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David Rowland Francis (October 1, 1850 – January 15, 1927) was an American politician and diplomat. He served in various positions including Mayor of St. Louis, the 27th Governor of Missouri, and United States Secretary of the Interior. He was the U.S. Ambassador to Russia
Russia
between 1916 and 1917, during the Russian Revolution of 1917. He was a Wilsonian Democrat.[1]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Career

2.1 World's Fair 1904 2.2 Later career 2.3 Diplomatic career

3 Personal life

3.1 Legacy

4 References 5 Further reading 6 External links

Early life[edit] Francis was born on October 1, 1850 in Richmond, Kentucky, the son of Eliza Caldwell (née Rowland) (1830–1898) and John Broaddus Francis (1818–1894).[1] He graduated from Washington University in St. Louis in 1870 where he was number two on the rolls of the Alpha Iota Chapter of Beta Theta Pi
Beta Theta Pi
fraternity.[1] Career[edit] After graduating from University, he became a successful businessman in St. Louis
St. Louis
and served as the president of a grain merchant's exchange.[1] The St. Louis
St. Louis
Mining and Stock Exchange was formed in St. Louis in the fall of 1880 with Francis as a founding member.[2] In 1885, he was elected Mayor of St. Louis, Missouri
St. Louis, Missouri
as a Democrat. In 1888, he was elected Governor of Missouri
Governor of Missouri
becoming the only Mayor of St. Louis
St. Louis
elected Governor of the state. In 1896, Francis was appointed United States Secretary of the Interior by President Grover Cleveland
Grover Cleveland
and served until 1897. World's Fair 1904[edit] Francis was one of the main promoters of the St. Louis
St. Louis
World's Fair of 1904, serving as President of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. Historians generally emphasize the prominence of themes of race and empire, and the Fair's long-lasting impact on intellectuals in the fields of history, art history, architecture and anthropology. From the point of view of the memory of the average person who attended the fair, it primarily promoted entertainment, consumer goods and popular culture.[3] The 1904 Summer Olympics
1904 Summer Olympics
were held in combination with that Exposition, and by overseeing the opening ceremony, Francis became the only American to open an Olympic Games who never served as President or Vice-President of the United States. Later career[edit] In 1905, after being elected President of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company, he was sent to Europe by the World's Fair directors to thank kings, emperors and other rulers for their part in making the exposition a success. He was decorated by the emperors of Germany and Austria[4] and Wilhelmina, the Queen of the Netherlands.[1] In 1910, Francis was arrested for non-payment of taxes, but released on bail.[5] Diplomatic career[edit] President Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
appointed Francis as the last U.S. Ambassador to the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
between 1916 and 1917.[6][7] During his time as ambassador, he was almost appointed as U.S. Senator
U.S. Senator
from Missouri.[8] He served in that post during the Russian Revolution of 1917.[9][10] His biographer, Harper Barnes, summarized his personality:

David R. Francis
David R. Francis
was a brash, opinionated, stubborn, smart, sometimes foolish, straight-talking, quick-acting, independent-minded, proud, self-made man who represented the United States in Russia
Russia
for two and a half years, during the most tumultuous era in that country's history. Much of his activity has been shrouded in myth – some of that heroic, more of that comic and tragic.[11]

Personal life[edit] On January 20, 1876, he married the former Jane Perry (1854–1924), the daughter of John Dietz Perry (1815–1895) and a granddaughter of James Earickson, the former Missouri
Missouri
State Treasurer.[12] They had six children: John David Perry (1876–1950), David Rowland, Jr. (1879–1938), Charles Broaddus (1881–1957), Talton Turner (1882–1955), Thomas (1884–1964), and Sidney Rowland Francis (1888–1960). His wife died in San Antonio, Texas
San Antonio, Texas
on March 21, 1924. Francis died in St. Louis, Missouri, on January 15, 1927. He was buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery.[1] Legacy[edit]

Francis Quadrangle Marker at the University of Missouri

Monument marking Francis's grave in Bellefontaine Cemetery.

In 1895, the University of Missouri
Missouri
dedicated David R. Francis Quadrangle in honor of the former governor who is credited with keeping the university in Columbia after the fire of Academic Hall in 1892. Francis insisted that the state's land-grant university remain in a central location, rather than moving to Sedalia, as many state legislators desired. Instead, Sedalia was awarded the Missouri
Missouri
State Fair as compensation. A bronze bust of Francis' face sits at the south end of Francis Quad near the steps of Jesse Hall. A popular MU student tradition is to rub Governor Francis' nose before taking a test in order to get an A. The track/soccer/football stadium at Washington University in St. Louis, as well as the adjacent gymnasium, are named in Francis' honor. Francis Field was the site of the 1904 Summer Olympics; Francis attended the opening ceremony and officially opened the games as the representative for the host nation. In 1916, he gave 60 acres (240,000 m2) of land to the city of St. Louis, Missouri
Missouri
as a Christmas
Christmas
gift. It was turned into a park that bears his name.[13] References[edit] Notes

