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Jeremiah Sullivan Black (January 10, 1810 – August 19, 1883) was an American statesman and lawyer. He served as a Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Supreme Court Justice (1851–1857) and Chief Justice of Pennsylvania (1851–1854). He later served as U.S. Attorney General (1857–1860) and the U.S. Secretary of State (1860–1861) in the administration of President James Buchanan.

Contents

1 Early life 2 U.S. Attorney General and U.S. Secretary of State (1857–1861) 3 Later life 4 Family 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External links

Early life[edit] Jeremiah S. Black
Jeremiah S. Black
was born on January 10, 1810, in Stony Creek, Pennsylvania, near Glades, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Representative Henry Black, and Mary (Sullivan) Black. Jeremiah Black was largely self-educated and was admitted to the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
bar before he was of age. He gradually became one of the leading American lawyers, and was a member of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania (1851–57), serving as Chief Justice (1851–54).[1] U.S. Attorney General and U.S. Secretary of State (1857–1861)[edit] In 1857, he entered the Cabinet of President James Buchanan
James Buchanan
as Attorney General. In this capacity, he successfully contested the validity of the California land claims to about 19,000 square miles (49,000 km2) of land, fraudulently alleged to have been granted to land-grabbers and others by the Mexican government prior to the close of the Mexican–American War.[1] When Secretary of State Lewis Cass
Lewis Cass
resigned in December 1860, Black was appointed to replace him, serving from December 17, 1860, to the end of Buchanan's term on March 4, 1861.[1] Black successfully urged the appointment of Edwin M. Stanton
Edwin M. Stanton
as his successor as Attorney General. Black was perhaps the most influential of President Buchanan's official advisers too, during the secession crisis. He denied the constitutionality of secession, and urged that Fort Sumter
Fort Sumter
be properly reinforced and defended.[1] However, he also argued that a state could not be legally coerced by the Federal government.

President Buchanan and his Cabinet From left to right: Jacob Thompson, Lewis Cass, John B. Floyd, James Buchanan, Howell Cobb, Isaac Toucey, Joseph Holt
Joseph Holt
and Jeremiah S. Black, (c. 1859)

In February 1861, President Buchanan nominated him for a seat on the Supreme Court; but his nomination was defeated in the Senate by a single vote on February 21. He became Reporter of Decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States
United States
in 1861; but, after publishing the reports for the years 1861 and 1862, he resigned and devoted himself almost exclusively to his private law practice.[1]

Mathew Brady
Mathew Brady
portrait of Jeremiah S. Black, (c. 1860-1865)

Later life[edit] After the Civil War, he vigorously opposed the Congressional Plan for Reconstruction and drafted President Johnson's message vetoing the Reconstruction Act passed on March 2, 1867;[1] his veto was overridden. Black was also briefly Counsel for President Johnson in his trial on his Article of Impeachment
Impeachment
before the United States Senate, and for William W. Belknap, United States
United States
Secretary of War from 1869 to 1876, who in 1876 was impeached on a charge of corruption; he also represented Samuel J. Tilden
Samuel J. Tilden
during the contest for the presidency between Tilden and Rutherford B. Hayes.[1] He died there at the Brockie in York, Pennsylvania, on August 19, 1883, at the age of 73, and was buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery. Family[edit] On March 23, 1836, Black married the former Mary Forward (March 24, 1819 – February 24, 1897). They had four children, Rebecca Black, Chauncey Black, Henry Black, Jr. and Mary Sullivan Black. Further reading[edit]

Black, C. F., Essays and Speeches of Jeremiah S. Black, with a Biographical Sketch, New York: 1885.

Black's Supreme Court nomination

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g Chisholm 1911.

Attribution

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Black, Jeremiah Sullivan". Encyclopædia Britannica. 4 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 

External links[edit]

Works by or about Jeremiah S. Black
Jeremiah S. Black
at Internet Archive

Legal offices

Preceded by John Gibson Chief Justice of the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Supreme Court 1851–1854 Succeeded by Ellis Lewis

Preceded by Caleb Cushing United States
United States
Attorney General 1857–1860 Succeeded by Edwin Stanton

Preceded by Benjamin Howard United States
United States
Supreme Court Reporter of Decisions 1861–1862 Succeeded by John Wallace

