
Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) teaches that modern revelation confirms the biblical account of John and also makes known additional events in his ministry. According to this belief, John was "ordained by the angel of God" when he was eight days old "to overthrow the kingdom of the Jews" and to prepare a people for the Lord. Mormons also believe that "he was baptized while yet in his childhood."[87] Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
said: "Let us come into New Testament
New Testament
times – so many are ever praising the Lord and His apostles. We will commence with John the Baptist. When Herod's edict went forth to destroy the young children, John was about six months older than Jesus, and came under this hellish edict, and Zecharias caused his mother to take him into the mountains, where he was raised on locusts and wild honey. When his father refused to disclose his hiding place, and being the officiating high priest at the Temple that year, was slain by Herod's order, between the porch and the altar, as Jesus
Jesus
said."[88][89] The LDS Church teaches that John the Baptist
John the Baptist
appeared on the banks of the Susquehanna River
Susquehanna River
near Harmony Township, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania as a resurrected being to Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
and Oliver Cowdery on May 15, 1829, and ordained them to the Aaronic Priesthood.[90][91] According to LDS doctrine, John's ministry has operated in three dispensations: he was the last of the prophets under the law of Moses; he was the first of the New Testament
New Testament
prophets; and he was sent to confirm the Aaronic Priesthood in our day (the dispensation of the fulness of times). Mormons believe John's ministry was foretold by two prophets whose teachings are included in the Book of Mormon: Lehi[92] and his son Nephi.[93][94] Gnosticism[edit] In Gnosticism, John the Baptist
John the Baptist
was a "personification" of the Old Testament prophet Elijah. Elijah
Elijah
did not know the True God
God
(as opposed to the Abrahamic God), and thus had to be reincarnated in Gnostic theology. As predicted by the Old Testament
Old Testament
prophet Malachi, Elijah must "come first" to herald the coming of Jesus
Jesus
Christ. Modern anthroposophy concurs with the idea that the Baptist was a reincarnation of Elijah, (cf. Mark 9:11–13),[95] Matthew 11:13–14,[96] Luke 7:27[97] although the Gospel
Gospel
of John explicitly denies this (John 1:21).[98][99] Syrian-Egyptian Gnosticism[edit] Among the early Judeo- Christian
Christian
Gnostics the Ebionites
Ebionites
held that John, along with Jesus
Jesus
and James the Just
James the Just
– all of whom they revered – were vegetarians.[100][101][102][103][104][105] Epiphanius of Salamis records that this group had amended their Gospel
Gospel
of Matthew, known today as the Gospel
Gospel
of the Ebionites, to change where John eats "locusts" to read "honey cakes" or "manna".[106][107] Mandaeans[edit] John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is considered the chief prophet of the Mandaeans, and plays a large part in some of their writings,[108] including the Ginza Rba and the Draša D-Iahia (The Mandaean
Mandaean
Book of John). They view John as the only true Messiah, and are opposed to Jesus. The Mandaean scriptures state: "If the carpenter [Jesus] has joined together the god, who then has joined together the carpenter?"[109] Islam[edit]

Part of a series on Islam Islamic
Islamic
prophets

Prophets in the Quran Listed by Islamic
Islamic
name and Biblical
Biblical
name.

ʾĀdam (Adam) ʾIdrīs (Enoch) Nūḥ (Noah) Hūd (Eber) Ṣāliḥ
Ṣāliḥ
(Salah) ʾIbrāhīm (Abraham) Lūṭ (Lot) ʾIsmāʿīl (Ishmael) ʾIsḥāq (Isaac) Yaʿqūb (Jacob) Yūsuf (Joseph) Ayūb (Job) Dhul-Kifl
Dhul-Kifl
(Ezekiel) Shuʿayb (Jethro) Mūsā (Moses) Hārūn (Aaron) Dāūd (David) Sulaymān (Solomon) Yūnus (Jonah) ʾIlyās (Elijah) Alyasaʿ (Elisha) Zakarīya (Zechariah) Yaḥyā (John) ʿĪsā (Jesus) Muḥammad (Muhammad)

Main events

Stories of the Prophets The Three Messengers

Views

Jews, Christians and Muslims prophets Abrahamic prophets

Islam
Islam
portal

v t e

John is also honored as a Nabi (Arabic: نَـبِي‎, Prophet) as Yaḥyā ibn Zakarīyā (Arabic: يحيى بن زكريا‎), or "John, son of Zechariah". He is believed by Muslims to have been a witness to the word of God, and a prophet who would herald the coming of Jesus.[110] His father Zechariah was also an Islamic
Islamic
prophet. Islamic
Islamic
tradition maintains that John was one of the prophets whom Muhammad
Muhammad
met on the night of the Mi'raj,[111] his ascension through the Seven Heavens. It is said that he met John and Jesus
Jesus
in the second heaven, where Muhammad
Muhammad
greeted his two brothers before ascending with archangel Gabriel
Gabriel
to the third heaven. John's story was also told to the Abyssinian king during the Muslim
Muslim
refugees' Migration to Abyssinia.[112] According to the Qur'an, John was one on whom God
God
sent peace on the day that he was born and the day that he died.[113] Qur'an[edit] In the Qur'an, God
God
frequently mentions Zechariah's continuous praying for the birth of a son. Zechariah's wife, mentioned in the New Testament as Elizabeth, was barren and therefore the birth of a child seemed impossible.[114] As a gift from God, Zechariah (or Zakaria) was given a son by the name of "Yaḥya", a name specially chosen for this child alone. In accordance with Zechariah's prayer, God
God
made John and Jesus, who according to exegesis was born six months later,[115] renew the message of God, which had been corrupted and lost by the Israelites. As the Qur'an
Qur'an
says:

(His prayer was answered): "O Zakariya! We give thee good news of a son: His name shall be Yahya: on none by that name have We conferred distinction before." He said: "O my Lord! How shall I have a son, when my wife is barren and I have grown quite decrepit from old age?" He (Gabriel) said: "So (it will be) thy Lord saith, 'that is easy for Me: I did indeed create thee before, when thou hadst been nothing!'" (Zakarya) said: "O my Lord! give me a Sign." "Thy Sign," was the answer, "Shall be that thou shalt speak to no man for three nights." — Qur'an, sura 19 (Maryam), verse 7[116]

John was exhorted to hold fast to the Scripture
Scripture
and was given wisdom by God
God
while still a child.[117] He was pure and devout, and walked well in the presence of God. He was dutiful towards his parents and he was not arrogant or rebellious. John's reading and understanding of the scriptures, when only a child, surpassed even that of the greatest scholars of the time.[114] Muslim
Muslim
exegesis narrates that Jesus
Jesus
sent John out with twelve disciples,[118] who preached the message before Jesus
Jesus
called his own disciples.[115] The Qur'an
Qur'an
says:

"O Yaḥya! take hold of the Book with might": and We gave him Wisdom even as a youth, — Qur'an, sura 19 (Maryam), ayah 12[117]

John was a classical prophet,[119] who was exalted high by God, for his bold denouncing of all things sinful. Furthermore, the Qur'an speaks of John's gentle pity and love and his humble attitude towards life, for which he was granted the Purity of Life:

And piety as from Us, and purity: He was devout, And kind to his parents, and he was not overbearing or rebellious. So Peace on him the day he was born, the day that he dies, and the day that he will be raised up to life (again)! — Qur'an, sura 19 (Maryam), ayah 13–15[113]

John is also honored highly in Sufism
Sufism
as well as Islamic
Islamic
mysticism, primarily because of the Qur'an's description of John's chastity and kindness.[120] Sufis have frequently applied commentaries on the passages on John in the Qur'an, primarily concerning the God-given gift of "Wisdom" which he acquired in youth as well as his parallels with Jesus. Although several phrases used to describe John and Jesus are virtually identical in the Qur'an, the manner in which they are expressed is different.[121] Name[edit] It has been claimed that the Quran
Quran
is mistaken in saying that John the Baptist was the first to receive this name (Quran 19:7–10), since the name Yoḥanan occurs many times before John the Baptist.[122] However, according to Islamic
Islamic
scholars, "Yaḥyā" is not the same name as "Yoḥanan".[123] Despite this, "Yaḥyā" is etymologically the same name as the Biblical
Biblical
figure Yᵉchîyâh (English rendering: "Jehiah") of the Books of the Chronicles.[124] Therefore, the Qur'an
Qur'an
in Surah 19:7 is likely not claiming that "no one was ever given the name Yahya before this child". Rather, this Qur'an
Qur'an
verse is a clear reference to the Biblical
Biblical
account of the miraculous naming of John, which accounted that he was almost named "Zacharias"[125][126] (Greek: Ζαχαρίας)[127] after his father's name, as no one in the lineage of his father Zacharias (also known as Zechariah) had been named "John" ("Yohanan"/"Yoannes") before him.[128] The exegetes frequently connected the name with the meaning of "to quicken" or "to make alive" in reference to John's mother's barrenness, which was cured by God, as well as John's preaching, which, as Muslims believe, "made alive" the faith of Israel.[129] This is the same meaning as the Hebrew
Hebrew
name Yᵉchîyâh (יְחִיָּה; "Jehiah") (lit.: " YHWH
YHWH
lives").[124] Yᵉchîyâh was also the name of one of the doorkeepers for the Ark of the Covenant
Ark of the Covenant
during the reign of King David
David
in the Bible.[130] Because of this, it is supposed that this name "Yaḥyā" was commonly used in the 6th–7th centuries CE by Arab Christians
Arab Christians
as an allegorical honorific of John the Baptist (Arabic: يُوحَنَّا الْمَعْمَدَانُ, Yūḥanna al-Mamadan), who considered him to be a "doorkeeper" for the "Ark of the New Covenant", Jesus
Jesus
Christ (Arabic: يَسُوعَ الْمَسِيحِ, Yasū‘u l-Masīḥ).[131] The Quran
Quran
also mentions a root used in the Hebrew
Hebrew
name, 'Yohanan' יוֹחָנָן (Yahweh is gracious). Sura
Sura
Maryam: 12–13 describes the virtues of Yahya: وَآتَيْنَاهُ الْحُكْمَ صَبِيًّا – وَحَنَانًا مِّن لَّدُنَّا وَزَكَاةً (And We gave him judgement, while yet a boy – And affection from Us, and purity.) Here 'Ḥanān' (حنان, Affection) is an Arabic
Arabic
word corresponding to the same root used in the Hebrew/Aramaic 'Yohanan'.[citation needed][dubious – discuss] Bahá'í view[edit] Bahá'ís consider John to have been a prophet of God
God
who like all other prophets was sent to instill the knowledge of God, promote unity among the people of the world, and to show people the correct way to live.[132] There are numerous quotations in the writings of Bahá'u'lláh, Founder of the Bahá'í Faith
Bahá'í Faith
mentioning John the Baptist. He is regarded by Bahá'ís as a lesser Prophet.[14] Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
claimed that his Forerunner, the Báb, was the spiritual return of John the Baptist. In his letter to Pope
Pope
Pius IX, Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
wrote:

"O followers of the Son! We have once again sent John unto you, and He, verily, hath cried out in the wilderness of the Bayán: O peoples of the world! Cleanse your eyes! The Day whereon ye can behold the Promised One and attain unto Him hath drawn nigh! O followers of the Gospel! Prepare the way! The Day of the advent of the Glorious Lord is at hand! Make ready to enter the Kingdom. Thus hath it been ordained by God, He Who causeth the dawn to break."[133]

John is believed to have had the specific role of foretelling and preparing the way for Jesus. In condemning those who had ‘turned aside’ from him, Bahá'u'lláh, compared them to the followers of John the Baptist, who, he said, ‘protested against Him Who was the Spirit (Jesus) saying: “The dispensation of John hath not yet ended; wherefore hast thou come?” Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
believed that the Báb played the same role as John in preparing the people for his own coming. As such Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
refers to the Báb
Báb
as ‘My Forerunner’, the Forerunner being a title that Christians reserve for John the Baptist.[134] However, Bahá'ís consider the Báb
Báb
to be a greater Prophet
Prophet
(Manifestation of God) and thus possessed of a far greater station than John the Baptist. Unification Church[edit] The Unification Church teaches that God
God
intended John to help Jesus during his public ministry in Judea. In particular, John should have done everything in his power to persuade the Jewish
Jewish
people that Jesus was the Messiah. He was to become Jesus' main disciple and John's disciples were to become Jesus' disciples. Unfortunately John didn't follow Jesus
Jesus
and continued his own way of baptizing people. John's failure to follow Jesus
Jesus
became the chief obstacle to the fulfillment of Jesus' mission.[135] In art[edit]

Puvis de Chavannes, The Beheading of St John the Baptist, c. 1869

Christ in the House of His Parents
Christ in the House of His Parents
by John Everett Millais, 1849–50

Wood
Wood
Sculpture of John The Baptist’s Head by Santiago Martinez Delgado.

Cristofano Allori's John the Baptist
John the Baptist
in the desert

The beheading of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is a standard theme in Christian
Christian
art,[9] in which John's head is often depicted on a platter, which represents the request of Herod's stepdaughter, Salome.[136] He is also depicted as an ascetic wearing camel hair, with a staff and scroll inscribed Ecce Agnus Dei, or bearing a book or dish with a lamb on it.[12] In Orthodox icons, he often has angel's wings, since Mark 1:2 describes him as a messenger.[137] The Baptism
Baptism
of Christ was one of the earliest scenes from the Life of Christ to be frequently depicted in Early Christian
Christian
art, and John's tall, thin, even gaunt, and bearded figure is already established by the 5th century. Only he and Jesus
Jesus
are consistently shown with long hair from Early Christian
Christian
times, when the apostles generally have trim classical cuts; in fact John is more consistently depicted in this way than Jesus. In Byzantine art
Byzantine art
the composition of the Deesis
Deesis
came to be included in every Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
church, as remains the case to this day. Here John and the Theotokos
Theotokos
(Mary) flank a Christ Pantocrator
Christ Pantocrator
and intercede for humanity; in many ways this is the equivalent of Western Crucifixions on roods and elsewhere, where John the Evangelist
John the Evangelist
takes the place of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
(except in the idiosyncratic Isenheim Altarpiece). John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is very often shown on altarpieces designed for churches dedicated to him, or where the donor patron was named for him or there was some other connection of patronage – John was the patron saint of Florence, among many other cities, which means he features among the supporting saints in many important works. A number of narrative scenes from his life were often shown on the predella of altarpieces dedicated to John, and other settings, notably the large series in grisaille fresco in the Chiostro dello Scalzo (it), which was Andrea del Sarto's largest work, and the frescoed Life by Domenico Ghirlandaio
Domenico Ghirlandaio
in the Tornabuoni Chapel, both in Florence. There is another important fresco cycle by Filippo Lippi in Prato Cathedral. These include the typical scenes:[138] the Annunciation to Zechariah, John's birth, his naming by his father, the Visitation, John's departure for the desert, his preaching in the desert, the Baptism
Baptism
of Christ, John before Herod, the dance of Salome, and his beheading.

St John the Baptist, from a medieval book of hours

St. John the Baptist
John the Baptist
(c. 1513–16), Leonardo da Vinci

His birth, which unlike the Nativity of Jesus
Jesus
allowed a relatively wealthy domestic interior to be shown, became increasingly popular as a subject in the late Middle Ages, with depictions by Jan van Eyck
Jan van Eyck
in the Turin-Milan Hours
Turin-Milan Hours
and Ghirlandaio in the Tornabuoni Chapel
Tornabuoni Chapel
being among the best known. His execution, a church feast-day, was often shown, and by the 15th-century scenes such as the dance of Salome became popular, sometimes, as in an engraving by Israhel van Meckenem, the interest of the artist is clearly in showing the life of Herod's court, given contemporary dress, as much as the martyrdom of the saint.[139] Salome
Salome
bearing John's head on a platter equally became a subject for the Northern Renaissance taste for images of glamorous but dangerous women (Delilah, Judith
Judith
and others),[140] and was often painted by Lucas Cranach the Elder
Lucas Cranach the Elder
and engraved by the Little Masters. These images remained popular into the Baroque, with Carlo Dolci painting at least three versions. John preaching, in a landscape setting, was a popular subject in Dutch art from Pieter Brueghel the Elder and his successors. As a child (of varying age), he is sometimes shown from the 15th century in family scenes from the life of Christ such as the Presentation of Christ, the Marriage of the Virgin
Marriage of the Virgin
and the Holy Kinship. Leonardo da Vinci's versions of the Virgin of the Rocks
Virgin of the Rocks
were influential in establishing a Renaissance fashion for variations on the Madonna and Child
Madonna and Child
that included John, probably intended to depict the relative's reunion in Egypt, when after Jesus' Flight to Egypt John was believed to have been carried to join him by an angel.[citation needed] Raphael
Raphael
in particular painted many compositions of the subject, such as the Alba Madonna, La belle jardinière, Aldobrandini Madonna, Madonna della seggiola, Madonna dell'Impannata, which were among his best-known works. John was also often shown by himself as an older child or adolescent, usually already wearing his distinctive dress and carrying a long thin wooden cross – another theme influenced by Leonardo, whose equivocal composition, reintroducing the camel-skin dress, was developed by Raphael
Raphael
Titian
Titian
and Guido Reni
Guido Reni
among many others. Often he is accompanied by a lamb, especially in the many Early Netherlandish paintings which needed this attribute as he wore normal clothes. Caravaggio
Caravaggio
painted an especially large number of works including John, from at least five largely nude youths attributed to him, to three late works on his death – the great Execution in Malta, and two sombre Salomes with his head, one in Madrid, and one in London.

