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James Naismith
James Naismith
(November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was a Canadian physical educator, physician, chaplain, sports coach and innovator.[1] He invented the game of basketball at age 30 in 1891. He wrote the original basketball rule book and founded the University of Kansas basketball program.[2] Naismith lived to see basketball adopted as an Olympic demonstration sport in 1904 and as an official event at the 1936 Summer Olympics
1936 Summer Olympics
in Berlin, as well as the birth of the National Invitation Tournament (1938) and the NCAA Tournament (1939). Born in Canada, Naismith studied physical education at McGill University in Montreal
Montreal
before moving to the United States, where he designed the game in late 1891 while teaching at the International YMCA
YMCA
Training School in Springfield, Massachusetts.[3] Seven years after inventing basketball, Naismith received his medical degree in Denver
Denver
in 1898. He then arrived at the University of Kansas, later becoming the Kansas
Kansas
Jayhawks' athletic director and coach.[4] While a coach at Kansas, Naismith coached Phog Allen, who later became the coach at Kansas
Kansas
for 39 seasons, beginning a lengthy and prestigious coaching tree. Allen then went on to coach legends including Adolph Rupp and Dean Smith, among others, who themselves coached many notable players and future coaches.[5] Despite coaching his final season in 1907, Naismith is still the only coach in Kansas
Kansas
men's basketball history with a losing record.

Contents

1 Early years 2 University of Kansas 3 Head coaching record 4 Legacy 5 Personal life 6 See also 7 References 8 External links

Early years[edit]

Sculpture, Almonte, Ontario

Naismith was born in 1861 in Almonte (now part of Mississippi Mills), Ontario, Canada
Canada
to Scottish immigrants.[6] He never had a middle name and never signed his name with the "A" initial. The "A" was added by someone in the administration at the University of Kansas.[nb 1] Struggling in school but gifted in farm labour, Naismith spent his days outside playing catch, hide-and-seek, or duck on a rock, a medieval game in which a person guards a large drake stone from opposing players, who try to knock it down by throwing smaller stones at it. To play duck on a rock most effectively, Naismith soon found that a soft lobbing shot was far more effective than a straight hard throw, a thought that later proved essential for the invention of basketball.[7] Orphaned early in his life, Naismith lived with his aunt and uncle for many years and attended grade school at Bennies Corners near Almonte. Then he enrolled in Almonte High School, in Almonte, Ontario, from which he graduated in 1883.[7] In the same year, Naismith entered McGill University
McGill University
in Montreal. Although described as a slight figure, standing 5 foot 10 ½ and listed at 178 pounds,[8] he was a talented and versatile athlete, representing McGill in Canadian football, lacrosse, rugby, soccer and gymnastics. He played centre on the football team, and made himself some padding to protect his ears. It was for personal use, not team use.[9] He won multiple Wicksteed medals for outstanding gymnastics performances.[10] Naismith earned a BA in Physical Education (1888) and a Diploma at the Presbyterian College in Montreal
Montreal
(1890).[7] From 1891 on, Naismith taught physical education and became the first McGill director of athletics, but then left Montreal
Montreal
to become a physical education teacher at the YMCA
YMCA
International Training School in Springfield, Massachusetts.[10][11] Springfield college: Invention of Basketball

Wikisource
Wikisource
has original text related to this article: Basket Ball

The original 1891 "Basket Ball" court in Springfield College. It used a peach basket attached to the wall.

