HOME
The Info List - Horton Foote





Albert Horton Foote Jr. (March 14, 1916 – March 4, 2009[1]) was an American playwright and screenwriter, perhaps best known for his screenplays for the 1962 film To Kill a Mockingbird and the 1983 film Tender Mercies, and his notable live television dramas during the Golden Age of Television. He received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama
Pulitzer Prize for Drama
in 1995 for his play The Young Man From Atlanta
The Young Man From Atlanta
and two Academy Awards, one for an original screenplay, Tender Mercies, and one for adapted screenplay, To Kill a Mockingbird. In 1995, Foote was the inaugural recipient of the Austin Film Festival's Distinguished Screenwriter Award. In describing his three-play work, The Orphans' Home Cycle, the drama critic for the Wall Street Journal
Wall Street Journal
said this: "Foote, who died last March, left behind a masterpiece, one that will rank high among the signal achievements of American theater in the 20th century."[2] In 2000, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts.[3]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Television 3 Theater 4 Films

4.1 Academy Awards

5 Personal life 6 Stage plays 7 Original screenplays 8 Memoirs 9 References 10 Sources 11 External links

Early life[edit] Foote was born in Wharton, Texas, the son of Harriet Gautier "Hallie" Brooks (1894–1974) and Albert Horton Foote (1890–1973).[4] His younger brothers were Thomas Brooks Foote (1921–44), who died in aerial combat over Germany, and John Speed Foote (1923–95). Television[edit]

This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Foote began as an actor after studying at the Pasadena Playhouse
Pasadena Playhouse
in 1931–32. After getting better reviews for plays he had written than his acting, he focused on writing in the 1940s and became one of the leading writers for television during the 1950s, beginning with an episode of The Gabby Hayes Show. The Trip to Bountiful
The Trip to Bountiful
premiered March 1, 1953 on NBC with the leading cast members (Lillian Gish, Eva Marie Saint) reprising their roles on Broadway later that year. Throughout the 1950s, Foote wrote for The Philco Television Playhouse, The United States
United States
Steel Hour, Playhouse 90, Studio One, and Armchair Theatre, among others. He continued into the 1960s with ITV Playhouse and DuPont Show of the Month. He adapted William Faulkner's "Old Man" to television twice, in 1959 and 1997; receiving Emmy
Emmy
nominations both years and winning for the 1997 drama (Outstanding Writing of a Miniseries or Special). Theater[edit]