Statue
Statue
of St John carved out of a blackberry tree by Pietro Paolo Azzopardi – 1845. Xewkija

Amiens cathedral, which holds one of the alleged heads of the Baptist, has a biographical sequence in polychrome relief, dating from the 16th century. This stresses the execution and the disposal of the saint's remains. A remarkable Pre-Raphaelite portrayal is Christ in the House of His Parents by John Everett Millais. Here the Baptist is shown as a child, wearing a loin covering of animal skins, hurrying into Joseph's carpenter shop with a bowl of water to join Mary, Joseph, and Mary's mother Anne in soothing the injured hand of Jesus. Artistic interest enjoyed a considerable revival at the end of the 19th century with Symbolist
Symbolist
painters such as Gustave Moreau
Gustave Moreau
and Puvis de Chavannes (National Gallery, London). Oscar Wilde's play Salome
Salome
was illustrated by Aubrey Beardsley, giving rise to some of his most memorable images. In poetry[edit] The Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
poet Lucrezia Tornabuoni
Lucrezia Tornabuoni
chose John the Baptist as one of biblical figures on which she wrote poetry.[141] In music[edit]

Guido D'Arezzo
Guido D'Arezzo
(991/992 – after 1033) an Italian Benedictine monk founded the standard music stave based on a hymn to Saint
Saint
John the Baptist. The hymn that begins with Ut Queant Laxis
Ut Queant Laxis
uses the first syllable for each line – Ut (later changed to Do), Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si. The teaching is also known as the solmization syllable. This Is the Record of John, by English Tudor composer Orlando Gibbons is a well-known part-setting of the Gospel
Gospel
of John for solo voice, choir and organ or viol accompaniment. The reformer Martin Luther
Martin Luther
wrote a hymn based on biblical accounts about the Baptist, "Christ unser Herr zum Jordan
Jordan
kam" (1541), base for a cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach for the feast day on 24 June, Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam, BWV 7
Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam, BWV 7
(1724). S. Giovanni Battista (scores) (St. John the Baptist) is a 1676 oratorio by Alessandro Stradella. The well-known Advent hymn On Jordan's Bank the Baptist's cry was written by Charles Coffin.[142] John the Baptist
John the Baptist
(Jokanaan), Baritone, is a character in the opera Salome
Salome
by Richard Strauss, premiered 1905 in Dresden. The text is from Oscar Wilde's French poem, translated into German by Hedwig Lachmann.[143] In popular music, Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan
dedicates four lines to John the Baptist in "Tombstone Blues", the second track of his 1965 album Highway 61 Revisited. He sings: " John the Baptist
John the Baptist
after torturing a thief / Looks up at his hero the Commander-in-Chief / Saying, “Tell me great hero, but please make it brief / Is there a hole for me to get sick in?”".[144] The song " John the Baptist
John the Baptist
(Holy John)" by Al Kooper
Al Kooper
on his 1971 album New York City (You're a Woman) is about John the Baptist. In the same year the song was also recorded by Blood, Sweat & Tears for their album Blood, Sweat & Tears 4. In his song "Everyman Needs a Companion," the closing track to his album Fear Fun, Father John Misty sings about the friendship between John the Baptist
John the Baptist
and Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth: " John the Baptist
John the Baptist
took Jesus Christ / Down to the river on a Friday night / They talked about Mary like a couple of boys / With nothing to lose / Too scared to try." [145]

In film and television[edit] John the Baptist
John the Baptist
has appeared in a number of screen adaptations of the life of Jesus. Actors who have played John include Robert Ryan
Robert Ryan
in King of Kings (1961),[146] Mario Socrate in The Gospel
Gospel
According to St. Matthew (1964),[147] Charlton Heston
Charlton Heston
in The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965),[148] David
David
Haskell in Godspell (1973),[149] Michael York in Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth (1977),[150] and Andre Gregory in The Last Temptation of Christ
Temptation of Christ
(1988).[151] Commemoration[edit] See also: Nativity of St. John the Baptist, St. John's Eve, Fête St-Jean-Baptiste, Festival of San Juan, Saint
Saint
Jonas Day, St John's Day (Estonia), Ivan Kupala Day, and Golowan

According to Armenian tradition, the remains of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
were laid to rest by Gregory the Illuminator
Gregory the Illuminator
at the Saint
Saint
Karapet Monastery.[152][153]

The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in Ein Kerem
Ein Kerem
on the site where John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is said to have been born

Saint
Saint
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is the patron saint of Jordan: his beheading is said to have taken place in Machaerus
Machaerus
in central Jordan. Saint
Saint
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is the patron saint of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and its capital city, San Juan. In 1521, the island was given its formal name, "San Juan Bautista de Puerto Rico", following the custom of christening a town with its formal name and the name which Christopher Columbus
Christopher Columbus
had originally given the island. The names "San Juan Bautista" and "Puerto Rico" were eventually used in reference to both city and island, leading to a reversal in terminology by most inhabitants largely due to a cartographic error. By 1746, the city's name ("Puerto Rico") had become that of the entire island, while the name for the island ("San Juan Bautista") had become that of the city. The official motto of Puerto Rico also references the saint: Joannes Est Nomen Eius ( Latin
Latin
for "his name is John", from Luke 1:63). He is also a patron saint of French Canada, and Newfoundland. The Canadian cities of St. John's, Newfoundland (1497) and Saint
Saint
John, New Brunswick (1604) were both named in his honor. In the United Kingdom, Saint
Saint
John is the patron of Penzance, Cornwall. His feast day of June 24, celebrated officially in Quebec
Quebec
as the Fête Nationale du Québec, and in Newfoundland as Discovery Day. In Scotland, he is the patron saint of Perth, which used to be known as St. John's Toun of Perth. The main church in the city is still the medieval Kirk of St. John the Baptist
John the Baptist
and the city's professional football club is called St Johnstone F.C. Also, on the night of June 23 on to the 24th, Saint
Saint
John is celebrated as the patron saint of Porto, the second largest city in Portugal. An article from June 2004 in The Guardian
The Guardian
remarked that "Porto's Festa de São João is one of Europe's liveliest street festivals, yet it is relatively unknown outside the country".[154] He is also patron of the Knights Hospitaller
Knights Hospitaller
of Jerusalem, Malta, Florence, and Genoa, Italy. John is patron saint of Xewkija, Gozo, Malta, which remember him with a great feast on the Sunday nearest to June 24. Calamba City, Laguna, Calumpit, Bulacan, Balayan and Lian in Batangas, and San Juan, Metro Manila
San Juan, Metro Manila
are among several places in the Philippines that venerate John as the town or city patron. A common practise of many Filipino fiestas in his honour is bathing and the dousing of people in memory of John's iconic act. The custom is similar in form to Songkran
Songkran
and Holi, and serves as a playful respite from the intense tropical heat. While famed for the Black Nazarene
Black Nazarene
it enshrines, Quiapo Church in Manila
Manila
is actually dedicated to Saint
Saint
John. He is also patron of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston, which covers the whole of South Carolina
South Carolina
in the United States. The Baptistines are the name given to a number of religious orders dedicated to the memory of John the Baptist. Along with John the Evangelist, John the Baptist
John the Baptist
is claimed as a patron saint by the fraternal society of Free and Accepted Masons (better known as the Freemasons).[155] In many Mediterranean countries, the summer solstice is dedicated to St. John. The associated ritual is very similar to Midsummer celebrations in the Anglo-Saxon tradition.[citation needed] See also[edit]

Christianity
Christianity
portal Saints portal

Biblical
Biblical
and Quranic narratives Chronology of Jesus Historical background of the New Testament Legends and the Quran Messengers from John the Baptist Saint
Saint
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
Church (other) St. John Baptist Church (other) Statue
Statue
of John the Baptist, Charles Bridge

References[edit] Citations[edit]

