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The Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Zoo
Zoo
was an 45-acre (18 ha) zoo in the Palermo district of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The zoo contained 89 species of mammals, 49 species of reptiles and 175 species of birds, with a total of over 2,500 animals.[1] The institution's goals are to conserve species, produce research and to educate the public. In June 2016 the city formed a bias about the zoo's cruelty. They had to close the 140-year-old zoo and relocate most of the animals to nature reserves, including Temaikèn. The zoo property will be converted into an ecopark.[6]

Contents

1 History 2 Animals and exhibits 3 Gallery 4 References 5 External links

History[edit]

The entrance of the zoo in the corner of Avenida Sarmiento
Avenida Sarmiento
and Avenida del Libertador, circa 1890s.

President Domingo Sarmiento
Domingo Sarmiento
was responsible for the laying out of the Parque Tres de Febrero
Parque Tres de Febrero
in land previously owned by Juan Manuel de Rosas. The project was begun in 1874; the park was opened on November 11, 1875, and included a small section dedicated for animals. This area was owned by the Federal Government until 1888 when it was transferred to the City of Buenos Aires. In that year, Mayor Antonio Crespo created the Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Zoo, and separated it from the rest of the park.[7] Its first director Eduardo Ladislao Holmberg was appointed in 1888 and stayed in that position for 15 years. He was the major designer of the zoo. Holmberg completed the assignment of the different parks, lakes and avenues, and began the exhibition of the 650 animals that the zoo had at that time. In that period zoos around the world did not have the same function as they do today; their main goal was recreational, and they had less space for animals and a large recreational area for visitors.[7] Clemente Onelli was the director from 1904 to 1924 and promoted the Zoo
Zoo
Gardens. Onelli added pony, elephant and camel rides to the zoo and increased the number of visitors (from 1,500 to 15,000) during his first year of office. He is also responsible for most of the Romanesque buildings at the zoo.[7] Don Adolfo Holmberg, nephew of the first director, took over as directory in 1924 and headed the zoo until 1944, after which a succession of political appointees let the zoo deteriorate. In 1991 the zoo was privatized, and the program to get the animals out from behind bars and into more naturalistic habitats began.[7] The zoo's last polar bear, Winner, died of fever in 2012. In December 2014, a Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
court ruled that a 29-year-old female Sumatran orangutan
Sumatran orangutan
named Sandra living at the zoo was a "non-human person" who was entitled to some basic rights and could be liberated from her enclosure.[8] Animals and exhibits[edit]

The "Palace of the Elephants", inspired by a Hindu temple architecture, as seen in 1904.

The grassy areas of the park are full of native birds and rodents, which came to the zoo for the food thrown to the animals by visitor. Nutria, rabbits, and peacock roam the park's grounds freely. A variety of monkeys and small mammals inhabited the zoo. Although some were in cages, others are located on the islands in the zoo's many ponds, or roam free.[2] At the Farm of the Zoo
Zoo
(La Granja Del Zoo), visitors used to pet and feed ponies, donkeys, sheep, and goats. This part of the zoo was also home to turkeys, chickens, roosters, pigs, rabbits, cows, and horses.[2] At the Aquarium, visitors could see many penguins, as well as fresh water fish including piranha and sea dwellers such as striped bream, grouper, black sea bass, sea catfish, and many tropical fish.[9] The aquarium also had a seal and sea lion show.[10] The Reptile house was home to most of the zoo's reptiles. The Tropical Rainforest did not house many animals. It was a two story building displaying tropical plant life and contained an indoor waterfall. A large iguana was kept on the grounds outside the exit from this exhibit.[2] Big cats at the zoo included white tigers, pumas, cheetahs, jaguars, and lions.[11] The lions were housed in a castle complex with its own moat.[12] Four white tiger cubs, two males and two females, recently born (January 14, 2013) from Cleo a Bengal white tiger, were on display at the zoo for the public to visit until the zoo's closure. Other animals at the zoo included red panda, camels, llamas, giraffes, bison, hippos, and elephants.[2][10] Camels were exhibited amidst Moroccan-style architecture. The flamingoes were in a lake near the entrance near Byzantine
Byzantine
"ruins" and kangaroos were surrounded by aboriginal paintings. The elephant house was built to look like the ruins of an Indian temple.[12] Gallery[edit]

Arc in the entrance on Las Heras Avenue

Hindu temple for the llamas and vicuñas (1903)

The Swan Lake

Entrance on the corner of Sarmiento and Del Libertador Avenues

Byzantine
Byzantine
ruins brought from Trieste
Trieste
by Eduardo Schiaffino

Palace of the Elephants

A couple at the zoo in 1911

References[edit]

Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
portal Zoos and aquariums portal

