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The Kingdom or Principality of Galicia–Volhynia[1] (Old East Slavic: Галицко-Волинскоє князство, Ukrainian: Галицько-Волинське князівство, Russian: Галицко-Волынское княжество, Polish: Królestwo Galicji-Wołyn, Slovak: Kráľovstvo Halíčsko-Volinské, Latin: Regnum Galiciae et Lodomeriae), also known as the Kingdom of Ruthenia (Old East Slavic: Королѣвство Русь, Ukrainian: Королівство Русі, Latin: Regnum Russiae) since 1253, was a state in the regions of Galicia and Volhynia, of present-day western Ukraine, which was formed after the conquest of Galicia by the Prince of Volhynia
Volhynia
Roman the Great, with the help of Leszek the White of Poland. Roman the Great
Roman the Great
united the principalities of Halych (Galicia) and Volhynia
Volhynia
into a state that existed from 1199 to 1349. Along with Novgorod and Vladimir-Suzdal, it was one of the three most important powers to emerge from the collapse of Kievan Rus'. After the enormous destruction wreaked by the Mongol
Mongol
invasion of Rus' in 1239 to 1241, Prince Danylo Romanovych
Danylo Romanovych
was forced to pledge allegiance to Batu Khan
Batu Khan
of the Golden Horde
Golden Horde
in 1246. He strove to rid his realm of the Mongol
Mongol
yoke, however, by a formal orientation to Western Europe
Western Europe
(coronation as a "Rex Rusiae" by a papal legate in 1253) and by trying unsuccessfully to establish military alliances with other European rulers.[2] The Polish conquest of the kingdom in 1349 ended its vassalage to the Golden Horde.[3] Western Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
extended between the rivers San and Wieprz in what is now south-eastern Poland, while eastern territories covered the Pripet Marshes
Pripet Marshes
(now in Belarus) and upper Southern Bug
Southern Bug
in modern-day Ukraine. During its time, the kingdom was bordered by Black Rus', the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, the Principality of Turov-Pinsk, the Principality of Kiev, the Golden Horde, the Kingdom of Hungary, the Kingdom of Poland, the Principality of Moldova
Moldova
and the Monastic State of the Teutonic Knights.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Tribal area 1.2 Rise and apogee 1.3 Decline and fall 1.4 End

2 Historical role 3 Division

3.1 Temporary division

4 Rulers 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 Further reading

8.1 Cyrilic 8.2 Latin

9 External links

9.1 Ukrainian

History[edit] Tribal area[edit] After the fall of the Roman Empire, the area was populated by Slav people, identified with groups called Buzhans, Dulebes and Croats. The southwestern edge of the land was probably part of the Great Moravian state. In 907, Galician Croats and Dulebs were involved in the military campaign against Constantinople led by Rus' Prince Oleg of Novgorod.[4][5] This is the first significant evidence of the political affiliation of native tribes. Around 970, the eastern edge of this territory was probably included into the Piast dynasty
Piast dynasty
state. The area was mentioned in 981 (by Nestor), when Vladimir the Great
Vladimir the Great
of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
took over on his way into Poland. He founded the city of Volodimir (Volynskii) and later Christianized the locals. In the 12th century, the Rurikid
Rurikid
Principality of Halych
Halych
was formed there by descendants of Vladimir the Great. It merged at the end of the 12th century with the neighboring Principality of Volhynia
Principality of Volhynia
into the principality of Galicia–Volhynia, which existed with some breaks for a century and a half. Rise and apogee[edit]

