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Clarence Lester "Biggie" Munn (September 11, 1908 – March 18, 1975) was an American football
American football
player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He was the head football coach at Albright College (1935–1936), Syracuse University
Syracuse University
(1946), and most notably Michigan State College (1947–1953), where his 1952 squad won a national championship. Munn retired from coaching in 1953 to assume duties as Michigan State's athletic director, a position he held until 1971. Each year, the Michigan State Spartans football
Michigan State Spartans football
team hands out the "Biggie Munn Award" to the team's most motivational player. MSU's Munn Ice Arena, built in 1974, is named in his honor. Munn was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame
College Football Hall of Fame
as a coach in 1959, and, in 1961, he became Michigan State's first inductee into the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame. He authored the coaching textbook Michigan State Multiple Offense in 1953.

Contents

1 Early life and playing career 2 Early coaching career 3 Coaching career at Michigan State 4 Family and death 5 Head coaching record

5.1 Football

6 Coaching tree 7 Bibliography 8 References 9 External links

Early life and playing career[edit] Munn was born in the former Grow Township, now known as Andover, Minnesota. A 1932 graduate of the University of Minnesota, he played guard and fullback for the Golden Gophers under head coach Fritz Crisler. Munn was a two-time first-team All-Big Ten Conference selection and during his senior year in 1931, he served football team captain, was a consensus All-American, and was awarded the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the Big Ten's best player. Many considered Munn as the top collegiate punter in the nation. He stood just under six feet and weighed 215 pounds, but was recorded running 100 yards in 10 seconds. Munn also served as captain of Minnesota's track and field team. Early coaching career[edit] Three years after his playing career ended, Munn got his first head coaching job at Albright College in Reading, Pennsylvania, where he stayed for two seasons (1935–1936), compiling a record of 13–2–1.[1] From 1938 to 1945, he was an assistant football coach at the University of Michigan, once again under Crisler. Munn served as head coach at Syracuse University
Syracuse University
for one season in 1946 before leaving for Michigan State. One of Munn's assistants at Syracuse was former Orangeman standout Duffy Daugherty, who followed Munn to Michigan State and assisted him there for seven seasons before succeeding Munn as head coach. Munn is one of the few people to have coached at both Michigan State and its archrival Michigan. Coaching career at Michigan State[edit] In 1947, Munn and the Michigan State administration, led by university president John A. Hannah, approached Notre Dame president Father Cavanaugh to have his Fighting Irish play the Spartans for the first time since 1921. MSU initially offered to let Notre Dame take 80 percent of the gate, but Cavanaugh insisted they split the receipts down the middle. Munn was the only coach to beat Notre Dame head coach Frank Leahy
Frank Leahy
three years in a row (1950–1952). Munn developed the "Wingback Deep" formation of his formula "Michigan State Multiple Offense." The play featured a shifting back and forth between a T-formation
T-formation
and a single-wing formation with a direct snap to the tailback between a T-formation
T-formation
quarterback's legs. On the Michigan State dressing room wall, Munn hung a statement on fundamentals that his players were required to read before every home game: "Do not cheat your team or your teammates. Know your plays. Block. Protect. Add to what we are trying to do. [signed] Biggie." During the latter part of his coaching career, Munn developed the talents of Willie Thrower, the Big Ten's first black quarterback. In 1953 with the Chicago Bears, Thrower became the first black quarterback to play in the National Football League. In 1952, Munn was named the AFCA Coach of the Year, coaching MSU to 9–0 record and a national championship. In 1953, Michigan State's first year of conference play in the Big Ten, the Spartans shared the conference title with Illinois and went to the Rose Bowl, where they beat UCLA, 28–20. Shortly after the Rose Bowl victory, MSU's athletic director, Ralph Young retired. Munn stepped down from coaching to assume duties as athletic director and remained in that position until 1971. Munn named his assistant, Duffy Daugherty, as his to successor to helm the football team. During his tenure as Michigan State's head football coach, Munn tutored 17 All-Americans. His teams have retained the school's top four season marks for rushing-yards-per-game: 1948 (304.5 yards/game), 1951 (293.9 yards), 1952 (272.4), and 1950 (269.3). Munn was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame
College Football Hall of Fame
in 1959. Syracuse University
Syracuse University
enshrined him in its hall of fame in 1973. Munn was inducted into Minnesota's "M" Club in 1993. Family and death[edit] Munn married the former Vera Jane Wattles (January 21, 1905 – January 4, 2004) in June 1935. The couple adopted two children: Michael and Jane Austin. Clarence Munn
Clarence Munn
died on March 18, 1975 in Lansing, Michigan
Lansing, Michigan
at the age of 66. Head coaching record[edit] Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°