This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Foote's plays were produced on Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off- Off-Broadway and at many regional theatres. He wrote the English adaptation of the original Japanese book for the 1970 musical Scarlett, a musical adaptation of Gone with the Wind. He won the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for Drama
Pulitzer Prize for Drama
for The Young Man From Atlanta. The Goodman Theatre
Goodman Theatre
production that was presented on Broadway in New York City
New York City
in 1997 was nominated for Best Play, but did not win. The production starred Rip Torn, Shirley Knight
Shirley Knight
and Biff McGuire. Knight and McGuire were also nominated for Tony Awards. In 1996, Foote was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame.[5] In 2000, Foote was honored with the PEN/Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater Award as a Master American Dramatist. His nine-play biographical series, mainly about his father, The Orphans' Home Cycle (Roots in a Parched Ground, Convicts, Lily Dale, The Widow Claire, Courtship, Valentine's Day, 1918, Cousins, and The Death of Papa) ran in repertory off-Broadway in 2009–2010. The combined productions received a Special
Special
Drama Desk Award "To the cast, creative team and producers of Horton Foote's epic The Orphans' Home Cycle".[6] Parts of the series had been produced as separate plays previously; Convicts, Lily Dale, Courtship, Valentine's Day and 1918 were filmed, the latter three being shown on PBS as a mini-series titled The Story of A Marriage. Films[edit] Foote received an Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay and the Writers Guild of America Screen Award for his adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird in 1962. Foote did not attend the Oscars ceremony because he did not expect to win, and so was not present to collect the award in person, however, it was accepted on his behalf by the film's producer, Alan J. Pakula.[7] Foote personally recommended actor Robert Duvall
Robert Duvall
for the part of Boo Radley in To Kill a Mockingbird after meeting him during a 1957 production of The Midnight Caller at Neighborhood Playhouse
Neighborhood Playhouse
in New York City. The two would work together many more times in the future. Foote has described Duvall as "our number one actor".[7] Foote's script for the 1983 film Tender Mercies
Tender Mercies
had been rejected by many American film directors before Australian director Bruce Beresford finally accepted it; Foote later said, "this film was turned down by every American director on the face of the globe."[citation needed] The film received five Academy Awards
Academy Awards
nominations, including Best Picture (which lost) and Best Original Screenplay (which Foote won). Duvall won an Academy Award for his performance. Well aware of his failure to attend the 1963 ceremony, Foote made sure to attend the 1984 ceremony. The film also earned Foote the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Screenplay.[7] His other film scripts include Baby the Rain Must Fall
Baby the Rain Must Fall
starring Steve McQueen and Lee Remick, which was based on his play The Travelling Lady. The film was directed by Robert Mulligan
Robert Mulligan
who had worked with Foote on To Kill a Mockingbird a few years earlier.[citation needed] Foote generally wrote screenplays that were based on his plays, such as the semi-autobiographic trilogy of 1918 (1985), On Valentine's Day (1986) and Courtship (1987). 1918 and On Valentine's Day
On Valentine's Day
were shot on location in Waxahachie, Texas. His screenplay for The Trip to Bountiful (1985) attracted another Academy Award nomination with Geraldine Page
Geraldine Page
winning an Academy Award for Best Actress.[8] He also adapted works by other authors, such as John Steinbeck
John Steinbeck
(Of Mice and Men directed by and starring Gary Sinise
Gary Sinise
with John Malkovich). In addition to Faulkner's "Old Man", he also adapted Faulkner's short story Tomorrow into a 1972 film starring Robert Duvall. Foote had previously adapted the story into a play. Leonard Maltin, in his movie guide book, calls the movie the best film adaptation of any of Faulkner's work. On the subject of Faulkner, Foote said, "Faulkner I never met but evidently he liked [my adaptations] because he's allowed me to share the dramatic copyrights to both Old Man and Tomorrow ... So in other words, you have to get both our permissions to do it."[9] Playwright Lillian Hellman
Lillian Hellman
adapted his play for the 1966 film The Chase, with Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
and Robert Redford. Foote provided the voice of Jefferson Davis
Jefferson Davis
for Ken Burns' critically acclaimed documentary, The Civil War (PBS, 1990), and adaptations of his plays The Habitation of Dragons (TNT, 1992) and Lily Dale (Showtime, 1996) preceded the Showtime production of Horton Foote's Alone (1997). His final work was the screenplay for Main Street, a 2010 dramatic film.[citation needed] Foote was awarded an honorary doctorate from Carson-Newman College. He received an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Spalding University (Louisville, Kentucky) in 1987. One of Foote's primary biographers is Dr. Gerald Wood, chair of the English Department at Carson-Newman College. Books by Wood about Foote include Horton Foote and the Theater of Intimacy and Horton Foote: A Casebook. Baylor University also holds close ties with Foote. In 2002, Foote accepted the title as "Visiting Distinguished Dramatist" with the Baylor Department of Theatre Arts.[citation needed] Foote was the cousin of actor/director Peter Masterson who directed three of his screenplays, including The Trip to Bountiful, Convicts and the Hallmark Hall of Fame television production of Lily Dale, starring Mary Stuart Masterson, Peter's daughter. He was a third cousin of Shelby Foote, an American historian and novelist who wrote about the Civil War and who appeared in Ken Burns's PBS documentary The Civil War in 1990.[10] Tess Harper, an actress who worked with Foote on Tender Mercies, described him as "America's Chekhov. If he didn't study the Russians, he's a reincarnation of the Russians. He's a quiet man who writes quiet people." Regarding his own writing, Foote said, "I know that people think I have a certain style, but I think style is like the color of the eyes. I don't know that you choose that."[7] Academy Awards[edit]