Saint Pantaleon Church, Shevchenkove, Halych
Halych
Raion, 1194

Volhynia
Volhynia
and Galicia had originally been two separate Rurikid principalities, assigned on a rotating basis to younger members of the Kievan dynasty. The line of Prince Roman the Great
Roman the Great
of Vladimir-in- Volhynia
Volhynia
had held the principality of Volhynia, while the line of Yaroslav Osmomysl held the Principality of Halych
Halych
(later adopted as Galicia). Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
was created following the death in 1198[6] or 1199[7] (and without a recognized heir in the paternal line) of the last Prince of Galicia, Vladimir II Yaroslavich; Roman acquired the Principality of Galicia and united his lands into one state. Roman's successors would mostly use Halych
Halych
(Galicia) as the designation of their combined kingdom. In Roman's time Galicia–Volhynia's principal cities were Halych
Halych
and Volodymyr-in-Volhynia. In 1204 he captured Kiev. Roman was allied with Poland, signed a peace treaty with Hungary
Hungary
and developed diplomatic relations with the Byzantine Empire. At the height of his reign he briefly became the most powerful of the Rus' princes.[8] He married the niece of the Byzantine emperor Alexios III, for whom Galicia was the main military ally against the Cumans. The relation with Byzantium helped to stabilize Galicia's relations with the Russian population of the Lower Dniester and the Lower Danube.[9] In 1205 Roman turned against his Polish allies, leading to a conflict with Leszek the White
Leszek the White
and Konrad of Masovia. Roman was subsequently killed in the Battle of Zawichost
Battle of Zawichost
(1205), and his dominion entered a period of rebellion and chaos. Thus weakened, Galicia–Volhynia became an arena of rivalry between Poland
Poland
and Hungary. King Andrew II of Hungary
Hungary
styled himself rex Galiciæ et Lodomeriæ, Latin
Latin
for "king of Galicia and Vladimir [in-Volhynia]", a title that later was adopted in the Habsburg Empire. In a compromise agreement made in 1214 between Hungary
Hungary
and Poland, the throne of Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
was given to Andrew's son, Coloman of Lodomeria, who had married Leszek the White's daughter, Salomea.

