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Donald Scott Drysdale (July 23, 1936 – July 3, 1993) was an American professional baseball player and television sports commentator. A right-handed pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
for his entire career in Major League Baseball, Drysdale was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984. Drysdale won the 1962 Cy Young Award
Cy Young Award
and in 1968 pitched a record six consecutive shutouts and ​58 2⁄3 consecutive scoreless innings.[1][2] One of the most dominant pitchers of the late 1950s and early to mid 1960s,[1] Drysdale stood 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) tall and was not afraid to throw pitches near batters to keep them off balance.[1] After his playing career, he became a radio and television broadcaster.[3]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Playing career 3 Broadcasting career

3.1 1987 3.2 1988

4 Personal life 5 Death 6 Media

6.1 Television 6.2 Film

7 See also 8 References 9 External links

Early life[edit] Drysdale was born in Van Nuys, Los Angeles, and attended Van Nuys High School, where one of his classmates was actor Robert Redford.[4] Playing career[edit]

Donald Drysdale's number 53 was retired by the Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
in 1984.

Pitching for the Brooklyn
Brooklyn
and Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Dodgers, he teamed with Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
during the late 1950s and early and middle 1960s to form one of the most dominating pitching duos in history. Nicknamed "Big D" by fans, Drysdale used brushback pitches and a sidearm fastball to intimidate batters,[3] similar to his fierce fellow Hall of Famer Bob Gibson. His 154 hit batsmen remains a modern National League
National League
record. Drysdale was a good hitting pitcher. In 14 seasons he had 218 hits, including 29 home runs. Drysdale was occasionally used as a pinch-hitter, once during the World Series.[5]

The ball thrown for the final out of Drysdale's 1968 consecutive scoreless innings streak.

In 1962, Drysdale won 25 games and the Cy Young
Cy Young
Award. In 1963, he struck out 251 batters and won Game 3 of the World Series
World Series
at Los Angeles' Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
over the Yankees, 1–0. In 1965 he was the Dodgers' only .300 hitter and tied his own National League
National League
record for pitchers with seven home runs. That year, he also won 23 games and helped the Dodgers to their third World Championship in Los Angeles. In 1968, Drysdale set Major League records with six consecutive shutouts and ​58 2⁄3 consecutive scoreless innings. The latter record was broken by fellow Dodger Orel Hershiser
Orel Hershiser
20 years later. Hershiser, however,did not match Drysdale's record of six consecutive complete game shutouts.[6] Drysdale ended his career with 209 wins, 2,486 strikeouts, 167 complete games and 49 shutouts. He was inducted into the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame in 1984, and had his number 53 retired at Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
on July 1, 1984. At the time of his retirement, Drysdale was the last remaining player on the Dodgers who had played for Brooklyn. He won three NL Player of the Month awards: June 1959 (6-0 record, 1.71 earned run average, 51 strikeouts), July 1960 (6-0 record, 2.00 earned run average, 48 strikeouts), and May 1968 (5-1 record, 0.53 earned run average, 45 strikeouts, with 5 consecutive shutouts to begin his scoreless inning streak, which was carried into June). In 1965, Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
declined to pitch the first game of the World Series because it was on Yom Kippur, a Jewish
Jewish
holy day. Drysdale pitched for the Dodgers instead of Koufax, giving up seven runs in 2 2/3 innings. When Walter Alston, the manager, came to the mound to remove him from the game, Drysdale said, "I bet right now you wish I was Jewish, too." The Dodgers lost the game to the Minnesota Twins 8-2 but went on to win the Series 4 games to 3. Drysdale and Koufax took part in a famous salary holdout together in the spring of 1966, with both finally signing contracts just before the season opened. Those contracts made them the first pitchers to earn more than $100,000 a year.[3] This holdout was the beginning of collective bargaining in baseball. Broadcasting career[edit] A chronically sore shoulder forced Drysdale to retire during the 1969 season. The next year, he started a broadcasting career that continued for the rest of his life: first for the Montreal
Montreal
Expos (1970–1971), then the Texas Rangers (1972), California
California
Angels (1973–1979, 1981), Chicago White Sox
Chicago White Sox
(1982–1987), NBC (1977), ABC (1978[7]–1986), and finally back in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
with the Dodgers (from 1988 until his death in 1993). He also worked with his Angels' partner Dick Enberg
Dick Enberg
on Los Angeles Rams
Los Angeles Rams
football broadcasts from 1973–1976. While at ABC Sports, Drysdale not only did baseball telecasts, but also regional college football games as well as Superstars
Superstars
and Wide World of Sports. In 1979, Drysdale covered the World Series
World Series
Trophy presentation ceremonies for ABC. On October 11, 1980, Keith Jackson called an Oklahoma–Texas college football game for ABC in the afternoon, then flew to Houston to call Game 4 of the NLCS between the Houston Astros and Philadelphia Phillies. In the meantime, Drysdale filled in for Jackson on play-by-play for the early innings. In 1984, Drysdale called play-by-play (alongside Reggie Jackson
Reggie Jackson
and Earl Weaver) for the National League
National League
Championship Series between the San Diego
San Diego
Padres and Chicago Cubs. On October 6, 1984 at San Diego's Jack Murphy Stadium, Game 4 of the NLCS ended when Padres first baseman Steve Garvey
Steve Garvey
hit a two run home run off Lee Smith. Drysdale on the call:

“ Deep right field, way back. Cotto going back to the wall...it's gone! Home run
Home run
Garvey! And there will be tomorrow! ”

The Padres, who rallied from a 2–0 deficit in the best-of-five series against the Cubs won the decisive Game 5 the next day (thus, winning their first ever National League
National League
pennant). In his last ABC assignment, Drysdale interviewed the winners in the Boston Red Sox's clubhouse following Game 7 of the 1986 American League Championship Series against the California
California
Angels. While broadcasting for the White Sox, Drysdale generated some controversy while covering a heated argument between an umpire and Sox manager Tony La Russa. LaRussa pulled up the third base bag and hurled it into the outfield, to the approval of the Comiskey Park
Comiskey Park
crowd, and ensuring his ejection. Drysdale remarked, "Go get 'em, Dago!" For the Sox, Drysdale broadcast Tom Seaver's 300th victory, against the host New York Yankees in 1985. His post-game interview with Seaver was carried live by both the Sox' network and the Yankees' longtime flagship television station WPIX. 1987[edit] Drysdale hosted a nationally syndicated radio show called Radio Baseball
Baseball
Cards. 162 episodes were produced with stories and anecdotes told by current and former Major League Baseball
Baseball
players. The highlight of the series were numerous episodes dedicated to the memory and impact of Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson
as told by teammates, opponents and admirers. Radio Baseball
Baseball
Cards aired on 38 stations, including WNBC New York, KSFO
KSFO
San Francisco and WEEI Boston, as a pre-game show. A collector's edition of the program was re-released in 2007 as a podcast.[8] 1988[edit] Drysdale conducted all of the National League
National League
player interviews for the Baseball
Baseball
Talk
Talk
series in 1988 ( Joe Torre
Joe Torre
did the same for the American League). On September 28, 1988, fellow Dodger Orel Hershiser
Orel Hershiser
surpassed Drysdale when Hershiser finished the season with a record 59 consecutive scoreless innings pitched. In his final start of the year, Hershiser needed to pitch 10 shutout innings to set the mark – meaning not only that he would have to prevent the San Diego
San Diego
Padres from scoring, but that his own team would also need to fail to score in order to ensure extra innings. The Dodgers' anemic offense obliged, and Hershiser pitched the first 10 innings of a scoreless tie, with the Padres eventually prevailing 2–1 in 16 innings. Hershiser almost did not pitch in the 10th inning, in deference to Drysdale, but was convinced to take the mound and try to break the record. When Hershiser broke Drysdale's record, Drysdale came onto the field to hug him, and said, "Oh, I'll tell ya, congratulations... And at least you kept it in the family."[citation needed] Drysdale also called Kirk Gibson's walk-off home run in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series[9] for the Dodgers Radio Network:

“ Well, the crowd is on its feet and if there was ever a preface to 'Casey at the Bat' it would have to be the ninth inning. Two out. The tying run aboard, the winning run at the plate, and Kirk Gibson, standing at the plate. Eckersley working out of the stretch, here's the three-two pitch...and a drive hit to right field (losing voice) WAY BACK! THIS BALL IS GONE! (followed by two minutes of crowd noise) This crowd will not stop! They can't believe the ending! And this time, Mighty Casey did NOT strike out!!!! ”

Personal life[edit]

Don Drysdale's plaque at the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame

In 1958, Drysdale married Ginger Dubberly, a native of Covington, Georgia, and a former Adrian fashion model.[10] The couple had a daughter, Kelly, but divorced in 1982. On November 1, 1986, he married basketball player Ann Meyers, who took the name Ann Meyers-Drysdale. Drysdale and Meyers had three children together: Don Junior ("DJ") (son), Darren (son), and Drew (daughter). In 1990, Drysdale published his autobiography, Once a Bum, Always a Dodger. Death[edit] Drysdale was 56 when he died of a heart attack at Le Centre Sheraton in Montreal, Quebec, on July 3, 1993.[3][11] Radio station employees were sent to look for him when he did not appear for the bus ride to Olympic Stadium, where the Dodgers were scheduled to play the Montreal Expos. Hotel staff entered his room and found him face-down near his bed. The coroner estimated that he had been dead for 18 hours. Drysdale's broadcasting colleague Vin Scully, who was instructed not to say anything on the air until Drysdale's family was notified, announced the news of his death by saying, "Never have I been asked to make an announcement that hurts me as much as this one. And I say it to you as best I can with a broken heart."[12] Fellow broadcaster Ross Porter told his radio audience, "I just don't believe it, folks." While this was going on, word reached Drysdale's former White Sox colleague Ken Harrelson
Ken Harrelson
as he was calling that evening's game against the Baltimore Orioles; an emotional Harrelson had trouble relaying the news to the viewing audience. Drysdale was replaced by Rick Monday
Rick Monday
in the broadcast booth. Among the personal belongings found in Drysdale's hotel room was a cassette tape of Robert F. Kennedy's victory speech after the 1968 California
California
Democratic presidential primary, a speech given only moments before Senator Kennedy's assassination. In the speech, Kennedy had noted, to the cheers of the crowd, that Drysdale had pitched his sixth straight shutout that evening. Drysdale had apparently carried the tape with him wherever he went since Kennedy's murder.[13] Drysdale's body was cremated and his ashes were placed in the Utility Columbarium in the Great Mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California, but they were scattered in 2002. Media[edit] Television[edit] Drysdale was a popular guest star in several television programs:

On the May 2, 1964, episode of The Joey Bishop Show, "Joey and the L.A. Dodgers", Bishop guests are several members of the 1963 World Series Champions LA Dodgers. The teammates show off their various talents, the highlight being Drysdale, a natural singer, crooning "I Left My Heart In San Francisco". On the April 10, 1963, episode of The Beverly Hillbillies, "The Clampetts & The Dodgers", Drysdale and Leo Durocher
Leo Durocher
play golf with Jed and Jethro, and Durocher finds out that Jed and Jethro are good baseball prospects. The Greatest American Hero
The Greatest American Hero
(episode "The Two Hundred Mile an Hour Fastball", which was first broadcast on November 4, 1981 as a broadcaster for the California
California
Stars.[14] The Brady Bunch
The Brady Bunch
episode "The Dropout", which was first broadcast on September 25, 1970. Our Man Higgins
Our Man Higgins
episode "Who's on First?" (May 8, 1963). The Donna Reed Show
The Donna Reed Show
episodes "The Man in the Mask", first broadcast in 1962; "All Those Dreams", first broadcast in 1963; and "Play Ball" and "My Son the Catcher", both first broadcast in 1964. In all four episodes Drysdale plays himself, and in "All Those Dreams" he appeared with first wife, Ginger, and daughter Kelly. Leave It to Beaver
Leave It to Beaver
episode "Long Distance Call", which was first broadcast on June 16, 1962.[15] The Rifleman
The Rifleman
episode "Skull", which was first broadcast on January 1, 1962. The Millionaire episode "Millionaire Larry Maxwell", which was first broadcast on March 1, 1960. With his first wife, Ginger, on February 26, 1959 edition of You Bet Your Life with host Groucho Marx.[16] The episode was released on the 2006 DVD "Groucho Marx: You Bet Your Life
You Bet Your Life
– 14 Classic Episodes". In 1959, Drysdale appeared as a mystery challenger on the TV panel show To Tell the Truth. The Flying Nun
The Flying Nun
episode "The Big Game", 1st episode of the 3rd season, aired September 17, 1969.[17]

Film[edit]

The number "53" used for Disney's Herbie
Herbie
the Love Bug was inspired by Drysdale.[18] Drysdale appears as himself (pitching) in the 1962 thriller Experiment in Terror starring Glenn Ford and Lee Remick. Drydale's 1958 Topps
Topps
baseball card served as a focal point in the 2000 movie Skipped Parts
Skipped Parts
starring Jennifer Jason Leigh. In it a grandfather (R. Lee Ermey) makes his 14-year-old grandson (Bug Hall) throw a stack of baseball cards into a fire as a rite of passage of growing up. However, the boy saves the Drysdale baseball card, which is later seen in the final scene of the film.[19] Drysdale appears as a soldier in the E-Club in The Last Time I Saw Archie (1961) starring Robert Mitchum and Jack Webb.