To Kill a Mockingbird (winner) – Screenplay Adapted from Another Medium (1962) Tender Mercies
Tender Mercies
(winner) – Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen (1983) The Trip to Bountiful
The Trip to Bountiful
(nominee) – Screenplay Adapted from Another Medium (1985)

Personal life[edit] Foote was married to Lillian Vallish Foote (1923–1992)[11] from June 4, 1945 until her death in 1992. Their four children are actors Albert Horton Foote III and Hallie Foote, playwright Daisy Brooks Foote, and director Walter Vallish Foote. All have worked on projects with their father.[citation needed] Foote was introduced to Christian Science
Christian Science
while in California and went on to become a dedicated member of the church. He served as a First Reader in a branch church in Nyack, New York, and also taught Sunday School for many years while living in New Hampshire.[12] Foote was the voice of Jefferson Davis
Jefferson Davis
in the 11-hour PBS series The Civil War. Shelby Foote
Shelby Foote
wrote the comprehensive three volume, 3000-page history, together entitled The Civil War: A Narrative, upon which the series was partially based and who appeared in almost ninety segments. The two Footes are third cousins; their great-grandfathers were brothers. "And while we didn't grow up together, we have become friends; I was the voice of Jefferson Davis
Jefferson Davis
in that TV series", Horton Foote added proudly.[10] Foote made an effort to employ lifelike language in his writing, citing W. B. Yeats's work as an example of this realistic approach. In an interview with playwright Stuart Spencer, Foote discusses his writing and material: "I think there's certain things you don't choose. I don't think that you can choose a style; I think a style chooses you. I think that's almost an unconscious choice. And I don't know that you can choose subject matter, really. I think that's almost an unconscious choice. I have a theory that from the time you're 12 years old all your themes are kind of locked in.".[13] The Fine Arts Building at the college located in Wharton, Texas, Wharton County Junior College, is named the Horton Foote Theatre. He was known to be a large supporter of the arts in his hometown of Wharton, Texas. A Horton Foote Scholarship still exists at the school, recognizing one student per year who excels in theatre.[14] Stage plays[edit] See the article on The Orphans' Home Cycle for the series of nine plays concerning Horace Robedaux (an alias for Horton Foote's father, Albert Horton Foote Sr.), Elizabeth Vaughn (his mother Harriet Gauthier "Hallie" Brooks), and their extended families.

Wharton Dance (1940) Texas Town (1941) Only the Heart (1942) Out of My House (1942) Two Southern Idylls: Miss Lou / The Girls (1943) The Lonely (1944) Goodbye to Richmond (1944) Daisy Lee (one-act) (1944) Homecoming (1944) In My Beginning (1944) People in the Show (1944) Return (1944) Celebration (1950) The Chase (1952) smd The Traveling Lady (1954) The Dancers (1954) John Turner Davis (1956) The Midnight Caller (1956) The Trip to Bountiful
The Trip to Bountiful
(1962) Roots in a Parched Ground (Orphans' Home cycle) (1962) Tomorrow (1968) Gone with the Wind (Author of book) (1972) A Young Lady of Property (1976) Night Seasons (1977) Courtship (Orphans' Home cycle) (1978) 1918 (Orphans' Home cycle) (1979) In a Coffin in Egypt (1980) Valentine's Day (Orphans' Home cycle) (1980)