Historical map of Kievan Rus', 1220-1240

In 1221, Mstislav Mstislavich, son of Mstislav Rostislavich, liberated Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
from the Hungarians, but it was Daniel Romanovych (Daniel I of Galicia or Danylo Romanovych
Danylo Romanovych
or Danylo Halytskyi), son of Roman, who formed a real union of Volhynia
Volhynia
and Galicia. In 1239 and 1242 he captured Kiev, attempting to become the Grand Prince of all Rus', but he lost the city the first time after a few weeks, the second after a year. Danylo defeated the Polish and Hungarian forces in the battle of Yaroslav (Jarosław) and crushed their ally Rostislav Mikhailovich, son of the prince of Chernigov, in 1245. He also strengthened his relations with Batu Khan
Batu Khan
by traveling to his capital Saray (Sarai) and acknowledging, at least nominally, the supremacy of the Mongol
Mongol
Golden Horde. After meeting with Batu Khan, Danylo reorganized his army along Mongol
Mongol
lines and equipped it with Mongolian weapons, although Danylo himself maintained the traditional attire of a Rus' prince. Danylo's alliance with the Mongols was merely tactical; he pursued a long-term strategy of resistance to the Mongols.[10] In 1245, Pope
Pope
Innocent IV
Innocent IV
allowed Danylo to be crowned king. Danylo wanted more than recognition, commenting bitterly that he expected an army when he received the crown.[11] Although Danylo promised to promote recognition of the Pope
Pope
to his people, his realm continued to be ecclesiastically independent from Rome. Thus, Danylo was the only member of the Rurik dynasty
Rurik dynasty
to have been crowned king.[citation needed] Danylo was crowned by the papal legate Opizo de Mezzano in Dorohochyn 1253 as the first King of all Rus' (Rex Russiae; 1253–1264). In 1256 Danylo succeeded in driving the Mongols out of Volhynia, and a year later he defeated their attempts to capture the cities of Lutsk
Lutsk
and Volodymyr-Volynskyi.[12] Upon the approach of a large army under the Mongolian general Boroldai in 1260, however, Danylo was forced to accept their authority and to raze the fortifications he had built against them.[13] Under Danylo's reign, Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
was one of the most powerful states in east central Europe.[13] Literature flourished, producing the Galician–Volhynian Chronicle. Demographic growth was enhanced by immigration from the west and the south, including Germans and Armenians. Commerce developed due to trade routes linking the Black Sea with Poland, Germany, and the Baltic basin. Major cities, which served as important economic and cultural centers, included Lvov (where the royal seat would later be moved by Danylo's son), Vladimir-in-Volhynia, Galich, Kholm (Danylo's capital), Peremyshl, Drohiczyn, and Terebovlya. Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
was important enough that in 1252 Danylo was able to marry his son Roman to the heiress of the Austrian Duchy in the vain hope of securing it for his family. Another son, Shvarn, married a daughter of Mindaugas, Lithuania's first king, and briefly ruled that land from 1267–1269. At the peak of its expansion, the Galician–Volhynian state contained not only south-western Rus' lands, including Red Rus'
Red Rus'
and Black Rus', but also briefly controlled the Brodnici on the Black Sea. After Danylo's death in 1264, he was succeeded by his son Lev, who moved the capital to Lviv
Lviv
in 1272 and for a time maintained the strength of Galicia–Volhynia. Unlike his father, who pursued a Western political course, Lev worked closely with the Mongols, in particular cultivating a close alliance with the Tatar Khan Nogai. Together with his Mongol
Mongol
allies, he invaded Poland. However, although his troops plundered territory as far west as Racibórz, sending many captives and much booty back to Galicia, Lev did not ultimately gain much territory from Poland. Lev also attempted, unsuccessfully, to establish his family's rule over Lithuania. Soon after his brother Shvarn ascended to the Lithuanian throne in 1267, he had the former Lithuanian ruler Vaišvilkas
Vaišvilkas
killed. Following Shvarn's loss of the throne in 1269, Lev entered into conflict with Lithuania. From 1274–76 he fought a war with the new Lithuanian ruler Traidenis
Traidenis
but was defeated, and Lithuania annexed the territory of Black Ruthenia with its city Navahrudak. In 1279, Lev allied himself with king Wenceslaus II of Bohemia
Wenceslaus II of Bohemia
and invaded Poland, although his attempt to capture Kraków
Kraków
in 1280 ended in failure. That same year, Lev defeated Hungary
Hungary
and annexed part of Transcarpathia, including the city of Mukachevo. In 1292 he defeated Poland
Poland
and added Lublin
Lublin
with surrounding areas to the territory of Galicia–Volhynia. Decline and fall[edit] After Lev's death in 1301, a period of decline ensued. Lev was succeeded by his son Yuri I, who ruled for only seven years. Although his reign was largely peaceful and Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
flourished economically, Yuri I lost Lublin
Lublin
to the Poles in 1302 and Transcarpathia to the Hungarians. From 1308 until 1323 Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
was jointly ruled by Yuri I's sons Andrew and Lev II, who proclaimed themselves to be the kings of Galicia and Volhynia. The brothers forged alliances with King Władysław I of Poland
Poland
and the Teutonic Order
Teutonic Order
against the Lithuanians and the Mongols, but the Kingdom was still tributary to the Mongols and joined the Mongol military expeditions of Uzbeg Khan
Uzbeg Khan
and his successor, Janibeg Khan.[3] The brothers died together in 1323, in battle, fighting against the Mongols, and left no heirs. After the extinction of the Rurikid
Rurikid
dynasty in Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
in 1323, Volhynia
Volhynia
passed into the control of the Lithuanian prince Liubartas, while the boyars took control over Galicia. They invited the Polish prince Boleslaw Yuri II, a grandson of Yuri I, to assume the Galician throne. Boleslaw converted to Orthodoxy and assumed the name Yuri II. Nevertheless, suspecting him of harboring Catholic feelings, the boyars poisoned him in 1340 and elected one of their own, Dmitry Detko, to lead the Galician state. In Winter 1341 Tatars, Ruthenians led by Detko, and Lithuanians led by Liubartas
Liubartas
were able to defeat the Poles, although they were not so successful in Summer 1341. Finally, Detko was forced to accept Polish overlordship, as a starost of Halych. After Detko's death, Poland's King Casimir III mounted a successful invasion, capturing and annexing Galicia in 1349. Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
ceased to exist as an independent state. Danylo's dynasty attempted to gain support from Pope
Pope
Benedict XII and broader European powers for an alliance against the Mongols, but ultimately proved unable to compete with the rising powers of the centralised Grand Duchy of Lithuania
Grand Duchy of Lithuania
and the Kingdom of Poland. Only in 1349, after the occupation of Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
by an allied Polish-Hungarian force, was the Kingdom of Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
finally conquered and incorporated in Poland. This ended the vassalage of Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
Rus' to the Golden Horde.[14] End[edit] See also: Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
Wars From 1340 to 1392 the civil war in the region transitioned into a power struggle between Lithuania, Poland, and Hungary. The first stage of conflict led to the signing of a treaty in 1344 that secured the Principality of Peremyshl for the Crown of Poland, while the rest of the territory belonged to a member of the Gediminis family, Liubartas. Eventually by the mid-14th century, the Kingdom of Poland
Poland
and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania
Grand Duchy of Lithuania
divided up the region between them: King Casimir III took Galicia and Western Volhynia, while the sister state of Eastern Volhynia
Volhynia
together with Kiev
Kiev
came under Lithuanian control, 1352–66. After 1352 most of the Ruthenian Voivodeship
Ruthenian Voivodeship
belonged to the Crown of the Polish Kingdom, where it remained also after the Union of Lublin between Poland
Poland
and Lithuania. The present-day town of Halych
Halych
is situated 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) away from the ancient capital of Galicia, on the spot where the river port of the old town was located, and where King Liubartas
Liubartas
of Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
constructed a wooden castle in 1367. By the treaty of the Union of Lublin
Lublin
of 1569, all of the former principality of Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
became part of Poland. In 1772, Empress Maria Theresa of Austria
Maria Theresa of Austria
(who was also Queen of Hungary) revived the old Hungarian claims to the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria (Regnum Galiciæ et Lodomeriæ), using them to justify the participation of Austria in the partitions of Poland.