At Springfield YMCA, Naismith struggled with a rowdy class that was confined to indoor games throughout the harsh New England
New England
winter and thus was perpetually short-tempered. Under orders from Dr. Luther Gulick, head of Springfield YMCA
YMCA
Physical Education, Naismith was given 14 days to create an indoor game that would provide an "athletic distraction": Gulick demanded that it would not take up much room, could help its track athletes to keep in shape[10] and explicitly emphasized to "make it fair for all players and not too rough."[8] In his attempt to think up a new game, Naismith was guided by three main thoughts.[7] Firstly, he analyzed the most popular games of those times (rugby, lacrosse, soccer, football, hockey, and baseball); Naismith noticed the hazards of a ball and concluded that the big soft soccer ball was safest. Secondly, he saw that most physical contact occurred while running with the ball, dribbling or hitting it, so he decided that passing was the only legal option. Finally, Naismith further reduced body contact by making the goal unguardable, namely placing it high above the player's heads. To score goals, he forced the players to throw a soft lobbing shot that had proven effective in his old favorite game duck on a rock. Naismith christened this new game "Basket Ball"[7] and put his thoughts together in 13 basic rules.[12] The first game of "Basket Ball" was played in December 1891. In a handwritten report, Naismith described the circumstances of the inaugural match; in contrast to modern basketball, the players played nine versus nine, handled a soccer ball, not a basketball, and instead of shooting at two hoops, the goals were a pair of peach baskets: "When Mr. Stubbins brot [sic] up the peach baskets to the gym I secured them on the inside of the railing of the gallery. This was about 10 feet from the floor, one at each end of the gymnasium. I then put the 13 rules on the bulletin board just behind the instructor's platform, secured a soccer ball and awaited the arrival of the class... The class did not show much enthusiasm but followed my lead... I then explained what they had to do to make goals, tossed the ball up between the two center men & tried to keep them somewhat near the rules. Most of the fouls were called for running with the ball, though tackling the man with the ball was not uncommon."[13] In contrast to modern basketball, the original rules did not include what is known today as the dribble. Since the ball could only be moved up the court via a pass early players tossed the ball over their heads as they ran up court. Also following each "goal" a jump ball was taken in the middle of the court. Both practices are obsolete in the rules of modern basketball.[14] In a radio interview in January 1939, Naismith gave more details of the first game and the initial rules that were used:

“I showed them two peach baskets I’d nailed up at each end of the gym, and I told them the idea was to throw the ball into the opposing team’s peach basket. I blew a whistle, and the first game of basketball began. … The boys began tackling, kicking and punching in the clinches. They ended up in a free-for-all in the middle of the gym floor. [The injury toll: several black eyes, one separated shoulder and one player knocked unconscious.] “It certainly was murder.” [Naismith changed some of the rules as part of his quest to develop a clean sport.] The most important one was that there should be no running with the ball. That stopped tackling and slugging. We tried out the game with those [new] rules (fouls), and we didn’t have one casualty.”[15]

By 1892, basketball had grown so popular on campus that Dennis Horkenbach (editor-in-chief of The Triangle, the Springfield college newspaper) featured it in an article called "A New Game",[6] and there were calls to call this new game "Naismith Ball", but Naismith refused.[7] By 1893, basketball was introduced internationally by the YMCA
YMCA
movement.[6] From Springfield, Naismith went to Denver
Denver
where he acquired a medical degree and in 1898 he joined the University of Kansas
Kansas
faculty at Lawrence, Kansas.[8] The family of Lambert G. Will has claimed that Dr. Naismith borrowed components for the game of basketball from Will to dispute Naismith's sole creation of the game, citing alleged photos and letters.[16][17] University of Kansas[edit]

1899 University of Kansas
University of Kansas
basketball team, with Dr. James Naismith
James Naismith
at the back, right

Basketball
Basketball
games at Allen Fieldhouse
Allen Fieldhouse
take place on the James Naismith Court

