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The Colorado
Colorado
College (CC) is a private liberal arts college in Colorado
Colorado
Springs, Colorado, United States, near the foot of the Rocky Mountains. It was founded in 1874 by Thomas Nelson Haskell in his daughter's memory. The college enrolls approximately 2,000 undergraduates at its 90-acre (36 ha) campus, 70 miles (110 km) south of Denver. The college offers 42 majors and 33 minors, and has a student-faculty ratio of 10:1.[4] Famous alumni include James Heckman, Ken Salazar, Lynne Cheney, Thomas Hornsby Ferril, Marc Webb, and Steve Sabol. Colorado
Colorado
College had an acceptance rate of 15%[5] for the Class of 2021, was ranked as the best private college in Colorado
Colorado
by Forbes,[6] and was listed as tied for the 23rd-best National Liberal Arts College, and as the No. 1 Most Innovative Liberal Arts School, in the 2018 U.S. News & World Report rankings.[7] In addition, Kiplinger's Personal Finance
Kiplinger's Personal Finance
ranked Colorado
Colorado
College 16th in its 2017 rating of best value liberal arts colleges in the U.S.[8] Colorado
Colorado
College is affiliated with the Associated Colleges of the Midwest. Most sports teams are in the NCAA
NCAA
Division III, with the exception of Division I teams in men's hockey and women's soccer.

Contents

1 History 2 Academics

2.1 Block plan 2.2 Admissions 2.3 Rankings 2.4 Requirements

3 Student Life

3.1 Extracurriculars 3.2 Housing 3.3 Culture

4 Campus

4.1 Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center

5 Athletics 6 KRCC radio 7 Notable people

7.1 Alumni 7.2 Faculty

8 References 9 Further reading 10 External links

History[edit]

William Jackson Palmer, founder of Colorado
Colorado
Springs and founding trustee of Colorado
Colorado
College

Colorado
Colorado
College was founded in 1874 on land designated by U.S. Civil War veteran General William Jackson Palmer, the founder of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad and of Colorado
Colorado
Springs.[9] Founder Thomas Nelson Haskell described it as a coeducational liberal arts college in the tradition of Oberlin College. Like many U.S. colleges and universities that have endured from the 19th century, it now is secular in outlook, though it retains its liberal arts focus. Cutler Hall, the college's first building, was completed in 1880 and the first degrees were conferred in 1882. William F. Slocum, president from 1888 to 1917, oversaw the initial building of the campus, expanded the library and recruited top scholars in a number of fields.[9] In 1930, Shove Chapel was erected by Mr. John Gray, to meet the religious needs of the students (though Colorado
Colorado
College is not religiously affiliated). Katharine Lee Bates
Katharine Lee Bates
wrote "America the Beautiful" during her summer teaching position at Colorado
Colorado
College in 1893. The tune has become something of a second school anthem for Colorado
Colorado
College and is commonly sung at commencement and baccalaureate.[10] Academics[edit]

