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Johann Palisa
Johann Palisa
(December 6, 1848 – May 2, 1925) was an Austrian astronomer, born in Troppau
Troppau
in Austrian Silesia
Austrian Silesia
(now in the Czech Republic).[1] He was a prolific discoverer of asteroids, discovering 122 in all, from 136 Austria
Austria
in 1874 to 1073 Gellivara in 1923. Some of his notable discoveries include 153 Hilda, 216 Kleopatra, 243 Ida, 253 Mathilde, 324 Bamberga, and the Amor asteroid
Amor asteroid
719 Albert. He was awarded the Valz Prize
Valz Prize
from the French Academy of Sciences
French Academy of Sciences
in 1906.[2] The Phocaea main-belt asteroid 914 Palisana, discovered by Max Wolf in 1919, and the lunar crater Palisa were named in his honour.[3]

Contents

1 Early work 2 Discoveries

2.1 List of discovered asteroids

3 References 4 External links

4.1 Obituaries

Early work[edit]

A view of the City of Pula

From 1866 to 1870, Palisa studied mathematics and astronomy at the University of Vienna; however, he did not graduate until 1884. Despite this, by 1870 he was an assistant at the University's observatory, and a year later gained a position at the observatory in Geneva. A few years later, in 1872, at the age of 24, Palisa became the director of the Austrian Naval Observatory in Pula. While at Pula, he discovered his first asteroid, 136 Austria, on March 18, 1874. Along with this, he discovered twenty-seven minor planets and one comet. During his stay in Pula
Pula
he used a small six-inch refractor telescope to aid in his research.[1]

Discoveries[edit]

253 Mathilde
253 Mathilde
(imaged by NEAR)

Between 1874 and 1923 Palisa discovered 122 asteroids ranging from 136 Austria
Austria
to 1073 Gellivara and the much later numbered Mars-crosser 14309 Defoy, respectively (see table below).[4] He worked from Pola and Vienna. He also discovered the parabolic comet C/1879 Q1 in the year 1879.[1][5] One of his discoveries was 253 Mathilde, which was visited by the spacecraft NEAR Shoemaker
NEAR Shoemaker
on June 27, 1997. The robotic probe passed within 1200 km of Mathilde at 12:56 UT at 9.93 km/s, returning imaging and other instrument data including over 500 images which covered 60% of Mathilde's surface.[6] List of discovered asteroids[edit]

Discoveries by Johann Palisa
Johann Palisa
(i)

136 Austria March 18, 1874

137 Meliboea April 21, 1874

140 Siwa October 13, 1874

142 Polana January 28, 1875

143 Adria February 23, 1875

151 Abundantia November 1, 1875

153 Hilda November 2, 1875

155 Scylla November 8, 1875

156 Xanthippe November 22, 1875

178 Belisana November 6, 1877

182 Elsa February 7, 1878

183 Istria February 8, 1878

184 Dejopeja February 28, 1878

192 Nausikaa February 17, 1879

195 Eurykleia April 19, 1879

197 Arete May 21, 1879

201 Penelope August 7, 1879

204 Kallisto October 8, 1879

205 Martha October 13, 1879

207 Hedda October 17, 1879

208 Lacrimosa October 21, 1879

210 Isabella November 12, 1879

211 Isolda December 10, 1879

212 Medea February 6, 1880

214 Aschera February 29, 1880

216 Kleopatra April 10, 1880

218 Bianca September 4, 1880

219 Thusnelda September 30, 1880

220 Stephania May 19, 1881

221 Eos January 18, 1882

222 Lucia February 9, 1882

223 Rosa March 9, 1882

224 Oceana March 30, 1882

225 Henrietta April 19, 1882

226 Weringia July 19, 1882

228 Agathe August 19, 1882

229 Adelinda August 22, 1882

231 Vindobona September 10, 1882

232 Russia January 31, 1883

235 Carolina November 28, 1883

236 Honoria April 26, 1884

Discoveries by Johann Palisa
Johann Palisa
(ii)