Political offices

Preceded by Lewis Cass United States
United States
Secretary of State 1860–1861 Succeeded by William Seward

v t e

United States
United States
Secretaries of State

Secretary of Foreign Affairs 1781–89

R. Livingston Jay

Secretary of State 1789–present

Jefferson Randolph Pickering J. Marshall Madison Smith Monroe Adams Clay Van Buren E. Livingston McLane Forsyth Webster Upshur Calhoun Buchanan Clayton Webster Everett Marcy Cass Black Seward Washburne Fish Evarts Blaine Frelinghuysen Bayard Blaine Foster Gresham Olney Sherman Day Hay Root Bacon Knox Bryan Lansing Colby Hughes Kellogg Stimson Hull Stettinius Byrnes G. Marshall Acheson Dulles Herter Rusk Rogers Kissinger Vance Muskie Haig Shultz Baker Eagleburger Christopher Albright Powell Rice (tenure) Clinton (tenure) Kerry (tenure) Tillerson

v t e

United States
United States
Attorneys General

18th century

Randolph Bradford Lee

19th century

Lincoln Breckinridge Rodney Pinkney Rush Wirt Berrien Taney Butler Grundy Gilpin Crittenden Legaré Nelson Mason Clifford Toucey Johnson Crittenden Cushing Black Stanton Bates Speed Stanbery Evarts Hoar Akerman Williams Pierrepont Taft Devens MacVeagh Brewster Garland Miller Olney Harmon McKenna Griggs

20th century

Knox Moody Bonaparte Wickersham McReynolds Gregory Palmer Daugherty Stone Sargent W. D. Mitchell Cummings Murphy Jackson Biddle T. C. Clark McGrath McGranery Brownell Rogers Kennedy Katzenbach R. Clark J. N. Mitchell Kleindienst Richardson Saxbe Levi Bell Civiletti Smith Meese Thornburgh Barr Reno

21st century

Ashcroft Gonzales Mukasey Holder Lynch Sessions

v t e

Cabinet of President James Buchanan
James Buchanan
(1857–1861)

Secretary of State

Lewis Cass
Lewis Cass
(1857–1860) Jeremiah S. Black
Jeremiah S. Black
(1860–1861)

Secretary of the Treasury

Howell Cobb
Howell Cobb
(1857–1860) Philip F. Thomas (1860–1861) John A. Dix (1861)

Secretary of War

John B. Floyd
John B. Floyd
(1857–1860) Joseph Holt
Joseph Holt
(1860–1861)

Attorney General

Jeremiah S. Black
Jeremiah S. Black
(1857–1860) Edwin M. Stanton
Edwin M. Stanton
(1860–1861)

Postmaster General

Aaron V. Brown
Aaron V. Brown
(1857–1859) Joseph Holt
Joseph Holt
(1859–1860) Horatio King
Horatio King
(1861)

Secretary of the Navy

Isaac Toucey
Isaac Toucey
(1857–1861)

Secretary of the Interior

Jacob Thompson
Jacob Thompson
(1857–1861)

v t e

Chief Justices of Pennsylvania

18th Century

David Lloyd Jeremiah Langhorne James Logan William Allen Benjamin Chew Thomas McKean Edward Shippen, IV

19th Century

William Tilghman John Bannister Gibson Jeremiah S. Black Ellis Lewis Walter H. Lowrie George W. Woodward James Thompson John M. Read Daniel Agnew George Sharswood Ulysses Mercur Isaac G. Gordon Edward M. Paxson James P. Sterrett Henry Green J. Brewster McCollum

20th Century

James T. Mitchell D. Newlin Fell J. Hay Brown Robert von Moschzisker Robert S. Frazer John W. Kephart William I. Schaffer George W. Maxey James B. Drew Horace Stern Charles Alvin Jones John C. Bell Jr. Benjamin R. Jones Michael J. Eagen Henry X. O'Brien Samuel J. Roberts Robert N. C. Nix Jr. John P. Flaherty Jr. Ralph Cappy

21st Century

Ronald D. Castille Thomas G. Saylor

v t e

(1868 ←) United States
United States
presidential election, 1872 (1876 →)

Republican Party Convention

Nominee

Ulysses S. Grant

VP nominee

Henry Wilson

Liberal Republican Party

Nominee

Horace Greeley

VP nominee

Benjamin G. Brown

Candidates

Charles F. Adams Lyman Trumbull Benjamin G. Brown David Davis Andrew Curtin Salmon P. Chase

Democratic Party Convention

Nominee

Horace Greeley

VP nominee

Benjamin G. Brown

Candidates

Jeremiah S. Black James A. Bayard William S. Groesbeck

Third party and independent candidates

Labor Reform Party

Nominee

David Davis

VP nominee

Joel Parker

Candidates

Charles O'Conor
Charles O'Conor
(declined nomination)

People's (Equal Rights) Party

Nominee

Victoria Woodhull

VP nominee

Frederick Douglass

Other 1872 elections: House Senate

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 64054435 LCCN: n85239104 ISNI: 0000 0000 8388 6345 GND: 142396257 BNF: cb12205155j (data) SN

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