HOME
The Info List - Command And General Staff College





The United States
United States
Army Command and General Staff College
College
(CGSC or, obsolete, USACGSC) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, is a graduate school for United States
United States
Army and sister service officers, interagency representatives, and international military officers. The college was established in 1881 by William Tecumseh Sherman
William Tecumseh Sherman
as the School of Application for Infantry
Infantry
and Cavalry, (later simply the Infantry
Infantry
and Cavalry
Cavalry
School), a training school for infantry and cavalry officers.[2] In 1907 it changed its title to the School of the Line. The curriculum expanded throughout World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War
Vietnam War
and continues to adapt to include lessons learned from current conflicts. In addition to the main campus at Fort Leavenworth, the college has satellite campuses at Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Fort Lee, Virginia; Fort Gordon, Georgia; and Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The satellite campuses provide non-residential distance learning opportunities.

Contents

1 Mission statement 2 Schools 3 Notable people

3.1 Notable alumni 3.2 Notable foreign alumni 3.3 Notable faculty and deputy commandants 3.4 Commandants

4 Photo gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

Mission statement[edit] The United States
United States
Army Command and General Staff College
College
(CGSC) educates and develops leaders for full spectrum joint, interagency and multinational operations; acts as lead agent for the Army's leader development program; and advances the art and science of the profession of arms in support of Army operational requirements.[3] Schools[edit]

Fort Leavenworth's Eisenhower Hall houses the CGSC Library.

The college consists of four schools:[3]

Command and General Staff School (CGSS) provides Intermediate Level Education (ILE) for United States
United States
Army and sister service officers, interagency representatives, and international military officers.[3] ILE is a ten-month graduate-level program; the curriculum includes instruction on leadership philosophy, military history, and the military planning and decision-making processes.[4] There are two ILE classes per year; the first begins in August and ends in June, the second begins in February and ends in December. Both classes complete the same curriculum. In addition to the ILE curriculum, students may complete a thesis-level research paper and receive a Master of Military Arts and Sciences (MMAS) degree. The Masters program is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, the accrediting body for collegiate institutions in the midwestern United States.[5] ILE students are normally mid-career field-grade officers preparing for battalion command or staff positions at the division, brigade, or battalion level. In addition to CGSS at Fort Leavenworth, the school operates satellite campuses at Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Fort Lee, Virginia; Fort Gordon, Georgia; and Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.[6] Students at the satellite campuses complete the ILE Common Core, a condensed ninety-day program without the MMAS option, in lieu of the traditional ten-month program.[6] School of Advanced Military Studies
School of Advanced Military Studies
(SAMS) provides post-ILE instruction on complex military issues at the strategic and operational levels.[7] Students who complete the curriculum receive a Master of Military Arts and Sciences (MMAS) and are then assigned as high-level military planners. The Masters program is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, the accrediting body for collegiate institutions in the midwestern United States.[5] School for Command Preparation (SCP) provides instruction for colonels, lieutenant colonels, and command sergeants major who have been selected for brigade or battalion command.[4][8] Courses are normally three to four weeks and focus on special topics unique to assumption of command at the levels indicated. School of Advanced Leadership and Tactics (SALT) provides officer continuing education towards developing the Scholar-Warrior-Leader from first lieutenant to selection for major. The result is mastery of branch-specific technical and tactical skills, staff processes in battalions and brigades, direct leadership and command competencies, and initial broadening opportunities.[9] During World War I, the CGSC at Ft. Leavenworth was closed, from 1916 until 1920. Most of the school staff was sent to Langres, France, to open and conduct the Army General Staff College, which operated from November 1917 to December 1918. This compressed-curriculum school was needed to provide command and staff officers for the exponentially growing number of Army units; divisions, regiments, brigades, and battalions.[10]

Notable people[edit] Notable alumni[edit] See also: Category: United States
United States
Army Command and General Staff College
College
alumni

Creighton Abrams
Creighton Abrams
(1949) Clara Leach Adams-Ender
Clara Leach Adams-Ender
(1976) Henry H. Arnold
Henry H. Arnold
(1929) Charles L. Bolte
Charles L. Bolte
(1932) Omar Bradley
Omar Bradley
(1929) Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr.
Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr.
(1928) Richard E. Cavazos
Richard E. Cavazos
(1960) Mark W. Clark
Mark W. Clark
(1935) J. Lawton Collins
J. Lawton Collins
(1933) Kenny Ray Cox William E. DePuy
William E. DePuy
(1946) Jacob L. Devers
Jacob L. Devers
(1925) Roger H.C. Donlon (1971) Robert L. Eichelberger
Robert L. Eichelberger
(1929) Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D. Eisenhower
(1925–26) James M. Gavin
James M. Gavin
(1942)

