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Commerce is the exchange of goods and services, especially on a large scale.[1]

Etymology

The English-language word commerce has been derived from the Latin word commercium, from cum ("together") and merx ("merchandise").[2]

History

The caduceus - used today as the symbol of commerce,[3] and traditionally associated with the Roman god Mercury, patron of commerce, trickery and thieves.

Historian Peter Watson and Ramesh Manickam date the history of long-distance commerce from circa 150,000 years ago.[4]

In historic times, the introduction of currency as a standardized money facilitated the exchange of goods and services.[5]

Banking systems developed in medieval Europe, facilitating financial transactions across national boundaries.[6] Markets became a feature of town life, and were regulated by town authorities.[7]

See also

References

Latin word commercium, from cum ("together") and merx ("merchandise").[2]

History

The caduceus - used today as the symbol of commerce,[3] and traditionally associated with the Roman god Peter Watson and Ramesh Manickam date the history of long-distance commerce from circa 150,000 years ago.[4]

In historic times, the introduction of currency as a standardized money facilitated the exchange of goods and services.[5]

Banking systems developed in medieval Europe, facilitating financial transactions across national boundaries.[6] Markets became a feature of town life, and were regulated by town authorities.[7]

See also

  • currency as a standardized money facilitated the exchange of goods and services.[5]

    Banking systems developed in medieval Europe, facilitating financial transactions across national boundaries.[6] Markets became a feature of town life, and were regulated by town authorities.[7]