Russell T. Tutt Science Center at Colorado
Colorado
College

The college offers more than 80 majors, minors, and specialized programs including: Southwest studies, feminist and gender studies, Asian studies, biochemistry, environmental science, neuroscience, Latin American studies, Russian and Eurasian studies, and American cultural studies, as well as an across-the-curriculum writing program. In addition to its undergraduate programs, the college offers a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree. Tutt Library has approximately half a million bound volumes. In 2012, Colorado
Colorado
College yielded a student-to-faculty ratio of 10:1.[11] Block plan[edit] Colorado
Colorado
College follows a unique schedule known as the "block plan" in which students study one subject intensively for three-and-a-half-week "blocks", followed by a 4.5 day break. The intensity stems from the time commitment (classes meet for a minimum of three hours Monday through Friday) as well as the demand for engaging rapidly with complex content. Advocates say this allows for more lab time, field research, and an intensive hands-on learning experience with fewer distractions. Critics say that this approach to learning does not allow adequate time for students to digest complex topics. The block plan epitomizes experiential learning. It is common for classes to take short or extended trips to apply classroom concepts in the real world. Because students only take one course for the duration of the block, professors have the flexibility to develop these types of excursions. For example, a renewable energy course might travel to a local wind farm or a geology class may take a week in Moab, Utah to study geological patterns in the region. A satellite campus in Crestone, Colorado
Colorado
at the base of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains
Sangre de Cristo Mountains
known as "Baca Campus" offers a retreat destination often utilized by language, philosophy, writing, and religion courses. Baca Campus boasts a lodge, conference center, classroom, restaurant, and student townhouse facilities. Some courses will even spend an entire block immersed in an area of interest. These occur both domestically and internationally. After each block, students are rewarded with 4.5 days off. Most students head off campus, often involving some type of outdoor exploration. Every student begins the Colorado
Colorado
College journey with a "First Year Experience" course, or FYE. This is a back-to-back block spanning 8 weeks and functions as a freshmen seminar course. Students can also take blocks during winter and summer breaks. In January, the college offers "half blocks," an intensive 10-day course fulfilling a half credit. Meanwhile, summer blocks are three weeks long, and there are also graduate blocks of differing lengths. In parallel with the students, professors teach only one block at a time. Classes are generally capped at 25 students to encourage a more personalized academic experience. Admissions[edit] Colorado
Colorado
College is considered a "most selective school" by U.S. News & World Report.[12] The admissions rate to the college was tied for the 8th lowest among national liberal arts colleges in the U.S. (excluding military academies) in 2017. When statistical ties are taken into account, the admission rate, excluding military academies, was the 5th lowest for all national liberal arts colleges.[13] For the Class of 2021 (enrolled fall 2017), Colorado
Colorado
College received a record 8,222 applications and admitted 15%, the lowest acceptance rate in the school's history, with 519 incoming and 31 transfer students.[14] The incoming class included 51 percent receiving some form of financial aid, 26.7 percent self-identifying as students of color, and 48 QuestBridge students.[5] For the class of 2020, the median ACT Composite score of accepted students was 31 (96th percentile[15]), with median SAT
SAT
scores of 1340 (for reading and math, out of 1600) and 2010 (including writing, out of 2400)[2] which represent the 94th[16] and 93rd[17] percentiles respectively. Rankings[edit]

University rankings

National

Forbes[18] 57

Liberal arts colleges

U.S. News & World Report[19] 23

Washington Monthly[20] 176

In its 2018 edition, U.S. News & World Report ranks Colorado College as tied for 23rd-best liberal arts college in the nation and No. 1 among the most innovative national liberal arts colleges.[7] The most innovative schools are those "making the most innovative improvements in terms of curriculum, faculty, students, campus life, technology or facilities."[21] Kiplinger's Personal Finance
Kiplinger's Personal Finance
places Colorado
Colorado
College 16th in its 2017 ranking of best value liberal arts colleges in the United States.[8] In 2016, Forbes
Forbes
rated it 57th overall in "America's Top Colleges," which ranked 660 national universities and liberal arts colleges. CC is considered a "Hidden Ivy." In 2010, Colorado
Colorado
College was ranked 21st in Newsweek's list of "25 Most Desirable Small Schools," which ranks schools based on selectivity, yield rate, retention rate, and quality of facilities and housing.[22] CC was also ranked 19th on Newsweek's "Most Desirable Urban Schools" list in the same year.[23] In 2012, Colorado
Colorado
College placed 12th in Niche's "Colleges with the Happiest Students."[24] Requirements[edit] Students must satisfactorily complete 32 credits to graduate in addition to specifying a major of study and fulfilling those requirements. The college offers a unique alternative for students who wish to design their own major. However, standardized cross-cutting requirements still apply, though these criteria are fairly broad compared to those at comparable colleges.[25] Student Life[edit] Extracurriculars[edit] The small campus of 2,000 boasts more than one hundred clubs and student groups, ranging from professional groups, interests clubs, and social groups. Among them are intramural sports groups, which have a strong presence on campus. There are a vibrant array of intramural teams, ranging from broomball to ultimate frisbee.[26] Housing[edit] Most students live on or directly adjacent to the college campus, fostering a closed and tight-knit community. During the first two years of study, students are required to live on campus in one of the student dorms, while apartments and student-owned housing become available as upperclassmen.[27] Culture[edit] Both inside and outside of the classroom, students at Colorado
Colorado
College have a reputation for being collaborative, intellectual, and adventurous. A 'work hard, play hard' motto is commonly referenced on campus. However, 'play' for Colorado
Colorado
College students is distinctive. Students share a thirst for outdoor exploration, and can be found hiking, biking, climbing, and skiing, among other things. Colorado College's proximity to the Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
and several mountain resort communities create an ideal environment for these types of activities. Campus[edit]