See also[edit]

Baseball
Baseball
portal Biography portal

List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
all-time leaders in home runs by pitchers List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
players who spent their entire career with one franchise List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
individual streaks List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
single-inning strikeout leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career wins leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
annual strikeout leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
annual wins leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career hit batsmen leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career strikeout leaders Major League Baseball
Baseball
titles leaders

References[edit]

^ a b c " Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
at the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame". baseballhall.org. Retrieved January 9, 2016.  ^ "1968: Year of the Pitcher". thisgreatgame.com. Retrieved January 9, 2016.  ^ a b c d Lyons, Richard D. (July 4, 1993). " Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
Is Dead at Age 56; Hall of Fame Pitcher
Pitcher
for Dodgers". New York Times. Retrieved 26 December 2015.  ^ Henson, Steve (July 12, 1993). "He Never Left Van Nuys High". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 28, 2011.  ^ Chass, Murray (October 27, 1991). " World Series
World Series
Notebook – Kaat Knows Something About Pitchers at the Plate". New York Times. Retrieved 26 December 2015.  ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orel_Hershiser%27s_scoreless_innings_streak ^ "History of #1 analyst demotions". Classic Sports TV and Media. February 18, 2013. Retrieved April 13, 2013.  ^ "Smarter Podcasts - Delivering Sound Advice - Podcast Production". Smarter Podcasts.  ^ Don Drysdale's call of Gibson home run on YouTube ^ Appearance of Don and Ginger Drysdale on the television quiz show You Bet Your Life
You Bet Your Life
with Groucho Marx
Groucho Marx
on February 26, 1958. The full episode of that episode (S08E23) is available for viewing on YouTube. Retrieved May 29, 2017. ^ SPRINGER, STEVE (8 August 1997). "There's Room for Memories of Drysdale in Montreal" – via LA Times.  ^ Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
Is Dead on YouTube ^ "Dodgers treated to screening of 'Bobby'". Major League Baseball.  ^ The Greatest American Hero: The Two-Hundred-Mile-an-Hour Fastball TV.com ^ TV.com. "Leave It to Beaver: Long Distance Call". TV.com.  ^ "YouTube". www.youtube.com.  ^ TV.com. "The Flying Nun: The Big Game". TV.com.  ^ Herbie
Herbie
The Love Bug Clip from Disney documentary Age of Believing with Dean Jones Walt Disney on YouTube ^ Mark Armour (April 19, 2017). "Skipped Parts". Society of American Baseball
Baseball
Research. Retrieved April 19, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)

Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
at the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame dondrysdale.com Official web site Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
at Find a Grave Branch Rickey's 1954 amateur scouting report on Drysdale, at the Library of Congress. Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
on IMDb Drysdale on You Bet Your Life
You Bet Your Life
in 1959

Accomplishments

Preceded by Roy Face Major League Player of the Month July 1959 Succeeded by Vern Law
Vern Law
& Willie McCovey

Preceded by Lindy McDaniel Major League Player of the Month July 1960 Succeeded by Warren Spahn

Preceded by Orlando Cepeda Major League Player of the Month May 1968 Succeeded by Bob Gibson

Preceded by Don Newcombe Johnny Podres Sandy Koufax Claude Osteen Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
Opening Day
Opening Day
Starting pitcher 1958–1961 1963 1965 1969 Succeeded by Johnny Podres Sandy Koufax Claude Osteen Claude Osteen

v t e

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Award: 1956–66

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National League
National League
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National League
season strikeout leaders

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Sporting News MLB Player of the Year Award

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Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
1959 World Series
World Series
champions

2 Don Demeter 4 Duke Snider 5 Norm Larker 6 Carl Furillo 8 Ron Fairly 9 Wally Moon 14 Gil Hodges 16 Danny McDevitt 19 Jim Gilliam 20 Rip Repulski 22 Johnny Podres 23 Don Zimmer 29 Chuck Essegian 30 Maury Wills 32 Sandy Koufax 35 Johnny Klippstein 38 Roger Craig 40 Stan Williams 41 Clem Labine 43 Charlie Neal 44 Johnny Roseboro 45 Chuck Churn 51 Larry Sherry ( World Series
World Series
MVP) 53 Don Drysdale 58 Joe Pignatano