The Man Who Climbed the Pecan Trees (1981) The Old Friends (1982) The Roads to Home: Nightingale / The Dearest of Friends / Spring Dance (1982) The Land of the Astronauts (1983) Cousins (Orphans' Home cycle) (1983) The Road to the Graveyard (one-act) (1985) Courtship/Valentine's Day (Orphans' Home cycle) (1985) The One-Armed Man (1985) The Prisoner's Song (1985) Blind Date (one-act) (1985) Convicts (Orphans' Home cycle) (1986) The Widow Claire (Orphans' Home cycle) (1986) Lily Dale (Orphans' Home cycle) (1986) The Habitation of Dragons (1988) The Death of Papa (Orphans' Home cycle) (1999) Dividing the Estate
Dividing the Estate
(1989) Talking Pictures (1990) Laura Dennis (1995) The Young Man From Atlanta
The Young Man From Atlanta
(1995) The Day Emily Married (1996) Vernon Early (1998) The Last of the Thorntons (2000) The Carpetbagger's Children (2001) The Actor (2002) Dividing the Estate
Dividing the Estate
(2008) Harrison, TX: Three Plays by Horton Foote (2012)

Original screenplays[edit]

Tender Mercies
Tender Mercies
(1983) Alone (1997) Main Street (2009)

Memoirs[edit]

Farewell: A Memoir of a Texas Childhood (1999) Beginnings (2001)

References[edit]

^ Murphy, Kate. "Horton Foote". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-06-15.  ^ Review:Theater by Terry Teachout, "Infinite Meaning in the Details of Ordinary Life", The Wall Street Journal, February 5, 2010, pg W5 ^ Lifetime Honors – National Medal of Arts
National Medal of Arts
Archived March 4, 2010, at the Wayback Machine. ^ " Horton Foote Biography". filmreference. 2008. Retrieved 2008-11-25.  ^ "Theatre Hall of Fame 1996". Playbill.com. Archived from the original on 2014-03-14.  ^ Gans, Andrew." Drama Desk Award Nominations Announced; Ragtime and Scottsboro Top List" Archived 2010-05-06 at the Wayback Machine. Playbill.com, May 3, 2010. ^ a b c d Bruce Beresford (actor), Robert Duvall
Robert Duvall
(actor), Horton Foote (actor), Tess Harper (actor), Gary Hertz (director) (2002-04-16). Miracles & Mercies (Documentary). West Hollywood, California: Blue Underground. Retrieved 2008-01-28.  ^ Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences."THE 58TH ACADEMY AWARDS: 1986", oscars.org; accessed 30 January 2018. ^ Spenser, Stuart."Horton Foote", BOMBsite.com, Spring 1986. ^ a b Shelby Foote
Shelby Foote
(2015-04-13). The Civil War: A Narrative, Vol. 1: Fort Sumter to Perryville. FindArticles.com. Retrieved 2017-06-15.  ^ "RootsWeb: Database Index". Ssdi.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved 2017-06-15.  ^ Christian Science
Christian Science
Journal (July 2006 Interview), Volume 124, Issue 7; accessed June 15, 2016. ^ Spencer, Stuart. "Horton Foote", BOMB Magazine
BOMB Magazine
(Spring 1986)]; retrieved 2012-11-26. ^ "Scholarship Info". Wcjc.edu. Retrieved 2017-06-15. 

Sources[edit]

Hampton, Wilborn (2009). Horton Foote: America's Storyteller. New York: Free Press.  Haynes, Robert W. (2010). The Major Plays of Horton Foote: The Trip to Bountiful, The Young Man from Atlanta, and The Orphans' Home Cycle. Lewiston, New York: The Edwin Mellen Press.  Castleberry, Marion. 2014. Blessed Assurance: The Life and Art of Horton Foote. Macon, GA: Mercer University Press.

External links[edit]

This article's use of external links may not follow's policies or guidelines. Please improve this article by removing excessive or inappropriate external links, and converting useful links where appropriate into footnote references. (June 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Horton Foote at the Internet Broadway Database
Internet Broadway Database
Horton Foote on IMDb Horton Foote at the Internet Off-Broadway Database Horton Foote Society Horton Foote interview video at the Archive of American Television Horton Foote at Find a Grave Program for Horton Foote's Getting Frankie Married—and Afterwards at South Coast Repertory Program from Horton Foote's The Carpetbagger's Children at South Coast Repertory Horton Foote at Curlie (based on DMOZ) Obituary in the Star-Gazette Interview with Horton Foote, from the Texas Archive of the Moving Image Interview with Horton Foote, December 11, 2001 . University of Texas at San Antonio: Institute of Texan Cultures: Oral History Collection, UA 15.01, University of Texas at San Antonio Libraries Special Collections.