The University of Kansas
University of Kansas
men's basketball program officially began following Naismith's arrival in 1898, which was six years after Naismith drafted the sport's first official rules. Naismith was not initially hired to coach basketball, but rather as a chapel director and physical education instructor.[18] In those early days, the majority of the basketball games were played against nearby YMCA teams, with YMCAs across the nation having played an integral part in the birth of basketball. Other common opponents were Haskell Indian Nations University and William Jewell College. Under Naismith, the team played only one current Big 12
Big 12
school: Kansas
Kansas
State (once). Naismith was, ironically, the only coach in the program's history to have a losing record (55–60).[19] However, Naismith coached Forrest "Phog" Allen, his eventual successor at Kansas,[20] who went on to join his mentor in the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame.[21] When Allen became a coach himself and told him that he was going to coach basketball at Baker University
Baker University
in 1904, Naismith discouraged him: "You can't coach basketball; you just play it."[10] Instead, Allen embarked on a coaching career that would lead him to be known as "the Father of Basketball
Basketball
Coaching." During his time at Kansas, Allen coached Dean Smith
Dean Smith
(1952 National Championship team) and Adolph Rupp (1922 Helms Foundation National Championship team). Smith and Rupp have joined Naismith and Allen as members of the Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame. By the turn of the century, there were enough college teams in the East that the first intercollegiate competitions could be played out.[20] Although the sport continued to grow, Naismith long regarded the game as a curiosity and preferred gymnastics and wrestling as better forms of physical activity.[20] However, basketball became a demonstration sport at the 1904 Summer Olympics
1904 Summer Olympics
in St. Louis. As the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame reports, Naismith was also neither interested in self-promotion nor in the glory of competitive sports.[22] Instead, he was more interested in his physical education career, receiving an honorary PE Masters degree in 1910,[7] patrolled the Mexican border for four months in 1916, traveled to France, published two books (A Modern College in 1911 and Essence of a Healthy Life in 1918). He took American citizenship in 1925.[7] In 1909, Naismith's duties at Kansas
Kansas
were redefined as a Professorship; he served as the de facto athletic director at Kansas
Kansas
for much of the early 20th century. In 1935, the National Association of Basketball
Basketball
Coaches (created by Naismith's pupil Phog Allen) collected money so that the 74-year-old Naismith could witness the introduction of basketball into the official Olympic sports program of the 1936 Summer Olympic Games.[22] There, Naismith handed out the medals to three North American teams: United States, for the gold medal, Canada, for the silver medal, and Mexico, for their bronze medal win.[23] During the Olympics, he was named the honorary president of the International Basketball Federation.[7] When Naismith returned he commented that seeing the game played by many nations was the greatest compensation he could have received for his invention.[20] In 1937, Naismith played a role in the formation of the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball, which later became the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA).[24] Naismith became professor emeritus in Kansas
Kansas
when he retired in 1937 at the age of 76. Including his years as coach, Naismith served as athletic director and faculty at the school for a total of almost 40 years. Naismith died in 1939 after he suffered a fatal brain hemorrhage. He was interred at Memorial Park Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas. His masterwork "Basketball — its Origins and Development" was published posthumously in 1941.[7] In Lawrence, Kansas, James Naismith
James Naismith
has a road named in his honor, Naismith Drive, which runs in front of Allen Fieldhouse
Allen Fieldhouse
(the official address of Allen Fieldhouse is 1651 Naismith Drive), the university's basketball facility. The university also named the court in Allen Fieldhouse James Naismith
James Naismith
Court in his honor, despite Naismith having the worst record in school history. Naismith Hall, a college residential dormitory, is located on the northeastern edge of 19th Street and Naismith Drive.[25] Head coaching record[edit] In 1898, Naismith became the first basketball coach of the University of Kansas. He compiled a record of 55–60 and is ironically the only losing coach in Kansas
Kansas
history.[19] Naismith is at the beginning of a massive and prestigious coaching tree, as he coached Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame coach Phog Allen, who himself coached Hall of Fame coaches Dean Smith, Adolph Rupp, and Ralph Miller
Ralph Miller
who all coached future coaches as well.[20]

Season Team Wins Losses Win %

1898–99 Kansas 7 4 .636

1899–1900 Kansas 3 4 .429

1900–01 Kansas 4 8 .333

1901–02 Kansas 5 7 .417

1902–03 Kansas 7 8 .467

1903–04 Kansas 5 8 .385

1904–05 Kansas 5 6 .455

1905–06 Kansas 12 7 .632

1906–07 Kansas 7 8 .467

Total Kansas 55 60 .478

Legacy[edit]

Statue of James Naismith
James Naismith
at Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame and Museum in Springfield, MA