Manager 24 Walter Alston

Coaches 1 Pee Wee Reese 7 Chuck Dressen 31 Greg Mulleavy 33 Joe Becker

Regular season

v t e

Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
1963 World Series
World Series
champions

3 Willie Davis 6 Ron Fairly 8 Johnny Roseboro 9 Wally Moon 11 Ken McMullen 12 Tommy Davis 14 Bill Skowron 15 Bob Miller 16 Ron Perranoski 19 Jim Gilliam 20 Al Ferrara 22 Johnny Podres 23 Marv Breeding 25 Frank Howard 30 Maury Wills 32 Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
(CYA, NL MVP, and World Series
World Series
MVP) 34 Dick Calmus 35 Doug Camilli 39 Ken Rowe 44 Dick Tracewski 45 Pete Richert 53 Don Drysdale

Manager 24 Walter Alston

Coaches 2 Leo Durocher 27 Pete Reiser 31 Greg Mulleavy 33 Joe Becker

Regular season Dodgers–Yankees rivalry

v t e

Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
1965 World Series
World Series
champions

3 Willie Davis 5 Jim Lefebvre
Jim Lefebvre
(NL ROY) 6 Ron Fairly 8 Johnny Roseboro 9 Wally Moon 10 Jeff Torborg 11 John Kennedy 15 Bob Miller 16 Ron Perranoski 19 Jim Gilliam 21 Jim Brewer 22 Johnny Podres 23 Claude Osteen 28 Wes Parker 30 Maury Wills 31 Don LeJohn 32 Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
(CYA and World Series
World Series
MVP) 39 Howie Reed 41 Lou Johnson 43 Willie Crawford 44 Dick Tracewski 53 Don Drysdale

Manager 24 Walter Alston

Coaches 18 Preston Gómez 19 Jim Gilliam 33 Danny Ozark 36 Lefty Phillips

Regular season

v t e

Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
retired numbers

1 Pee Wee Reese 2 Tommy Lasorda 4 Duke Snider 19 Jim Gilliam 20 Don Sutton 24 Walter Alston 32 Sandy Koufax 39 Roy Campanella 42 Jackie Robinson 53 Don Drysdale MIC Vin Scully

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Formerly the Brooklyn
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Culture

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Rick Monday
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Lore

Chronicle-Telegraph Cup 1955 World Series Fernandomania Kirk Gibson's 1988 World Series
World Series
home run Orel Hershiser's scoreless innings streak Sandy Koufax's perfect game "Shot Heard 'Round the World" NL tie-breaker games/series

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Subway Series

Hall of Fame members

Walter Alston Roy Campanella Don Drysdale Leo Durocher Burleigh Grimes Willie Keeler Sandy Koufax Vin Scully Tommy Lasorda Walter O'Malley Pee Wee Reese Branch Rickey Jackie Robinson Wilbert Robinson Duke Snider Don Sutton Dazzy Vance Zack Wheat

Key personnel

Owner: Guggenheim Baseball
Baseball
Management President: Stan Kasten President of Baseball
Baseball
Operations: Andrew Friedman General Manager: Farhan Zaidi Manager: Dave Roberts

World Series Championships (6)

1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988

League pennants (23)

American Association: 1889 National League: 1890 1899 1900 1916 1920 1941 1947 1949 1952 1953 1955 1956 1959 1963 1965 1966 1974 1977 1978 1981 1988 2017

Division titles (16)

1974 1977 1978 1981 (first half) 1983 1985 1988 1995 2004 2008 2009 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Wild card berths (2)

1996 2006

Minor league affiliates

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Seasons (136)

1880s

1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889

1890s

1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899

1900s

1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

1910s

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1980s

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2000s

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Los Angeles Dodgers
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broadcasters

English announcers

Nat Allbright Red Barber André Baruch Ron Cey Eric Collins Joe Davis Connie Desmond Jerry Doggett Eddie Doucette Al Downing Don Drysdale Nomar Garciaparra Alan Hale Ernie Harwell Al Helfer Orel Hershiser Kevin Kennedy Steve Lyons Joel Meyers Rick Monday Ross Porter Jerry Reuss Vin Scully Duke Snider Charley Steiner Don Sutton Geoff Witcher

Spanish announcers

Miguel Alonzo Buck Canel René Cárdenas Jose Garcia Tony Hernandez Rudy Hoyos Jaime Jarrín Jorge Jarrín Herb Marine Manny Mota Milt Nava Fernando Valenzuela Pepe Yñiguez

