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The Info List - Henry G. Lapham





Henry G. Lapham was an American businessman who was founding president of the Boston Garden-Arena Corporation and a major sports promoter in Boston
Boston
during the 1920s and 1930s.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Business career 3 Sports

3.1 BAA 3.2 Boston
Boston
Arena and Boston
Boston
Garden 3.3 Other

4 Personal life

4.1 Threats

5 Death 6 References

Early life[edit] Lapham was born in 1875 in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
to John Jesse and Mary Elizabeth (Walker) Lapham. He graduated from Yale University
Yale University
in 1897 and a year later moved to Boston.[1] Business career[edit] Lapham's first position was as a clerk in the offices of the United States Leather Company.[1] He later branched out into banking and brokerage and was involved in a number of businesses, including B. A. Corbin & Sons Co. (as treasurer), Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway Company, the National Rockland Bank, Franklin Shoe Company, and the Boston
Boston
National League baseball club (as director).[1][2] He was also a director of the Texas Company, which was founded by family member Lewis Henry Lapham.[2] He resigned from the board in 1933.[3] Sports[edit] BAA[edit] Lapham joined the Boston
Boston
Athletic Association in 1914. He was the BAA's vice president from 1918 to 1920.[4] Lapham then served as president from 1920 to 1926, when he chose not to continue in that role due to business pressures. He was succeeded by George W. Wightman, husband of Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman.[5] Boston
Boston
Arena and Boston
Boston
Garden[edit] Lapham played an instrumental role in the construction of the Boston Arena.[1] In the late 1920s the arena received competition from the newly constructed Boston
Boston
Garden, which was owned by the Boston
Boston
& Maine Railroad and run by the Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
Corporation.[1] The Boston
Boston
Garden was unable to make a profit and in 1934 the smaller Boston
Boston
Arena Corporation, led by Lapham, purchased a controlling interest in the Boston
Boston
Garden.[1][6] In 1936, Lapham's group bought out the remaining stock owned by the Madison Square Garden Corporation.[7] Under the management of Lapham and general manager George V. Brown, the Garden was able to become a prosperous venture.[1] Other[edit] In 1920, Lapham was elected president of the National Association of Amateur Billiard Players.[8] In 1924 he was elected first vice chairman of the American Olympic Association.[9] He became president of the Olympic Committee following the death of president William C. Prout. He resigned from the committee in 1927, citing the stress of his business interests.[10] He was succeeded by Douglas MacArthur.[11] In 1924, Lapham donated $350,000 for the construction of an athletic clubhouse on the Yale campus, which was named the Lapham Field House.[1] Personal life[edit] Lapham was married to Rebecca (Lounsberry) Lapham, a fellow native of Brooklyn. They had two children – Raymond Lapham and Kathryn E. Lapham. Rebecca Lapham died in April 1940, less than four months after Lapham's death.[12] Lapham was a noted golfer, angler, and philatelist. In 1930, his collection of Spanish stamps was chosen as the best show as the American Philatelic Society's annual banquet[1] Threats[edit] In 1924, Salvatore Schiavone, a resident of Boston's North End, was arrested for sending a letter in which he threatened to kill to Lapham if he did not pay him $5,000. Schiavone sent a second letter in 1932, this time asking for $10,800. Schiavone admitted to sending the second letter, stating he felt that Lapham owed him the money as he had been imprisoned unfairly.[13] In 1934, Lapham's daughter-in-law received police protection after she received a phone call that police interpreted as a threat to kidnap her.[14] Death[edit] Lapham died on December 16, 1939 at his home at 514 Warren Street Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts
Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts
following two years of poor health.[1] References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j "Henry G. Lapham, Noted Promoter of Sports Events, Dies". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe. December 17, 1939.  ^ a b "Henry G. Lapham". The Wall Street Journal. October 20, 1926.  ^ "Homes Renews Fight Against "Lapham Group"". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe. October 17, 1924.  ^ "Present Lapham with Set of Clubs". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe. October 17, 1924.  ^ "Wightman Chosen B.A.A. President". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe. April 28, 1926.  ^ Hurwitz, Hy (September 7, 1934). "Garden-Arena Plan Adopted". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe.  ^ " Boston
Boston
Garden Is On Its Own". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe. November 8, 1936.  ^ "Lapham is Elected to Head N.A.A.B.P". The New York Times. March 30, 1920.  ^ "Tennis Body in Olympics". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe. November 23, 1922.  ^ "Lapham to Resign from Olympic Committee". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe. September 27, 1927.  ^ "MacArthur Chosen U.S. Olympic Head". The New York Times. September 18, 1927.  ^ "Mrs. Rebecca Lapham". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe. April 9, 1940.  ^ "Schiavone Held For Letter to Lapham". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe. May 20, 1932.  ^ "Guard Mrs. Lapham From Kidnapers". The Boston
Boston
Daily Globe. February 15, 1934. 

v t e

Presidents of the United States Olympic Committee

Albert Spalding
Albert Spalding
(1900–1904) David R. Francis
David R. Francis
(1904–1906) Caspar Whitney
Caspar Whitney
(1906–1910) Frederic B. Pratt
Frederic B. Pratt
(1910–1912) Robert M. Thompson (1912–1920) Gustavus T. Kirby (1920–1924) Robert M. Thompson (1924–1926) William C. Prout (1926–1927) Henry G. Lapham (interim 1927) Douglas MacArthur
Douglas MacArthur
(1927–1928) Avery Brundage
Avery Brundage
(1928–1953) Tug Wilson (1953–1965) Doug Roby
Doug Roby
(1965–1968) Franklin Orth (1969–1970) Clifford H. Buck (interim 1970, elected 1970–1973) Philip O. Krumm (1973–1977) Robert Kane (1977–1981) William E. Simon
William E. Simon
(1981–1985) John B. Kelly Jr. (1985) Robert Helmick (interim 1985, elected 1985–1991) Bill Hybl (interim 1991–1992) LeRoy T. Walker
LeRoy T. Walker
(1992–1996) Bill Hybl (1996–1999) Sandra Baldwin (2000–2002) Marty Mankamyer (interim 2002, elected 2002–2003) William C. Martin (interim 2003–2004) Peter Ueberroth
Peter Ueberroth
(2004–2008) Larry Probst
Larry Probst
(200

.