^ Luke 1:36 indicates that John was born about six months before Jesus, whose birth cannot be dated later than early in 4 BC, L. Morris, "John The Baptist", ed. Geoffrey W Bromiley, The International Standard Bible
Bible
Encyclopedia, Revised (Wm. B. Eerdmans, 1938–1958), 1108. ^ Metzger, Bruce Manning (1993). The Oxford Companion to the Bible. Oxford University Press. p. 283. ISBN 9780199743919. Herod beheaded John at Machaerus
Machaerus
in 31 or 32 CE.  ^ Metzger (2004). The Oxford Guide to People & Places of the Bible. Oxford University Press. p. 103. ISBN 9780195176100. Herod beheaded John at Machaerus
Machaerus
in 31 or 32 CE.  ^ Kokkinos, The Herodian Dynasty, pp. 268, 277. ^ Lang, Bernhard (2009) International Review of Biblical
Biblical
Studies Brill Academic Pub ISBN 9004172548 p. 380 – "33/34 CE Herod Antipas's marriage to Herodias
Herodias
(and beginning of the ministry of Jesus
Jesus
in a sabbatical year); 35 CE – death of John the Baptist" ^ "Ορθόδοξος Συναξαριστής :: Άγιος Ιωάννης Πρόδρομος και Βαπτιστής (Σύλληψη)". Saint.gr. September 23, 2012. Retrieved October 20, 2012.  ^ "H ΕΚΚΛΗΣΙΑ ΤΗΣ ΕΛΛΑΔΟΣ : Επιτροπές της Ιεράς Συνόδου – Συνοδική Επιτροπή επί της Εκκλησιαστικής Τέχνης και Μουσικής". Ecclesia.gr. Retrieved October 20, 2012.  ^ παπα Γιώργης Δορμπαράκης (January 26, 2012). "ΑΚΟΛΟΥΘΕΙΝ: Η ΣΥΝΑΞΙΣ ΤΟΥ ΑΓΙΟΥ ΕΝΔΟΞΟΥ ΠΡΟΦΗΤΟΥ, ΠΡΟΔΡΟΜΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΒΑΠΤΙΣΤΟΥ ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ (7 ΙΑΝΟΥΑΡΙΟΥ)". Pgdorbas.blogspot.com. Retrieved October 20, 2012.  ^ a b Wetterau, Bruce. World history. New York: Henry Holt and company. 1994. ^ https://st-takla.org/Full-Free-Coptic-Books/FreeCopticBooks-002-Holy-Arabic-Bible-Dictionary/28_E/E_291.html ^ " Prophet
Prophet
John".  ^ a b Cross, F. L. (ed.) (2005) Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, 3rd ed. Oxford University Press ISBN 978-0-19-280290-3, article "John the Baptist, St" ^ Funk, Robert W. & the Jesus
Jesus
Seminar (1998). The Acts of Jesus: the search for the authentic deeds of Jesus. San Francisco: Harper; "John the Baptist" cameo, p. 268 ^ a b Compilations (1983). Hornby, Helen, ed. Lights of Guidance: A Bahá'í Reference File. Bahá'í Publishing Trust, New Delhi, India. p. 475. ISBN 81-85091-46-3.  ^ Webb, Robert L. (2006-10-01) [1991]. John the Baptizer and Prophet: A Socio-historic Study. Eugene, Oregon: Wipf & Stock Publishers (published 29 September 2006). ISBN 9781597529860.  ^ Sykes, Robert Henry (1982). Friend of the Bridegroom: Meditations in the Life of John the Baptizer. Everyday Publications, Inc. ISBN 9780888730527. Retrieved 5 June 2016.  ^ Mead, G.R.S. Gnostic John the Baptizer: Selections from the Mandaean John-Book. Forgotten Books. ISBN 9781605062105. Retrieved 5 June 2016.  ^ Edward Oliver James, Sacrament
Sacrament
in Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved May 20, 2009, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/515366/sacrament ^ Charles M. Sennott, The body and the blood, Public Affairs Pub, 2003. p 234 Google Link ^ Jesus
Jesus
as a figure in history: how modern historians view the man from Galilee. Mark Allan Powell, published by Westminster John Knox Press, p. 47 "Few would doubt the basic fact... Jesus
Jesus
was baptized by John" ^ Sanders, E.P. (1985) Jesus
Jesus
and Judaism. Philadelphia: Fortress Press; p. 91 ^ James D. G. Dunn, Jesus
Jesus
Remembered (Eerdmans, 2003) p. 350. ^ Robert L. Webb, ' John the Baptist
John the Baptist
and his relationship to Jesus', in Bruce David
David
Chilton, Craig Alan Evans, Studying the Historical Jesus: Evaluations of the State of Current Research (BRILL, 1998) p. 219. ^ Harris, Stephen L. (1985) Understanding the Bible. Palo Alto: Mayfield John 1:36–40 ^ Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews
Antiquities of the Jews
18.5.2 ^ Harris, Stephen L. (1985) Understanding the Bible. Palo Alto: Mayfield; p. 382 ^ Marshall, I. H.; Millard, A. R.; Packer, J. I. (eds.). "John the Baptist". New Bible
Bible
Dictionary (Third ed.). IVP reference collection. ISBN 0-85110-636-6.  ^ Funk, Robert W. & the Jesus
Jesus
Seminar (1998). The Acts of Jesus: the search for the authentic deeds of Jesus.San Francisco: Harper; "Mark," pp. 51–161. ^ Meier, John (1994). Mentor, Message, and Miracles (A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, Vol. 2). 2. Anchor Bible. ISBN 0-385-46992-6.  ^ Stephen L. Harris, Understanding the Bible. Palo Alto: Mayfield. 1985. ISBN 1-55934-655-8 Matthew 17:12–13 ^ a b Carl R. Kazmierski, John the Baptist: Prophet
Prophet
and Evangelist (Liturgical Press, 1996) p. 31. ^ John R. Donahue, Daniel J. Harrington, The Gospel
Gospel
of Mark (Liturgical Press, 2005) p. 195. ^ a b Florence
Florence
Morgan Gillman (2003). Herodias: At Home in that Fox's Den. Liturgical Press. pp. 54–55. ISBN 978-0-8146-5108-7.  ^ Geoff R. Webb, Mark at the Threshold: Applying Bakhtinian Categories to Markan Characterisation, (BRILL, 2008) pp 110–11. ^ John R. Donahue, Daniel J. Harrington, The Gospel
Gospel
of Mark (Liturgical Press, 2005) p. 198. ^ Florence
Florence
Morgan Gillman, Herodias: At Home in that Fox's Den (Liturgical Press, 2003) p. 80. ^ Florence
Florence
Morgan Gillman, Herodias: At Home in that Fox's Den (Liturgical Press, 2003) pp. 81–83. ^ Geoff R. Webb, Mark at the Threshold: Applying Bakhtinian Categories to Markan Characterisation, (Brill, 2008) p. 107. ^ " Isaiah
Isaiah
40.3 NRSV
NRSV
– A voice cries out: "In the wilderness". Bible Gateway.  ^ Steve Moyise (September 1, 2011). Jesus
Jesus
and Scripture: Studying the New Testament
New Testament
Use of the Old Testament. Baker Books. p. 40. ISBN 978-1-4412-3749-1.  ^ Walter Wink (November 2006). John the Baptist
John the Baptist
in the Gospel Tradition. Cambridge University Press. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-521-03130-1.  ^ Robert Horton Gundry, Matthew: A Commentary on His Handbook for a Mixed Church Under Persecution (Eerdmans, 1994) p. 286. ^ Libby Ahluwalia, Understanding Philosophy of Religion (Folens, 2008), p. 180. ^ Just, Arthur A.; Oden, Thomas C. (2003), Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture
Scripture
– Luke: New Testament
New Testament
III, InterVarsity Press; p. 10. ISBN 978-0830814886 Luke 1:7 ^ Luke 1:5 ^ 'Aaron', In: Mills, Watson E. (ed.) (1998) Mercer Dictionary of the Bible, Vol. 5, Macon GA: Mercer University Press, ISBN 0-86554-299-6; p. 1 ^ Englebert, Omer (1951). The Lives of the Saints. New York: Barnes & Noble. p. 529. ISBN 978-1-56619-516-4.  ^ Brown, Raymond Edward (1973), The Virginal Conception and Bodily Resurrection of Jesus, Paulist Press, p. 54 ^ Vermes, Geza. The Nativity, p. 143. ^ Freed, Edwin D. (2001), The Stories of Jesus' Birth: a Critical Introduction Continuum International, pp. 87–90. ^ John 1:6-8 ^ John 1:23, compare Isaiah
Isaiah
40:3 ^ Vande Vrede, Keith (December 2014), Kostenberger, Andreas, ed., "A Contrast Between Nicodemus
Nicodemus
and John the Baptist
John the Baptist
in the Gospel
Gospel
of John", Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, Louisville: Evangelical Theological Society, 57 (4): 715–26, ISSN 0360-8808  ^ John 3:22–36 ^ John 3:30 ^ John 4:2 ^ John 5:35 ^ Simon J. Joseph
Joseph
(2012). Jesus, Q, and the Dead Sea
Sea
Scrolls: A Judaic Approach to Q. Mohr Siebeck. pp. 147–. ISBN 978-3-16-152120-1.  ^ "Was John the Baptist
John the Baptist
really Elijah? Christian
Christian
Apologetics and Research Ministry". Carm.org. March 15, 2013. Retrieved January 26, 2014.  ^ "Josephus, Flavius." In: Cross, F. L. (ed.) (2005) The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian
Christian
Church, 3rd ed. Oxford University Press ^ Flavius Josephus, Jewish
Jewish
Antiqities 18. 5. 2. (Translation by William Whiston). Original Greek. ^ Hoehner, Harold W. (2010-08-10). Chronological Aspects of the Life of Christ. p. 101. ISBN 9780310877103.  ^ Mark 1:4 ^ Crossan, John Dominic (2007), God
God
and Empire, London: HarperCollins, p. 117 ff ^ Benson's Commentary on Matthew 14, accessed 17 Jauuary 2017 ^ Nicephorus, Ecclesiastical History I, ix. See Patrologia Graeca, cxlv.–cxlvii. ^ Lost Worlds: Knights Templar, July 10, 2006 video documentary on The History Channel, directed and written by Stuart Elliott ^ "BBC ON THIS DAY - 7 - 2001: Thousands greet Pope
Pope
in Syrian visit".  ^ a b c Hooper, Simon (August 30, 2010). "Are these the bones of John the Baptist?". Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. Retrieved August 31, 2011.  ^ "Hetq Online " Pilgrimage to the oldest Armenian Apostolic Church in India". Hetq.am. January 10, 2010. Retrieved February 14, 2010.  ^ "The Monastery
Monastery
of St. Macarius the Great". Stmacariusmonastery.org. Retrieved February 14, 2010.  ^ "Heraldry of the World; Civic heraldry of the United Kingdom; Halifax (Yorkshire)". Ralf Hartemink. Retrieved 6 February 2017.  ^ Roberts, Kai (19 June 2010). "The Holy Face of Halifax". Omnia Exeunt In Mysterium. Archived from the original on 15 February 2016. Retrieved 16 February 2017.  ^ a b Ker Than (June 19, 2012). "John the Baptist's Bones Found?". National Geographic.  ^ Moss, Candida. National Geographic: Search for the Head of John the Baptist. 19 April 2014. ^ Old Town Sozopol
Sozopol
– Bulgaria's 'Rescued' Miracle
Miracle
and Its Modern Day Saviors. Sofia News Agency, October 10, 2011. ^ Malachi
Malachi
3:1 ^ Mat 3:3 For this is he that was spoken of by the prophet Esaias, saying, The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. ^ Mar 1:2 As it is written in the prophets, Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, which shall prepare thy way before thee. Mar 1:3 The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. ^ Luk 1:16–17 And many of the children of Israel
Israel
shall he turn to the Lord their God. And he shall go before him in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; to make ready a people prepared for the Lord. ^ a b "Paul, Letters of". Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea
Sea
Scrolls. Oxford University Press. 2008. doi:10.1093/acref/9780195084504.001.0001/acref-9780195084504-e-383 (inactive 2017-12-11). ISBN 978-0-19-508450-4. Retrieved 2017-05-29. (subscription required) ^ "Essenes". The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East. Oxford University Press. 2011. doi:10.1093/acref/9780195065121.001.0001/acref-9780195065121-e-354 (inactive 2017-12-11). ISBN 978-0-19-506512-1. Retrieved 2017-05-29. (subscription required) ^ Acts 19:1–7 ^ Treatise of Prayer. Retrieved 1-15-2012. ^ The Dialogue of Saint