^ a b c d e f "D. R. FRANCIS DEAD; EX-AMBASSADOR; Was in Russia
Russia
When Kerensky Deposed Czar, Also When "Reds" Seized Power. EX-SECRETARY OF INTERIOR Served Missouri
Missouri
as Governor and St. Louis
St. Louis
as Mayor -- Headed the 1904 World's Fair." The New York Times. 16 January 1927. Retrieved 13 July 2017.  ^ Thomas Scharf, John, History of Saint Louis City and County: From the Earliest Periods ..., Volume 2, retrieved September 24, 2017  ^ James Gilbert, Whose Fair? Experience, and Memory, and the History of the Great St. Louis
St. Louis
Exposition (2009) ^ "Austrian Honor for David R. Francis". The New York Times. 24 June 1905. Retrieved 13 July 2017.  ^ Gov. Francis Gives $200 Bail, at the Tacoma Times (via Chronicling America); published March 12, 1910; retrieved April 14, 2014 ^ Times, Special
Special
To The New York (23 February 1916). "FRANCIS GOING TO RUSSIA.; Missouri
Missouri
Ex-Governor Accepts Appointment as Ambassador". The New York Times. Retrieved 13 July 2017.  ^ Times, Special
Special
Cable To The New York (20 July 1917). "FRANCIS ESCAPES PLOT TO KILL HIM; Attempt Made in Finland to Blow Up Train on Which Ambassador Was Traveling". The New York Times. Retrieved 13 July 2017.  ^ "BARS NAMING FRANCIS.; Lansing's Objection Prevents Appointment of Ambassador as Senator". The New York Times. 24 April 1918. Retrieved 13 July 2017.  ^ "Francis Warns Russians of Danger in Separate Peace". The New York Times. 14 January 1918. Retrieved 13 July 2017.  ^ "Ex-Ambassador Francis Describes the Russian Revolution". The New York Times. 21 August 1921. Retrieved 13 July 2017.  ^ Harper Barnes (2001). Standing on a Volcano: The Life and Times of David Rowland Francis. Missouri
Missouri
History Museum. p. 11.  ^ Missouri
Missouri
State Treasurer-Past Treasurers Biography ^ http://stlouis.missouri.org/citygov/parks/parks_div/Francis.html

Sources

"Installed". St. Louis
St. Louis
Post-Dispatch. 14 April 1885. p. 2.  "The City Hall Change". St. Louis
St. Louis
Post-Dispatch. 2 January 1889. p. 10. 

Francis, David Rowland. The universal exposition of 1904. (Louisiana purchase exposition Company, 1913). online Francis, David Rowland. Russia
Russia
from the American Embassy, April, 1916-November, 1918 (C. Scribner's Sons, 1921). Francis, David Rowland, and Jamie H. Cockfield. (1981). Dollars and diplomacy: Ambassador David Rowland Francis and the fall of tsarism, 1916-17 (Durham: Duke University Press). Francis, David Rowland, Robert Chadwell Williams, and Robert Lester. (1986). Russia
Russia
in transition: the diplomatic papers of David R. Francis, U.S. Ambassador to Russia, 1916-1918 (Frederick, Md: University Publications of America).

Further reading[edit]

Barnes, Harper. (2001). Standing on a volcano: the life and times of David Rowland Francis (St. Louis: Missouri
Missouri
Historical Society Press in association with the Francis Press. ISBN 1-883982-13-8).

External links[edit]

Biography portal

Wikimedia Commons has media related to David R. Francis.

Wikisource
Wikisource
has original works written by or about: David R. Francis

David R. Francis
David R. Francis
at St. Louis
St. Louis
Public Library: St. Louis
St. Louis
Mayors. Standing on a Volcano: The Life and Times of David R. Francis
David R. Francis
by Harper Barnes, October 2001. ISBN 1-883982-17-0. Missouri
Missouri
State Archives. David Rowland Francis, 1889-1893

Political offices

Preceded by William L. Ewing Mayor of St. Louis, Missouri 1885–1889 Succeeded by Edward Noonan

Preceded by Albert P. Morehouse Governor of Missouri 1889–1893 Succeeded by William J. Stone

Preceded by Michael Hoke Smith U.S. Secretary of the Interior Served under: Grover Cleveland 1896–1897 Succeeded by Cornelius Newton Bliss

Diplomatic posts

Preceded by George T. Marye United States Ambassador to Russia 1916–1917 Succeeded by Last ambassador to Russian Empire