Andrew Goodpaster
Andrew Goodpaster
(1943) Stuart Heintzelman (1916) Lewis Blaine Hershey
Lewis Blaine Hershey
(1933) Courtney Hodges
Courtney Hodges
(1925) William M. Hoge
William M. Hoge
(1928) Michelle J. Howard
Michelle J. Howard
(1998) Clarence R. Huebner
Clarence R. Huebner
(1925) Harold Keith Johnson
Harold Keith Johnson
(1949) Robert Kingston
Robert Kingston
(1960) John C. H. Lee
John C. H. Lee
(1918) Kirk Lippold (1994) Douglas MacArthur
Douglas MacArthur
(1912) Raymond S. McLain
Raymond S. McLain
(1938) George Marshall
George Marshall
(1907) Troy H. Middleton
Troy H. Middleton
(1924) Aubrey Newman (1943)

Lunsford E. Oliver
Lunsford E. Oliver
(1928) John McAuley Palmer (1910) George S. Patton
George S. Patton
Jr. (1924) David Petraeus
David Petraeus
(1983) Colin Powell
Colin Powell
(1968) Elwood Richard Quesada (1937) Matthew Ridgway
Matthew Ridgway
(1935) Bernard W. Rogers
Bernard W. Rogers
(1954) Richard J. Seitz (1950) Peter J. Schoomaker
Peter J. Schoomaker
(1982) H. Norman Schwarzkopf (1969) Walter Bedell Smith
Walter Bedell Smith
(1935) Carl Andrew Spaatz
Carl Andrew Spaatz
(1936) Donn A. Starry
Donn A. Starry
(1960) Joseph Warren Stilwell (1926) Gordon R. Sullivan
Gordon R. Sullivan
(1969)

Maxwell D. Taylor
Maxwell D. Taylor
(1935) Maxwell R. Thurman
Maxwell R. Thurman
(1967) Hoyt Vandenberg
Hoyt Vandenberg
(1936) James Van Fleet
James Van Fleet
(1918) Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright IV (1931) Albert Coady Wedemeyer
Albert Coady Wedemeyer
(1936)

Notable foreign alumni[edit] The college reports that 7,000 international students representing 155 countries have attended CGSC since 1894 and that more than 50 percent of CGSC International Military Student (IMS) graduates attain the rank of general.[11]

Brigadier General Mamerto S. Bocanegra Armed Forces of the Philippines Director General Recaredo Sarmiento II, Chief PNP (Philippine National Police) General Rodolfo G. Alvarado of the Philippines General Alfredo M. Santos
Alfredo M. Santos
of the Philippines Lieutenant General Rafael Ileto (former Secretary of the Department of National Defense) of the Philippines Lieutenant General Guillermo G. Flores (former Philippine Army Chief and Armed Forces Vice-Chief of Staff) of the Philippines Major General Edmund E. Dillon of Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force Prime Minister and General Tran Thien Khiem
Tran Thien Khiem
of South Vietnam General Do Cao Tri
Do Cao Tri
of South Vietnam Colonel Le Huy Luyen of South Vietnam General Hau Pei-tsun
Hau Pei-tsun
of the Republic of China (Taiwan) President Paul Kagame
Paul Kagame
of Rwanda General Katumba Wamala
Katumba Wamala
of Uganda Brigadier General Muhoozi Kainerugaba son of Ugandan president, 2007–08. General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq
Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq
of Pakistan General Rahimuddin Khan
Rahimuddin Khan
of Pakistan General Jehangir Karamat
Jehangir Karamat
of Pakistan General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani
Ashfaq Parvez Kayani
of Pakistan Brigadier Abdul Shakur Malik, Force Commander for the Northern Areas, Acting Director-General Military Training, of Pakistan General Eiji Kimizuka
Eiji Kimizuka
of Japan General Hisham Jaber
Hisham Jaber
of Lebanon General Krishnaswamy Sundarji of Indian Army Prime Minister and Brigadier-General Lee Hsien Loong
Lee Hsien Loong
of Singapore General Dieudonné Kayembe Mbandakulu of the Democratic Republic of the Congo President Gaafar Nimeiry
Gaafar Nimeiry
of Sudan Lt.Col Anastasio Somoza Portocarrero of the Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua General Nguyễn Hợp Đoàn
Nguyễn Hợp Đoàn
of South Vietnam General Nguyễn Khánh
Nguyễn Khánh
of South Vietnam General Phạm Văn Đồng of South Vietnam Ministry/Chief of Army General Staff and General Ahmad Yani
Ahmad Yani
of Indonesia President and General Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono
Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono
of Indonesia General Veljko Kadijević of Yugoslavia General Antonio Domingo Bussi
Antonio Domingo Bussi
of Argentina General Moeen U Ahmed
Moeen U Ahmed
of Bangladesh General Amer Khammash
Amer Khammash
of Jordan General Arne Dagfin Dahl
Arne Dagfin Dahl
of Norway General Gustav Hägglund
Gustav Hägglund
of Finland General Avigdor Kahalani
Avigdor Kahalani
of Israel General David Tevzadze
David Tevzadze
of Georgia Colonel Nikoloz Janjgava of Georgia General Moeen U Ahmed
Moeen U Ahmed
of Bangladesh Minister of War and Chief of Intelligence Amin Howeidy of Egypt Général d'armée René Imbot, (fr:René Imbot#États-majors et commandements) Chief of Staff of the French Army, General Director of DGSE, France. King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa
Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa
of Bahrain[12] General Abdulkadir Sheikh Dini of Somalia Colonel Ahmed Mohammed Ali
Ahmed Mohammed Ali
of Egypt Lieutenant General Sean McCann of Ireland Lieutenant General Mahesh Senanayake of Sri Lanka

