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Indy Lights
Indy Lights
is an American developmental automobile racing series sanctioned by IndyCar, currently known as Indy Lights
Indy Lights
Presented by Cooper Tires for sponsorship reasons. Indy Lights
Indy Lights
is the highest step on the Road to Indy, a programme of racing series leading up to the IndyCar
IndyCar
Series. The Indy Lights
Indy Lights
series has been promoted by Anderson Promotions since 2014, which also manages the Road to Indy programme. A similar series named Indy Lights
Indy Lights
filled the developmental role for the CART series, and ran from 1986 to 1993 as the American Racing Series and Dayton Indy Lights
Indy Lights
from 1991 to 2001. The current IndyCar sanctioned series was founded in 2002 as the Infiniti
Infiniti
Pro Series as a way to introduce new talent to IndyCar, with the moniker Indy Lights returning in 2008 when CART and IndyCar
IndyCar
unified. The Indy Lights champion is awarded a $1M scholarship toward the IndyCar
IndyCar
Series, and guaranteed three races including the Indianapolis 500.

Contents

1 Early origins

1.1 USAC Mini Indy Series

2 Original series (1986–2001) 3 Current series (2002–present)

3.1 Specifications (2002–2014) 3.2 Specifications (2015–present)

4 Champions

4.1 USAC Mini-Indy Series 4.2 Indy Lights

5 Indy Lights
Indy Lights
Graduates who have competed in the IndyCar
IndyCar
Series or Champ Car 6 See also 7 References 8 External links

Early origins[edit] During the early 1960s, open wheel cars were front engined roadsters. The primary ladder series included sprints and midgets. By the end of the decade, and into the 1970s, the cars evolved into rear-engine formula-style machines. Likewise, the feeder series began to follow the same mold. When USAC became the primary sanctioning body for top-level Indy car racing, the ladder of progression began to change. USAC Mini Indy Series[edit] The SCCA Super Vee and Formula Atlantic
Formula Atlantic
series were among the first formula-based ladder series. However, neither had any direct tie to USAC. In 1977, USAC started the "Mini-Indy" series, using Super Vee machines. The series ended after 1980 when USAC stopped sanctioning Indy car races outside of Indianapolis. Following the end of the "Mini Indy" series, the driver pool in the early 1980s to CART and the Indy 500 was drawn in a largely unorganized fashion amongst Super Vees, Atlantics, SCCA, former Can-Am drivers, sprints, midgets, and even stock cars and off-road racing. In addition, a number of CART series drivers during the 1980s and early 1990s were former Formula 1
Formula 1
competitors, most of whom had climbed the European-based ladder series. Original series (1986–2001)[edit]

Mark Smith racing an Indy Lights
Indy Lights
car at Phoenix International Raceway in 1991.

The original Indy Lights
Indy Lights
series was formed as an open-wheeled racing series that acted as a developmental circuit for CART from 1986 to 2001. It was founded in 1986 as the American Racing Series (ARS). The series was renamed Indy Lights
Indy Lights
in 1991. The CART-sanctioned series became widely popular and secured the title sponsorship of Firestone. Later, Firestone's subsidiary Dayton Tires took over as tire supplier and title sponsor. A spec-series, CART Indy Lights
Indy Lights
used March chassis (essentially a modified 85B Formula 3000
Formula 3000
chassis, renamed to Wildcat) from 1986 to 1992. In 1992 Lola became primary chassis constructor to the series, using a modified F3000 chassis. In 1997, a newly-updated and modern looking chassis was introduced, also based on an F3000 design. It would remain through 2001. Buick
Buick
V6 engines were used for its entire existence. The ARS/ Indy Lights
Indy Lights
series' championship winners included two CART champions, two IndyCar
IndyCar
Series champions, seven CCWS race-winners and two Formula One
Formula One
drivers. The Indy Lights
Indy Lights
schedule closely followed that of the CART series, with the noteworthy exception of Indianapolis. The series typically had a gap of up to a month while the primary CART teams raced at the Indy 500. The races were usually held the morning of the CART series races, as an undercard, support event. In early years, the Indy Lights series skipped superspeedway races such as Michigan, but eventually found its way to race there.

The Lola T97/20 was the specified chassis used from 1997 to 2001. It is pictured here at a vintage racing event in 2016.

