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David Sorkin is an award-winning author and professor specializing in the intersection of Jewish
Jewish
and European history.[1][2] Sorkin has published several prominent books on Jewish
Jewish
and European history
European history
and currently teaches modern Jewish
Jewish
History at Yale
Yale
University.[3]

Contents

1 Career 2 Reception 3 Awards 4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 References

Career[edit] Sorkin graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison
University of Wisconsin-Madison
in 1975 (Phi Beta Kappa). In 1977 he received a Masters degree in Comparative Literature, and in 1983 a PhD
PhD
in History from the University of California-Berkeley.[4] From 1983 to 1986 he worked as Assistant Professor
Professor
of Judaic studies at Brown University. In 1986 he became a Research Fellow and in 1990 a Lecturer in Modern History
Modern History
at Oxford University. He was a Governing Body Fellow at St. Antony's College and a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Postgraduate Hebrew Studies. From 1992 to 2011 he was Frances and Laurence Weinstein Professor
Professor
of Jewish Studies
Jewish Studies
and Professor
Professor
of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.[5] From 2011 to 2014 he served as Distinguished Professor
Professor
of History at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. In 2014 he moved to Yale
Yale
where he is the Lucy G. Moses Professor
Professor
in the Department of History and Program in Judaic Studies.[6] Sorkin has published several prominent works on Jewish
Jewish
history.[7] His first book, The Transformation of Germany Jewry, 1780-1840 published in 1987, argued that Jewish
Jewish
culture in the German states constituted a “subculture.”[8] In 1996 he wrote Moses Mendelssohn
Mendelssohn
and the Religious Enlightenment, a concise study of Mendelssohn's Jewish thought in which he emphasized the neglected Hebrew writings. The book has been translated into French, German, and Italian.[9] In 2000 he wrote The Berlin Haskalah
Haskalah
and German Religious Thought: Orphans of Knowledge. The book, first delivered in 1997 as the Sherman Lectures in the Department of Religions and Theology at Manchester University (UK), argued that the Haskalah
Haskalah
should be understood within the context of wider Central European religious and intellectual changes.[10] In his most recent book, The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews, and Catholics from London to Vienna (Jews, Christians, and Muslims from the Ancient to the Modern World) published in 2008, Sorkin reconceived the relationship of the Enlightenment to religion.[11] Sorkin has also co-edited three volumes: Profiles in Diversity: Jews in a Changing Europe, 1750-1870 (1998),[12] New Perspectives on the Haskalah
Haskalah
(2001),[13] and What History Tells: George L. Mosse and the Culture of Modern Europe (2004).[14] He also served as associate editor of The Oxford Handbook of Jewish Studies
Jewish Studies
(2002), which won the National Jewish
Jewish
Book Award.[15] Reception[edit] Sorkin’s books have had a notable impact.[16][17] The American Historical Review described Sorkin’s The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews, and Catholics from London to Vienna as a work that makes “very interesting discoveries about the parallel developments within different religions in the eighteenth century." Similarly, the New York Times
New York Times
described it as a “persuasive work” about how “Europe’s major religions produced movements of religious reform compatible with the enlightenment.”[18] Central European History reviewed it as a book of "very great importance, for early modernists and modern historians alike."[19] Sorkin has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities (1994-5) and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (2005-06). He is a fellow of the American Academy for Jewish
Jewish
Research. Awards[edit]

1988 Joel H. Cavior Literary Award for History (The Transformation of German Jewry) 2003 National Jewish
Jewish
Book Award for Scholarship (Oxford Handbook of Jewish
Jewish
Studies) 2010 Dorothy and Hsin-Nung Yao Teaching Award (History, UW-Madison)

Bibliography[edit]

The Transformation of German Jewry, 1780-1840 Oxford University
Oxford University
Press (1987) (pbk. 1990); New edition (Wayne State University Press, 1999) ISBN 978-0814328286 The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews, and Catholics from London to Vienna (Jews, Christians, and Muslims from the Ancient to the Modern World), Princeton University Press; First edition (July 21, 2008) ISBN 978-0691135021 Berlin Haskalah
Haskalah
and German Religious Thought: Orphans of Knowledge (Parkes-Wiener Series on Jewish
Jewish
Studies), Vallentine Mitchell (November 29, 1999) ISBN 978-0853033653 Moses Mendelssohn
Mendelssohn
and the Religious Enlightenment ( Jewish
Jewish
Thinkers) (New Ed edition), Halban (2012) ASIN B0099TPJ4K

See also[edit]

Port Jew

References[edit]

^ Sorkin, David (2004). Assimilation and Community: The Jews in Nineteenth-Century Europe. Gallery. p. 3. ISBN 978-0521526012.  ^ Sorkin, David (2010). Beyond the east-west divide: rethinking the narrative of the Jews' political status in Europe, 1600-1750. Gallery. p. 3. ISBN 978-0521526012. JSTOR 40864852.  ^ "David Sorkin". Yale
Yale
Edu.  ^ " David Sorkin appointed to the Graduate Center". GC.  ^ "Revisiting Jewish
Jewish
Emancipation: Reform and Revolution". JHFC.  ^ "Tremendously influential, tremendously admired" historian Peter Gay dies at 91". Yale
Yale
Daily News.  ^ "The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews, and Catholics from London to Vienna". Princeton Press.  ^ Caron, Vicky (1991). Reviewed Works: The Transformation of German Jewry, 1780-1840 by David Sorkin; Between France and Germany: The Jews of Alsace-Lorraine, 1871-1918. University of Chicago Press. JSTOR 40864852.  ^ Arkush, Allan (1997). Review: Moses Mendelssohn
Mendelssohn
and the Religious Enlightenment.  ^ Feiner, Shmuel. Reviewed Work: The Berlin Haskalah
Haskalah
and German Religious Thought: Orphans of Knowledge by David J. Sorkin. JSTOR 1455534.  ^ "The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews, and Catholics from London to Vienna". Quest CDEC Journal.  ^ Sorkin, David. Reviewed Work: Profiles in Diversity: Jews in a Changing Europe, 1750-1870.  ^ "New Perspectives on the Haskalah
Haskalah
(review)". Muse JHU.  ^ "WHAT HISTORY TELLS: GEORGE L. MOSSE AND THE CULTURE OF MODERN EUROPE (review)". ACLS Humanities.  ^ Sorkin, David. The Oxford Handbook of Jewish
Jewish
Studies.  ^ "The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews, and Catholics from London to Vienna (review)". Quest Journal.  ^ "New Perspectives on the Haskalah
Haskalah
(review)". Muse JHU.  ^ "The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews, and Catholics from London to Vienna David Sorkin". Princeton University Press.  ^ "Reviewed Work: The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews, and Catholics from London to Vienna by David Sorkin". Central European History. JSTOR 40600983.  Missing or

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