Saint
Catherine of Siena. Retrieved 1-15-2012 ^ In late antiquity this feast in some churches marked the beginning of the Ecclesiastical Year; see Archbishop Peter (L'Huiller) of New York and New Jersey, "Liturgical Matters: "The Lukan Jump"", in: Newspaper of the Diocese of New York and New Jersey, Fall 1992. ^ "Doctrine and Covenants 84:27–28". Scriptures.lds.org. Retrieved February 14, 2010.  ^ "Section Five: 1842–1843". Retrieved May 15, 2014.  ^ Teaching of The Prophet
Prophet
Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
Section Five 1842–43, p. 261 ^ [D&C 13]; D&C 27:7–8 ^ Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
History 1:68–72 ^ "1 Nephi 10:7–10". Archived from the original on June 24, 2012.  ^ 1 Nephi 11:27 ^ 2 Nephi 31:4-18 ^ Mark 9:11–13 ^ Matthew 11:13–14 ^ Luke 7:27 ^ John 1:21 ^ Sergei Prokofieff, The Mystery of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
and John the Evangelist Turning Point of Time: An Esoteric Study, Temple Lodge Publishing 2005, ISBN 1-902636-67-8 ^ J Verheyden, Epiphanius on the Ebionites, in The image of the Judaeo-Christians in ancient Jewish
Jewish
and Christian
Christian
literature, eds Peter J. Tomson, Doris Lambers-Petry, ISBN 3-16-148094-5, p. 188 "The vegetarianism of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
and of Jesus
Jesus
is an important issue too in the Ebionite interpretation of the Christian
Christian
life. " ^ Robert Eisenman
Robert Eisenman
(1997), James the Brother of Jesus, p. 240 – "John (unlike Jesus) was both a ‘Rechabite’ or ‘Nazarite’ and vegetarian", p. 264 – "One suggestion is that John ate 'carobs'; there have been others. Epiphanius, in preserving what he calls 'the Ebionite Gospel', rails against the passage there claiming that John ate 'wild honey' and 'manna-like vegetarian cakes dipped in oil. ... John would have been one of those wilderness-dwelling, vegetable-eating persons", p. 326 – "They [the Nazerini] ate nothing but wild fruit milk and honey – probably the same food that John the Baptist also ate.", p. 367 – "We have already seen how in some traditions 'carobs' were said to have been the true composition of John's food.", p. 403 – "his [John's] diet was stems, roots and fruits. Like James and the other Nazirites/Rechabites, he is presented as a vegetarian ..". ^ James Tabor, The Jesus
Jesus
Dynasty p. 134 and footnotes p. 335, p. 134 – "The Greek New Testament
New Testament
gospels says John's diet consisted of "locusts and wild honey" but an ancient Hebrew
Hebrew
version of Matthew insists that "locusts" is a mistake in Greek for a related Hebrew
Hebrew
word that means a cake of some type, made from a desert plant, similar to the "manna" that the ancient Israelites
Israelites
ate in the desert on the days of Moses.(ref 9) Jesus
Jesus
describes John as "neither eating nor drinking," or "neither eating bread nor drinking wine." Such phrases indicate the lifestyle of one who is strictly vegetarian, avoids even bread since it has to be processed from grain, and shuns all alcohol.(ref 10) The idea is that one would eat only what grows naturally.(ref 11) It was a way of avoiding all refinements of civilization." ^ Bart D. Ehrman (2003). Lost Christianities: The Battles for Scripture
Scripture
and the Faiths We Never Knew. Oxford University Press. pp. 102, 103. ISBN 0-19-514183-0.  p. 102 – "Probably the most interesting of the changes from the familiar New Testament accounts of Jesus
Jesus
comes in the Gospel
Gospel
of the Ebionites
Ebionites
description of John the Baptist, who, evidently, like his successor Jesus, maintained a strictly vegetarian cuisine." ^ James A. Kelhoffer, The Diet of John the Baptist, ISBN 978-3-16-148460-5, pp. 19–21 ^ G.R.S. Mead (2007). Gnostic John the Baptizer: Selections from the Mandæan John-Book. Forgotten Books. p. 104. ISBN 978-1-60506-210-5.  p. 104 – "And when he had been brought to Archelaus and the doctors of the Law had assembled, they asked him who he is and where he has been until then. And to this he made answer and spake: I am pure; [for] the Spirit of God
God
hath led me on, and [I live on] cane and roots and tree-food." ^ Tabor (2006) Jesus
Jesus
Dynasty p. 334 (note 9) – "The Gospel
Gospel
of the Ebionites
Ebionites
as quoted by the 4th-century writer Epiphanius. The Greek word for locusts (akris) is very similar to the Greek word for "honey cake" (ekris) that is used for the "manna" that the Israelites
Israelites
ate in the desert in the days of Moses
Moses
(Exodus 16:32)" & p. 335 (note 11) – "There is an old Russian (Slavic) version of Josephus's Antiquities that describes John the Baptizer as living on 'roots and fruits of the tree' and insists that he never touches bread, even at Passover." ^ Bart D. Ehrman (2003). Lost Scriptures: Books that Did Not Make It into the New Testament. Oxford University Press. p. 13. ISBN 0-19-514182-2.  p. 13 – Referring to Epiphanius' quotation from the Gospel
Gospel
of the Ebionites
Ebionites
in Panarion 30.13, "And his food, it says, was wild honey whose taste was of manna, as cake in oil". ^ Oxford Dictionary of the Christian
Christian
Church (Oxford University Press 2005 ISBN 978-0-19-280290-3), article Mandaeans ^ "Baptisms of Yeshu in ancient Mandaic scrolls – The Order of Nazorean Essenes". Essenes.net. Retrieved October 20, 2012.  ^ "Yahya", Encyclopedia of Islam ^ Ibn Ishaq, Sirat Rasul Allah, Mi'raj ^ Muhammad, Martin Lings, Abysinnia. etc. ^ a b Quran 19:13–15 ^ a b Lives of the Prophets, Leila Azzam, John and Zechariah ^ a b A–Z of Prophets in Islam
Islam
and Judaism, B. M. Wheeler, John the Baptist ^ Quran 19:7–10 ^ a b Quran 19:12 ^ Tabari, i, 712 ^ Abdullah Yusuf Ali, The Holy Qur'an: Text, Translation and Commentary, Note. 905: "The third group consists not of men of action, but Preachers of Truth, who led solitary lives. Their epithet is: "the Righteous." They form a connected group round Jesus. Zachariah was the father of John the Baptist, who is referenced as "Elias, which was for to come" (Matt 11:14); and Elias is said to have been present and talked to Jesus
Jesus
at the Transfiguration on the Mount (Matt. 17:3)." ^ Encyclopedia of Islam, Yahya ibn Zakkariya, Online web. ^ Whereas the Qur'an
Qur'an
itself gives blessings of peace to John (Quran 19: 15), Jesus, in contrast, gives himself the blessings of peace. ( Qur'an
Qur'an
19: 16–33) ^ A. Geiger, Judaism And Islam
Islam
(English translation of Was hat Mohammed aus dem Judenthume aufgenommen?), 1970, Ktav Publishing House Inc.: New York, p. 19. ^ "And No One Had The Name Yahya (= John?) Before: A Linguistic & Exegetical Enquiry Into Qur'an
Qur'an
19:7". Islamic-awareness.org. Retrieved October 20, 2012.  ^ a b http://biblehub.com/topical/j/jehiah.htm ^ Young's Literal Translation of the Bible. Luke 1:59, 1:5, et al. http://www.biblestudytools.com/ylt/luke/1.html ^ King James Bible. Luke 1:59, 1:5, et al. https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/Luke-Chapter-1/ ^ Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη (1894 Scrivener NT). Luke 1:59, 1:5, et al. https://biblia.com/books/tr1894mr/Lk1?embeddedPreview=False ^ Luke 1:59–63 ^ A. Jeffrey, Foreign Vocab. of the Qur'an, Baroda 1938, 290–1 ^ I Chronicles 15:24 ^ cf. I Chronicles 15:24 with Matthew 3:3 ^ Effendi, Shoghi (1988). Epistle
Epistle
to the Son of the Wolf. Wilmette, Illinois: Baha'i Publishing Trust. p. 12. ISBN 9780877430483.  ^ Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
(2002). The Summons of the Lord of Hosts. Haifa, Israel: Bahá'í World Centre. p. 63. ISBN 0-85398-976-1.  ^ Effendi, Shoghi (1988). Epistle
Epistle
to the Son of the Wolf. Wilmette, Illinois: Baha'i Publish Trust. pp. 157–158. ISBN 9780877430483.  ^ "Divine Principle Chapter 4, Section 2". Webcitation.org. Archived from the original on October 26, 2009. Retrieved January 26, 2014.  ^ The story appears in Matthew 14:8 and Mark 6:25, without the name Salome ^ "John the Baptist, St." Cross, F. L., ed. The Oxford dictionary of the Christian
Christian
church. New York: Oxford University Press. 2005 ^ See Tornabuoni Chapel
Tornabuoni Chapel
for further information on these scenes ^ " Engraving
Engraving
by Israhel van Meckenem". Artsmia.org. Archived from the original on January 11, 2009. Retrieved February 14, 2010.  ^ On this see Chapter V, "The Power of Women", in H Diane Russell;Eva/Ave; Women in Renaissance and Baroque Prints; National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1990; ISBN 1-55861-039-1 ^ Robin, Larsen and Levin, p. 368 ^ Julian, John. Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ^ The Victor Book of the Opera, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1968. ^ " Tombstone Blues The Official Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan
Site" Check url= value (help). bobdylan.com. Retrieved 3 April 2017.  ^ "Father John Misty - Everyman Needs A Companion". Retrieved 2018-03-08.  ^ King of Kings, cast and crew ^ The Gospel
Gospel
According to St. Matthew, cast and crew ^ The Greatest Story Ever Told, cast and crew ^ Godspell, cast and crew ^ Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, cast and crew ^ The Last Temptation of Christ, cast and crew ^ Kharatyan, Lusine; Keskin, Ismail; Keshishyan, Avetis; Ozturk, S. Aykut; Khachatryan, Nane; Albayrak, Nihal; Hakobyan, Karen (2013). Moush, sweet Moush: Mapping Memories from Armenia and Turkey (PDF). The Institute for International Cooperation Of the German Adult Education Association (dvv international). p. 69. ISBN 978-3-942755-12-2. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 3, 2015. The Saint
Saint
Karapet Monastery
Monastery
is one of the oldest Armenian monasteries in Moush Valley, dating back to the 4th century when Gregory the Illuminator, founder of the Armenian Apostolic Church, is believed to have buried the relics of Saint
Saint
John the Baptist (Karapet) here.  ^ Avetisyan, Kamsar (1979). "Տարոնի պատմական հուշարձանները [Historical monuments of Taron]". Հայրենագիտական էտյուդներ [Armenian studies sketches] (in Armenian). Yerevan: Sovetakan Grogh. p. 204. ...ըստ ավանդության, Գրիգոր Լուսավորիչը ամփոփել է ս. Կարապետի և Աթանագինե եպիսկոպոսի նշխարները։  ^ Matthew Hancock (June 12, 2004). "There's only one São João". The Guardian. London. Retrieved February 14, 2010.  ^ "Pietre-Stones Review of Freemasonry". Freemasons-freemasonry.com. Retrieved February 14, 2010. 