Albright Lions (Independent) (1935–1936)

1935 Albright 7–1

1936 Albright 6–1–1

Albright: 13–2–1

Syracuse Orangemen (Independent) (1946)

1946 Syracuse 4–5

Syracuse: 4–5

Michigan State Spartans
Michigan State Spartans
(Independent) (1947–1952)

1947 Michigan State 7–2

1948 Michigan State 6–2–2

14

1949 Michigan State 6–3

19

1950 Michigan State 8–1

9 8

1951 Michigan State 9–0

2 2

1952 Michigan State 9–0

1 1

Michigan State Spartans
Michigan State Spartans
(Big Ten Conference) (1953)

1953 Michigan State 9–1 5–1 T–1st W Rose 3 3

Michigan State: 54–9–2 5–1

Total: 71–16–3

      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

#Rankings from final Coaches Poll. °Rankings from final AP Poll.

Coaching tree[edit] Munn worked as an assistant under only one head coach:

Fritz Crisler, Michigan (1938–1945)

Bibliography[edit]

Munn, Clarence L. (Biggie) (1953). Michigan State Multiple Offense. ASIN
ASIN
B0007DRAY4. 

References[edit]

^ "2010 Albright College Football Media Guide" (PDF). p. 54. Retrieved October 7, 2010. 

External links[edit]

Clarence Munn
Clarence Munn
at the College Football Hall of Fame

Links to related articles

v t e

Albright Lions head football coaches

Pop Kelchner (1912–1918) Haps Benfer
Haps Benfer
(1919–1924) James Bond (1925) Harry Weller (1926–1927) John B. Smith (1928) Doggie Julian
Doggie Julian
(1929–1930) Frank White (1931–1934) Clarence Munn
Clarence Munn
(1935–1936) William Henry Dietz (1937–1942) No team (1943–1945) Dave Strong (1946) LeVan Smith (1947–1948) Eddie Gulian (1949–1954) John Potsklan (1955–1984) Bill Popp (1985) Jeff Sparagana (1986–1992) Kevin Kiesel (1993–1995) Ron Maier (1996) E. J. Sandusky (1997–2006) John Marzka (2007– )

v t e

Syracuse Orange head football coaches

No coach (1889) Robert Winston (1890) William Galbraith (1891) Jordan C. Wells (1892) No coach (1893) George H. Bond (1894) George O. Redington (1895–1896) Frank E. Wade (1897–1899) Edwin Sweetland
Edwin Sweetland
(1900–1902) Jason B. Parrish & Ancil D. Brown (1903) Charles P. Hutchins
Charles P. Hutchins
(1904–1905) Frank "Buck" O'Neill
Frank "Buck" O'Neill
(1906–1907) Howard Jones (1908) Tad Jones (1909–1910) C. DeForest Cummings (1911–1912) Frank "Buck" O'Neill
Frank "Buck" O'Neill
(1913–1915) Bill Hollenback
Bill Hollenback
(1916) Frank "Buck" O'Neill
Frank "Buck" O'Neill
(1917–1919) Chick Meehan
Chick Meehan
(1920–1924) Pete Reynolds (1925–1926) Lew Andreas (1927–1929) Vic Hanson (1930–1936) Ossie Solem
Ossie Solem
(1937–1942) No team (1943) Ossie Solem
Ossie Solem
(1944–1945) Clarence Munn
Clarence Munn
(1946) Reaves Baysinger (1947–1948) Ben Schwartzwalder
Ben Schwartzwalder
(1949–1973) Frank Maloney (1974–1980) Dick MacPherson (1981–1990) Paul Pasqualoni
Paul Pasqualoni
(1991–2004) Greg Robinson (2005–2008) Doug Marrone
Doug Marrone
(2009–2012) Scott Shafer
Scott Shafer
(2013–2015) Dino Babers (2016– )