Sporting positions

Preceded by Pierre de Coubertin President of Organizing Committee for Summer Olympic Games 1904 Succeeded by Edward Battell

v t e

United States Secretaries of the Interior

Ewing McKennan Stuart McClelland Thompson C Smith Usher Harlan Browning Cox Delano Chandler Schurz Kirkwood Teller Lamar Vilas Noble M Smith Francis Bliss Hitchcock Garfield Ballinger Fisher Lane Payne Fall Work West Wilbur Ickes Krug Chapman McKay Seaton Udall Hickel Morton Hathaway Kleppe Andrus Watt Clark Hodel Lujan Babbitt Norton Kempthorne Salazar Jewell Zinke

v t e

Presidents of the United States Olympic Committee

Albert Spalding
Albert Spalding
(1900–1904) David R. Francis
David R. Francis
(1904–1906) Caspar Whitney
Caspar Whitney
(1906–1910) Frederic B. Pratt
Frederic B. Pratt
(1910–1912) Robert M. Thompson (1912–1920) Gustavus T. Kirby (1920–1924) Robert M. Thompson (1924–1926) William C. Prout (1926–1927) Henry G. Lapham (interim 1927) Douglas MacArthur
Douglas MacArthur
(1927–1928) Avery Brundage
Avery Brundage
(1928–1953) Tug Wilson (1953–1965) Doug Roby
Doug Roby
(1965–1968) Franklin Orth (1969–1970) Clifford H. Buck (interim 1970, elected 1970–1973) Philip O. Krumm (1973–1977) Robert Kane (1977–1981) William E. Simon
William E. Simon
(1981–1985) John B. Kelly Jr.
John B. Kelly Jr.
(1985) Robert Helmick (interim 1985, elected 1985–1991) Bill Hybl (interim 1991–1992) LeRoy T. Walker
LeRoy T. Walker
(1992–1996) Bill Hybl (1996–1999) Sandra Baldwin (2000–2002) Marty Mankamyer (interim 2002, elected 2002–2003) William C. Martin (interim 2003–2004) Peter Ueberroth
Peter Ueberroth
(2004–2008) Larry Probst
Larry Probst
(2008–present)

v t e

Governors of Missouri

Territorial (1805–20)

Wilkinson Lewis Howard Clark

State (since 1820)

McNair Bates Williams Miller Dunklin Boggs Reynolds M. Marmaduke Edwards King Price Polk H. Jackson Stewart C. Jackson Gamble Hall Fletcher McClurg Brown Woodson Hardin Phelps Crittenden J. Marmaduke Morehouse Francis Stone Stephens Dockery Folk Hadley Major Gardner Hyde Baker Caulfield Park Stark Donnell Donnelly Smith Donnelly Blair Dalton Hearnes Bond Teasdale Bond Ashcroft Carnahan Wilson Holden Blunt Nixon Greitens

v t e

Mayors of St. Louis, Missouri

Lane Page Johnston Darby Daggett Maguire Wimer Pratte Camden Mullanphy Krum Barry Kennett How King O. Filley Taylor C. Filley Thomas Cole Brown Barret Britton Overstolz Ewing Francis Noonan Walbridge Ziegenhein Wells Kreismann Kiel Miller Dickmann Becker Kaufmann Darst Tucker Cervantes Poelker Conway Schoemehl Bosley Harmon Slay Krewson

v t e

United States Ambassadors to Russia
Russia

Ambassador to the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
(1780–1917)

Dana Short Adams Bayard Pinkney Campbell Middleton Randolph Buchanan Dickerson Wilkins Clay Dallas Cambreleng Todd Ingersoll Bagby Brown Seymour Pickens Appleton Clay Cameron Clay Dawson Smythe Curtin Orr Jewell Boker Stoughton Foster Hunt Sargent Taft Lawton Lothrop Tree Rice Smith White Breckinridge Hitchcock Tower McCormick Meyer Riddle Rockhill Guild Pindell Marye Francis

Ambassador to the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(1933–1991)

Bullitt Davies Steinhardt Standley Harriman Smith Kirk Kennan Bohlen Thompson Kohler Thompson Beam Stoessel Toon Watson Hartman Matlock Strauss

Ambassador to the Russian Federation (1992–present)

Strauss Pickering Collins Vershbow Burns Beyrle McFaul Tefft Huntsman

v t e

Cabinet of President Grover Cleveland
Grover Cleveland
(1893–97)

Secretary of State

Walter Q. Gresham
Walter Q. Gresham
(1893–95) Richard Olney
Richard Olney
(1895–97)

Secretary of the Treasury

John Griffin Carlisle (1893–97)

Secretary of War

Daniel S. Lamont
Daniel S. Lamont
(1893–97)

Attorney General

Richard Olney
Richard Olney
(1893–95) Judson Harmon
Judson Harmon
(1895–97)

Postmaster General

Wilson S. Bissell
Wilson S. Bissell
(1893–95) William Lyne Wilson
William Lyne Wilson
(1895–97)

Secretary of the Navy

Hilary A. Herbert
Hilary A. Herbert
(1893–97)

Secretary of the Interior

Hoke Smith (1893–96) David R. Francis
David R. Francis
(1896–97)

Secretary of Agriculture

J. Sterling Morton (1893–97)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 44421206 LCCN: n80087692 ISNI: 0000 0000 8377 8168 GND: 121759970 SUDOC: 191890324 BNF: cb12671080n (data) NLA: 35098851 SN

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