Historical role[edit] The Galician-Volhynian Chronicle reflected the political programme of the Romanovich dynasty ruling Galicia–Volhynia. Galicia–Volhynia competed with other successor states of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
(notably Vladimir-Suzdal) to claim the Kievan inheritance. According to the Galician–Volhynian Chronicle, Galicia–Volhynia's King Daniil was the last ruler of Kiev
Kiev
preceding the Mongolian invasion and thus Galicia–Volhynia's rulers were the only legitimate successors to the Kievan throne.[15] Until the end of Galician-Volhynian state, its rulers advanced claims upon "all the land of Rus'." The seal of King Yuri I contained the Latin
Latin
inscription domini georgi regis rusie.[15] In contrast to their consistent secular or political claims to the Kievan inheritance, Galicia's rulers were not concerned by religious succession. This differentiated them from their rivals in Vladimir-Suzdal, who sought to, and attained, control over the Kievan Church. Rather than contest Vladimir-Suzal's dominance of the Kievan Church, Galicia-Volhynia's rulers merely asked for and obtained a separate Church from Byzantium.[15] Galicia– Volhynia
Volhynia
also differed from the northern and eastern principalities of the former Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
in terms of its relationship with its western neighbors. King Danylo was alternatively an ally or a rival with neighboring Slavic Poland
Poland
and partially Slavic Hungary. According to historian George Vernadsky, Galicia–Volhynia, Poland and Hungary
Hungary
belonged to the same psychological and cultural world. The Roman Catholic Church was seen as a neighbor and there was much intermarriage between the princely houses of Galicia and those of neighboring Catholic countries. In contrast, the Westerners faced by Alexander, prince of Novgorod, were the Teutonic Knights, and the northeastern Rus' experience of the West was that of hostile crusaders rather than peers.[12] Division[edit]

Volhynia
Volhynia
coat of arms

Halych
Halych
coat of arms

Peremyshl coat of arms

Belz
Belz
coat of arms

The principality was divided into several appanage duchies and lands.