Notable faculty and deputy commandants[edit]

Robert Arter
Robert Arter
(Deputy Commandant 1977–79) Richard E. Cavazos
Richard E. Cavazos
(faculty 1970–71) Roger H.C. Donlon (1978–81)[13] Frederick M. Franks, Jr.
Frederick M. Franks, Jr.
(Deputy commandant 1985–87) James F. Hamlet Chief of the Air Mobility Branch 1968–69 Glenn K. Otis
Glenn K. Otis
Deputy Chief of Staff 1976–78 Colin Powell
Colin Powell
Deputy Commanding General of the Combined Arms Combat Development Activity (1982–83) Gordon R. Sullivan
Gordon R. Sullivan
Deputy Commandant 1987–88 Adna R. Chaffee, Jr.
Adna R. Chaffee, Jr.
1919–20 Clarence R. Huebner
Clarence R. Huebner
(1929–33) Walter Krueger
Walter Krueger
(1901–12) Lucian Truscott
Lucian Truscott
1934–40

Commandants[edit] Main article: Commandant of the United States
United States
Army Command and General Staff College Since 1976, the commandant of the college has been a Lieutenant General. David Petraeus
David Petraeus
was the commandant between 2005 and 2007, immediately before going to command the Multi-National Force – Iraq. Photo gallery[edit]

International Students of Class 1998–99

International Students of Class 1998–99 on a Kansas
Kansas
company visit

International Students of Class 1998–99 Gettysburg visit

See also[edit]

Battle command Air Command and Staff College

References[edit]

^ "CGSC Leadership". U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Retrieved 13 February 2017.  ^ Otis, E. S. (1882). "8.—Report of Col. E. S. Otis". In United States
United States
War Department. Report of the Secretary of War; being part of the message and documents communicated to the two Houses of Congress at the beginning of the second session of the Forty-seventh Congress. In four volumes. I. Washington: GPO. pp. 173–177. Retrieved 11 August 2013. (p.173): "As directed by the General of the Army, in communication of September 27, I have the honor to submit the annual report of proceedings and results at the United States infantry and cavalry school here located, or for the period from December 1, last, the date of its organization, to the present time. The school was organized under the provisions of General Orders No. 42, War Department, of May 7, 1881, which provided that the commanding general of the Department of the Missouri
Department of the Missouri
should, as soon as the requisite number of companies could be assembled at Fort Leavenworth, take measures to establish a school for infantry and cavalry similar to that in operation at Fort Monroe
Fort Monroe
for the artillery arm of the service."  ^ a b c "About the Command and General Staff College". U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Retrieved 11 August 2013.  ^ a b "About the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College". CGSC Foundation. Retrieved 11 August 2013.  ^ a b "CGSC Registrar". U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Retrieved 11 August 2013.  ^ a b "Satellite Campus Program". U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Retrieved 11 August 2013.  ^ " School of Advanced Military Studies
School of Advanced Military Studies
– Converting intellectual power into combat power". U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Retrieved 11 August 2013.  ^ "School for Command Preparation". U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Retrieved 11 August 2013.  ^ "School of Advanced Leadership and Tactics". U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Retrieved 11 August 2013.  ^ http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/cgsc/carl/resources/archival/agsccoll.pdf ^ "International Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony". U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. 1 October 2009. Retrieved 11 August 2013.  ^ "US embassy cables: Bahrainis trained by Hezbollah, claims King Hamad". The Guardian. London. 15 February 2011. Retrieved 11 August 2013.  ^ Halloran, Richard; Molotsky, Irvin (14 December 1988). "Washington Talk: Briefing; A Hero Retires". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 August 2013. 