v t e

Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay

1940–1960

Preston Sturges
Preston Sturges
(1940) Herman J. Mankiewicz
Herman J. Mankiewicz
and Orson Welles
Orson Welles
(1941) Michael Kanin
Michael Kanin
and Ring Lardner Jr.
Ring Lardner Jr.
(1942) Norman Krasna (1943) Lamar Trotti (1944) Richard Schweizer (1945) Muriel Box and Sydney Box (1946) Sidney Sheldon (1947) No award (1948) Robert Pirosh (1949) Charles Brackett, D. M. Marshman Jr. and Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1950) Alan Jay Lerner
Alan Jay Lerner
(1951) T. E. B. Clarke (1952) Charles Brackett, Richard L. Breen and Walter Reisch (1953) Budd Schulberg
Budd Schulberg
(1954) Sonya Levien and William Ludwig (1955) Albert Lamorisse
Albert Lamorisse
(1956) George Wells (1957) Nathan E. Douglas and Harold Jacob Smith (1958) Clarence Greene, Maurice Richlin, Russell Rouse and Stanley Shapiro (1959) I. A. L. Diamond and Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1960)

1961–1980

William Inge
William Inge
(1961) Ennio de Concini, Pietro Germi, and Alfredo Giannetti (1962) James Webb (1963) Peter Stone and Frank Tarloff (1964) Frederic Raphael (1965) Claude Lelouch
Claude Lelouch
and Pierre Uytterhoeven (1966) William Rose (1967) Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
(1968) William Goldman
William Goldman
(1969) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Edmund H. North (1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Jeremy Larner (1972) David S. Ward
David S. Ward
(1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
(1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Robert C. Jones, Waldo Salt, and Nancy Dowd (1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980)

1981–2000

Colin Welland (1981) John Briley (1982) Horton Foote (1983) Robert Benton (1984) William Kelley, Pamela Wallace and Earl W. Wallace (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(1987) Ronald Bass and Barry Morrow (1988) Tom Schulman (1989) Bruce Joel Rubin (1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Christopher McQuarrie
Christopher McQuarrie
(1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (1996) Ben Affleck
Ben Affleck
and Matt Damon
Matt Damon
(1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Cameron Crowe
Cameron Crowe
(2000)

2001–present

Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Pedro Almodóvar
Pedro Almodóvar
(2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Pierre Bismuth, Michel Gondry
Michel Gondry
and Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Dustin Lance Black
Dustin Lance Black
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) David Seidler (2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr., and Armando Bo (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2016) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2017)

v t e

Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

1928–1950

Benjamin Glazer (1928) Hanns Kräly (1929) Frances Marion
Frances Marion
(1930) Howard Estabrook
Howard Estabrook
(1931) Edwin J. Burke (1932) Victor Heerman
Victor Heerman
and Sarah Y. Mason
Sarah Y. Mason
(1933) Robert Riskin
Robert Riskin
(1934) Dudley Nichols (1935) Pierre Collings
Pierre Collings
and Sheridan Gibney (1936) Heinz Herald, Geza Herczeg, and Norman Reilly Raine
Norman Reilly Raine
(1937) Ian Dalrymple, Cecil Arthur Lewis, W. P. Lipscomb, and George Bernard Shaw (1938) Sidney Howard
Sidney Howard
(1939) Donald Ogden Stewart
Donald Ogden Stewart
(1940) Sidney Buchman and Seton I. Miller (1941) George Froeschel, James Hilton, Claudine West, and Arthur Wimperis (1942) Philip G. Epstein, Julius J. Epstein, and Howard E. Koch (1943) Frank Butler, and Frank Cavett (1944) Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1945) Robert Sherwood (1946) George Seaton
George Seaton
(1947) John Huston
John Huston
(1948) Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Joseph L. Mankiewicz
(1949) Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Joseph L. Mankiewicz
(1950)