Cutler Hall, located at 912 North Cascade Avenue, on the Colorado College campus, in Colorado
Colorado
Springs, Colorado. The property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Many of the earliest campus buildings, including Bemis, Cossitt, Cutler, McGregor, Montgomery, Palmer, and Ticknor Halls, are on the National Register of Historic Places, along with Shove Memorial Chapel and the William I. Spencer Center. Arthur House or Edgeplain, once home to the son of President Chester A. Arthur, is also on the National Register.[28] Since the mid-1950s, newer facilities include three large residence halls, Worner Campus Center, Olin Hall of Science and the Barnes Science Center, Honnen Ice Rink, Boettcher Health Center, Schlessman Pool, Armstrong Hall of Humanities, and the El Pomar Sports Center. The face of campus changed again at the beginning of the 21st century with construction of the Western Ridge Housing Complex, which offers apartment-style living for upper-division students and completion of the Russell T. Tutt Science Center. The east campus has been expanded, and is now home to the Greek Quad and several small residence halls known as "theme houses." Some of the more recent notable buildings include Tutt Library, designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Packard Hall of Music and Art, designed by Edward Larrabee Barnes, and the Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, which was designed by Antoine Predock
Antoine Predock
with input from faculty and students.

Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center at Colorado
Colorado
College

Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center[edit] Colorado
Colorado
College's Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, completed in 2008 and located at the intersection of a performing arts corridor in Colorado
Colorado
Springs, was designed to foster creativity and interdisciplinary collaboration. It is home to the college's film, drama and dance departments and contains a large theater, several smaller performance spaces, a screening room, the I.D.E.A. Space gallery, and classrooms, among other rooms. The building is also LEED certified. Athletics[edit] See also: Colorado
Colorado
College Tigers men's ice hockey

Map of CC

The school's sports teams are nicknamed the "Tigers." Colorado
Colorado
College competes at the NCAA Division III
NCAA Division III
level in all sports except men's hockey, in which it participates in the NCAA
NCAA
Division I National Collegiate Hockey Conference, and women's soccer, where it competes as an NCAA
NCAA
Division I team in the Mountain West Conference. CC dropped its intercollegiate athletic programs in football, softball, and women's water polo following the 2008–09 academic year.[29] In 1994, a student referendum to change the athletic teams' nicknames to the Cutthroat Trout narrowly failed, by a margin of 468-423.[30] The Tigers hockey team won the NCAA
NCAA
Division I championship twice (1950, 1957), were runners up three times (1952, 1955, 1996) and have made the NCAA
NCAA
Tournament eighteen times, including eleven times since 1995.[31] In 1996, 1997, and 2005, CC played in the Frozen Four, finishing second in 1996. Fifty-five CC Tigers have been named All-Americans.[32] Hockey Hall of Fame coach Bob Johnson coached the Tigers from 1963 to 1966.[33] The current hockey coach is Mike Haviland, who had been head coach of the Hershey Bears
Hershey Bears
of the American Hockey League
American Hockey League
and was an assistant coach for the Chicago Blackhawks
Chicago Blackhawks
of the National Hockey League. KRCC radio[edit] Colorado
Colorado
College operates National Public Radio
National Public Radio
Member Station KRCC-FM. In 1944, KRCC began as a two-room public address system in the basement of Bemis Hall. Professor Woodson "Chief" Tyree, Director of Radio and Drama Department at Colorado
Colorado
College was the founder and inspirational force in the program that one day became KRCC-FM. In 1946, KRCC moved to South Hall (where Packard Hall now stands) on campus where two students, Charles "Bud" Edmonds '51, and Margaret Merle-Smith '51, were instrumental in securing a war surplus FM transmitter. KRCC began over the air broadcasting in April 1951 as the first non-commercial educational FM radio station in the state of Colorado. KRCC broadcasts through a series of eleven transmitters and translators throughout southern Colorado
Colorado
and a portion of northern New Mexico. KRCC's main transmitter, atop Cheyenne Mountain, broadcasts three separate HD multi-cast channels, including a channel run completely by Colorado
Colorado
College students called the SOCC (Sounds of Colorado
Colorado
College). Notable people[edit] See also: List of Colorado
Colorado
College people Alumni[edit] Colorado
Colorado
College's alumni include a Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winner, a Pulitzer Prize winner, a MacArthur Fellow, 14 Rhodes Scholars, 31 Fulbright Scholars, and 68 Watson Fellows.[34] CC has also graduated 18 Olympians[34] and 170 professional hockey players, including over 30 current and former NHL
NHL
players.[35][36] Selected notable graduates include:

James Heckman

Ken Salazar

Brett Sterling

Abigail Washburn

William "Bro" Adams, Chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities Neal Baer, former executive producer and writer for television series ER, Law & Order: SVU, and Under the Dome Austin R. Brunelli, Brigadier general in the Marine Corps, World War II Navy Cross
Navy Cross
recipient David Burnett, photojournalist recognized for the World Press Photo of the Year (1980), co-recipient of the Robert Capa Gold Medal, and named Magazine Photographer of the Year by the National Press Photographers Association Elizabeth Cheney, United States Representative for Wyoming Lynne Cheney, wife of former Vice President Dick Cheney, novelist, conservative scholar, and former talk-show host Earl H. "Dutch" Clark, first All- American football
American football
player from any college or university in Colorado[citation needed] Marian W. Clarke, US Representative for New York's 34th congressional district. Second woman elected to the United States Congress from New York. Diana DeGette, US Representative for Colorado's 1st congressional district Gregg Easterbrook, author and contributing editor of The New Republic and The Atlantic Monthly[citation needed] Joe Ellis, President of the Denver Broncos Thomas Hornsby Ferril, poet laureate of Colorado Mark Fiore, Pulitzer Prize-winning political cartoonist Peggy Fleming, figure skater, 1968 Olympic champion in ladies' singles and a three-time world champion Paul Franco, political theorist and professor of government at Bowdoin College Jennifer Galt, current United States Ambassador to Mongolia Lori Garver, former deputy NASA administrator Abdul Aziz Abdul Ghani, former prime minister of Yemen Glenna Goodacre, sculptor Richard Green, chairman of the Space Sciences Institute, previously served as President and CEO of CableLabs James D. Hamilton, econometrician and author of "Time Series Analysis" Donna Haraway, scholar in the field of science and technology studies James Heckman, winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics
Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics
(2000), John Bates Clark Medal (1983), and Frisch Medal (2014), currently appointed as Henry Schultz Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago Kaui Hart Hemmings, author of The Descendants[citation needed] Laura Hershey, writer and disability rights activist William J. Hybl, former president of the U.S. Olympic Committee, delegate to the United Nations General Assembly[37] David Jenkins, 1960 Olympic gold medalist in men's figure skating, three-time world champion (1957–1959)[38] Daniel Junge, Academy Award-winning filmmaker of the documentary Saving Face Margaret Kilgallen, artist and member of the Mission School
Mission School
art movement Liang Shih-chiu, scholar and author who produced the first translation of Shakespeare's complete works into Chinese Jane Lubchenco, marine ecologist and environmental scientist, former head of NOAA David Malpass, chief economist at Bear Stearns, Republican candidate for US Senate in New York, founder and president of Encima Global LLC Reginald McKnight, author, recipient of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize, the Whiting Award, and the O. Henry Award. Inaugural Hamilton Holmes Professor of English at the University of Georgia. Marcia McNutt, geophysicist, President of the National Academy of Sciences[39] Helen Stevenson Meyner, US Representative for New Jersey's 13th congressional district Pete Nelson, host of the Animal Planet television show Treehouse Masters Tara Nott, first American gold medalist in women's weight lifting, 2000 Olympics[40] John Novembre, winner of 2015 MacArthur Fellowship, Professor of Computational Biology at the University of Chicago Philip Perry, former general counsel for the Department of Homeland Security Doug Pray, Emmy Award-winning film director (Art & Copy) Frederick Madison Roberts, first African-American elected to public office on the West Coast and great-grandson of Sally Hemmings Gregor Robertson, mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Steve Sabol, President of NFL Films Ken Salazar, 50th United States Secretary of the Interior, former United States Senator Harry H. Seldomridge, US Representative for Colorado's 2nd congressional district Joe Simitian, former mayor of Palo Alto Ed Smith, former NFL player for the Denver Broncos[41] Kagen Sound, puzzle artist Brett Sterling, NHL
NHL
ice hockey player Bert Stiles, author and World War II fighter pilot awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal Timothy Tymkovich, Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit Trista Vick-Majors, Antarctic researcher[citation needed] Abigail Washburn, Grammy Award-winning banjo player and songwriter Marc Webb, producer and director of music videos and films such as (500) Days of Summer
(500) Days of Summer
and The Amazing Spider-Man Terry Winograd, professor of computer science at Stanford University and co-director of the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group Dean Winters, actor (Rescue Me, Battle Creek, Oz, Law and Order: SVU,"30 Rock")