Naismith invented the game of basketball and wrote the original 13 rules of this sport as opposed to the NBA rule book which features 66 pages.[22] The Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts
Springfield, Massachusetts
is named in his honor, and he was an inaugural inductee in 1959.[22] The National Collegiate Athletic Association rewards its best players and coaches annually with the Naismith Awards, among them the Naismith College Player of the Year, the Naismith College Coach of the Year
Naismith College Coach of the Year
and the Naismith Prep Player of the Year. After the Olympic introduction to men's basketball in 1936, women's basketball became an Olympic event in Montreal
Montreal
during the 1976 Summer Olympics.[26] Naismith was also inducted into the Canadian Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame, the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame, the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame, the Ontario
Ontario
Sports Hall of Fame, the Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame, the McGill University
McGill University
Sports Hall of Fame, the Kansas
Kansas
State Sports Hall of Fame, FIBA Hall of Fame, and The Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame, which was named in his honor.[7][27] The FIBA Basketball
Basketball
World Cup trophy is named the "James Naismith Trophy" in his honour. On June 21, 2013, Dr. Naismith was inducted into the Kansas
Kansas
Hall of Fame during ceremonies in Topeka.[28] Naismith's home town of Almonte, Ontario, hosts an annual 3-on-3 tournament for all ages and skill levels in his honor. Every year this event attracts hundreds of participants and involves over 20 half court games along the main street of the town. All proceeds of the event go to youth basketball programs in the area. Basketball
Basketball
today is played by more than 300 million people worldwide, making it one of the most popular team sports.[10] In North America, basketball has produced some of the most-admired athletes of the 20th century. ESPN
ESPN
and the Associated Press
Associated Press
both conducted polls to name the greatest North American athlete of the 20th century. Basketball player Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
came in first in the ESPN
ESPN
poll and second (behind Babe Ruth) in the AP poll. Both polls featured fellow basketball players Wilt Chamberlain
Wilt Chamberlain
(of KU, like Naismith) and Bill Russell in the Top 20.[29][30] The original rules of basketball written by James Naismith
James Naismith
in 1891, considered to be basketball's founding document, was auctioned at Sotheby's, New York in December, 2010. Josh Swade, a University of Kansas
Kansas
alumnus and basketball enthusiast, went on a crusade in 2010 to persuade moneyed alumni to considering bidding on and hopefully winning the document at auction to gift it to the University of Kansas. Swade eventually persuaded David G. Booth, a billionaire investment banker and KU alumnus, and his wife Suzanne Booth to commit to bidding at the auction. The Booths won the bidding and purchased the document for a record $4,338,500 USD, the most ever paid for a sports memorabilia item, and gifted the document to the University of Kansas.[31] Swade's project and eventual success are chronicled in a 2012 ESPN
ESPN
30 for 30
30 for 30
documentary "There's No Place Like Home" and in a corresponding book, "The Holy Grail of Hoops: One Fan's Quest to Buy the Original Rules of Basketball".[32] The University of Kansas constructed an $18 million building named the Debruce Center, which houses the rules and opened in March 2016.[33] Personal life[edit] James Naismith
James Naismith
was the second child of Margaret and John Naismith, two Scottish immigrants. His mother, Margaret Young, was born in 1833 and immigrated to Lanark County, Canada
Canada
in 1852 as the fourth of 11 children.[7] His father, John Naismith, was born in 1833,[34] left Europe when he was 18, and also settled down in Lanark County. On June 20, 1894, Naismith married Maude Evelyn Sherman (1870–1937) in Springfield, MA, USA. The couple had five children: Margaret Mason (Stanley) (1895–1976), Helen Carolyn (Dodd) (1897–1980), John Edwin (1900–1986), Maude Ann (Dawe) (1904–1972) and James Sherman (1913–1980).[8] He was a member of the Pi Gamma Mu
Pi Gamma Mu
and Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternities.[8] Naismith was a Presbyterian minister, and was also remembered as a Freemason.[35] Maude Naismith died in 1937, and on June 11, 1939, he married his second wife Florence B. Kincaid. On November 19 of that year, Naismith suffered a major brain hemorrhage and died nine days later in his home located in Lawrence, Kansas.[36] Naismith was 78 years old.[37] Coincidentally, Naismith died eight months after the birth of the NCAA Basketball
Basketball
Championship, which today has evolved to one of the biggest sports events in North America. Naismith is buried with his first wife in Memorial Park Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.[38] Florence Kincaid died in 1977 at the age of 98 and is buried with her first husband, Dr. Frank B. Kincaid, in Elmwood Cemetery in Beloit, Kansas. During his lifetime, Naismith held the following education and academic positions:[8]