Principality of Halych

Principality of Peremyshl Principality of Zvenyhorod Principality of Trebovlia

Principality of Volhynia

Principality of Lutsk Principality of Dorohobuzh Principality of Peresopnytsia

Principality of Belz Land of Chełm
Chełm
( Lublin
Lublin
1289–1302) Land of Berestia Black Ruthenia, a fief of Grand Duchy of Lithuania
Grand Duchy of Lithuania
after a treaty between Daniel of Galicia
Daniel of Galicia
and Vaišvilkas

Temporary division[edit]

Principality of Kiev
Principality of Kiev
(1230–1240) Principality of Turow (1230s) Zakarpattia (1280–1320) ???

Halych–Volyn 2nd half of the 13th century – 1st half of the 14th century

Halych-Volyn in mid-13th century Annexations by Halych-Volyn (years) Other Ruthenian Principalities Golden Horde Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Poland Teutonic Order Grand Duchy of Lithuania Borders of lands and regional principalities Main trade routes Borders of Ruthenian Principalities "Capital cities" Kiev Chernigov Pereyaslavl Horodok (Hrodna) Pinsk Turov Volodymyr Halych Minsk Sluchesk Dubrovytsia Stepan' Horchevsk Ovruch Iskorosten (Korosten) Vozviahel (Novohrad-Volynsky) Kolodiazhen Hubyn Medjybozh (Medzhybizh) Novhorodok Valkhovyisk Rodka Mukacheve Koshytsi Sandomierz Lublin Kholm Cherven Suteysk Vizna Bilsk Dorohychyn Kamyanets Kobryn Berestia (Brest) Vlodava Luboml Belz Zvenyhorod Lviv Buzhsk Peremyshl Yaroslavl Sanok Sambir Lutsk Dorogobuzh Peresopnytsia Duben (Dubno) Kremyanets Zaslav Terebovl Kolomyia Vasyliv Chern (Chernivtsi) Okut Boloto Ushytsia Kiev

Principality Turov–Pinsk Principality Minsk
Minsk
Principality Polatsk Principality Black Ruthenia Zakarpattia (1230–1240) (1230–ті) (1252–1276) (1280–1320) (1289–1302) (1251–1252) (1254) Halych
Halych
Principality Land of

Berestia Cherven–

Kholm Land Volhynia

Principality Belz Principality Lutsk

Principality Dnipro Bozh (Southern Bug) Dnister Prut Seret Tysa Wisla San Bug Neman Prypyat Vepr

Rulers[edit]

Royal seal of George I of Halych
Halych
(1301–1308) "S[igillum] Domini Georgi Regis Rusie", "S[igillum] Domini Georgi Ducis Ladimerie".

Prinz Władysław II Opolczyk Governor of Galicia 1372–1378

1199–1205 Roman the Great 1205–1214 political crisis

1205–1206 Euphrosine Angelina (daughter of Isaac II Angelos) as a regent for Daniel of Galicia 1206–1211 children of Igor Svyatoslavich 1210 Rostislav II of Kiev
Kiev
(short stint) 1211–1212 Mstislav the Mute as a regent for Daniel of Galicia 1212–1214 Uprising led by a boyar Volodyslav Kormylchych

1214–1232 Hungarian occupation, sons of Andrew II of Hungary

1214–1220 Coloman, son of Andrew (King of Galicia and Lodomeria) 1220 Uprising led by Mstislav the Prosperous 1220–1232 Andrew, son of Andrew

1232–1235 Daniel of Galicia 1235–1238 children of Michael of Chernigov 1238–1264 Daniel of Galicia 1264–1269 Dual power descendants of Daniel