Faculty[edit] Notable faculty members include:

Ofer Ben-Amots, classical composer Rebecca Barnes, environmental scientist, educator and advocate for women in science, board member of Earth Science Women's Network Peter Blasenheim, Latin American & African historian, as well as Brazilianist[42][43] Florian Cajori, author of A History of Mathematics Tom Cronin, former president of Whitman College Edward Diller, German literary scholar and author Jesse Glenn Gray, author of The Warriors: Reflections of Men in Battle Steve Hayward, novelist[44] and co-creator/co-host of Critical Karaoke radio broadcast Linda Hogan
Linda Hogan
(b. 1947), Native American author and poet Anne F. Hyde, historian, author, 2012 Bancroft Prize winner,[45] 2012 Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
finalist[46] Dan Johnson, microeconomist and entrepreneur, notable for research in predicting Olympic medals[47] David Mason, Poet Laureate
Poet Laureate
of Colorado Jim Parco, author, businessman, and retired Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Price-Smith, academic writer, best known for his work on health security and environmental security Stephen Scott, founder of the Bowed Piano Ensemble Adrienne L. Seward, folklorist, edited 2014 book Toni Morrison: Memory and Meaning Christine Siddoway, geologist and Antarctic investigator, best known for advances in geological knowledge of West Antarctica Dennis Showalter, the 2005 recipient of the Samuel Eliot Morison Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Military History Leila Clement Spaulding, the first female faculty member of Colorado College with a PhD

References[edit]

