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The ethnic competition thesis, also known as ethnic competition theory or ethnic competition hypothesis, is an academic theory that posits that individuals support far-right political parties because they wish to reduce competition from immigrants over scarce resources such as jobs, housing and welfare benefits.[1] According to the theory, support for the far right should be higher in areas if there are more immigrants and more lower-educated and lower-skilled voters who would face competition from them.

Several studies have found support for ethnic competition thesis. A 2011 study by Jens Rydgren and Patrick Ruth found some support for the theory in that support for the far-right Sweden Democrats party was higher in areas where there were a higher number of immigrants.[2] However, other studies have questioned the link between the number of refugees, number of asylum seekers, or proportion of noncitizens and people born abroad and the success of the far right.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Rydgren, Jens; Ruth, Patrick (September 2011). "Voting for the radical right in Swedish municipalities: social marginality and ethnic competition?". Scandinavian Political Studies. Wiley. 34 (3): 209. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9477.2011.00269.x. 
  2. ^ Rydgren, Jens; Ruth, Patrick (September 2011). "Voting for the radical right in Swedish municipalities: social marginality and ethnic competition?". Scandinavian Political Studies. Wiley. 34 (3): 202. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9477.2011.00269.x. 
  3. ^ Norris, Pippa (2005). Radical right : voters and parties in the electoral market. New York, New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521613859.