By the late 1990s and early 2000s, CART was suffering from financial problems. Meanwhile, in 1996, the rival Indy Racing League
Indy Racing League
was formed. CART canceled the minor league outright after the 2001 season. By this time, the Toyota Atlantic
Toyota Atlantic
series was equally effective in providing CART with new drivers. In addition, the Atlantics served as a springboard for such drivers as Greg Ray, Sam Hornish, Jr.
Sam Hornish, Jr.
and Richie Hearn to enter the IRL. The Atlantics effectively became CART's primary feeder system, and later became Champ Car
Champ Car
World Series' official in-house feeder championship for a time. Current series (2002–present)[edit] The Infiniti
Infiniti
Pro Series was founded by the Indy Racing League
Indy Racing League
and began racing in 2002, the year after the CART-sanctioned Indy Lights series' demise. It was a spec series using a TWR (Tom Walkinshaw Racing) developed 3.5L version of the V8 engine
V8 engine
used in the Infiniti Q45 combined with Dallara
Dallara
chassis producing 420 horsepower (310 kW). The series initially struggled to attract drivers and some races have had fewer than 10 entrants. However, with the introduction of a number of road-course races to the schedule in 2005, many of America's top prospects like Marco Andretti
Marco Andretti
and Phil Giebler were attracted to the series to run part-time schedules on road courses. In 2006, a boost in prize money even further increased car counts to 16 or more, with an even six oval and six road course mix. The selected races being double races, and a stand-alone race (independent of the IndyCar
IndyCar
Series) were scheduled on the USGP weekend.

Green flag for the 2008 Miami 100 at the Homestead-Miami Speedway.

The series was called the Menards
Menards
Infiniti
Infiniti
Pro Series (MIPS) until 2006 when both Menards
Menards
and Nissan
Nissan
dropped their sponsorship of the series. It was then known as the Indy Pro Series. On March 26, 2008, the series announced a changing of names, when the historical records and proprietary information of Champ Car
Champ Car
were acquired by the IRL. The series then became known as Firestone Indy Lights. The centerpiece of the Indy Lights
Indy Lights
schedule is the Freedom 100, contested at Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
on the Friday prior to the Indianapolis 500. The series also held a support race for the U.S. Grand Prix, the Liberty Challenge, from 2005 to 2007. It was the series' only event that was not a support race to an IndyCar
IndyCar
event. On September 9, 2007, during the Chicagoland 100, Logan Gomez
Logan Gomez
beat Alex Lloyd by 0.0005 seconds (approximately 1.65 inches (42 mm) at 188 mph) which reflects the closest recognized finish in the over century-long history of organized automobile racing throughout the world.[1] In 2008, the margin was established by the Guinness Book of World Records as the closest finish ever in a car race.[2] On May 24, 2013, Peter Dempsey captured his first Indy Lights
Indy Lights
win in the Freedom 100
Freedom 100
in the closest finish in Indianapolis Motor Speedway history (0.0026 secs) in a four-wide finish.[3] In June 2013, it was announced that the series would be promoted by Andersen Promotions beginning in 2014.[4] IndyCar
IndyCar
sanctioning will remain. In August it was announced that Cooper Tire
Cooper Tire
would replace Firestone as the official tire of the series in 2014.[5] The result being that all three levels of the Road to Indy leading up to the IndyCar
IndyCar
Series will be promoted by Andersen and feature Cooper tires, beginning in 2014. The Andersen team implemented a number of cost-reducing updates to the chassis and engine package in 2014 and introduced a new chassis and engine combination in 2015. On October 31, 2013, the series announced that Dallara
Dallara
would be the manufacturer of the fourth-generation Indy Lights
Indy Lights
chassis and it would be named the Dallara
Dallara
IL-15.[6] On November 1, 2013 a new logo was unveiled for the Indy Lights
Indy Lights
series[7] On November 26 it was announced that the engine for the new package would be a 2.0L turbocharged MZR-R four cylinder engine, tuned to last a full season of competition and producing 450 horsepower, with push-to-pass offering an additional 50 horsepower.[8] Specifications (2002–2014)[edit]

2008 Firestone Indy Lights
Indy Lights
car during testing at the Homestead-Miami Speedway.

Engine displacement: Nissan/ Infiniti
Infiniti
built by Speedway Motors 3.5 L (214 cu in) DOHC V8 Gearbox: 6-speed sequential manual transmission Weight: 1,490 lb (676 kg) on ovals; 1,520 lb (689 kg) on road/street courses Power output: 420 hp (313 kW) Fuel: Sunoco
Sunoco
100 RON unleaded Fuel capacity: 25 US gallons (95 litres) Fuel delivery: Fuel injection Aspiration: Naturally aspirated Length: 191.5 in (4,864 mm) Width: 75 in (1,905 mm) Wheelbase: 117 in (2,972 mm) Steering: Manual, rack and pinion

Dallara
Dallara
IL-15, driven by Matheus Leist
Matheus Leist
in the 2017 Freedom 100