Sources[edit]

Books on John the Baptist

Brooks Hansen (2009) John the Baptizer: A Novel. New York: W. W. Norton. ISBN 978-0-393-06947-1 Murphy, Catherine M. (2003) John the Baptist: Prophet
Prophet
of Purity for a New Age. Collegeville: Liturgical Press. ISBN 0-8146-5933-0 Taylor, Joan E. (1997) The Immerser: John the Baptist
John the Baptist
within Second Temple Judaism. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans. ISBN 0-8028-4236-4 W. Barnes Tatum (1994) John the Baptist
John the Baptist
and Jesus: A Report of the Jesus
Jesus
Seminar, Sonoma, California: Polebridge Press, 1994, ISBN 0-944344-42-9 Webb, Robert L. (1991) John the Baptizer and Prophet: a Socio-Historical Study. Wipf and Stock Publishers. ISBN 978-1-59752-986-0 (first published Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1991)

Islamic
Islamic
view

Rippin, A. "Yahya b. Zakariya". In P.J. Bearman; Th. Bianquis; C.E. Bosworth; E. van Donzel; W.P. Heinrichs. Encyclopaedia of Islam Online. Brill Academic Publishers. ISSN 1573-3912.  J.C.L Gibson, John the Baptist
John the Baptist
in Muslim
Muslim
writings, in MW, xlv (1955), 334–345

Passages in the Quran

Appraisals for Yahya: 6:85, 19:7, 19:12, 19:13, 19:14, 19:15 Yahya's prophecy: 3:39, 6:85, 19:12

External links[edit]

Find more aboutJohn the Baptistat's sister projects

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John the Baptist
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Impenitent thief
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Joseph
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Nicodemus
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Aeneas Agabus Ananias (Damascus) Ananias (Judaea) Ananias son of Nedebeus Apollos Aquila Aristarchus Barnabas Blastus Cornelius Demetrius Dionysius Dorcas Elymas Egyptian Ethiopian eunuch Eutychus Gamaliel James, brother of Jesus Jason Joseph
Joseph
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Evangelist cousin of Barnabas

Mary, mother of (John) Mark Matthias Mnason Nicanor Nicholas Parmenas Paul Philip Priscilla Prochorus Publius Rhoda Sapphira Sceva Seven Deacons Silas / Silvanus Simeon Niger Simon Magus Sopater Sosthenes Stephen Theudas Timothy Titus Trophimus Tychicus Zenas

Romans Herod's family

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Antipas Archelaus Herod the Great Herodias Longinus Philip Pilate Pilate's wife Quirinius Salome Tiberius

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Epistles

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Jesus
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Archangels

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Confessors

Anatolius Chariton the Confessor Edward the Confessor Maximus the Confessor Michael of Synnada Paphnutius the Confessor Paul I of Constantinople Salonius Theophanes the Confessor

Disciples

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Doctors

Gregory the Great Ambrose Augustine of Hippo Jerome John Chrysostom Basil of Caesarea Gregory of Nazianzus Athanasius of Alexandria Cyril of Alexandria Cyril of Jerusalem John of Damascus Bede
Bede
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Evangelists

Matthew Mark Luke John

Church Fathers

Alexander of Alexandria Alexander of Jerusalem Ambrose
Ambrose
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Cyprian
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Irenaeus
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Jerome
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Patriarchs

Adam Abel Abraham Isaac Jacob Joseph Joseph
Joseph
(father of Jesus) David Noah Solomon Matriarchs

Popes

Adeodatus I Adeodatus II Adrian III Agapetus I Agatho Alexander I Anacletus Anastasius I Anicetus Anterus Benedict II Boniface I Boniface IV Caius Callixtus I Celestine I Celestine V Clement I Cornelius Damasus I Dionysius Eleuterus Eugene I Eusebius Eutychian Evaristus Fabian Felix I Felix III Felix IV Gelasius I Gregory I Gregory II Gregory III Gregory VII Hilarius Hormisdas Hyginus Innocent I John I John XXIII John Paul II Julius I Leo I Leo II Leo III Leo IV Leo IX Linus Lucius I Marcellinus Marcellus I Mark Martin I Miltiades Nicholas I Paschal I Paul I Peter Pius I Pius V Pius X Pontian Sergius I Silverius Simplicius Siricius Sixtus I Sixtus II Sixtus III Soter Stephen I Stephen IV Sylvester I Symmachus Telesphorus Urban I Victor I Vitalian Zachary Zephyrinus Zosimus

Prophets

Agabus Amos Anna Baruch ben Neriah David Dalua Elijah Ezekiel Habakkuk Haggai Hosea Isaiah Jeremiah Job Joel John the Baptist Jonah Judas Barsabbas Malachi Melchizedek Micah Moses Nahum Obadiah Samuel Seven Maccabees and their mother Simeon Zechariah (prophet) Zechariah (NT) Zephaniah

Virgins

Agatha of Sicily Agnes of Rome Bernadette Soubirous Brigid of Kildare Cecilia Clare of Assisi Eulalia of Mérida Euphemia Genevieve Kateri Tekakwitha Lucy of Syracuse Maria Goretti Mother Teresa Narcisa de Jesús Rose of Lima

See also

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Catholicism portal Saints portal

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Theotokos

Our Lady of Assiut Our Lady of Warraq Our Lady of Zeitoun

,

,

,

Seven Archangels

Michael Gabriel Raphael Suriel Zedekiel Sarathiel Aniel

Patriarchs

Abraham Isaac Jacob Joseph

Prophets

Moses Job Samuel David Hosea Amos Micah Joel Obadiah Jonah Nahum Habakkuk Zephaniah Haggai Zechariah Malachi Isaiah Jeremiah Baruch Ezekiel Daniel John the Baptist

Apostles

Andrew Bartholomew James, son of Alphaeus James, son of Zebedee John Jude Matthew Matthias Peter Philip Simon Thomas

Evangelists

Matthew Mark Luke John

Disciples

Apollos Barnabas Mary Magdalene Philemon Priscilla and Aquila Silvanus Stephen Timothy Titus Seventy disciples

Martyrs

21 martyrs in Libya Abāmūn Abāmūn Abanoub Abaskhiron Alexandrian Martyrs Apollonia Barbara Bashnouna Basilides Catherine Chiaffredo Theodore Stratelates Chrysanthus Colluthus Cyprian Cyrus Sarah Damian Daria Dasya George Demiana Dorothea Epimachus Faustus, Abibus and Dionysius Felix Gallicanus George el-Mozahem Gereon Theban Legion Varus Theodora and Didymus Hor, Besoy, and Daydara Otimus Memnon Rais Imbaba Martyrs John Moura John of Senhout Elias and four companions Justina Kosheh Martyrs Saint
Saint
Marina the Martyr Malati Maspero Martyrs Maurice Menas Mohrael Nah Hammadi Philotheos Potamiana Regula Sidhom Bishay Thecla Theoclia Veronica Wanas Wadamoun

Popes

Mark I Anianus Avilius Kedron Primus Justus Eumenes Markianos Celadion Agrippinus Julian Demetrius I Heraclas Dionysius Maximus Theonas Peter I Achillas Alexander I Athanasius I Peter II Timothy I Theophilus I Cyril I Dioscorus I Timothy II Peter III Athanasius II John I John II Dioscorus II Timothy III Theodosius I Peter IV Damian Anastasius Andronicus Benjamin I Agathon John III Isaac Simeon I Alexander II Cosmas I Theodore I Michael I Mina I John IV Mark II James Simeon II Joseph
Joseph
I Michael II Cosmas II Shenouda I Michael III Gabriel
Gabriel
I Cosmas III Macarius I Theophanes Mina II Abraham Philotheos Zacharias Shenouda II Christodolos Cyril II Michael IV Macarius II Gabriel
Gabriel
II Michael V John V Mark III John VI Cyril III Athanasius III John VII Gabriel
Gabriel
III John VII Theodosius III John VIII John IX Benjamin II Peter V Mark IV John X Gabriel
Gabriel
IV Matthew I Cyril VI Shenouda III Tawadros II (current)

