HOME
The Info List - Grantland Rice


--- Advertisement ---



Henry Grantland
Grantland
Rice (November 1, 1880 - July 13, 1954) was an early 20th-century American sportswriter known for his elegant prose. His writing was published in newspapers around the country and broadcast on the radio.

Contents

1 Early years 2 Sportswriter 3 Quotations 4 Legacy 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External links

Early years[edit] Grantland
Grantland
Rice was born in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, the son of Bolling Hendon Rice, a cotton dealer,[1] and his wife, Mary Beulah (Grantland) Rice.[2] His grandfather Major H. W. Rice was a Confederate veteran of the Civil War.[3]

A young Rice at Vanderbilt

Rice attended Montgomery Bell Academy
Montgomery Bell Academy
and Vanderbilt University
Vanderbilt University
in Nashville, where he was a member of the football team for three years, a shortstop on the baseball team, a brother in the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, and graduated with a BA degree in 1901 in classics.[4] On the football team, he lettered in the year of 1899 as an end and averaged two injuries a year. On the baseball team, he was captain in 1901.[4][5] Sportswriter[edit] In 1907 Rice saw what he would call the greatest thrill he ever witnessed in his years of watching sports during the Sewanee–Vanderbilt football game: the catch by Vanderbilt center Stein Stone, on a double-pass play then thrown near the end zone by Bob Blake to set up the touchdown run by Honus Craig
Honus Craig
that beat Sewanee at the very end for the SIAA championship.[6] Vanderbilt coach Dan McGugin in Spalding's Football Guide's summation of the season in the SIAA wrote, "The standing. First, Vanderbilt; second, Sewanee, a mighty good second;" and that Aubrey Lanier "came near winning the Vanderbilt game by his brilliant dashes after receiving punts."[7] Rice coached the 1908 Vanderbilt baseball team. Rice was an advocate for the game of golf. He became interested in golf in 1909 while covering the Southern Amateur at the Nashville Golf Club. It was not his first golf event, but it was the one that seemed to pull him toward the game.[8] After taking early jobs with the Atlanta Journal and the Cleveland News, he later became a sportswriter for the Nashville Tennessean. The job at the Tennessean was given to him by former Sewanee Tigers
Sewanee Tigers
coach Billy Suter, who coached baseball teams against which Rice played while at Vanderbilt. Afterwards he obtained a series of prestigious jobs with major newspapers in the northeastern United States. In 1914 he began his Sportlight column in the New York Tribune. He also provided monthly Grantland
Grantland
Rice Sportlights as part of Paramount newsreels from 1925–1954.[9] He is best known for being the successor to Walter Camp
Walter Camp
in the selection of College Football All-America Teams beginning in 1925, and for being the writer who dubbed the great backfield of the 1924 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team the "Four Horsemen" of Notre Dame. A Biblical reference to the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, this famous account was published in the New York Herald Tribune on October 18, describing the Notre Dame vs. Army game played at the Polo Grounds:

Outlined against a blue-gray October sky the Four Horsemen rode again. In dramatic lore they are known as famine, pestilence, destruction and death. These are only aliases. Their real names are: Stuhldreher, Miller, Crowley and Layden. They formed the crest of the South Bend cyclone before which another fighting Army team was swept over the precipice at the Polo Grounds
Polo Grounds
this afternoon as 55,000 spectators peered down upon the bewildering panorama spread out upon the green plain below.

The passage added great import to the event described and elevated it to a level far beyond that of a mere football game. This passage, although famous, is far from atypical, as Rice's writing tended to be of an "inspirational" or "heroic" style, raising games to the level of ancient combat and their heroes to the status of demigods. He became even better known after his columns were nationally syndicated beginning in 1930, and became known as the "Dean of American Sports Writers". He and his writing are among the reasons that the 1920s in the United States are sometimes referred to as the "Golden Age of Sports". Rice's all-time All-America backfield was Jim Thorpe, Red Grange, Ken Strong, and Ernie Nevers.[10]