Specifications (2015–present)[edit]

Engine displacement: Mazda-AER P63 2.0 L (122 cu in) DOHC inline-4 Gearbox: 6-speed sequential semi-automatic gearbox Weight: 1,400 lb (635 kg) excluding driver and fuel Power output: 450 + 50 hp (336 + 37 kW) push-to-pass Fuel: VP Racing Fuels 101 RON unleaded Fuel delivery: Direct fuel injection Aspiration: Single-turbocharged Length: 192 in (4,877 mm) Width: 76 in (1,930 mm) Wheelbase: Undisclosed Steering: Manual, rack and pinion

Champions[edit] USAC Mini-Indy Series[edit]

Season Driver Chassis Engine

1977 Tom Bagley Zink Z11 Volkswagen

Herm Johnson Lola T324 Volkswagen

1978 Bill Alsup Argo JM2 Volkswagen

1979 Dennis Firestone March Volkswagen

1980 Peter Kuhn Ralt
Ralt
RT1/RT5 Volkswagen

1977: Bagley and Johnson tied in the points and were declared co-champions.

Indy Lights[edit]

Season Driver Team Chassis Engine

CART American Racing Series

1986 Fabrizio Barbazza Arciero Racing March Buick

1987 Didier Theys Truesports March Buick

1988 Jon Beekhuis Enterprise Racing March Buick

1989 Mike Groff Leading Edge Motorsport March Buick

1990 Paul Tracy Landford Racing March Buick

CART Firestone/PPG/Dayton Indy Lights
Indy Lights
Series

1991 Éric Bachelart Landford Racing March Buick

1992 Robbie Buhl Leading Edge Motorsport March Buick

1993 Bryan Herta Tasman Motorsports Lola Buick

1994 Steve Robertson Tasman Motorsports Lola Buick

1995 Greg Moore Forsythe Racing Lola Buick

1996 David Empringham Forsythe Racing Lola Buick

1997 Tony Kanaan Tasman Motorsports Lola Buick

1998 Cristiano da Matta Tasman Motorsports Lola Buick

1999 Oriol Servià Dorricott Racing Lola Buick

2000 Scott Dixon PacWest Lights Lola Buick

2001 Townsend Bell Dorricott Racing Lola Buick

IRL Infiniti
Infiniti
Pro Series

2002 A.J. Foyt IV A.J. Foyt Enterprises Dallara Infiniti

2003 Mark Taylor Panther Racing Dallara Infiniti

2004 Thiago Medeiros Sam Schmidt Motorsports Dallara Infiniti

2005 Wade Cunningham Brian Stewart Racing Dallara Infiniti

IRL Indy Pro Series

2006 Jay Howard Sam Schmidt Motorsports Dallara Nissan
Nissan
VRH

2007 Alex Lloyd Sam Schmidt Motorsports Dallara Nissan
Nissan
VRH

INDYCAR Indy Lights

2008 Raphael Matos AGR–AFS Racing Dallara Nissan
Nissan
VRH

2009 J. R. Hildebrand AGR–AFS Racing Dallara Nissan
Nissan
VRH

2010 Jean-Karl Vernay Sam Schmidt Motorsports Dallara Nissan
Nissan
VRH

2011 Josef Newgarden Sam Schmidt Motorsports Dallara Nissan
Nissan
VRH

2012 Tristan Vautier Sam Schmidt Motorsports Dallara Nissan
Nissan
VRH

2013 Sage Karam Schmidt Peterson Motorsports Dallara Nissan
Nissan
VRH

2014 Gabby Chaves 1 Belardi Auto Racing Dallara Nissan
Nissan
VRH

2015 Spencer Pigot Juncos Racing Dallara
Dallara
IL-15 Mazda
Mazda
MZR-R

2016 Ed Jones Carlin Dallara
Dallara
IL-15 Mazda
Mazda
MZR-R

2017 Kyle Kaiser Juncos Racing Dallara
Dallara
IL-15 Mazda
Mazda
MZR-R

1 Chaves and Jack Harvey ( Schmidt Peterson Motorsports
Schmidt Peterson Motorsports
were tied in points and wins (4 each). Chaves won the title based on more second-place finishes (5 vs 1). Indy Lights
Indy Lights
Graduates who have competed in the IndyCar
IndyCar
Series or Champ Car[edit]

