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Cinema Paradiso (Italian: Nuovo Cinema Paradiso, Italian pronunciation: [ˈnwɔːvo ˈtʃiːnema paraˈdiːzo], "New Paradise Cinema") is a 1988 Italian drama film written and directed by Giuseppe Tornatore. The film stars Jacques Perrin, Philippe Noiret, Leopoldo Trieste, Marco Leonardi, Agnese Nano and Salvatore Cascio, and was produced by Franco Cristaldi and Giovanna Romagnoli, while the music score was composed by Ennio Morricone
Ennio Morricone
along with his son, Andrea. It won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film at the 62nd Academy Awards.[3]

Contents

1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Releases

4.1 Director's cut

5 Home media 6 Reception 7 Awards 8 See also 9 References 10 References 11 External links

Plot[edit] In Rome, in the 1980s, famous Italian film director Salvatore Di Vita returns home late one evening, where his girlfriend sleepily tells him that his mother called to say someone named Alfredo has died. Salvatore obviously shies from committed relationships and has not been to his home village of Giancaldo, Sicily
Sicily
in 30 years. As his girlfriend asks him who Alfredo is, Salvatore flashes back to his childhood. A few years after World War II, six-year-old Salvatore is the mischievous, intelligent son of a war widow. Nicknamed Toto, he discovers a love for films and spends every free moment at the movie house Cinema Paradiso. Although they initially start off on tense terms, he develops a friendship with the fatherly projectionist, Alfredo, who takes a shine to the young boy and often lets him watch movies from the projection booth. During the shows, the audience can be heard booing when there are missing sections, causing the films to suddenly jump, bypassing a critical romantic kiss or embrace. The local priest had ordered these sections censored, and the deleted scenes are piled on the projection room floor. At first, Alfredo considers Toto a bit of a pest, but eventually he teaches Salvatore to operate the film projector. The montage ends as the movie house catches fire as Alfredo was projecting The Firemen of Viggiù
The Firemen of Viggiù
after hours, on the wall of a nearby house. Salvatore saves Alfredo's life, but not before a film reel explodes in Alfredo's face, leaving him permanently blind. The Cinema Paradiso is rebuilt by a town citizen, Ciccio, who invests his football lottery winnings. Salvatore, still a child, is hired as the new projectionist, as he is the only person who knows how to run the machines. About a decade later, Salvatore, now in high school, is still operating the projector at the Cinema Paradiso. His relationship with the blind Alfredo has strengthened, and Salvatore often looks to him for help – advice that Alfredo often dispenses by quoting classic films. Salvatore has been experimenting with film, using a home movie camera, and he has met, and captured on film, Elena, daughter of a wealthy banker. Salvatore woos – and wins – Elena's heart, only to lose her due to her father's disapproval. As Elena and her family move away, Salvatore leaves town for compulsory military service. His attempts to write to Elena are fruitless; his letters are returned as undeliverable. Upon his return from the military, Alfredo urges Salvatore to leave Giancaldo permanently, counseling that the town is too small for Salvatore to ever find his dreams. Moreover, the old man tells him, once Salvatore leaves, he must pursue his destiny wholeheartedly, never looking back and never returning, even to visit; he must never give in to nostalgia or even write or think about them. They tearfully embrace, and Salvatore leaves town to pursue his future, as a filmmaker. Salvatore has obeyed Alfredo, but he returns home to attend the funeral. Though the town has changed greatly, he now understands why Alfredo thought it was important that he leave. Alfredo's widow tells him that the old man followed Salvatore's successes with pride and he left him something – an unlabeled film reel and the old stool that Salvatore once stood on to operate the projector. Salvatore learns that Cinema Paradiso is to be demolished to make way for a parking lot. At the funeral, he recognizes the faces of many people who attended the cinema when he was the projectionist. Salvatore returns to Rome. He watches Alfredo's reel and discovers it comprises all the romantic scenes that the priest had ordered to cut from the movies; Alfredo had spliced the sequences together to form a single unreduced film of aching desire and lustfull frenzy. Salvatore has made peace with his past with tears in his eyes. Cast[edit]