Korean announcers

Richard Choi

Radio stations

KABC KAZN KFI KFWB KLAC KMPC KTNQ KXTA KHJ KWKW KYPA WHN WHOM WMGM XEGM

Television stations

KCAL KCOP KDOC KTLA KTTV WOR

Cable television

Fox Sports West 2/Prime Ticket ONTV SportsChannel LA SportsNet LA Z Channel

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Brooklyn
Brooklyn
/ Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
Opening Day
Opening Day
starting pitchers

Cy Barger Rex Barney Tim Belcher Kevin Brown Leon Cadore Bob Caruthers Larry Cheney Watty Clark Curt Davis Wheezer Dell Bill Donovan Don Drysdale George Earnshaw Carl Erskine Red Evans Hal Gregg John Harkins Joe Hatten Ed Head George Hemming Orel Hershiser Burt Hooton Waite Hoyt Mickey Hughes Oscar Jones Brickyard Kennedy Clayton Kershaw Sam Kimber Sandy Koufax Hiroki Kuroda Derek Lowe Rube Marquard Ramón Martínez Harry McIntire Bob Miller Van Mungo Don Newcombe Hideo Nomo Claude Osteen Vicente Padilla Chan Ho Park Harley Payne Brad Penny Jesse Petty Jeff Pfeffer Johnny Podres Henry Porter Jack Quinn Ed Reulbach Jerry Reuss Preacher Roe Nap Rucker Dutch Ruether Henry Schmidt Bill Singer Don Sutton Ed Stein Elmer Stricklett Fernando Valenzuela Dazzy Vance Kaiser Wilhelm Whit Wyatt

v t e

Major League Baseball
Baseball
on ABC

Related programs

Major League Baseball
Baseball
Game of the Week (1953–1954; 1960; 1965) Monday Night Baseball
Baseball
(1976–1988) Thursday Night Baseball
Baseball
(1989) Baseball
Baseball
Night in America (1994–1995) ESPN Major League Baseball
Baseball
(broadcasters)

Non-MLB programs

Little League World Series
World Series
(broadcasters) Wide World of Sports

Related articles

The Baseball
Baseball
Network World Series
World Series
television ratings Television contracts List of events on Wide World of Sports

1953 season

Chicago White Sox Cleveland Indians Philadelphia Athletics

ABC's owned & operated TV stations

WABC 7 ( Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Dodgers, August 17, 1953-October 1, 1953) WLS 7 (Chicago Cubs, 2015-present) KTRK 13 (Houston Astros, 1962-1972) WFIL 6 (later WPVI) (Philadelphia Athletics, 1949-1954; Philadelphia Phillies, 1959-1970)

Sponsors

Falstaff Brewing Corporation L&M

Commentators

The Baseball
Baseball
Network All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Key figures

Gary Bender Jack Buck Ken Coleman Dizzy Dean Bob DeLaney Don Drysdale Curt Gowdy Merle Harmon Keith Jackson George Kell Gene Kirby Jim Lampley Al Michaels Brent Musburger Bob Prince Chris Schenkel Gary Thorne Jack Whitaker Steve Zabriskie

Color commentators

Johnny Bench Buddy Blattner Lou Brock Steve Busby Norm Cash Howard Cosell Don Drysdale Leo Durocher Carl Erskine Tommy Hutton Jim Kaat Reggie Jackson Bob Gibson Tommy Henrich Tim McCarver Joe Morgan Jim Palmer Jackie Robinson Steve Stone Bob Uecker Earl Weaver Bill White Warner Wolf

Guest commentators

Johnny Bench Rick Dempsey Mark Fidrych Tommy John Tommy Lasorda Billy Martin Ross Porter Tom Seaver

Hosts & field reporters

Jack Arute Tim Brant Dave Diles Corey McPherrin John Saunders Al Trautwig Lesley Visser

"Inside Pitch" scouting analysts

Tony Gwynn Paul Molitor Steve Sax Mike Schmidt

Lore

Roger Maris' 61 home run season (1961) "The Bird" (1976) "The Double" (1995)

Tiebreaker games

1959 National League
National League
playoff series 1978 AL East Playoff 1980 NL West Playoff

LCS games

Chris Chambliss' Walk-Off Home Run
Chris Chambliss' Walk-Off Home Run
(1976) "Garvey Home Run" (1984) "Gatorade Glove Play" (1984) "You're Looking at One for the Ages Here" (1986)

World Series
World Series
games

"Ladies and Gentlemen, the Bronx Is Burning" (1977) "Mr. October" (1977) "The Call" (1985) 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