1951–1975

Harry Brown and Michael Wilson (1951) Charles Schnee (1952) Daniel Taradash (1953) George Seaton
George Seaton
(1954) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1955) John Farrow, S. J. Perelman, and James Poe (1956) Carl Foreman
Carl Foreman
and Michael Wilson (1957) Alan Jay Lerner
Alan Jay Lerner
(1958) Neil Paterson (1959) Richard Brooks
Richard Brooks
(1960) Abby Mann (1961) Horton Foote (1962) John Osborne
John Osborne
(1963) Edward Anhalt (1964) Robert Bolt (1965) Robert Bolt (1966) Stirling Silliphant (1967) James Goldman (1968) Waldo Salt (1969) Ring Lardner Jr.
Ring Lardner Jr.
(1970) Ernest Tidyman (1971) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Mario Puzo
Mario Puzo
(1972) William Peter Blatty
William Peter Blatty
(1973) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Mario Puzo
Mario Puzo
(1974) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
and Lawrence Hauben (1975)

1976–2000

William Goldman
William Goldman
(1976) Alvin Sargent (1977) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1978) Robert Benton (1979) Alvin Sargent (1980) Ernest Thompson
Ernest Thompson
(1981) Costa-Gavras
Costa-Gavras
and Donald E. Stewart (1982) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
(1983) Peter Shaffer (1984) Kurt Luedtke (1985) Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
(1986) Bernardo Bertolucci
Bernardo Bertolucci
and Mark Peploe (1987) Christopher Hampton
Christopher Hampton
(1988) Alfred Uhry
Alfred Uhry
(1989) Michael Blake (1990) Ted Tally (1991) Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
(1992) Steven Zaillian (1993) Eric Roth (1994) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1995) Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
(1996) Curtis Hanson
Curtis Hanson
and Brian Helgeland (1997) Bill Condon (1998) John Irving
John Irving
(1999) Stephen Gaghan
Stephen Gaghan
(2000)

2001–present

Akiva Goldsman
Akiva Goldsman
(2001) Ronald Harwood (2002) Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson, and Fran Walsh (2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Larry McMurtry
Larry McMurtry
and Diana Ossana (2005) William Monahan
William Monahan
(2006) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (2007) Simon Beaufoy (2008) Geoffrey S. Fletcher
Geoffrey S. Fletcher
(2009) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2010) Alexander Payne, Jim Rash, and Nat Faxon
Nat Faxon
(2011) Chris Terrio (2012) John Ridley
John Ridley
(2013) Graham Moore (2014) Adam McKay
Adam McKay
and Charles Randolph (2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
and Tarell Alvin McCraney
Tarell Alvin McCraney
(2016) James Ivory
James Ivory
(2017)

v t e

Primetime Emmy
Emmy
Award for Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special

Michael Mann
Michael Mann
and Patrick Nolan (1979) David Chase
David Chase
(1980) Arthur Miller
Arthur Miller
(1981) Barry Morrow (1982) Marshall Herskovitz
Marshall Herskovitz
and Edward Zwick
Edward Zwick
(1983) William Hanley (1984) Vickie Patik (1985) Ron Cowen, Daniel Lipman, Sherman Yellen and David Butler (1986) Kenneth Blackwell, Tennyson Flowers and Richard Friedenberg (1987) William Hanley (1988) Ron Hutchison, Abby Mann and Robin Vote (1989) Terrence McNally
Terrence McNally
(1990) Andrew Davies (1991) Joshua Brand and John Falsey (1992) Jane Anderson (1993) Bob Randall (1994) Alison Cross (1995) Simon Moore (1996) Horton Foote (1997) Kario Salem (1998) Ann Peacock (1999) David Mills and David Simon
David Simon
(2000) Loring Mandel (2001) Larry Ramin and Hugh Whitemore (2002) William H. Macy
William H. Macy
and Steven Schachter (2003) Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner
(2004) Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely (2005) Richard Curtis
Richard Curtis
(2006) Frank Deasy (2007) Kirk Ellis (2008) Andrew Davies (2009) Adam Mazer (2010) Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2011) Danny Strong
Danny Strong
(2012) Abi Morgan (2013) Steven Moffat
Steven Moffat
(2014) Jane Anderson (2015) D.V. DeVincentis (2016) Charlie Brooker
Charlie Brooker
(2017)