Philippe Noiret
Philippe Noiret
as Alfredo Salvatore Cascio as Salvatore Di Vita (child) Marco Leonardi as Salvatore Di Vita (adolescent) Jacques Perrin
Jacques Perrin
as Salvatore Di Vita (adult) Agnese Nano as Elena Mendola (adolescent) Antonella Attili as Maria (young) Enzo Cannavale
Enzo Cannavale
as Spaccafico Isa Danieli
Isa Danieli
as Anna Pupella Maggio
Pupella Maggio
as Maria (old) Leopoldo Trieste
Leopoldo Trieste
as Father Adelfio Nino Terzo
Nino Terzo
as Peppino's father Giovanni Giancono as the Mayor Brigitte Fossey
Brigitte Fossey
(Extended cut) as Elena Mendola (adult)

Production[edit] Cinema Paradiso was shot in director Tornatore's hometown Bagheria, Sicily, as well as Cefalù
Cefalù
on the Tyrrhenian Sea.[4] The famous town square is Piazza Umberto I in the village of Palazzo Adriano, about 30 miles to the south of Palermo. The ‘Paradiso’ cinema was built here, at Via Nino Bixio, overlooking the octagonal Baroque fountain, which dates from 1608.[5] Told largely in flashback of a successful film director Salvatore to his childhood years, it also tells the story of the return to his native Sicilian village for the funeral of his old friend Alfredo, the projectionist at the local "Cinema Paradiso". Ultimately, Alfredo serves as a wise father figure to his young friend who only wishes to see him succeed, even if it means breaking his heart in the process. Seen as an example of "nostalgic postmodernism",[6] the film intertwines sentimentality with comedy, and nostalgia with pragmaticism. It explores issues of youth, coming of age, and reflections (in adulthood) about the past. The imagery in the scenes can be said to reflect Salvatore's idealised memories of his childhood. Cinema Paradiso is also a celebration of films; as a projectionist, young Salvatore (a.k.a. Totò) develops a passion for films that shapes his life path in adulthood. Releases[edit] The film exists in multiple versions. It was originally released in Italy at 155 minutes, but poor box office performance in its native country led to its being shortened to 123 minutes for international release; it was an instant success.[7] This international version won the Special
Special
Jury Prize at the 1989 Cannes Film Festival[8] and the 1989 Best Foreign Language Film Oscar. In 2002, the director's cut 173-minute version was released (known in the U.S. as Cinema Paradiso: The New Version). Director's cut[edit] In the 173-minute version of the film, after the funeral, Salvatore glimpses an adolescent girl who resembles the teenage Elena. He follows the teen as she rides her scooter to her home, which allows Salvatore to contact his long-lost love Elena, who is revealed to be the girl's mother. Salvatore calls her in hopes of rekindling their romance; she initially rejects him, but later reconsiders and goes to see Salvatore, who was contemplating his rejection at a favorite location from their early years. Their meeting ultimately leads to a lovemaking session in her car. He learns that she had married an acquaintance from his school years, who became a local politician of modest means. Afterwards, feeling cheated, he strives to rekindle their romance, and while she clearly wishes it were possible, she rejects his entreaties, choosing to remain with her family and leave their romance in the past. During their evening together, a frustrated and angry Salvatore asks Elena why she never contacted him or left word of where her family was moving to. He learns that the reason they lost touch was because Alfredo asked her not to see him again, fearing that Salvatore's romantic fulfillment would only destroy what Alfredo sees as Salvatore's destiny – to be successful in film. Alfredo tried to convince her that if she loved Salvatore, she should leave him for his own good. Elena explains to Salvatore that, against Alfredo's instruction, she had secretly left a note with an address where she could be reached and a promise of undying love and loyalty. Salvatore reveals that he never knew of her note, and thus lost his true love for more than thirty years. The next morning, Salvatore returns to the decaying Cinema Paradiso and frantically searches through the piles of old film invoices pinned to the wall of the projection booth. There, on the reverse side of one of the dockets, he finds the handwritten note Elena had left thirty years earlier. The film ends with Salvatore returning to Rome
Rome
and viewing the film reel that Alfredo left, tears in his eyes. Home media[edit] A special edition of Cinema Paradiso was released on DVD by Umbrella Entertainment in September 2006. The DVD is compatible with all region codes and includes special features such as the theatrical trailer, the Director's Cut version, scenes from the Director's Cut, the Ennio Morricone soundtrack and a documentary on Giuseppe Tornatore.[9] An Academy Award
Academy Award
edition of Cinema Paradiso was released on DVD by Umbrella Entertainment in February 2009. It is also compatible with all region codes and includes different special features such as Umbrella Entertainment trailers, cast and crew biographies and the Director's filmography.[10] In July 2011 Umbrella Entertainment released the film on Blu-ray.[11] Arrow released a remastered special edition Blu-ray of the film, with both theatrical and extended cuts, in 2017. Reception[edit]

