HOME
        TheInfoList






Flames of charcoal

A flame (from Latin flamma) is the visible, gaseous part of a fire. It is caused by a highly exothermic reaction taking place in a thin zone.[1] Very hot flames are hot enough to have ionized gaseous components of sufficient density to be considered plasma.[vague][citation needed].

Mechanism

Zones in a candle flame

Color and temperature of a flame are dependent on the type of fuel involved in the combustion, as, for example, when a lighter is held to a candle. The applied heat causes the fuel molecules in the candle wax to vaporize (If this process happens in inert atmosphere without oxidizer, it's called pyrolysis). In this state they can then readily react with oxygen in the air, which gives off enough heat in the subsequent exothermic reaction to vaporize yet more fuel, thus sustaining a consistent flame. The high temperature of the flame causes the vaporized fuel molecules to decompose, forming various incomplete combustion products and free radicals, and these products then react with eac

A flame (from Latin flamma) is the visible, gaseous part of a fire. It is caused by a highly exothermic reaction taking place in a thin zone.[1] Very hot flames are hot enough to have ionized gaseous components of sufficient density to be considered plasma.[vague][citation needed].