The grave of Grantland
Grantland
Rice

His sense of honor can be seen in his own actions. Before leaving for service in World War I, he entrusted his entire fortune, about $75,000, to a friend. On his return from the war, Rice discovered that his friend had lost all the money in bad investments, and then had committed suicide. Rice accepted the blame for putting “that much temptation” in his friend's way.[11] Rice then made monthly contributions to the man’s widow throughout his life.[12] According to author Mark Inabinett in his 1994 work, Grantland
Grantland
Rice and His Heroes: The Sportswriter as Mythmaker in the 1920s, Rice very consciously set out to make heroes of sports figures who impressed him, most notably Jack Dempsey, Babe Ruth, Bobby Jones, Bill Tilden, Red Grange, Babe Didrikson Zaharias, and Knute Rockne. Unlike many writers of his era, Rice defended the right of football players such as Grange, and tennis players such as Tilden, to make a living as professionals, but he also decried the warping influence of big money in sports, once writing in his column:

"Money to the left of them and money to the right Money everywhere they turn from morning to the night Only two things count at all from mountain to the sea Part of it's percentage, and the rest is guarantee"

Rice authored a book of poetry, Songs of the Stalwart, which was published in 1917 by D. Appleton and Company of New York. Rice married Fannie Katherine Hollis on April 11, 1906; they had one child, the actress Florence Rice. Rice died at the age 73 on July 13, 1954, following a stroke.[2] He is interred at Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York City. Quotations[edit]

This page is a candidate to be copied to Wikiquote using the Transwiki process. If the page can be expanded into an encyclopedic article, rather than a list of quotations, please do so and remove this message.

"For when the One Great Scorer comes To mark against your name, He writes – not that you won or lost – But how you played the Game."

(from the poem "Alumnus Football")

"The loafer has no come-back and the quitter no reply, When the Anvil Chorus echoes, as it will, against the sky; But there’s one quick answer ready that will wrap them in a hood: Make good."

(from the poem "The Answer")

Legacy[edit]

Fred Russell
Fred Russell
(left) and Grantland
Grantland
Rice in 1951

In 1951, in recognition of Rice's 50 years in journalism, an anonymous donor contributed $50,000 to establish the Grantland
Grantland
Rice Fellowship in Journalism with the New York Community Trust.[2][13] In 1954, the Football Writers Association established the Grantland
Grantland
Rice Memorial Award, given annually to an outstanding college player selected by the group.[14] The Grantland
Grantland
Rice Bowl, an annual college football bowl game held from 1964 to 1977, was named in his honor, as was the Grantland Rice Award given to the winner. Rice was posthumously awarded the 1966 J. G. Taylor Spink Award by the Baseball Writers Association of America. The award, presented the following year at the annual induction ceremony at the Baseball Hall of Fame, is given for "meritorious contributions to baseball writing".[15] At Vanderbilt, a four-year scholarship named for Rice and former colleague and fellow Vanderbilt alumnus Fred Russell
Fred Russell
is awarded each year to an incoming first-year student who intends to pursue a career in sportswriting. Recipients of the Fred Russell– Grantland
Grantland
Rice Sportswriting
Sportswriting
Scholarship include author and humorist Roy Blount, Jr.; Skip Bayless
Skip Bayless
of ESPN; Dave Sheinin of The Washington Post; and Tyler Kepner of The New York Times.[16] The press box in Vanderbilt Stadium at Vanderbilt University
Vanderbilt University
is dedicated to Rice and named after Rice's protégé, Fred Russell. For many years, a portion of one floor of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
was designated the " Grantland
Grantland
Rice Suite". Grantland
Grantland
Avenue in his hometown of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, was named in his honor. Rice was mentioned in an I Love Lucy
I Love Lucy
episode entitled "The Camping Trip", and was portrayed by actor Lane Smith, also a native of Tennessee, in The Legend of Bagger Vance. On June 8, 2011, ESPN's Bill Simmons launched a sports and popular culture website titled Grantland, a name intended to honor Rice's legacy.[17] It operated for a little more than four years until being shuttered by ESPN
ESPN
on October 30, 2015, several months after Simmons's departure.[18] References[edit]