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Cinema Paradiso was a critical and box-office success and is regarded by many as a classic. It is particularly renowned for the 'kissing scenes' montage at the film's end. Winning the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Foreign Film in 1989, the film is often credited with reviving Italy's film industry, which later produced Mediterraneo and Life Is Beautiful. Film critic Roger Ebert
Roger Ebert
gave it three and a half stars out of four[12] and four stars out of four for the extended version, declaring "Still, I'm happy to have seen it--not as an alternate version, but as the ultimate exercise in viewing deleted scenes."[13] Review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes
Rotten Tomatoes
reports that 90% of critics have given the film a positive review based on 70 reviews, with an average score of 8/10.[14] The film also holds a score of 80 based on 20 reviews on Metacritic.[15] The film was ranked #27 in Empire magazine's "The 100 Best Films Of World Cinema" in 2010.[16] The famed "kissing scene" montage at the end of the film was used in an episode of "Stealing First Base", an episode of The Simpsons
The Simpsons
that aired on March 21, 2010, during its twenty-first season. The scene used Morricone's "Love Theme" and included animated clips of famous movie kisses, including scenes used in Cinema Paradiso as well as contemporary films not shown in the original film. Awards[edit]

1989: Cannes Film Festival

Grand Prix du Jury (tied with Trop belle pour toi)

1989: Golden Globe Awards

Best Foreign Language Film

1989: Academy Awards

Best Foreign Language Film

1991: BAFTA Awards

Best Film (Not in the English Language) Best Actor: Philippe Noiret Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Salvatore Cascio Best Original Screenplay: Giuseppe Tornatore Best Film Music: Ennio Morricone
Ennio Morricone
and Andrea Morricone[17]

2010: 20/20 Awards[citation needed]

Nominated – Best Picture Won – Best Foreign Language Picture Won – Best Cinematography

See also[edit]

List of submissions to the 62nd Academy Awards
62nd Academy Awards
for Best Foreign Language Film List of Italian submissions for the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Foreign Language Film

References[edit]

^ Vancheri, Barabara (March 26, 1990). "Foreign-movie nominees discuss money, muses". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. p. 10. Retrieved July 7, 2012.  ^ " Cinema Paradiso (1990) - Box Office Mojo".  ^ "The 62nd Academy Awards
62nd Academy Awards
(1990) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved 6 September 2015.  ^ Porter, Darwin; Danforth Prince (2009). Frommer's Sicily. Frommer's. p. 132. ISBN 0-470-39899-X.  ^ " Cinema Paradiso film locations (1988)". The Worldwide Guide to Movie Locations.  ^ Marcus, p. 99 ^ Bondanella, p. 454 ^ "Festival de Cannes: Cinema Paradiso". festival-cannes.com. Retrieved 2009-08-01.  ^ " Umbrella Entertainment - Special
Special
Edition DVD". Archived from the original on 28 August 2011. Retrieved 28 May 2013.  ^ " Umbrella Entertainment - Academy Award
Academy Award
DVD". Retrieved 28 May 2013.  ^ " Umbrella Entertainment - Blu-ray". Retrieved 28 May 2013.  ^ Roger Ebert
Roger Ebert
(March 16, 1990), " Cinema Paradiso Movie Review & Film Summary (1990)", rogerebert.com, retrieved August 8, 2015  ^ Roger Ebert
Roger Ebert
(June 28, 2002), "Cinema Paradiso: The New Version Movie Review (2002)", rogerebert.com, retrieved August 8, 2015  ^ " Cinema Paradiso (Nuovo Cinema Paradiso) (1988)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved February 22, 2018.  ^ " Cinema Paradiso Movie Reviews, Ratings, Credits, and More". Metacritic. Retrieved 2011-01-26.  ^ "The 100 Best Films Of World Cinema – 27. Cinema Paradiso". Empire.  ^ Awards IMDB

References[edit]

Bondanella, Peter E. (2001). Italian cinema: from neorealism to the present. Continuum International Publishing. ISBN 0-8264-1247-5.  Marcus, Millicent Joy (2002). After Fellini: national cinema in the postmodern age. JHU Press. ISBN 0-8018-6847-5. 