Location Position Period Remarks

Bennie's Corner Grade School (Almonte, Ontario) Primary school 1867–1875

Almonte High School Secondary school 1875–1877, 1881–83 Dropped out and re-entered

McGill University University student 1883–87 Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education

McGill University Instructor in Physical Education 1887–1890 Gold Wickstead Medal (1887), Best All-Around Athlete; Silver Cup (1886), first prize for one-mile walk; Silver Wickstead Medal (1885), Best All-Around Athlete; Awarded one of McGill's first varsity letters

The Presbyterian College, Montreal Education in Theology 1887–1890 Silver medal (1890), second highest award for regular and special honor work in Theology

Springfield College Instructor in Physical Education 1890–1895 Invented "Basket Ball" in December 1891

YMCA
YMCA
of Denver Instructor in Physical Education 1895–1898

University of Kansas Instructor in Physical Education and Chapel Director 1898–1909

University of Kansas Basketball
Basketball
Coach 1898–1907 First-ever campus basketball coach

University of Kansas Professor and University Physician 1909–1917 Hiatus from 1914 on due to World War I

First Kansas
Kansas
Infantry Chaplain/Captain 1914–1917 Military service due to World War I

First Kansas
Kansas
Infantry (Mexican Border) Chaplain 1916

Military and YMCA
YMCA
secretary in France Lecturer of Moral Conditions and Sex Education 1917–1919

University of Kansas Athletic Director 1919–1937 Emeritus in 1937

See also[edit]

Basketball
Basketball
portal

James Naismith's Original Rules of Basketball

References[edit] Informational notes

^ In 1982 Dr. Naismith's only living child stated that his father never had the middle initial "A". The Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame also clarifies this as do other members of his family and personal friends of his. Historian Curtis J. Phillips has done extensive research on the subject