^ "Obituary Notes", The New York Times. October 9, 1917. Accessed on June 29, 2009. ^ a b c " Grantland
Grantland
Rice Dies at the Age of 73", The New York Times, July 14, 1954. Accessed on December 27, 2012. ^ "Major H.W. Grantland
Grantland
dies", The New York Times, February 18, 1926. Accessed on June 29, 2009. ^ a b Sideliner (March 1920). "Athlete, Soldier and Writer". Outing:Sport, Adventure, Travel, Fiction. 75 (6). Retrieved April 23, 2015 – via Google books.  ^ John A. Simpson. The Greatest Game Ever Played In Dixie. p. 27.  ^ " Grantland
Grantland
Rice Tells Of Greatest Thrill In Years Of Watching Sport". Boston Daily Globe. April 27, 1924.  ^ Dan McGugin
Dan McGugin
(1907). "Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association Foot Ball". The Official National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Guide. National Collegiate Athletic Association: 71–75.  ^ Hardin, Robin (2004). "Crowning the King: Grantland
Grantland
Rice and Bobby Jones". Georgia Historical Quarterly. 88 (4): 511–529. Retrieved 15 February 2018.  ^ Porter, David L. (1988) Biographical Dictionary of American Sports: Outdoor Sports, Greenwood Press ISBN 9780313262609 pp 88–90 ^ https://books.google.com/books?id=rDV1jOx2P3cC&pg=PA198 ^ Rice, Grantland
Grantland
(January 27, 1955). "War Interrupted Writing Career". Democrat and Chronicle. Rochester, New York. Retrieved February 4, 2017 – via newspapers.com.  ^ Harper, William (February 25, 1999). How You Played the Game: The Life of Grantland
Grantland
Rice. Columbia, Missouri: University of Missouri Press. p. 245. ISBN 978-0826212047.  ^ "$50,000 Fund Created", The New York Times, May 3, 1951. Accessed on June 29, 2009. ^ " Grantland Rice Award Established in Football", The New York Times, August 14, 1954. Accessed on June 29, 2009. ^ " J. G. Taylor Spink Award Honorees", Baseball Hall of Fame. Accessed on June 30, 2009. ^ "The Fred Russell– Grantland
Grantland
Rice Sportswriting
Sportswriting
Scholarship" (PDF), Vanderbilt University. Accessed on June 29, 2009. ^ ESPN
ESPN
MediaZone (2011). All-Star Roster of Writers and Editors to Join New ESPN
ESPN
Web Site Archived 2011-04-30 at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved May 3, 2011. ^ http://espnmediazone.com/us/espn-statement-regarding-grantland/

Further reading[edit]

Fountain, Charles (November 11, 1993). Sportswriter: The Life and Times of Grantland
Grantland
Rice. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0195061765.  Harper, William (February 25, 1999). How You Played the Game: The Life of Grantland
Grantland
Rice. Columbia, Missouri: University of Missouri Press. ISBN 978-0826212047.  Inabinett, Mark (December 21, 1994). Grantland
Grantland
Rice and His Heroes: The Sportswriter as Mythmaker in the 1920s. Knoxville, Tennessee: University of Tennessee Press. ISBN 978-0870498497.  Rice, Grantland
Grantland
(1954). The Tumult and the Shouting. Phillies Sports Library. ASIN B0007H313Y.  Rice, Grantland
Grantland
(December 30, 2004). Base-Ball Ballads: Grantland
Grantland
Rice (McFarland Historical Baseball Library). C H Wellington (Illustrator). McFarland & Company. ISBN 978-0786420384.  Rice, Grantland
Grantland
(August 30, 2012). Songs of the Stalwart (Classic Reprint). Forgotten Books. ASIN B0099GNMZG.  Rice, Grantland
Grantland
(June 14, 2014). Casey's Revenge. Jim Hull (Illustrator). CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. ISBN 978-1499593587. 