World Series

1948 1949 1950 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1994 (cancelled) 1995 (Games 1, 4-5)

AL Championship Series

1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995 (Games 1–2)

NL Championship Series

1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995 (Games 1–2)

AL Division Series

1981 1995 2002 (ABC Family, coverage produced by ESPN)

NL Division Series

1995 2002 (ABC Family, coverage produced by ESPN)

All-Star Game

1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995

Music

"Hello Old Friend" "Lights"

Seasons

Saturday Game of the Week

1953 1954 1959 (NL tie-breaker series) 1960 1961 (prime time games) 1965

Monday Night Baseball

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 (now on Thursday nights)

The Baseball
Baseball
Network

1994 1995

v t e

Major League Baseball
Baseball
on NBC

Related programs

Baseball
Baseball
Night in America (1994–1995) Major League Baseball: An Inside Look (1979–1989) Major League Baseball
Baseball
Game of the Week (1957–1964; 1966–1989) Major League Baseball
Baseball
on NBC Radio (1927–1938; 1957–1975) Monday Night Baseball
Baseball
(1967–1975)

Misc. programs

Gillette
Gillette
Cavalcade of Sports USA Thursday Game of the Week (1979–1983)

Related articles

The Baseball
Baseball
Network World Series
World Series
television ratings Television contracts

NBC's owned & operated TV stations

W2XBS (later WNBT) (New York Yankees, 1939–1945) WCAU
WCAU
10 (Philadelphia Phillies, 2014–present) KCST 39 (later KNSD) ( San Diego
San Diego
Padres, 1971–1972; 1984–1986) KNTV
KNTV
11 (San Francisco Giants, 2008–present)

NBC Sports

Bay Area (San Francisco Giants) California
California
(Oakland Athletics) Chicago (Chicago Cubs & White Sox) Philadelphia (Philadelphia Phillies) New York (New York Mets)

Sponsors

Ford Gillette National Bohemian

Commentators

The Baseball
Baseball
Network All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Key figures

Mel Allen Jim Britt Jack Buck Skip Caray Bob Carpenter Bob Costas Dick Enberg Bill Enis Joe Garagiola Curt Gowdy Greg Gumbel Merle Harmon Ernie Harwell Charlie Jones George Kell Jon Miller Monte Moore Bob Neal Lindsey Nelson Bill O'Donnell Jay Randolph Ted Robinson Vin Scully Jim Simpson Chuck Thompson Gary Thorne Pete van Wieren Bob Wolff Jim Woods

Color commentators

Sal Bando Bucky Dent Larry Dierker Don Drysdale Leo Durocher Joe Garagiola Ken Harrelson Fred Haney Tommy Hutton Jim Kaat Sandy Koufax Tony Kubek Ron Luciano John Lowenstein Mickey Mantle Tim McCarver Joe Morgan Bobby Murcer Wes Parker Pee Wee Reese Al Rosen Tom Seaver Mike Shannon Joe Torre Bob Uecker Bill Veeck Maury Wills

Guest commentators

Rick Dempsey Barry Larkin Ronald Reagan Mike Schmidt Don Sutton Bobby Valentine

Hosts

Mike Adamle Marv Albert Len Berman Jimmy Cefalo Gayle Gardner Bryant Gumbel Bill Macatee Keith Olbermann Ahmad Rashād Hannah Storm

Field reporters

Johnny Bench Jim Gray Jimmy Roberts Craig Sager Bob Wischusen

Lore

Regular season games

#715 (1974) "The Sandberg Game" (1984)

Tie-breaker games

1951 National League
National League
tie-breaker series (Games 2-3) 1962 National League
National League
tie-breaker series

LCS games

"Go crazy folks!" (1985) Jeffrey Maier (1996) "Grand Slam Single" (1999)

World Series games

Subway Series "The Catch (1954)" Don Larsen's Perfect Game (1956) "Shoe polish incident" (1969) "Fisk Waves it Fair" (1975) Michael Sergio (1986) "It gets through Buckner!" (1986) Kirk Gibson's home run (1988) All-Century Team (1999)

Music

"Broken Wings" "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" "Don't Look in My Eyes" "Fame" "Limelight" "One Moment in Time" "The Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of"

Instrumentals

The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. "Chase" "Don't Turn Away" "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" The Untouchables

World Series

1947 (Games 1 & 5) 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995 (Games 2–3, & 6) 1997 1999

AL Championship

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1995 (Games 3–6) 1996 1998 2000