External links[edit]

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Cinema Paradiso

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Nuovo Cinema Paradiso.

Cinema Paradiso on IMDb Cinema Paradiso at Rotten Tomatoes Cinema Paradiso at AllMovie

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v t e

Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Foreign Language Film

1947–1955 (Honorary)

1947: Shoeshine – Vittorio De Sica 1948: Monsieur Vincent
Monsieur Vincent
– Maurice Cloche 1949: Bicycle Thieves
Bicycle Thieves
– Vittorio De Sica 1950: The Walls of Malapaga – René Clément 1951: Rashomon
Rashomon
– Akira Kurosawa 1952: Forbidden Games
Forbidden Games
– René Clément 1953: No Award 1954: Gate of Hell – Teinosuke Kinugasa 1955: Samurai, The Legend of Musashi – Hiroshi Inagaki

1956–1975

1956: La Strada
La Strada
– Federico Fellini 1957: Nights of Cabiria
Nights of Cabiria
– Federico Fellini 1958: My Uncle – Jacques Tati 1959: Black Orpheus
Black Orpheus
– Marcel Camus 1960: The Virgin Spring
The Virgin Spring
– Ingmar Bergman 1961: Through a Glass Darkly – Ingmar Bergman 1962: Sundays and Cybele
Sundays and Cybele
– Serge Bourguignon 1963:
– Federico Fellini 1964: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
– Vittorio De Sica 1965: The Shop on Main Street
The Shop on Main Street
Ján Kadár & Elmar Klos 1966: A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
– Claude Lelouch 1967: Closely Watched Trains
Closely Watched Trains
– Jiří Menzel 1968: War and Peace – Sergei Bondarchuk 1969: Z – Costa-Gavras 1970: Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
– Elio Petri 1971: The Garden of the Finzi Continis – Vittorio De Sica 1972: The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
– Luis Buñuel 1973: Day for Night – François Truffaut 1974: Amarcord
Amarcord
– Federico Fellini 1975: Dersu Uzala – Akira Kurosawa

1976–2000

1976: Black and White in Color
Black and White in Color
– Jean-Jacques Annaud 1977: Madame Rosa
Madame Rosa
– Moshé Mizrahi 1978: Get Out Your Handkerchiefs
Get Out Your Handkerchiefs
– Bertrand Blier 1979: The Tin Drum – Volker Schlöndorff 1980: Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears
Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears
– Vladimir Menshov 1981: Mephisto – István Szabó 1982: Volver
Volver
a Empezar ('To Begin Again') – José Luis Garci 1983: Fanny and Alexander
Fanny and Alexander
– Ingmar Bergman 1984: Dangerous Moves
Dangerous Moves
– Richard Dembo 1985: The Official Story
The Official Story
– Luis Puenzo 1986: The Assault – Fons Rademakers 1987: Babette's Feast – Gabriel Axel 1988: Pelle the Conqueror
Pelle the Conqueror
– Bille August 1989: Cinema Paradiso – Giuseppe Tornatore 1990: Journey of Hope – Xavier Koller 1991: Mediterraneo – Gabriele Salvatores 1992: Indochine – Régis Wargnier 1993: Belle Époque – Fernando Trueba 1994: Burnt by the Sun
Burnt by the Sun
– Nikita Mikhalkov 1995: Antonia's Line
Antonia's Line
– Marleen Gorris 1996: Kolya
Kolya
– Jan Svěrák 1997: Character – Mike van Diem 1998: Life Is Beautiful
Life Is Beautiful
– Roberto Benigni 1999: All About My Mother
All About My Mother
– Pedro Almodóvar 2000: Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
– Ang Lee