External links[edit]

Official website Command and General Staff College, Combined Arms Research Library Command and General Staff College, Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library

United States
United States
Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC)

Sub-commands

Capabilities Integration Center Cadet Command Combined Arms Center Fires Center of Excellence Initial Military Training Maneuver Center of Excellence Maneuver Support Center of Excellence Accessions Command Center for Army Lessons Learned Recruiting Command Sustainment Center of Excellence

Installations

Aberdeen Proving Ground Carlisle Barracks Fort Belvoir Fort Benning Fort Eustis Fort Gordon Fort Huachuca Fort Jackson Fort Knox Fort Leavenworth Fort Lee Fort Leonard Wood Fort Rucker Fort Sill Presidio of Monterey Redstone Arsenal

Schools

Air Assault School Air Defense Artillery School Airborne School Armor School Aviation School Basic Training CBRN School Sniper School Combatives
Combatives
School Command and General Staff College Defense Language Institute Engineer School Field Artillery School Infantry
Infantry
School Intelligence Center Jumpmaster School Army Logistics University Mountain Warfare School Officer Candidate School Pathfinder School Prime Power School Quartermaster School Ranger School Reconnaissance and Surveillance Leaders Course School of Advanced Military Studies Sergeants Major Academy Soldier Support Institute War College Warrant Officer Candidate School

v t e

United States
United States
federal service academies and military colleges

Service academies

Military Academy (West Point) Naval Academy (Annapolis) Air Force Academy Coast Guard Academy (New London) Merchant Marine Academy (Kings Point)

Colleges

Air Force Institute of Technology Community College
College
of the Air Force Defense Language Institute Naval Postgraduate School Uniformed Services University
University
of the Health Sciences

Staff colleges

Joint Forces Staff College Army Command and General Staff College Army War College Army Warrant Officer Career College Marine Corps University Marine Corps War College National Defense University Naval War College School of Advanced Military Studies Air Command and Staff College Air University Air War College

Preparatory

Military Academy Preparatory School Naval Academy Preparatory School Air Force Academy Preparatory School

Military academy Military education and training

v t e

  Kansas
Kansas
colleges and universities (list)

Public institutions

Emporia State Fort Hays State Kansas Kansas
Kansas
State Pittsburg State Washburn Wichita State

Private institutions

Baker Barclay Benedictine Bethany Bethel Brown Mackie Central Christian Cleveland Chiropractic Friends Hesston Kansas
Kansas
Christian Kansas
Kansas
Wesleyan Manhattan Christian McPherson MidAmerica Nazarene Newman Ottawa St. Mary's Saint Paul School of Theology Southwestern Sterling Tabor University
University
of Saint Mary

Community colleges

Allen CC Barton CC Butler CC Cloud County CC Coffeyville CC Colby CC Cowley County CC Dodge City CC Fort Scott CC Garden City CC Highland CC Hutchinson CC Independence CC Johnson County CC Kansas
Kansas
City Kansas
Kansas
CC Labette CC Neosho County CC Pratt CC Seward County CC

Technical colleges

Flint Hills Technical College Manhattan Area Technical College North Central Kansas
Kansas
Technical College Northwest Kansas
Kansas
Technical College Salina Area Technical College Washburn Institute of Technology Wichita Area Technical College

Federal/military colleges

Haskell Indian Nations US Army Command and General Staff

Governing body: Kansas
Kansas
Board of Regents

List of defunct colleges and universities in Kansas

Coordinates: 39°20′39″N 94°54′57″W / 39.34417°N 94.91583°W / 39.34417; -94.91583

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 126752257 LCCN: n83008056 GND: 1034956-X SUDOC: 122268415 BNF: cb1358

.