NL Championship

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1995 (Games 3–4) 1997 1999

AL Division Series

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

NL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

All-Star Game

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959: First–Second 1960: First–Second 1961: First–Second 1962: First–Second 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1994 1996 1998 2000

Seasons

Pre-Game of the Week

1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956

Game of the Week era

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 (All-Star Game and World Series
World Series
only) 1966 (exclusive coverage begins) 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

The Baseball
Baseball
Network era

1994 1995

No regular season coverage

1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

v t e

Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame Class of 1984

BBWAA Vote

Luis Aparicio
Luis Aparicio
(84.6%) Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
(78.4%) Harmon Killebrew
Harmon Killebrew
(83.1%)

Veterans Committee

Rick Ferrell Pee Wee Reese

J. G. Taylor Spink Award

Ken Smith

Ford C. Frick Award

Curt Gowdy

v t e

Members of the National Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame

Pitchers

Alexander Bender Blyleven M. Brown R. Brown Bunning Carlton Chesbro Clarkson Cooper Coveleski Cummings Day Dean Dihigo Drysdale Eckersley Faber Feller Fingers Ford B. Foster Galvin B. Gibson Glavine Gomez Gossage Grimes Grove Haines Hoffman Hoyt Hubbell Hunter Jenkins R. Johnson W. Johnson Joss Keefe Koufax Lemon Lyons Maddux Marichal Marquard Martínez Mathewson McGinnity Méndez Morris Newhouser Nichols Niekro Paige Palmer Pennock Perry Plank Radbourn Rixey Roberts Rogan Ruffing Rusie Ryan Seaver H. Smith Smoltz Spahn Sutter Sutton Vance Waddell Walsh Welch Wilhelm J. Williams Willis Wynn Young

Catchers

Bench Berra Bresnahan Campanella Carter Cochrane Dickey Ewing Ferrell Fisk J. Gibson Hartnett Lombardi Mackey Piazza Rodríguez Santop Schalk

First basemen

Anson Bagwell Beckley Bottomley Brouthers Cepeda Chance Connor Foxx Gehrig Greenberg G. Kelly Killebrew Leonard McCovey Mize Murray Pérez Sisler Suttles Taylor Terry Thomas Thome

Second basemen

Alomar Biggio Carew E. Collins Doerr Evers Fox Frisch Gehringer Gordon Grant Herman Hornsby Lajoie Lazzeri Mazeroski McPhee Morgan J. Robinson Sandberg Schoendienst

Third basemen

Baker Boggs Brett J. Collins Dandridge J. Johnson Jones Kell Lindstrom Mathews Molitor B. Robinson Santo Schmidt Traynor J. Wilson D. White

Shortstops

Aparicio Appling Bancroft Banks Boudreau Cronin Davis T. Jackson Jennings Larkin Lloyd Maranville Reese Ripken Jr. Rizzuto Sewell O. Smith Tinker Trammell Vaughan Wagner Wallace Ward Wells Yount

Outfielders

Aaron Ashburn Averill Bell Brock W. Brown Burkett Carey Charleston Clarke Clemente Cobb Combs Crawford Cuyler Dawson Delahanty DiMaggio Doby Duffy Flick Goslin Griffey Jr. Guerrero Gwynn Hafey Hamilton Heilmann Henderson Hill Hooper Irvin R. Jackson Kaline Keeler Kelley K. Kelly Kiner Klein Mantle Manush Mays T. McCarthy Medwick Musial O'Rourke Ott Puckett Raines J. Rice S. Rice F. Robinson Roush Ruth Simmons Slaughter Snider Speaker Stargell Stearnes Thompson Torriente L. Waner P. Waner Wheat B. Williams T. Williams H. Wilson Winfield Yastrzemski Youngs

Managers

Alston Anderson Cox Durocher Hanlon Harris Herzog Huggins La Russa Lasorda López Mack J. McCarthy McGraw McKechnie W. Robinson Selee Southworth Stengel Torre Weaver D. Williams

Executives / pioneers

Barrow Bulkeley Cartwright Chadwick Chandler Comiskey Dreyfuss R. Foster Frick Giles Gillick Griffith Harridge Hulbert B. Johnson Kuhn Landis La. MacPhail Le. MacPhail Manley O'Malley Pompez Posey Rickey Ruppert Schuerholz Selig Spalding Veeck Weiss S. White Wilkinson G. Wright H. Wright Yawkey

Umpires

Barlick Chylak Conlan Connolly Evans Harvey Hubbard Klem McGowan O'Day

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 48376500 LCCN: n89650745 SN

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