2001–present

2001: No Man's Land – Danis Tanović 2002: Nowhere in Africa – Caroline Link 2003: The Barbarian Invasions
The Barbarian Invasions
– Denys Arcand 2004: The Sea Inside
The Sea Inside
– Alejandro Amenábar 2005: Tsotsi
Tsotsi
– Gavin Hood 2006: The Lives of Others
The Lives of Others
– Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck 2007: The Counterfeiters – Stefan Ruzowitzky 2008: Departures – Yōjirō Takita 2009: The Secret in Their Eyes
The Secret in Their Eyes
– Juan J. Campanella 2010: In a Better World
In a Better World
– Susanne Bier 2011: A Separation – Asghar Farhadi 2012: Amour – Michael Haneke 2013: The Great Beauty
The Great Beauty
– Paolo Sorrentino 2014: Ida – Paweł Pawlikowski 2015: Son of Saul
Son of Saul
– László Nemes 2016: The Salesman – Asghar Farhadi 2017: A Fantastic Woman
A Fantastic Woman
– Sebastián Lelio

v t e

BAFTA Award for Best Film Not in the English Language

Best Foreign Language Film 1982–1987

Christ Stopped at Eboli (1982) Danton (1983) Carmen (1984) Colonel Redl
Colonel Redl
(1985) Ran (1986) The Sacrifice (1987)

Best Film Not in the English Language 1988–present

Babette's Feast (1988) Life and Nothing But (1989) Cinema Paradiso (1990) The Nasty Girl
The Nasty Girl
(1991) Raise the Red Lantern
Raise the Red Lantern
(1992) Farewell My Concubine (1993) To Live (1994) Il Postino: The Postman (1995) Ridicule
Ridicule
(1996) The Apartment (1997) Central Station (1998) All About My Mother
All About My Mother
(1999) Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
(2000) Amores perros (2001) Talk to Her (2002) In This World
In This World
(2003) The Motorcycle Diaries (2004) The Beat That My Heart Skipped
The Beat That My Heart Skipped
(2005) Pan's Labyrinth
Pan's Labyrinth
(2006) The Lives of Others
The Lives of Others
(2007) I've Loved You So Long
I've Loved You So Long
(2008) A Prophet
A Prophet
(2009) The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2010) The Skin I Live In
The Skin I Live In
(2011) Amour (2012) The Great Beauty
The Great Beauty
(2013) Ida (2014) Wild Tales (2015) Son of Saul
Son of Saul
(2016) The Handmaiden
The Handmaiden
(2017)

v t e

Cannes Film Festival
Cannes Film Festival
Grand Prix

1967–1989

Accident (1967) I Even Met Happy Gypsies
I Even Met Happy Gypsies
(1967) Ådalen 31
Ådalen 31
(1969) Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
(1970) Johnny Got His Gun (1971) Taking Off (1971) Solaris (1972) The Mother and the Whore
The Mother and the Whore
(1973) Fantastic Planet
Fantastic Planet
(1973) Arabian Nights (1974) The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser
The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser
(1975) Cría Cuervos
Cría Cuervos
(1976) The Marquise of O (1976) Bye Bye Monkey
Bye Bye Monkey
(1978) The Shout
The Shout
(1978) Siberiade
Siberiade
(1979) My American Uncle
My American Uncle
(1980) Light Years Away (1981) The Night of the Shooting Stars
The Night of the Shooting Stars
(1982) Monty Python's The Meaning of Life
Monty Python's The Meaning of Life
(1983) Diary for My Children (1984) Birdy (1985) The Sacrifice (1986) Repentance (1987) A World Apart (1988) Cinema Paradiso (1989) Too Beautiful for You
Too Beautiful for You
(1989)

1990–2009

Tilaï (1990) The Sting of Death (1990) La Belle Noiseuse
La Belle Noiseuse
(1991) The Stolen Children (1992) Faraway, So Close!
Faraway, So Close!
(1993) To Live (1994) Burnt by the Sun
Burnt by the Sun
(1994) Ulysses' Gaze
Ulysses' Gaze
(1995) Breaking the Waves (1996) The Sweet Hereafter (1997) Life Is Beautiful
Life Is Beautiful
(1998) Humanité
Humanité
(1999) Devils on the Doorstep
Devils on the Doorstep
(2000) The Piano Teacher (2001) The Man Without a Past
The Man Without a Past
(2002) Uzak
Uzak
(2003) Oldboy (2004) Broken Flowers
Broken Flowers
(2005) Flanders (2006) The Mourning Forest
The Mourning Forest
(2007) Gomorrah (2008) A Prophet
A Prophet
(2009)