Bishops

Abadiu of Antinoe Abraam of Faiyum Alexander of Jerusalem Amun of Scetes Athanasius of Beni Suef Basil of Caesarea Cyril of Jerusalem Epiphanius of Cyprus Eusebius
Eusebius
of Caesarea Gregory of Nyssa Gregory of Neocaesarea Hadra of Aswan Ignatius of Antioch Isidorus of Hermonpolis Jacob
Jacob
of Nisibis James of Cairo James of Jerusalem John of Nikiu John of Jerusalem Karas of California Macarius of Edkow Mikhaeil of Asyut Narcissus of Jerusalem Nicholas of Myra Paphnutius of Scetes Paphnutius of Thebes Peter Elrahawy of Gaza Pisentius of Qift Pisentius of Hermonthis Pisora of Masil Polycarp
Polycarp
of Smyrna Porphyry of Gaza Ptolemy of Minuf Psote
Psote
of Ebsay Sarapamon of Monufia Sarapamon of Niku Serapion of Thmuis Severian of Gabala Yousab el-Abah of Girga Timothy of Ansena Zacharias of Sakha

Anchorites

Annasimon Babnuda Balamon Elisa Ezekiel Ghalion Hedra Hermina Karas Keriakos Latsoun Mary Misael Olaghi Onuphrius Paphnutius Paul Pijimi Shenouda Silas Stephanos Stratios Timothy Thomas Yousab Zosimas

Monks

Ababius Abdel Messih El-Makari Abib and Apollo Abraham
Abraham
of Farshut Abraham
Abraham
of Scetes Amun Anthony the Great Awgin Bashnouna Hilarion Isaac
Isaac
of Nineveh Isidore of Pelusium John Climacus John the Dwarf Macarius of Alexandria Macarius of Egypt Moses
Moses
the Black Mother Irini Hospitius Nilus of Sinai Pachomius the Great Pambo Parsoma Paul of Thebes Paul of Tammah Paul the Simple Patapios of Thebes Pishoy Poemen Samuel
Samuel
the Confessor Saint
Saint
Patapios of Thebes Tekle Haymanot Clement of Alexandria Sisoes the Great Theodorus of Tabennese Theodora of Alexandria

Other Saints

Ambrose Didymus the Blind Euphrosyne Freig Candidus Simon the Tanner Verena

Oriental Orthodoxy portal

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Prophets in the New Testament

Canonical gospels

Anna Elizabeth Jesus John the Baptist Joseph Mary Simeon Zechariah

Acts of the Apostles

Agabus Ananias of Damascus Barnabas Judas Barsabbas Lucius of Cyrene Manahen Paul Philip the Evangelist Silas Simeon Niger

Epistles and Revelation

John of Patmos The Two Witnesses

Note: Italics denote that the status as a prophet is not universally accepted.

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Prophets in the Quran

آدم إدريس نوح هود صالح إبراهيم لوط إسماعيل

Adam Adam

Idris Enoch (?)

Nuh Noah

Hud Eber
Eber
(?)

Saleh Salah (?)

Ibrahim Abraham

Lut Lot

Ismail Ishmael

إسحاق يعقوب يوسف أيوب شُعيب موسى هارون ذو الكفل داود

Is'haq Isaac

Yaqub Jacob

Yusuf Joseph

Ayyub Job

Shuayb Jethro (?)

Musa Moses

Harun Aaron

Dhul-Kifl Ezekiel
Ezekiel
(?)

Daud David

سليمان إلياس إليسع يونس زكريا يحيى عيسى مُحمد

Sulaiman Solomon

Ilyas Elijah

Al-Yasa Elisha

Yunus Jonah

Zakaria Zechariah

Yahya John

Isa Jesus

Muhammad Muhammad

Note: Muslims believe that there were many prophets sent by God
God
to mankind. The Islamic
Islamic
prophets above are only the ones mentioned by name in the Quran.

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People and things in the Quran

Characters

Non-humans

Allâh ("The God")

Names of Allah
Allah
found in the Quran

Beings in Paradise

Ghilmān or Wildān Ḥūr

Animals

Related

The baqarah (cow) of Israelites The dhi’b (wolf) that Jacob
Jacob
feared could attack Joseph The fīl (elephant) of the Abyssinians) Ḥimār (Domesticated donkey) The hud-hud (hoopoe) of Solomon The kalb (dog) of the sleepers of the cave The nāqaṫ (she-camel) of Saleh The nūn (fish or whale) of Jonah

Non-related

Ḥimār (Wild ass) Qaswarah
Qaswarah
('Lion', 'Beast of prey' or 'Hunter')

Jinns

‘Ifrîṫ ("Strong one") Mârid ("Rebellious one")

Iblīs the Shayṭān (Devil)

Qarīn

Prophets

Mentioned

Ādam (Adam) Al-Yasa‘ (Elisha) Ayyūb (Job) Dāwūd (David) Dhūl-Kifl (Ezekiel?) Hārūn (Aaron) Hūd (Eber?) Idrīs (Enoch?) Ilyās (Elijah) ‘Imrān (Joachim the father of Maryam) Is-ḥāq (Isaac) Ismā‘īl (Ishmael)

Dhabih Ullah

Isma'il Ṣādiq al-Wa‘d (Fulfiller of the Promise) Lūṭ (Lot) Ṣāliḥ Shu‘ayb (Jethro, Reuel or Hobab?) Sulaymān ibn Dāwūd ( Solomon
Solomon
son of David) ‘ Uzair
Uzair
(Ezra?) Yaḥyā ibn Zakariyyā ( John the Baptist
John the Baptist
the son of Zechariah) Ya‘qūb (Jacob)

Isrâ’îl (Israel)

Yūnus (Jonah)

Dhūn-Nūn ("He of the Fish
Fish
(or Whale)" or "Owner of the Fish
Fish
(or Whale)") Ṣāḥib al-Ḥūṫ ("Companion of the Whale")

Yūsuf ibn Ya‘qūb ( Joseph
Joseph
son of Jacob) Zakariyyā (Zechariah)

Ulu-l-‘Azm

Muḥammad

Aḥmad Other names and titles of Muhammad

ʿĪsā (Jesus)

Al-Masīḥ (The Messiah) Ibn Maryam (Son of Mary)

Mūsā Kalīmullāh ( Moses
Moses
He who spoke to God) Ibrāhīm Khalīlullāh ( Abraham
Abraham
Friend of God) Nūḥ (Noah)

Debatable ones

Dhūl-Qarnain (Cyrus the Great?) Luqmân Maryam (Mary) Ṭâlûṫ (Saul or Gideon?)

Implied

Irmiyā (Jeremiah) Ṣamû’îl (Samuel) Yūsha‘ ibn Nūn (Joshua, companion and successor of Moses)

People of Prophets

Evil ones

Āzar (possibly Terah) Fir‘awn ( Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of Moses' time) Hāmān Jâlûṫ (Goliath) Qārūn (Korah, cousin of Moses) As-Sāmirī Abî Lahab Slayers of Saleh's she-camel (Qaddar ibn Salif and Musda' ibn Dahr)

Good ones

Adam's immediate relatives

Martyred son Wife

Believer of Ya-Sin Family of Noah

Father Lamech Mother Shamkhah bint Anush or Betenos

Luqman's son People of Aaron
Aaron
and Moses

Believer of Fir'aun Family (Hizbil/Hizqil ibn Sabura) Imra’aṫ Fir‘awn (Âsiyá bint Muzâḥim or Bithiah) Khidr Magicians of the Pharaoh Moses' wife Moses' sister-in-law Mother Sister

People of Abraham

Mother Abiona or Amtelai the daughter of Karnebo Ishmael's mother Isaac's mother

People of Jesus

Disciples (including Peter) Mary's mother Zechariah's wife

People of Joseph

Brothers (including Binyāmin (Benjamin) and Simeon) Egyptians

‘Azîz (Potiphar, Qatafir or Qittin) Malik (King Ar-Rayyân ibn Al-Walîd)) Wife of ‘Azîz (Zulaykhah)

Mother

People of Solomon

Mother Queen of Sheba Vizier

Zayd

Implied or not specified

Abrahah Bal'am/Balaam Barsisa Caleb or Kaleb the companion of Joshua Luqman's son Nebuchadnezzar II Nimrod Rahmah the wife of Ayyub Shaddad

Groups

Mentioned

Aş-ḥāb al-Jannah

People of Paradise People of the Burnt Garden

Aş-ḥāb as-Sabṫ (Companions of the Sabbath) Christian
Christian
apostles

Ḥawāriyyūn (Disciples of Jesus)

Companions of Noah's Ark Aş-ḥāb al-Kahf war-Raqīm (Companions of the Cave and Al-Raqaim? Companions of the Elephant People of al-Ukhdūd People of a township in Surah Ya-Sin People of Yathrib or Medina Qawm Lûṭ (People of Sodom and Gomorrah) Nation of Noah

Tribes, ethnicities or families

A‘rāb (Arabs or Bedouins)

ʿĀd (people of Hud) Companions of the Rass Qawm Ṫubba‘ (People of Tubba')

People of Saba’ or Sheba

Quraysh Thamûd (people of Saleh)

Aṣ-ḥâb al-Ḥijr ("Companions of the Stoneland")

Ajam Ar- Rûm (literally "The Romans") Banî Isrâ’îl (Children of Israel) Mu’ṫafikāṫ (The overthrown cities of Sodom and Gomorrah) People of Ibrahim People of Ilyas People of Nuh People of Shuaib

