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The Info List - Bullet Joe Bush





Leslie Ambrose "Bullet Joe" Bush (November 27, 1892 – November 1, 1974) was an American Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
pitcher with the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators, Pittsburgh Pirates
Pittsburgh Pirates
and the New York Giants between 1912 and 1928. Bush batted and threw right-handed. He is credited with having developed the forkball pitch.[1]

Contents

1 Career 2 See also 3 Notes 4 External links

Career[edit] Bush helped the Athletics win the 1913 World Series
World Series
and the 1914 American League
American League
pennant, the Red Sox win the 1918 World Series, the Yankees win the 1922 AL pennant and 1923 World Series
World Series
and the Pirates win the 1927 National League
National League
pennant. Bush led the American League
American League
in losses (24) in 1916, walks allowed (109) in 1924, and wild pitches in 1916 (15), 1923 (12) and 1924 (7). While with the Athletics in 1916, when he led the league in losses, he won 15 games; the entire team won only 36 during what was then a Major League-worst 36-117 (.235 won-loss percentage) season. This was 41.7% of the team's total wins. On August 26 of that season, Bush no-hit the Cleveland Indians
Cleveland Indians
5-0 at Shibe Park; a first inning, leadoff walk to Jack Graney
Jack Graney
was the only play that kept him from a perfect game. Bush finished fourth in voting for the 1922 American League
American League
MVP, as he led the league in winning percentage (.788). He also had a 26–7 win-loss record, 255 ⅓ innings pitched, 85 walks allowed, 92 strikeouts, and a 3.31 earned run average. Over a seventeen-year career, Bush had a 195–183 win-loss record, 489 games, 366 games started, 225 complete games, 35 shutouts, 93 games finished, 20 saves, 3,087 ⅓ innings pitched, 2,992 hits allowed, 1,443 runs allowed, 1,205 earned runs allowed, 96 home runs allowed, 1,263 walks allowed, 1,319 strikeouts, 62 hit batsmen, 90 wild pitches, 13,185 batters faced, 1 balk and a 3.51 ERA. Bush died in Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
at the age of 81. See also[edit]

Biography portal Baseball portal

List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
no-hitters

Notes[edit]

^ Wood, Allan (2000). Babe Ruth
Babe Ruth
and the 1918 Red Sox. San Jose: Writers Club Press. p. 372. ISBN 0-595-14826-3. 

External links[edit]

Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference (Minors) Retrosheet The Deadball Era Bullet Joe Bush
Bullet Joe Bush
at Find a Grave

Preceded by Rube Foster No-hitter
No-hitter
pitcher August 26, 1916 Succeeded by Dutch Leonard

v t e

Philadelphia Athletics
Philadelphia Athletics
1913 World Series
World Series
champions

Frank Baker Jack Barry Chief Bender Boardwalk Brown Joe Bush Eddie Collins Jack Coombs Harry Davis Byron Houck Jack Lapp Doc Lavan Stuffy McInnis Danny Murphy Eddie Murphy Rube Oldring Billy Orr Herb Pennock Eddie Plank Wally Schang Bob Shawkey Amos Strunk Ira Thomas Jimmy Walsh Weldon Wyckoff

Manager Connie Mack

Regular season Rivalry

v t e

Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
1918 World Series
World Series
champions

Sam Agnew Joe Bush Jean Dubuc Harry Hooper Sam Jones Carl Mays Stuffy McInnis Hack Miller Babe Ruth Wally Schang Everett Scott Dave Shean Amos Strunk Fred Thomas George Whiteman

Manager Ed Barrow

Regular season

v t e

New York Yankees
New York Yankees
1923 World Series
World Series
champions

Benny Bengough Joe Bush Joe Dugan Mike Gazella Hinkey Haines Harvey Hendrick Fred Hofmann Waite Hoyt Ernie Johnson Sam Jones Carl Mays Mike McNally Bob Meusel Herb Pennock George Pipgras Wally Pipp Babe Ruth Wally Schang Everett Scott Bob Shawkey Elmer Smith Aaron Ward Whitey Witt

Manager Miller Huggins

Regular season Giants–Yankees rivalry S

.