2010–present

Of Gods and Men (2010) Once Upon a Time in Anatolia
Once Upon a Time in Anatolia
(2011) The Kid with a Bike
The Kid with a Bike
(2011) Reality (2012) Inside Llewyn Davis (2013) The Wonders (2014) Son of Saul
Son of Saul
(2015) It's Only the End of the World
It's Only the End of the World
(2016) BPM (Beats per Minute)
BPM (Beats per Minute)
(2017)

v t e

Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film

Foreign Film – Foreign Language 1965–1972

Juliet of the Spirits (1965) A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
(1966) Live for Life (1967) War and Peace (1968) Z (1969) Rider on the Rain
Rider on the Rain
(1970) The Policeman
The Policeman
(1971) The Emigrants (1972) The New Land
The New Land
(1972)

Foreign Film 1973–1985

The Pedestrian (1973) Scenes from a Marriage
Scenes from a Marriage
(1974) Lies My Father Told Me
Lies My Father Told Me
(1975) Face to Face (1976) A Special
Special
Day (1977) Autumn Sonata
Autumn Sonata
(1978) La Cage aux Folles (1979) Tess (1980) Chariots of Fire
Chariots of Fire
(1981) Gandhi (1982) Fanny and Alexander
Fanny and Alexander
(1983) A Passage to India (1984) The Official Story
The Official Story
(1985)

Foreign Language Film 1986–present

The Assault (1986) My Life as a Dog
My Life as a Dog
(1987) Pelle the Conqueror
Pelle the Conqueror
(1988) Cinema Paradiso (1989) Cyrano de Bergerac (1990) Europa Europa
Europa Europa
(1991) Indochine (1992) Farewell My Concubine (1993) Farinelli (1994) Les Misérables (1995) Kolya
Kolya
(1996) Ma vie en rose (1997) Central Station (1998) All About My Mother
All About My Mother
(1999) Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
(2000) No Man's Land (2001) Talk to Her (2002) Osama (2003) The Sea Inside
The Sea Inside
(2004) Paradise Now
Paradise Now
(2005) Letters from Iwo Jima
Letters from Iwo Jima
(2006) The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007) Waltz with Bashir
Waltz with Bashir
(2008) The White Ribbon
The White Ribbon
(2009) In a Better World
In a Better World
(2010) A Separation (2011) Amour (2012) The Great Beauty
The Great Beauty
(2013) Leviathan (2014) Son of Saul
Son of Saul
(2015) Elle (2016) In the Fade (2017)

v t e

London Film Critics' Circle Foreign Language Film of the Year

The Marriage of Maria Braun
The Marriage of Maria Braun
and Angi Vera
Angi Vera
(1980) Man of Iron (1981) Mephisto (1982) Yol
Yol
(1983) A Sunday in the Country
A Sunday in the Country
(1984) Heimat: A Chronicle of Germany (1985) Ran (1986) Jean de Florette
Jean de Florette
(1987) Babette's Feast (1988) Au revoir les enfants
Au revoir les enfants
(1989) Cinema Paradiso (1990) Cyrano de Bergerac (1991) Raise the Red Lantern
Raise the Red Lantern
(1992) A Heart in Winter
A Heart in Winter
(1993) Farewell My Concubine (1994) Il Postino: The Postman (1995) Les Misérables (1996) Ridicule
Ridicule
(1997) Shall We Dance? (1998) All About My Mother
All About My Mother
(1999) Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
(2000) Amélie
Amélie
(2001) Y Tu Mamá También (2002) Good Bye, Lenin!
Good Bye, Lenin!
(2003) The Motorcycle Diaries (2004) Downfall (2005) Volver
Volver
(2006) The Lives of Others
The Lives of Others
(2007) N/A (2008) Let the Right One In (2009) Of Gods and Men (2010) A Separation (2011) Rust and Bone
Rust and Bone
(2012) Blue Is the Warmest Colour
Blue Is the Warmest Colour
(2013) Leviathan (2014) The Look of Silence
The Look of Silence
(2015) Toni Erdmann (2016) Elle (2017)

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Films directed by Giuseppe Tornatore

The Professor (1986) Cinema Paradiso (1988) Everybody's Fine (1990) Especially on Sunday
Especially on Sunday
(1991) A Pure Formality
A Pure Formality
(1994) The Star Maker (1995) The Legend of 1900
The Legend of 1900
(1998) Malèna
Malèna
(2000) The Unknown Woman
The Unknown Woman
(2006) Baarìa (2009) L'ultimo gattopardo: Ritratto di Goffredo Lombardo (2010) The Best Offer
The Best Offer
(2013) The Correspon

.