Didier André Jeff Andretti Marco Andrettia Richard Antinucci Ian Ashley Éric Bachelart Fabrizio Barbazza Dillon Battistini Ana Beatriz Jon Beekhuis Townsend Bell Billy Boata Brian Bonner Geoff Boss Claude Bourbonnais Matthew Brabham Steve Bren Jason Bright Robbie Buhla Buzz Calkinsa b Jaime Camara Juan Carlos Carbonell Ed Carpentera Patrick Carpentierd Hélio Castronevesa c d Gabby Chaves Ross Cheever P. J. Chesson Max Chilton Zachary Claman DeMelo Bryan Clauson Wade Cunningham Guido Daccò Wally Dallenbach, Jr. Conor Daly Cristiano da Mattad e Paul Dana Airton Daréa James Davison Luis Díaz Mark Dismorea Scott Dixona b c d Mario Domínguezd Fredrik Ekblom RC Enerson

Wim Eyckmans Juan Manuel Fangio II Adrián Fernándeza d Stan Fox A. J. Foyt IV Franck Fréon Luiz Garcia, Jr. Affonso Giaffone Felipe Giaffonea Phil Giebler Jorge Goeters Marco Greco Michael Greenfield Mike Groff Robbie Groff Dean Hall Matt Halliday Scott Harrington Jack Harvey Naoki Hattori Shigeaki Hattori Jack Hawksworth Jon Herb Bryan Hertaa d J. R. Hildebrand James Hinchcliffea Jay Howard Ken Johnson Davy Jones Ed Jones P. J. Jones Niclas Jönsson Tony Kanaana b c d Sage Karam Charlie Kimballa David Kudrave Rodolfo Lavín Eddie Lawson Jaques Laziera Matheus Leist Alex Lloyd Arie Luyendyk Jr. Pippa Mann Raphael Matos

Hiro Matsushita Casey Mears Thiago Medeiros Chris Menninga Dr. Jack Miller Greg Moored Carlos Muñoza Brad Murphey Hideki Mutoh Josef Newgardena b Hideki Noda Johnny O'Connell Franck Perera Spencer Pigot Martin Plowman Ted Prappas Graham Rahala Greg Raya b Tony Renna André Ribeirod Billy Roe Mario Romancini Marty Roth Sebastian Saavedra Gualter Salles Vinicio Salmi Franco Scapini Oriol Serviàd Jeff Simmons Guy Smith Mark Smith Sammy Swindell Mark Taylor Didier Theys Brian Till Paul Tracyd e Robby Unser Jimmy Vasserd e Tristan Vautier Zach Veach Jeff Warda Dan Wheldona b c Stefan Wilson Cory Witherill

a denotes driver who has won an IndyCar
IndyCar
Series event. b denotes driver who has won an IndyCar
IndyCar
Series championship. c denotes driver who has won an Indianapolis 500. d denotes driver who has won a CART/ Champ Car
Champ Car
event. e denotes driver who has won a CART/ Champ Car
Champ Car
World Series championship. See also[edit]

IndyCar Firestone Freedom 100

References[edit]

^ "To the fourth degree". IndyCar.com. 2007-09-13. Retrieved 2007-09-14. [permanent dead link] ^ "Closest finish recognized as world record". IndyCar.com. 2008-03-04. Retrieved 2008-03-04. [permanent dead link] ^ Marot, Michael. Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
With Historic Final Lap, Huffington Post, 24 May 2013, Retrieved 2013-05-24 ^ Andersen Promotions to take over Indy Lights, Racer, June 20, 2013, Retrieved 2013-10-22 ^ Cooper Tires Named Official Tire Of New Indy Lights
Indy Lights
Series, Performance Racing Industry, August 22, 2013, Retrieved 2013-10-22 ^ DiZinno, Tony. No surprise: Indy Lights
Indy Lights
confirms Dallara
Dallara
for new 2015 chassis, NBC Sports, October 31, 2013, Retrieved 2013-10-31 ^ http://pbs.twimg.com/media/BX8YmQMCYAA0iIV.png:large ^ Pruett, Marshall. Indy Lights
Indy Lights
series selects 2015 engine supplier, Racer, November 26, 2013, Retrieved 2013-11-26

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Indy Lights.

Official website

v t e

Indy Lights
Indy Lights
seasons

USAC Mini-Indy Series

1977 1978 1979 1980

CART American Racing Series

1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

CART Firestone/Dayton Indy Lights

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001

IRL Infiniti/Indy Pro Series

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Firestone Indy Lights
Indy Lights
Series

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Indy Lights
Indy Lights
Series presented by Cooper Tire

2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

Andersen Promotions

USF2000

2010 2011 (Winterfest) 2012 (Winterfest) 2013 (Winterfest) 2014 (Winterfest) 2015 (Winterfest) 2016 2017