v t e

Independent Spirit Award for Best Screenplay

Horton Foote (1985) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1986) Neal Jimenez (1987) Ramon Menendez and Tom Musca (1988) Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
and Daniel Yost (1989) Charles Burnett (1990) Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
(1991) Neal Jimenez (1992) Robert Altman
Robert Altman
and Frank Barhydt (1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Christopher McQuarrie
Christopher McQuarrie
(1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (1996) Kevin Smith
Kevin Smith
(1997) Don Roos
Don Roos
(1998) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000) Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2001) Mike White (2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Dan Futterman (2005) Jason Reitman
Jason Reitman
(2006) Tamara Jenkins
Tamara Jenkins
(2007) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2008) Scott Neustadter
Scott Neustadter
and Michael H. Weber (2009) Stuart Blumberg and Lisa Cholodenko (2010) Alexander Payne, Jim Rash, and Nat Faxon
Nat Faxon
(2011) David O. Russell
David O. Russell
(2012) John Ridley
John Ridley
(2013) Dan Gilroy
Dan Gilroy
(2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
and Tarell Alvin McCraney
Tarell Alvin McCraney
(2016) Greta Gerwig
Greta Gerwig
(2017)

v t e

Pulitzer Prize for Drama: Authors

Jesse Lynch Williams (1918) Eugene O'Neill
Eugene O'Neill
(1920) Zona Gale
Zona Gale
(1921) Eugene O'Neill
Eugene O'Neill
(1922) Owen Davis
Owen Davis
(1923) Hatcher Hughes (1924) Sidney Howard
Sidney Howard
(1925) George Kelly (1926) Paul Green (1927) Eugene O'Neill
Eugene O'Neill
(1928) Elmer Rice
Elmer Rice
(1929) Marc Connelly
Marc Connelly
(1930) Susan Glaspell
Susan Glaspell
(1931) George S. Kaufman, Morrie Ryskind and Ira Gershwin
Ira Gershwin
(1932) Maxwell Anderson
Maxwell Anderson
(1933) Sidney Kingsley
Sidney Kingsley
(1934) Zoe Akins
Zoe Akins
(1935) Robert E. Sherwood
Robert E. Sherwood
(1936) Moss Hart
Moss Hart
and George S. Kaufman
George S. Kaufman
(1937) Thornton Wilder
Thornton Wilder
(1938) Robert E. Sherwood
Robert E. Sherwood
(1939) William Saroyan
William Saroyan
(1940) Robert E. Sherwood
Robert E. Sherwood
(1941) Thornton Wilder
Thornton Wilder
(1943) Mary Chase (1945) Russel Crouse and Howard Lindsay (1946) Tennessee Williams
Tennessee Williams
(1948) Arthur Miller
Arthur Miller
(1949) Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II
Oscar Hammerstein II
and Joshua Logan (1950) Joseph Kramm (1952) William Inge
William Inge
(1953) John Patrick (1954) Tennessee Williams
Tennessee Williams
(1955) Albert Hackett
Albert Hackett
and Frances Goodrich (1956) Eugene O'Neill
Eugene O'Neill
(1957) Ketti Frings (1958) Archibald MacLeish
Archibald MacLeish
(1959) Jerome Weidman, George Abbott, Jerry Bock
Jerry Bock
and Sheldon Harnick
Sheldon Harnick
(1960) Tad Mosel
Tad Mosel
(1961) Frank Loesser
Frank Loesser
and Abe Burrows
Abe Burrows
(1962) Frank D. Gilroy (1965) Edward Albee
Edward Albee
(1967) Howard Sackler (1969) Charles Gordone (1970) Paul Zindel
Paul Zindel
(1971) Jason Miller (1973) Edward Albee
Edward Albee
(1975) Michael Bennett, Nicholas Dante, James Kirkwood Jr., Marvin Hamlisch and Edward Kleban (1976) Michael Cristofer
Michael Cristofer
(1977) Donald L. Coburn (1978) Sam Shepard
Sam Shepard
(1979) Lanford Wilson
Lanford Wilson
(1980) Beth Henley (1981) Charles Fuller (1982) Marsha Norman
Marsha Norman
(1983) David Mamet
David Mamet
(1984) James Lapine
James Lapine
and Stephen Sondheim
Stephen Sondheim
(1985) August Wilson
August Wilson
(1987) Alfred Uhry
Alfred Uhry
(1988) Wendy Wasserstein
Wendy Wasserstein
(1989) August Wilson
August Wilson
(1990) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(1991) Robert Schenkkan
Robert Schenkkan
(1992) Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner
(1993) Edward Albee
Edward Albee
(1994) Horton Foote (1995) Jonathan Larson (1996) Paula Vogel
Paula Vogel
(1998) Margaret Edson (1999) Donald Margulies
Donald Margulies
(2000) David Auburn (2001) Suzan-Lori Parks
Suzan-Lori Parks
(2002) Nilo Cruz
Nilo Cruz
(2003) Doug Wright (2004) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(2005) David Lindsay-Abaire (2007) Tracy Letts
Tracy Letts
(2008) Lynn Nottage
Lynn Nottage
(2009) Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey (2010) Bruce Norris (2011) Quiara Alegría Hudes (2012) Ayad Akhtar
Ayad Akhtar
(2013) Annie Baker
Annie Baker
(2014) Stephen Adly Guirgis (2015) Lin-Manuel Miranda
Lin-Manuel Miranda
(2016) Lynn Nottage
Lynn Nottage
(2017)