Citations

^ "James A. Naismith". Biography.com. Retrieved 2017-05-19.  ^ Sandomir, Richard (2015-12-15). "Basketball's Birth, in James Naismith's Own Spoken Words". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-05-19.  ^ Dr. Porter. (2005). Basketball: a biographical dictionary p.346. ^ David L. Porter. (2005). Basketball: A biographical dictionary. p.347. ^ "DEAN SMITH'S COACHING TREE DISPLAYS INCREDIBLE REACH ACROSS DECADES". BleacherReport.com.  ^ a b c Laughead, George. "Dr. James Naismith, Inventor of Basketball". Kansas
Kansas
Heritage Group. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Laughead, George. "Dr. James Naismith". Kansas
Kansas
Heritage Group. Retrieved 2013-09-14. In the late 1930s he played a role in what became the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball.  ^ a b c d e f Dodd, Hellen Naismith (January 6, 1959). "James Naismith's Resume". Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on November 19, 2007. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ John Melady (2013). Breakthrough!: Canada's Greatest Inventions and Innovations. Dundurn. p. 56.  ^ a b c d e Zukerman, Earl (December 17, 2003). "McGill grad James Naismith, inventor of basketball". Varsity Sports News. McGill Athletics. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ "A SHOT AT HISTORY: BASKETBALL". Retrieved 24 October 2013.  ^ Naismith, James. "Dr. James Naismith's 13 Original Rules of Basketball". National Collegiate Athletic Association. Archived from the original on 2008-04-08. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ Naismith, James. " James Naismith
James Naismith
Handwritten Manuscript Detailing First Basketball
Basketball
Game". Heritage Auction Galleries. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ "Official basketball rules". International Basketball
Basketball
Federation. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ "Basketball's Birth, in James Naismith's Own Spoken Words". The New York Times. 16 December 2015.  ^ Baruth, Philip. " Basketball
Basketball
Inventor". Basketball
Basketball
Inventor. Vermont Public Radio. Retrieved 27 March 2011.  ^ Fosty, George & Darril. "Basketball's Origins, Lingering Questions Remain". Box Score News. Archived from the original on 27 July 2011. Retrieved 27 March 2011.  ^ Chimelis, Ron. "Naismith Untold". Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on November 2, 2007. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ a b "Naismith's Record". kusports.com. Archived from the original on 2008-07-04. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ a b c d e "James Naismith, A Kansas
Kansas
Portrait". Kansas
Kansas
Historical Society. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ "Forrest C. "Phog" Allen". Naismith Museum And Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on December 30, 2007. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ a b c d "Hall of Fame Feature: James Naismith". Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on November 23, 2007. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ "James Naismith, the inventor of basketball". collegesportsscholarships.com. Archived from the original on 2008-10-17. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ Kerkhoff, Blair. "The NAIA basketball tournament? Throw 32 teams in the same building and see which is the last one standing at the end of a weeklong frenzy". Retrieved 2008-09-30. [dead link] ^ "Google Maps Route". Google Maps. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ Jenkins, Sally. "History of women's basketball". WNBA.com. Women's National Basketball
Basketball
Association. Archived from the original on 2013-01-06. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ "James Naismith". Retrieved 23 September 2014.  ^ "Naismith, Dr. James". Retrieved 14 September 2013.  ^ "Top N. American athletes of the century". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ "Top 100 athletes of the 20th century". USA Today. 1999-12-21. Archived from the original on 2009-03-12. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ "Sotheby's - Auctions - James Naismith's Founding Rules of Basketball
Basketball
- Sotheby's".  ^ "There's No Place Like Home - ESPN
ESPN
Films: 30 for 30".  ^ "Updates from the DeBruce Center, future home of Naismith's 'Rules of Basket Ball' - Heard on the Hill / LJWorld.com".  ^ "Dr. James A. Naismith and the Barony Naismiths".  ^ "James Naismith". Grand Lodge of British Columbia and Yukon the great couple had five kids. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ "Naismith Museum & Hall of Fame: Biography of James Naismith". Archived from the original on 2007-02-05. Retrieved 2008-12-12.  ^ Schlabac, Mark (2005-01-15). " James Naismith
James Naismith
Biography". bookrags.com. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  ^ "James Naismith". Retrieved 2009-08-30. 

Further reading

Naismith, James (1996) [1941], Basketball: its origin and development, University of Nebraska Press, ISBN 0-8032-8370-9  Rains, Rob; Carpenter, Hellen (2009). James Naismith: The Man Who Invented Basketball
Basketball
Temple University Press, ISBN 978-1-4399-0133-5

External links[edit]

Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame profile Naismith Museum in Mississippi Mills, Ontario, Canada; has information about Naismith Foundation (See "About Us") FIBA Hall of Fame
FIBA Hall of Fame
profile Works by or about James Naismith
James Naismith
in libraries ( WorldCat
WorldCat
catalog)

v t e

Basketball
Basketball
(outline)

General topics

History of basketball James Naismith Variations of basketball Leagues Statistics Glossary of terms Index of articles

Rules

Bonus Jump ball Officials Turnover

Violation

3 seconds

Offense Defense

5 seconds Basket interference Carrying Double dribble Goaltending Shot clock Traveling

Foul

Flagrant Personal Technical

Game play

Air ball Alley-oop Assist Backboard shattering Ball hog Block Buzzer beater Cherry picking Dribble

Crossover

Dunk Euro step Fadeaway Fast break

Fly

Flop Jump shot Layup

Finger roll

Field goal Four-point play Free throw Hook shot Moves Pick and roll Positions Posterized Playbook Rebound Point Screen

