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Coors is responsible for originating a number of alcoholic beverage brands. The most notable of those brands are Coors Banquet, Coors Light, and Blue Moon.

Controversies

Labor problems

In April 1977, the brewery workers union at Coors, representi

Coors is responsible for originating a number of alcoholic beverage brands. The most notable of those brands are Coors Banquet, Coors Light, and Blue Moon.

Controversies

Labor problems

In April 1977, the brewery workers union at Coors, representing 1,472 employees, went on strike. The brewery kept operating with supervisors and 250 to 300 union members, including one member of the union executive board who ignored the strike. Soon after, Coors announced that it would hire replacements for the striking workers.[21] About 700 workers quit the picket line to go back to work, and Coors replaced the remaining 500 workers, keeping the beer production process uninterrupted.[22] In December 1978, the workers at Coors voted by greater than a two-to-one ratio to decertify the union, ending 44 years of union representation at Coors. Because the strike was by then more than a year old, striking workers could not vote in the election.[23]

Labor unions organized a boycott to punish Coors for its labor practices.[24] One tactic employed by the unions was a push for states to pass laws banning the sale of unpasteurized canned and bottled beer.[25] Because Coors was the

In April 1977, the brewery workers union at Coors, representing 1,472 employees, went on strike. The brewery kept operating with supervisors and 250 to 300 union members, including one member of the union executive board who ignored the strike. Soon after, Coors announced that it would hire replacements for the striking workers.[21] About 700 workers quit the picket line to go back to work, and Coors replaced the remaining 500 workers, keeping the beer production process uninterrupted.[22] In December 1978, the workers at Coors voted by greater than a two-to-one ratio to decertify the union, ending 44 years of union representation at Coors. Because the strike was by then more than a year old, striking workers could not vote in the election.[23]

Labor unions organized a boycott to punish Coors for its labor practices.[24] One tactic employed by the unions was a push for states to pass laws banning the sale of unpasteurized canned and bottled beer.[25] Because Coors was the only major brewer at the time not pasteurizing its canned and bottled beer, such laws would hurt only Coors.[26] Sales of Coors suffered during the decade-long labor union boy

Labor unions organized a boycott to punish Coors for its labor practices.[24] One tactic employed by the unions was a push for states to pass laws banning the sale of unpasteurized canned and bottled beer.[25] Because Coors was the only major brewer at the time not pasteurizing its canned and bottled beer, such laws would hurt only Coors.[26] Sales of Coors suffered during the decade-long labor union boycott, although Coors stated that declining sales were also due to an industry-wide downturn in beer sales, and to increased competition. To maintain production, Coors expanded its sales area from the 18 western states to which it had marketed for years, to nationwide distribution.[27] This was completed in 1991 with Indiana being the last state for the brand to appear.[28]

The AFL-CIO ended its boycott of Coors in August 1987, after negotiations with Pete Coors, head of brewery operations. The details of the settlement were not divulged, but were said to include an early union representation election in Colorado and use of union workers to build the new Coors brewery in Virginia.[29]

In 1988, the Teamsters Union, which represented brewery workers at the top three US beer makers at the time (Anheuser-Busch, Miller, and Stroh), gained enough signatures to trigger a union representation election inside the Coors company. Coors workers again rejected union representation by more than a two-to-one ratio.[30]

Mexican Americans charged Coors with discriminatory hiring practices following the passage of the Civil Rights Act, and launched a boycott of the company's products beginning in the late 1960s. Labor unions and gay rights activists joined the boycott, which lasted into the 1980s.[31]

A federal lawsuit in 1975 by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission[32] ended in a settlement with Coors agreeing not

A federal lawsuit in 1975 by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission[32] ended in a settlement with Coors agreeing not to discriminate against blacks, Hispanics, and women.[33] In 1977, Coors was accused of firing gay and lesbian employees.[34] From the late 1970s, Coors agreed not to discriminate against homosexuals; the first major brewery in the United States to make such a commitment.[35]

Coors encouraged the organization of its gay and lesbian employees into the Lesbian and Gay Employee Resource (LAGER) in 1993.[36] In May 1995, Coors became the 21st publicly traded corporation in the United States to extend employee benefits to same-sex partners.[37] When company chairman Pete Coors was criticized for the company's gay-friendly policy during his 2004 Republican primary campaign for a United States Senate seat from Colorado, he defended the policy as a basic good business practice.[38] At the same time critics cite the Coors family’s Castle Rock Foundation's continuing history of gifts to organizations that actively promote explicitly anti-LGBT political campaigns and candidates, claiming that the Coors family's support of what critics view as anti-gay hate groups speaks more loudly than the company's multi-million dollar image campaigns, or out gay son of William Coors, Scott Coors' public defense of his family's firm's civil rights and labor rights record.[39]

The 1977 film Smokey and the Bandit centers around an illegal shipment of Coors from Texas to Georgia.

Kurt Russell's character R.J. MacReady in John Carpenter's The Thing is seen with a can of Coors beer while also drinking J&B Whiskey.

Kurt Russell's character R.J. MacReady in John Carpenter's The Thing is seen with a can of Coors beer while also drinking J&B Whiskey.

William Zabka's Karate Kid character Johnny Lawrence is often seen drinking Coors Banquet in the web television series Cobra Kai.