v t e

Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay

Original Drama (1969–1983, retired)

William Goldman
William Goldman
(1969) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Edmund H. North (1970) Penelope Gilliatt (1971) Jeremy Larner (1972) Steve Shagan (1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
(1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Arthur Laurents
Arthur Laurents
(1977) Nancy Dowd, Robert C. Jones and Waldo Salt (1978) Mike Gray, T. S. Cook and James Bridges (1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
and Trevor Griffiths (1981) Melissa Mathison
Melissa Mathison
(1982) Horton Foote (1983)

Original Comedy (1969–1983, retired)

Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
and Larry Tucker (1969) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Peter Bogdanovich, Buck Henry, David Newman and Robert Benton (1972) Melvin Frank and Jack Rose (1973) Mel Brooks, Norman Steinberg, Andrew Bergman, Richard Pryor
Richard Pryor
and Alan Uger (1974) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Bill Lancaster
Bill Lancaster
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Sheldon Keller (1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Nancy Meyers, Harvey Miller and Charles Shyer
Charles Shyer
(1980) Steve Gordon (1981) Don McGuire, Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Murray Schisgal (1982) Lawrence Kasdan
Lawrence Kasdan
and Barbara Benedek (1983)

Original Screenplay (1984–present)

Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1984) William Kelley and Earl W. Wallace (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(1987) Ron Shelton (1988) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1989) Barry Levinson
Barry Levinson
(1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Richard Curtis
Richard Curtis
(1994) Randall Wallace (1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (1996) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
and Mark Andrus (1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000) Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Michael Moore
Michael Moore
(2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Dustin Lance Black
Dustin Lance Black
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
and Hugo Guinness (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
and Tarell Alvin McCraney
Tarell Alvin McCraney
(2016) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 34482735 LCCN: n84005993 ISNI: 0000 0001 1757 4121 GND: 119150786 SUDOC: 029173302 BNF: cb12085446q (data) BNE: XX1177248 SN

.