^ As of June 30, 2017. "Market Value & Asset Allocation".  ^ a b "Class of 2020".  ^ "Visual Identity Resources". coloradocollege.edu.  ^ "Departments and Program". Colorado
Colorado
College.  ^ a b "Welcome, Class of 2021".  ^ "America's Top Colleges: Colorado". Forbes.  ^ a b " Colorado
Colorado
College". U.S. News & World Report.  ^ a b "Kiplinger's Best College Values: College Rankings, 2017". Kiplinger's Personal Finance. December 2017.  ^ a b Colorado
Colorado
College. History of Colorado
Colorado
College Archived May 27, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved on: 2010-05-19. ^ America the Beautiful ^ " Colorado
Colorado
College". locatecolleges.com.  ^ " Colorado
Colorado
College". U.S. News & World Report. 2016.  ^ "National Liberal Arts Colleges". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved September 29, 2017.  ^ "Welcome, Class of 2021".  ^ "National Distributions of Cumulative Percents for ACT Test Scores" (PDF). ACT.  ^ " SAT
SAT
Understanding Scores 2016" (PDF). SAT.  ^ " SAT
SAT
Percentile Ranks for Males, Females, and Total Group" (PDF). SAT. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-05-22.  ^ "America's Top Colleges". Forbes. July 5, 2016.  ^ "Best Colleges 2017: National Liberal Arts Colleges Rankings". U.S. News & World Report. September 12, 2016.  ^ "2016 Rankings - National Universities - Liberal Arts". Washington Monthly. Retrieved September 6, 2016.  ^ "Most Innovative Schools – National Liberal Arts Colleges". U.S. News & World Report. 2016.  ^ "25 Most Desirable Small Schools".  ^ "Most Desirable Urban Schools".  ^ "Colleges with the Happiest Students".  ^ Requirements • Colorado
Colorado
College ^ The Curriculum • Colorado
Colorado
College ^ On-Campus Housing • Housing & Conferences Colorado
Colorado
College ^ El Paso County – Colorado
Colorado
State Register of Historic Properties. History Colorado. June 8, 2013. ^ Tough Times, Tough Decisions: Athletics Cuts at CC Bulletin ^ The Trout that Almost Was Cipher ^ Colorado
Colorado
College Ice Hockey History NCAA
NCAA
Tournament Archived September 22, 2006, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Colorado
Colorado
College Ice Hockey History All-Americans Archived February 11, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Colorado
Colorado
College Ice Hockey History Coaches Archived September 22, 2006, at the Wayback Machine. ^ a b "After CC". Colorado
Colorado
College.  ^ "Alumni Report". Internet Hockey Database. 2011. Retrieved May 11, 2011.  ^ "Tiger Hockey Media Guide 2013–2014" (PDF). Retrieved November 30, 2013.  ^ "William J. Hybl". United States Department of State.  ^ "David Jenkins".  ^ " Marcia McNutt
Marcia McNutt
Elected 22nd NAS President; New Treasurer, Council Members Chosen" (Press release). National Academy of Sciences. February 16, 2016. Archived from the original on February 21, 2016. Retrieved February 23, 2016.  ^ "After CC • Colorado
Colorado
College". Colorado
Colorado
College. Retrieved 2012-02-29.  ^ Ed Smith, DE at NFL.com ^ "Profile • History • Colorado
Colorado
College". Colorado
Colorado
College. Retrieved 2012-02-29.  ^ "Peter Blasenheim". Colorado
Colorado
College. Archived from the original on May 27, 2011. Retrieved February 29, 2012.  ^ Hayward, Steven (2011). Don't Be Afraid. Knopf Canada. p. 313. ISBN 0676977367.  ^ "Winners of the 2012 Bancroft Prize Announced". Retrieved 2012-12-10.  ^ "2012 Finalists". Retrieved 2012-12-10.  ^ William Heuslein (January 19, 2010). "The Man Who Predicts The Medals". Forbes. 

Further reading[edit]

Dunn, Joe P., "A Mission on the Frontier: Edward P. Tenney, Colorado College, the New West Education Commission, and the School Movement for Mormons and ‘Mexicans,’" History of Education Quarterly, 52 (Nov. 2012), 535–58. Loevy, Robert D. Colorado
Colorado
College: A Place of Learning, 1874–1999. Colorado
Colorado
Springs: Colorado
Colorado
College, 1999. Reid, J. Juan. Colorado
Colorado
College: The First Century, 1874–1974. Colorado
Colorado
Springs: Colorado
Colorado
College, 1979.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Colorado
Colorado
College.

Wikisource
Wikisource
has the text of the 1905 New International Encyclopedia article Colorado
Colorado
College.

Official website Colorado
Colorado
College Athletics website  " Colorado
Colorado
College". Collier's New Encyclopedia. 1921. 

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