External links[edit]

Wikisource
Wikisource
has original works written by or about: Grantland
Grantland
Rice

Works by or about Grantland
Grantland
Rice at Internet Archive Works by Grantland
Grantland
Rice at LibriVox
LibriVox
(public domain audiobooks) Grantland
Grantland
Rice at Find a Grave J. G. Taylor Spink Award – 1966 winner Alumnus Football by Grantland
Grantland
Rice The Answer by Grantland
Grantland
Rice

v t e

Vanderbilt Commodores head baseball coaches

Unknown (1886–1903) T. W. Davis (1904) Unknown (1905–1907) Grantland
Grantland
Rice (1908) Ed Hamilton (1909–1910) Anderson Weakley (1911) Herbert Charles Sanborn (1912–1913) Dick Lyle (1914) Unknown (1915–1916) Bill Schwartz (1917) Ralph Palmer (1918) Ray Morrison
Ray Morrison
(1919) Byrd Douglas (1920–1921) Wallace Wade
Wallace Wade
(1922–1923) Bill Schwartz (1924–1932) Unknown (1933) Bill Schwartz (1934–1940) Unknown (1941) James A. Scoggins (1942) Unknown (1943) No team (1944–1946) James A. Scoggins (1947) Tommy Harrison (1948) Dave Scobey (1949–1951) Bill Schwartz (1952) Woody T. Johnson (1953) Dave Scobey (1954–1956) Dick Richardson (1957–1959) Harley Boss (1960) Dick Richardson (1961) Jerry Elliot (1962) Harley Boss (1963–1964) George Archie (1965–1967) Larry Schmittou
Larry Schmittou
(1968–1978) Roy Mewbourne (1979–2002) Tim Corbin (2003– )

v t e

Amos Alonzo Stagg Award winners

1940: Herring Jr. 1941: Cowell 1942–1945 No award given 1946: Rice 1947: Alexander 1948: Dobie, Warner & Zuppke 1949: Harlow 1950 No award given 1951: McLaughry 1952: McMillin 1953: Little 1954: Bible 1955: Tomlin 1956 No award given 1957: Neyland 1958: Bierman 1959: Wilce 1960: Harman 1961: Eliot 1962: Wieman 1963: Kerr 1964: Faurot 1965: Stuhldreher 1966: Moore 1967: Neely 1968: Martin 1969: Engle 1970: Waldorf 1971: Murray 1972: Curtice 1973: Jordan 1974: Gaither 1975: Zornow 1976 No award given 1977: Schwartzwalder 1978: Hamilton 1979: Crisler 1980 No award given 1981: Russell 1982: Robinson 1983: Bryant 1984: Wilkinson 1985: Daugherty 1986: Hayes 1987: Scovell 1988: McCracken 1989: Nelson 1990: Casanova 1991: Blackman 1992: McClendon 1993: Jackson 1994: Devaney 1995: Merritt 1996: Neinas 1997: Parseghian 1998: Reade 1999: Schembechler 2000: Osborne 2001: Dooley 2002: Paterno 2003: Edwards 2004: Schipper 2005: Fry 2006: Teaff 2007: Curry 2008: Walsh 2009: Gagliardi 2010: Royal 2011: Bowden 2012: DeBerry 2013: Westering 2014: Slocum 2015: Hatfield 2016: Cooper 2017: Nehlen 2018: Broyles

v t e

Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 1967

BBWAA Vote

Red Ruffing
Red Ruffing
(86.9%)

Veterans Committee

Branch Rickey Lloyd Waner

J. G. Taylor Spink Award

Grantland
Grantland
Rice

v t e

J. G. Taylor Spink Award recipients

Addie Angell Broeg Broun Brown Burick Carmichael Chass Cobbledick Collett Collier Conlin Daniel Drebinger Durso Dryden Elliott Falls Feeney Fullerton Gage Gammons Graham Hagen Holmes Holtzman Hummel Hunter Isaminger Kaese Kelly Kieran Koppett Lacy Lang Lardner Lawson Lebovitz Lewis Lieb Madden McCoy McGuff Meany Mercer Munzel Murnane Murray Newhan Ocker Peters Povich Reicher Rice Richman Ringolsby Runyon Saidt Salsinger Shaughnessy Spink C. Smith K. Smith R. Smith W. Smith Stevens Stockton Whiteside Young

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 41043191 LCCN: n92118

.