1264–1269 Shvarn 1264–1300 Lev I of Galicia

1300–1308 Yuri I of Galicia 1308–1323 Dual power descendants of Yuri

1308–1323 Lev II of Galicia 1308–1323 Andrew of Galicia

1323–1349 political crisis, de facto ruled by a boyar Dmytro Dedko

1323–1325 Galicia: Volodymyr I of Galicia, Volhynia: Liubartas 1325–1340 Yuri II Boleslav (united as compromise)

1340 occupation of Galicia by Casimir III the Great, start of war

1341–1349 Liubartas

1349 Galicia occupied by Poland
Poland
and Hungary, Volhynia
Volhynia
- Lithuania

See also[edit]

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invasion of Rus' List of early East Slavic states List of rulers of Galicia and Volhynia Ruthenian nobility

References[edit]

^ It is also called Galich-Volhyn, Galicia–Volynia, Galicia–Volyn, and Galich–Volyn, Halych–Volhyn, Halych–Volhynia, or Galicia–Vladimir ^ Principality of Galicia-Volhynia. ^ a b Michael B. Zdan - The Dependence of Halych-Volyn' Rus' on the Golden Horde, The Slavonic and East European Review, Vol. 35, No. 85 (Jun., 1957), p. 522 ^ " Oleg of Novgorod
Oleg of Novgorod
History of Russia". historyofrussia.org. Retrieved 2016-02-14. ^ Ипатьевская летопись. — СПб., 1908. — Стлб. 21 ^ Dimnik, Martin (2003). The Dynasty of Chernigov - 1146-1246. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. (Chronological table of events) xxviii. ISBN 978-0-521-03981-9.  ^ Charles Cawley (2008-05-19). "Russia, Rurikids – Chapter 3: Princes of Galich B. Princes of Galich 1144-1199". Medieval Lands. Foundation of Medieval Genealogy. Retrieved 2009-12-26.  ^ Encyclopedia of Ukraine, Roman Mstyslavych ^ Alexander V. Maiorov, The Alliance between Byzantium and Rus’ Before the Conquest of Constantinople by the Crusaders in 1204,Russian History, Volume 42, Issue 3, pages 272 – 303. Publication Year : 2015 ^ Vernadsky, George. (1970). The Mongols and Russia. A History of Russia, Vol. III. New Haven: Yale University Press pp. 144-149. ^ John Joseph Saunders. (2001). The history of the Mongol
Mongol
conquests. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, p101 ^ a b Vernadsky, George. (1970). The Mongols and Russia. A History of Russia, Vol. III. New Haven: Yale University Press pg. 157. ^ a b "Daniel Romanovich" Archived 2007-08-24 at the Wayback Machine.. Encyclopædia Britannica. 2007. Britannica Concise Encyclopedia. 23 August 2007 ^ Zdan, Michael B. "The Dependence of Halych-Volyn' Rus' on the Golden Horde." The Slavonic and East European Review, Vol. 35, No. 85 (June, 1957), p. 521-522 ^ a b c Jarosław
Jarosław
Pelenski. In P. Potichnyj (ed.) (1992). Ukraine
Ukraine
and Russia in their historical encounter. Edmonton, Alberta: Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies Press, University of Alberta. pp.8-15

Subtelny, Orest (2000). Ukraine: A History. University of Toronto Press. ISBN 0-8020-8390-0. 

Sources[edit]

Галицько-Волинський Літопис. Іпатіївський список Галицько-Волинський Літопис. Іпатіївський список Галицько-Волинський Літопис. Острозький (Хлєбниковський) список Галицько-Волинський Літопис. Переклад Л.Махновця Литовсько-білоруські літописи Список городів руських дальніх і близьких Ілюстрації з "Chronicon Pictum" Перелік джерел за "Крип'якевич І. Галицько-волинське князівство. Київ, 1984" Болеслав-Юрий II, князь всей Малой Руси: Сборник материалов и исследований. — Санкт-Петербург, 1907.

