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An intermetallic (also called an intermetallic compound, intermetallic alloy, ordered intermetallic alloy, and a long-range-ordered alloy) is a type of metallic alloy that forms an ordered solid-state compound between two or more metallic elements. Intermetallics are generally hard and brittle, with good high-temperature mechanical properties.[1][2][3] They can be classified as stoichiometric or nonstoichiometic intermetallic compounds.[1]

Although the term "intermetallic compounds", as it applies to solid phases, has been in use for many years, its introduction was regretted, for example by Hume-Rothery in 1955.[4]

Intermetallic particles often form during solidification of metallic alloys, and can be used as a dispersion strengthening mechanism.[1]

History

Examples of intermetallics through history include:

  1. Roman yellow brass, CuZn
  2. Chinese high tin bronze, Cu31Sn8
  3. Type metal, SbSn

German type metal is described as breaking like glass, not bending, softer than copper but more fusible than lead.[11] The chemical formula does not agree with the one above; however, the properties match with an intermetallic compound or an alloy of one.

See also

Intermetallic particles often form during solidification of metallic alloys, and can be used as a dispersion strengthening mechanism.[1]

History

Examples of intermetallics through history include:

  1. Roman yellow brass, CuZn
  2. Chinese high tin bronze, Cu31

    Examples of intermetallics through history include:

    1. Roman yellow brass, CuZn
    2. Chinese high tin bronze, Cu31Sn8
    3. Type metal, SbSn

    German type metal is described a

    German type metal is described as breaking like glass, not bending, softer than copper but more fusible than lead.[11] The chemical formula does not agree with the one above; however, the properties match with an intermetallic compound or an alloy of one.

    See also