v t e

Michigan State Spartans
Michigan State Spartans
head football coaches

Henry Keep (1897–1898) Charles Bemies
Charles Bemies
(1899–1900) George Denman (1901–1902) Chester Brewer
Chester Brewer
(1903–1910) John Macklin
John Macklin
(1911–1915) Dutch Sommer (1916) Chester Brewer
Chester Brewer
(1917) George Gauthier (1918) Chester Brewer
Chester Brewer
(1919) George Clark (1920) Albert Barron (1921–1922) Ralph H. Young
Ralph H. Young
(1923–1927) Harry Kipke
Harry Kipke
(1928) Jim Crowley
Jim Crowley
(1929–1932) Charlie Bachman
Charlie Bachman
(1933–1942) No team (1943) Charlie Bachman
Charlie Bachman
(1944–1946) Clarence Munn
Clarence Munn
(1947–1953) Duffy Daugherty
Duffy Daugherty
(1954–1972) Denny Stolz (1973–1975) Darryl Rogers
Darryl Rogers
(1976–1979) Muddy Waters (1980–1982) George Perles
George Perles
(1983–1994) Nick Saban
Nick Saban
(1995–1999) Bobby Williams (2000–2002) Morris Watts # (2002) John L. Smith (2003–2006) Mark Dantonio
Mark Dantonio
(2007– )

Pound sign (#) denotes interim coach.

v t e

Michigan State Spartans
Michigan State Spartans
athletic directors

Charles Bemies
Charles Bemies
(1899–1900) George Denman (1901–1902) Chester Brewer
Chester Brewer
(1903–1910) John Macklin
John Macklin
(1911–1915) George Gauthier # (1916) Chester Brewer
Chester Brewer
(1917) George Gauthier # (1918) Chester Brewer
Chester Brewer
(1919–1921) Albert Barron (1922) Ralph H. Young
Ralph H. Young
(1923–1954) Clarence Munn
Clarence Munn
(1954–1971) J. Burt Smith (1971–1975) Joseph Kearney
Joseph Kearney
(1976–1980) Doug Weaver (1980–1990) George Perles
George Perles
(1990–1992) Merrily Baker (1992–1995) Merritt Norvell
Merritt Norvell
(1995–1998) Clarence Underwood (1998–2002) Ron Mason (2002–2008) Mark Hollis (2008–2018) Bill Beekman # (2018– )

# denotes acting/interim athletic director

v t e

1952 Michigan State Spartans
Michigan State Spartans
football—consensus national champions

Leroy Bolden Hank Bullough Paul Dekker Chuck Fairbanks Frank Kush Gary Lowe Earl Morrall Jerry Planutis Dick Tamburo Willie Thrower Doug Weaver Billy Wells Tom Yewcic Bert Zagers