Further reading[edit] Cyrilic[edit]

Андрияшев А. М. Очерки истории Волынской земли до конца XIV ст. Киев, 1887. Галицкий исторический сборник, 1854, вып. 2. Греков Б. Д. Древнейшие судьбы славянства в Прикарпатских. областях // Вестник АН СССР. 1940. № 11-12. Греков Б. Д. Крестьяне на Руси. — Москва,1952. Иванов П. А., Исторические судьбы Волынской земли с древнейших времен до конца XIV века, Одесса, 1895. Крип'якевич І. Галицько-волинське князівство. Київ, 1984. Коваленко В. Чернігів і Галич у ХІІ — ХІІІ ст. // Галичина та Волинь у добу Середньовіччя. — Львів, 2001. — С.154-165. Котляр М. Ф. Данило Галицький. — Київ, 1979. Материалы для истории и этнографии края. — Волынския губернския ведомости, 1854. Пашуто В. Т., Очерки по истории Галицко-ВольІнской Руси. — Москва, 1950. Руссов С. Волынские записки сочинінные Степаном Руссовым в Житомире. — Санкт-Петербург, 1809. Шабульдо Ф. М. Земли Юго-Западной Руси в составе Великого княжества Литовского. Киев, "Наукова думка", 1987.[permanent dead link]

Latin[edit]

Bielowski A. Halickowlodzimierskie księstwo. — Biblioteka Ossolińskich., t. 4. Bielowski A. Królewstwo Galicji (o starem księstwie Halickiem). — Biblioteka Ossolińskich, 1860, t. 1 Gebhard L. A. Geschichte des Konigreiches Galizien, Lodomerien und Rotreussen. — Pest, 1778; Engel J. Ch. Geschichte von Halitsch und Vlodimir. — Wien, 1792. Harasiewicz M. Berichtigung der Umrisse zu einer Geschichte der Ruthenen. — Wien, 1835. Harasiewicz M. Annales ecclesiae Ruthenae. — Leopoli, 1862. Hoppe L A. Geschichte des Konigreiches Galizien und Lodomerien. — Wien, 1792. Lewicki A. Ruthenische Teilfürstentümer. — In: Österreichische Monarchie im Wort und Bild Galizien. Wien, 1894. Siarczyński F. Dzieje księstwa niegdyś Przemyślskiego. — Czasopism naukowy Biblioteki im. Ossolińskich, 1828, N 2/3; Siarczyński F. Dzieje niegdyś księstwa Belzkiego i miasta Belza. — Czasopism naukowy Biblioteki im. Ossolińskich, 1829, N 2. Stecki J. T. Wołyń pod względem statystycznym, historycznym i archeologicznym. — Lwów, 1864 Zubrzycki D. Rys do historii narodu ruskiego w Galicji i hierarchii cerkiewnej w temże królewstwie. — Lwów, 1837. Zubrzycki D. Kronika miasta Lwowa. — Lwów, 1844.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Halych-Volhynia.

Довідник з історії України. За ред. І. Підкови та Р. Шуста. — Київ: Генеза, 1993. Галицько-волинські князі Ісаєвич Я. Князь і король Данило та його спадкоємці // Дзеркало тижня. 2001, №48 (372) Карта Галицько-Волинського князівства Володимир-Волинський у «Галереї мистецтв»

Ukrainian[edit]

Борис Яценко, «Слово о полку Ігоревім» та його доба («Slovo o polku Ihorevim» ta joho doba) Волинська земля у складі Галицько-Волинського князівства (Volynśka zemľa u skladi Halyćko-Volynśkoho kńazivstva) За що боролись (Za ščo borolyś)

v t e

East Slavic principalities of the pre- Mongol
Mongol
period

Main Principalities

Chernigov Galicia–Volhynia Kiev Novgorod Severia Pereyaslavl Polotsk Pskov Rostov/Suzdal/Vladimir Ryazan Smolensk Yaroslavl

Other Principalities

Beloozero Drutsk Halych Minsk Murom Slutsk Terebovlia Tmutarakan Trubetsk Turov-Pinsk Vitebsk

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