Pro Mazda

2013 2014 (Winterfest) 2015 (Winterfest) 2016 2017

Indy Lights

2014 2015 2016 2017

Global Mazda
Mazda
MX-5 Cup

2017

Partnerships

US Rotax Max Challenge Latam Challenge Series Australian Formula Ford
Formula Ford
Championship

Mazda
Mazda
Road to Indy - Mazda
Mazda
Road to 24

v t e

Classes of auto racing

Formula racing

F1 F2 F3 F4 F500 Formula 1000 Formula Atlantic Formula Car Challenge Formula Continental Formula E Formula Ford FF1600 Formula Libre Formula Vee IndyCar Super Formula Supermodified BOSS GP Monoposto Racing Club

Defunct Formula racing

F3000 F5000 Formula A (SCCA) Formula B (SCCA) Formula C (SCCA) FCJ Formula Dream Formula Holden Formula Junior Formula Mondial Formula Pacific Formula Super Vee Australian National Formula Grand Prix Masters Tasman Formula

One-make formulae

CFGP Formula Abarth Formula Car Challenge Formula LGB

Swift Hyundai

Formula Maruti Formula Masters China Formula Mazda Formula Renault Formula Toyota GP3 Indy Lights SRF USF2000 FIA Formula 2 Championship

Defunct one-make formulae

A1GP ADAC Formel Masters Auto GP Barber Pro FA1 Formula Alfa Formula Asia Formula BMW FC Euro Series Formula König Formula Lightning Formula Nissan Formula Opel/Vauxhall Formula Palmer Audi Formula RUS Formula Rolon Formula SCCA Grand Prix Masters GP2 International Formula Master Superleague Formula World Series Formula V8 3.5

Karting

KF1 KF2 KF3 KZ1 KZ2 Superkart

Touring car racing

DTM WTCR BTCC Group F Group G Group H Super 2000 Diesel 2000 NGTC (TCN-1) TCR (TCN-2) Supercars TC2000

Defunct touring car racing

Appendix J BTC-T Group 1 Group 2 Group 5 Group A Group C
Group C
(Australia) Group E Group N Group N
Group N
(Australia) Group S Class 1 Super Touring
Super Touring
(Class 2) Superstars V8Star WTCC

Stock car racing

ARCA Allison Legacy Series AUSCAR IMCA Sport Compact Late model Legends Modifieds NASCAR

Monster Energy NASCAR
NASCAR
Cup Xfinity Truck Pinty's Whelen Euro Series PEAK Mexico

Super Stock Street Stock Brasil Turismo Carretera

Oval racing

BriSCA F1 BriSCA F2 V8 Hotstox Hot Rods Superstocks Sprint car racing Midget car racing Quarter Midget racing

Rallying

Group R Group R-GT Super 2000 Super 1600 World Rally Car

Defunct rallying

Group 1 Group 2 Group 4 Group A Group B Group N Group S

Sports prototypes

Clubmans DP Group 3 Group 4 Group 5 Group 6 Group 7 Group A
Group A
Sports Cars Group C GC GC-21 Group CN IMSA GTP LMP LMPC S2000

Grand touring

LM GTE (GT2) GT3 GT4 GT500 GT300 Trans-Am Appendix K Group D GT Cars

Defunct grand touring

Group 3 Group 4 Group 5 Group B Group D Production Sports Cars GT1 (1993–99) GT2 (1993–99) FIA GT1 (2000-12) IMSA AAGT IMSA GTO/GTS IMSA GTU IMSA GTX

Drag racing

Top Fuel
Top Fuel
Dragster (TF/D) Top Alcohol
Top Alcohol
Dragster (TA/D) Top Fuel
Top Fuel
Funny Car
Funny Car
(TF/FC) Pro Stock
Pro Stock
(PS) Pro Modified (Pro Mod) Pro FWD Super Comp/Quick Rod Top Doorslammer

Defunct drag racing

Top Gas Modified Altered Competition Super Stock

Off-road racing

Baja Bug Dune buggy Rallycross Trophy Truck Group T4 Truggy Side by Side (UTV)

v t e

Formula Vee
Formula Vee
and Formula Super Vee

European Formula Super Vee
Formula Super Vee
Championship

1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992

Formula Super Vee
Formula Super Vee
GTX Championship

1972 1973 1974 1975 1976

Formel Super Vau Gold Pokal

1971 1972 1974 1975 1976

SCCA Formula Super Vee

1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988

USAC Mini Indy Series

1977 1978 1979 1980

German Formula Super Vee

1977 1978

Engines

Volkswagen

Type 1 Type 2 Type 3 Type 4

Notable current and former constructors

Apal Argo Autodynamics Beach Fitti Kaimann Lola Lynx March Ralt Royale Tui V

.