Back screen

Slashing Steal Three-pointer Three-point play Uncontested shot

Strategy

General

Sixth man

Offense

Continuity offense

Flex Shuffle UCLA High Post Wheel

Dribble drive motion Four corners Motion Princeton Run and gun

Grinnell System Nellie Ball Small ball

Triangle

Defense

1-2-1-1 1–3–1 2–3 zone Amoeba Box-and-one Double team Full-court press Hack-a-Shaq Jordan Rules Line Man-to-man Match-up zone Triangle-and-two Zone

Equipment

Backboard Ball Breakaway rim Court

Half court

Key Net Possession arrow Whistle

Clothing

Basketball
Basketball
sleeve Finger sleeve Air Jordan Chuck Taylor All-Stars

Miscellaneous

100-point scorers 50–40–90 club AAU All-Americans AAU champions Mikan Drill Player tracking Shootaround Tip drill Winning streaks

v t e

Kansas Jayhawks
Kansas Jayhawks
men's basketball head coaches

James Naismith
James Naismith
(1898–1907) Phog Allen
Phog Allen
(1907–1909) W. O. Hamilton (1909–1919) Karl Schlademan
Karl Schlademan
# (1919) Phog Allen
Phog Allen
(1919–1947) Howard Engleman
Howard Engleman
# (1947) Phog Allen
Phog Allen
(1947–1956) Dick Harp (1956–1964) Ted Owens (1964–1983) Larry Brown (1983–1988) Roy Williams (1988–2003) Bill Self
Bill Self
(2003– )

# denotes interim head coach

v t e

Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 1959

Players

Charley Hyatt Hank Luisetti George Mikan John Schommer

Coaches

Phog Allen Doc Carlson Walter Meanwell

Contributors

Luther Gulick Edward J. Hickox Ralph Morgan James Naismith Harold Olsen Amos Alonzo Stagg Oswald Tower

Referees

Matthew P. Kennedy

Teams

Original Celtics The First Team

v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States
United States
Olympic Team 1992 United States
United States
Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

v t e

FIBA Hall of Fame
FIBA Hall of Fame
inductees

Coaches (22)

Alexeyeva Canavesi Díaz-Miguel Donohue Ferrándiz A. Gomelsky E. Gomelsky Gaze Iba Ivković Kondrashin Newell Nikolić Novosel Primo Rubini Smith Soares Stirling Summitt Yow Žeravica

Contributors (35)

Airaldi Rivarola Ashry Atakol Bouffard Busnel Calvo Carneiro Dos Reis Greim Hepp Jones Killian Klieger Kozlowski López Martín Naismith Otto Pitzl Popović Ramsay Samaranch Šaper Saporta Scuri Seguro de Luna Semashko Seye Moreau Stanković Steitz Stern Ueda Vitale Wahby Yoon

Players (55)

A. Belov S. Belov Berkovich Cameron Chazalon Ćosić Cruz Dalipagić Daneu Delibašić Divac Donovan Edwards Epi Fasoulas Furlong Galis Gaze Gonçalves González Herrera Jean-Jacques Jordan Kićanović Korać Kukoč Maciel Marcari Marčiulionis Martín Marzorati Meneghin Meyers Miller Mujanović Olajuwon O'Neal Pasos Petrović Raga Rigaudeau Robertson Robinson Rodríguez Ronchetti Russell Sabonis Schmidt Semjonova Slavnić Timms Tkachenko Valters Voynova Zasulskaya

Teams (1)

United States
United States
Men's 1992 Olympic Dream Team

Technical officials (14)

Arabadjian Bain Belošević Blanchard Dimou Hopenhaym Kassai Kostin Lazarov Pfeuti Rae Reverberi Rigas Righetto

Authority control

WorldCat
WorldCat
Identities VIAF: 50873407 LCCN: n91122143 ISNI: 0000 0000 9925 4019 GND: 121214273 NDL: 00450

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