237 Coelestina June 27, 1884

239 Adrastea August 18, 1884

242 Kriemhild September 22, 1884

243 Ida September 29, 1884

244 Sita October 14, 1884

248 Lameia June 5, 1885

250 Bettina September 3, 1885

251 Sophia October 4, 1885

253 Mathilde November 12, 1885

254 Augusta March 31, 1886

255 Oppavia March 31, 1886

256 Walpurga April 3, 1886

257 Silesia April 5, 1886

260 Huberta October 3, 1886

262 Valda November 3, 1886

263 Dresda November 3, 1886

265 Anna February 25, 1887

266 Aline May 17, 1887

269 Justitia September 21, 1887

273 Atropos March 8, 1888

274 Philagoria April 3, 1888

275 Sapientia April 15, 1888

276 Adelheid April 17, 1888

278 Paulina May 16, 1888

279 Thule October 25, 1888

280 Philia October 29, 1888

281 Lucretia October 31, 1888

286 Iclea August 3, 1889

290 Bruna March 20, 1890

291 Alice April 25, 1890

292 Ludovica April 25, 1890

295 Theresia August 17, 1890

299 Thora October 6, 1890

301 Bavaria November 16, 1890

304 Olga February 14, 1891

309 Fraternitas April 6, 1891

313 Chaldaea August 30, 1891

315 Constantia September 4, 1891

320 Katharina October 11, 1891

321 Florentina October 15, 1891

324 Bamberga February 25, 1892

Discoveries by Johann Palisa
Johann Palisa
(iii)

326 Tamara March 19, 1892

569 Misa July 27, 1905

583 Klotilde December 31, 1905

652 Jubilatrix November 4, 1907

671 Carnegia September 21, 1908

687 Tinette August 16, 1909

688 Melanie August 25, 1909

689 Zita September 12, 1909

703 Noëmi October 3, 1910

710 Gertrud February 28, 1911

711 Marmulla March 1, 1911

716 Berkeley July 30, 1911

718 Erida September 29, 1911

719 Albert October 3, 1911

722 Frieda October 18, 1911

723 Hammonia October 21, 1911

724 Hapag October 21, 1911

725 Amanda October 21, 1911

728 Leonisis February 16, 1912

730 Athanasia April 10, 1912

734 Benda October 11, 1912

750 Oskar April 28, 1913

782 Montefiore March 18, 1914

783 Nora March 18, 1914

794 Irenaea August 27, 1914

795 Fini September 26, 1914

803 Picka March 21, 1915

827 Wolfiana August 29, 1916

828 Lindemannia August 29, 1916

867 Kovacia February 25, 1917

876 Scott June 20, 1917

902 Probitas September 3, 1918

903 Nealley September 13, 1918

932 Hooveria March 23, 1920

941 Murray October 10, 1920

964 Subamara October 27, 1921

975 Perseverantia March 27, 1922

996 Hilaritas March 21, 1923

1073 Gellivara September 14, 1923

14309 Defoy September 22, 1908

References[edit]

^ a b c Herbert Raab. "Johann Palisa, the most successful visual discoverer of asteroids" (PDF). Astrometrica. Retrieved 3 July 2016.  ^ Lockyer, Sir Norman (January 3, 1907). "Prizes Awarded and Proposed by the Paris Academy of Sciences". Nature. 75 (1940): 231. Bibcode:1907Natur..75R.231.. doi:10.1038/075231b0.  ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (914) Palisana. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 82. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 3 July 2016.  ^ "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 23 May 2016. Retrieved 28 June 2016.  ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: C/1879 Q1 (Palisa)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 3 July 2016.  ^ Williams, David R. (December 18, 2001). "NEAR Flyby of Asteroid
Asteroid
253 Mathilde". NASA. Retrieved 2006-08-10. 

External links[edit]

Portraits of Johann Palisa
Johann Palisa
from the Lick Observatory Records Digital Archive, UC Santa Cruz Library's Digital Collections

Obituaries[edit]

von Hepperger, J. (November 1925). "Anzeige des Todes von Johann Palisa". Astronomische Nachrichten (in German). 225 (7): 125–127. Bibcode:1925AN....225..125V. doi:10.1002/asna.19252250706. 

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 27810913 GND: 116018577 SUDOC: 174

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