Ahl Madyan People of Madyan) Aṣ-ḥāb al-Aykah
Aṣ-ḥāb al-Aykah
("Companions of the Wood")

Qawm Yûnus (People of Jonah) Ya'juj and Ma'juj/Gog and Magog Ahl al-Bayṫ ("People of the Household")

Household of Abraham

Brothers of Yūsuf Daughters of Abraham's nephew Lot (Ritha, Za'ura, et al.) Progeny of Imran Household of Moses Household of Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Abdullah ibn Abdul-Muttalib ibn Hashim

Daughters of Muhammad Wives of Muhammad

Household of Salih

People of Fir'aun Current Ummah of Islam
Islam
(Ummah of Muhammad)

Aṣ-ḥāb Muḥammad (Companions of Muhammad)

Muhajirun (Emigrants) Anṣār Muslims of Medina
Medina
who helped Muhammad
Muhammad
and his Meccan followers, literally 'Helpers')

People of Mecca

Umm Jamil (wife of Abu Lahab)

Children of Ayyub Dead son of Sulaiman Qabil/Cain (son of Adam) Wali'ah or Wa'ilah/Waala (wife of Nuh) Walihah or Wahilah (wife of Lut) Ya’jūj wa Ma’jūj (Gog and Magog) Yam or Kan'an (son of Nuh)

Implicitly mentioned

Amalek Ahl al-Suffa (People of the Verandah) Banu Nadir Banu Qaynuqa Banu Qurayza Iranian people Umayyad Dynasty Aus & Khazraj People of Quba

Religious groups

Ahl al-dhimmah (Dhimmi) Kâfirûn (Infidels) Zoroastrians Munāfiqūn (Hypocrites) Muslims People of the Book (Ahl al-Kiṫāb)

Naṣārā (Christian(s) or People of the Injil)

Ruhban ( Christian
Christian
monks) Qissis ( Christian
Christian
priest)

Yahūd (Jews)

Ahbār ( Jewish
Jewish
scholars) Rabbani/Rabbi

Sabians

Polytheists

Meccan polytheists at the time of Muhammad Mesopotamian polytheists at the time of Abraham
Abraham
and Lot

Locations

Mentioned

Al-Arḍ Al-Mubārakah
Al-Arḍ Al-Mubārakah
("The Land The Blessed")

Al-Arḍ Al-Muqaddasah ("The Land The Holy")

In the Arabian Peninsula
Arabian Peninsula
(excluding Madyan)

Al-Aḥqāf ("The Sandy Plains," or "the Wind-curved Sand-hills")

Iram dhāṫ al-‘Imād (Iram of the Pillars)

Al-Madīnah (formerly Yathrib) ‘Arafāṫ Al-Ḥijr (Hegra) Badr Ḥunayn Makkah (Mecca)

Bakkah Ka‘bah (Kaaba) Maqām Ibrāhīm (Station of Abraham) Safa and Marwah

Saba’ (Sheba)

‘Arim Saba’ (Dam of Sheba)

Rass

Jahannam
Jahannam
(Hell) Jannah
Jannah
(Paradise, literally 'Garden') In Mesopotamia:

Al-Jūdiyy

Munzalanm-Mubārakan ("Place-of-Landing Blessed")

Bābil (Babylon) Qaryaṫ Yūnus ("Township of Jonah," that is Nineveh)

Door of Hittah Madyan (Midian) Majma' al-Bahrain Miṣr (Mainland Egypt) Salsabîl (A river in Paradise) Sinai Region or Tīh Desert

Al-Wād Al-Muqaddas Ṭuwan (The Holy Valley of Tuwa)

Al-Wādil-Ayman (The valley on the 'righthand' side of the Valley of Tuwa and Mount Sinai)

Mount Sinai
Mount Sinai
or Mount Tabor

Implied

Antioch

Antakya

Arabia Ayla Barrier of Dhul-Qarnayn Bayt al-Muqaddas
Bayt al-Muqaddas
& 'Ariha Bilād ar-Rāfidayn (Mesopotamia) Canaan Cave of Seven Sleepers Dār al-Nadwa Al-Ḥijāz (literally "The Barrier")

Black Stone
Black Stone
(Al-Ḥajar al-Aswad) & Al-Hijr of Isma'il Cave of Hira
Hira
& Ghar al-Thawr (Cave of the Bull) Ta'if

Hudaybiyyah Jordan
Jordan
River Nile
Nile
River Palestine River Paradise
Paradise
of Shaddad

Religious locations

Bay'a (Church) Mihrab Monastery Masjid (Mosque, literally "Place of Prostration")

Al-Mash‘ar Al-Ḥarām
Al-Mash‘ar Al-Ḥarām
("The Monument the Sacred") Al-Masjid Al-Aqṣā (Al-Aqsa Mosque, literally "The Place-of-Prostration The Farthest") Al-Masjid Al-Ḥarām (The Sacred Mosque
Mosque
of Mecca) Masjid al-Dirar A Mosque
Mosque
in the area of Medina, possibly:

Masjid Qubâ’ (Quba Mosque) The Prophet's Mosque

Salat (Synagogue)

Plant
Plant
matter

Fruits

Ḥabb dhul-‘aṣf (Corn of the husk) Rummān (Pomegranate) Ṫīn (Fig) Ukul khamṭ (Bitter fruit or food of Sheba) Zayṫūn (Olive) In Paradise

Forbidden fruit of Adam

Bushes, trees or plants

Plants of Sheba

Athl (Tamarisk) Sidr (lote-tree)

Līnah (Tender palm tree) Nakhl (date palm) Rayḥān (Scented plant) Sidraṫ al-Munṫahā Zaqqūm

Texts

Al-Injîl (The Gospel
Gospel
of Jesus) Al-Qur’ân (The Book of Muhammad) Ṣuḥuf-i Ibrâhîm (Scroll(s) of Abraham) Aṫ-Ṫawrâṫ (The Torah)

Ṣuḥuf-i-Mûsâ (Scroll(s) of Moses) Tablets of Stone

Az-Zabûr (The Psalms
Psalms
of David) Umm al-Kiṫâb ("Mother of the Book(s)")

Objects of people or beings

Heavenly Food of Christian
Christian
Apostles Noah's Ark Staff of Musa Ṫābūṫ as-Sakīnah (Casket of Shekhinah) Throne of Bilqis Trumpet of Israfil

Mentioned idols (cult images)

'Ansāb Idols of Israelites:

Baal The ‘ijl (golden calf statue) of Israelites

Idols of Noah's people:

Nasr Suwā‘ Wadd Yaghūth Ya‘ūq

Idols of Quraysh:

Al-Lāṫ Al-‘Uzzá Manāṫ

Jibṫ and Ṭâghûṫ

Celestial bodies

Maṣābīḥ (literally 'lamps'):

Al-Qamar (The Moon) Kawâkib (Planets)

Al-Arḍ (The Earth)

Nujūm (Stars)

Ash-Shams (The Sun)

Liquids

Mā’ ( Water
Water
or fluid)

Nahr (River) Yamm ( River
River
or sea)

Sharâb (Drink)

Events

Battle of al-Aḥzāb ("the Confederates") Battle of Badr Battle of Hunayn Battle of Khaybar Battle of Tabouk Battle of Uhud Conquest of Mecca Incident of Ifk Laylat al-Mabit Mubahala Sayl al-‘Arim
Sayl al-‘Arim
(Flood of the Great Dam of Marib
Marib
in Sheba) The Farewell Pilgrimage
The Farewell Pilgrimage
(Hujja al-Wada') Treaty of Hudaybiyyah Umrah al-Qaza Yawm al-Dār

Implied

Event of Ghadir Khumm

Note: The names are sorted alphabetically. Standard form: Islamic
Islamic
name / Biblical
Biblical
name (title or relationship)

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Precursors in religion

Precursors

Asita Báb Bahira
Bahira
(Sergius) John the Baptist Sayyid Kazim Rashti Shaykh Ahmad

v t e

Jesus

Historicity

Chronology of Jesus Genealogy of Jesus Historical Jesus

Quest for the historical Jesus portraits sources Josephus on Jesus Tacitus mention Mara bar Serapion letter

Historicity

Gospels race and appearance

Life events

Birth

Nativity Mary Joseph Flight into Egypt

Childhood Unknown years Baptism Temptation Apostles

selecting Great Commission

Ministry Sermon on the Mount

Plain

Prayers

Lord's Prayer

Parables Miracles Transfiguration Homelessness Last Supper Passion

arrest trial

Crucifixion

sayings on the cross

Tomb Resurrection Ascension

New Testament

Gospels

Matthew Mark Luke John Gospel
Gospel
harmony Oral gospel traditions

Life of Jesus
Jesus
in the New Testament Historical background of the New Testament New Testament
New Testament
places associated with Jesus Names and titles of Jesus
Jesus
in the New Testament

Culture

Language of Jesus Bibliography Films

Christianity

Christ Christianity Christology Depictions of Jesus

art

Jesus
Jesus
in Christianity

pre-existence incarnation

Relics associated with Jesus Scholastic Lutheran Christology Second Coming Session of Christ

Other views

Brothers of Jesus Holy Family Jesuism Jesus
Jesus
in comparative mythology Christ myth theory Jesus
Jesus
in Islam

Ahmadiyya

Jesus
Jesus
in Scientology Judaism's view of Jesus

in the Talmud

Master Jesus Religious perspectives on Jesus Criticism

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 27863229 ISNI: 0000 0000 8705 0

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