Head coach: Clarence Munn

Assistant coaches: Duffy Daugherty Dan Devine Earle Edwards Dewey King Steve Sebo

v t e

1931 College Football All-America Team consensus selections

Backfield

QB Barry Wood HB Pug Rentner HB Marchmont Schwartz FB Gaius Shaver

Line

E Jerry Dalrymple E Vernon "Catfish" Smith T Dallas Marvil T Jess Quatse T Jack Riley G Johnny Baker G Clarence Munn C Tommy Yarr

v t e

Chicago Tribune Silver Football

1924: Grange 1925: Lowry 1926: Friedman 1927: Rouse 1928: Bennet 1929: Glassgow 1930: Fesler 1931: Munn 1932: Newman 1933: Laws 1934: Lund 1935: Berwanger 1936: Huffman 1937: Davis 1938: Weiss 1939: Kinnick 1940: Harmon 1941: Graf 1942: Schreiner 1943: O. Graham 1944: Horvath 1945: Cline 1946: Agase 1947: B. Elliott 1948: Murakowski 1949: Wilson 1950: Janowicz 1951: Reichardt 1952: Giel 1953: Giel 1954: Ameche 1955: Cassady 1956: Ploen 1957: J. Pace 1958: Duncan 1959: Burrell 1960: Brown 1961: Stephens 1962: Vander Kelen 1963: Butkus 1964: Timberlake 1965: Grabowski 1966: Griese 1967: Keyes 1968: Johnson 1969: Phipps 1970: Adamle 1971: Allen 1972: Armstrong 1973: Griffin 1974: Griffin 1975: C. Greene 1976: Lytle 1977: Bethea 1978: Leach 1979: Clifford 1980: Herrmann 1981: Schlichter 1982: Carter 1983: Thorp 1984: Byars 1985: Long 1986: Harbaugh 1987: White 1988: Thompson 1989: Thompson 1990: Bell 1991: Howard 1992: Gissendaner 1993: Moss 1994: Collins 1995: George 1996: O. Pace 1997: Woodson 1998: Germaine 1999: Dayne 2000: Brees 2001: Randle El 2002: Banks 2003: Perry 2004: Edwards 2005: M. Robinson 2006: Smith 2007: Mendenhall 2008: S. Greene 2009: Clark & B. Graham 2010: D. Robinson 2011: Ball 2012: Miller 2013: Miller 2014: Gordon 2015: E. Elliott 2016: Barkley & Barrett 2017: Barkley

v t e

AFCA Division I FBS Coach of the Year winners

1935: Waldorf 1936: Harlow 1937: Mylin 1938: Kern 1939: Anderson 1940: Shaughnessy 1941: Leahy 1942: Alexander 1943: Stagg 1944: Widdoes 1945: McMillin 1946: Blaik 1947: Crisler 1948: Oosterbaan 1949: Wilkinson 1950: Caldwell 1951: Taylor 1952: Munn 1953: Tatum 1954: Sanders 1955: Daugherty 1956: Wyatt 1957: Hayes 1958: Dietzel 1959: Schwartzwalder 1960: Warmath 1961: Bryant 1962: McKay 1963: Royal 1964: Broyles & Parseghian 1965: Prothro 1966: Cahill 1967: Pont 1968: Paterno 1969: Schembechler 1970: McClendon & Royal 1971: Bryant 1972: McKay 1973: Bryant 1974: Teaff 1975: Kush 1976: Majors 1977: James 1978: Paterno 1979: Bruce 1980: Dooley 1981: Ford 1982: Paterno 1983: Hatfield 1984: Edwards 1985: DeBerry 1986: Paterno 1987: MacPherson 1988: Nehlen 1989: McCartney 1990: Ross 1991: B. Lewis 1992: Stallings 1993: Alvarez 1994: Osborne 1995: Barnett 1996: Br. Snyder 1997: Carr 1998: Fulmer 1999: Beamer 2000: Stoops 2001: Coker & Friedgen 2002: Tressel 2003: Carroll 2004: Tuberville 2005: Paterno 2006: Grobe 2007: Mangino 2008: Whittingham 2009: Patterson 2010: C. Kelly 2011: Miles 2012: B. Kelly 2013: Cutcliffe 2014: Patterson 2015: Swinney 2016: Mac

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