^ a b c " Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Zoo". buenosairestravelplanet.com. Buenos Aires Travel Planet. Archived from the original on 2 June 2010. Retrieved 15 May 2010.  ^ a b c d e " Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Zoo, Zoological Gardens". buenosairescityguide.com. Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
City Guide. Retrieved 15 May 2010.  ^ " Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Zoo". wordtravels.com. World Travels. Retrieved 15 May 2010.  ^ "List of members". alpza.com. ALPZA. Retrieved 31 August 2011.  ^ "Zoos and Aquariums of the World". waza.org. WAZA. Retrieved 31 August 2011.  ^ " Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
zoo to close after 140 years: 'Captivity is degrading'". The Guardian. June 23, 2016. Retrieved 3 September 2016.  ^ a b c d "Historia del Zoológico de Buenos Aires". argentinaxplora.com. argentinaXplora. Retrieved 15 May 2010.  (click "Informacion General") ^ "Captive orangutan has human right to freedom, Argentine court rules Reuters". reuters.com. Reuters. Retrieved 27 April 2015.  ^ "Attracciones del Zoo". zoobuenosaires.com.ar. Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Zoo. Archived from the original on 7 February 2010. Retrieved 15 May 2010.  (click "Informacion General") ^ a b "A Trip to the Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Zoo". argentinastravel.co. Argentina's Travel Guide. Retrieved 15 May 2010.  ^ " Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Zoo". buenostours.com. Buenos Tours. Retrieved 15 May 2010.  ^ a b "Zoological Gardens". frommers.com. Frommers. Retrieved 15 May 2010. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Zoológico de Buenos Aires.

Official website (in Spanish) History of the Zoo
Zoo
(in Spanish)

v t e

Landmarks of Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
City

Public and historic buildings and structures

Argentine National Congress Palace Torre Monumental Cabildo Café Tortoni Casa Rosada Centro Cultural Néstor Kirchner Chacarita Cemetery City Hall City Legislature Customs House Duhau Palace Estrugamou Building Floralis Genérica Galerías Pacífico Hotel de Inmigrantes Kavanagh Building Libertador Building May Pyramid Metropolitan Cathedral Monument to Giuseppe Garibaldi Obelisco Palacio Barolo Palacio Haedo Pizzurno Palace Plaza Hotel Recoleta Cemetery San Martín Palace Santo Domingo convent Sarmiento Frigate Uruguay Corvette The Water Company Palace Women's Bridge

Precincts and neighbourhoods

Almagro Belgrano Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
CBD Caballito City Centre Colegiales Montserrat Núñez Palermo Puerto Madero Recoleta Retiro San Telmo

Nature and parks

Avellaneda Park Botanical gardens Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Ecological Reserve Chacabuco Park Congressional Plaza Japanese Gardens Lezama Park Palermo gardens Plaza de la República Plaza de Mayo Plaza San Martín Parque Centenario Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Zoo Plaza Alvear

Cultural Institutions

El Ateneo Grand Splendid Argentine Automobile Club Bernardino Rivadavia Natural Sciences Museum Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Museum of Modern Art Café Tortoni Fortabat Art Collection House of Culture Illuminated Block Isaac Fernández Blanco Museum King Fahd Cultural Center Latin American Art Museum Museum of Foreign Debt National Library National Museum of Decorative Arts National Museum of Fine Arts National Museum of History Opera House Paz Palace Planetarium Recoleta Cultural Center San Martín Cultural Center San Martín National Institute Sarmiento Museum Eduardo Sívori Museum Fundacion Proa

Sport

Boca Juniors Stadium River Plate Stadium Huracan Stadium Argentinos Juniors Stadium Vélez Sársfield Stadium San Lorenzo Stadium Argentine Hippodrome of Palermo Lawn Tennis Club Polo Stadium Juan y Oscar Gálvez Race Circuit Obras Sanitarias Arena CeNARD Estadio Ricardo Etcheverry G.E.B.A. Stadium Luna Park Arena Malvinas Argentinas Arena Mary Terán de Weiss Tennis Stadium

Transport

Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Belgrano Sur Subte Premetro Constitución station Federico Lacroze station Jorge Newbery Airport Once station Retiro station MetroBus

Shopping and entertainment

Abasto Mall Avenida Theatre Cervantes Theatre Fishermen's Pier Galerías Pacífico Gran Rex Theatre Paseo La Plaza Patio Bullrich Opera Theatre San Martin Theatre Parque de la Ciudad La Trastienda Club Galería Güemes

Streets and avenues

9 de Julio Avenue Avenida Alvear Avenida de Mayo Avenida del Libertador Callao Avenue Caminito Córdoba Avenue Coronel Díaz Street Corrientes Avenue Figueroa Alcorta Avenue Florida Street General Paz Avenue President Julio Argentino Roca Avenue Leandro Alem Avenue Pueyrredón Avenue President Roque Sáenz Peña Avenue Rivadavia Avenue Santa Fe Avenue Sarmiento Avenue Scalabrini Ortiz Avenue

v t e

Zoos of Argentina

Zoos

Bubalcó Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Zoo Estación de Cría de Animales Salvajes Mendoza Zoological Park Mundo Marino Bahía Blanca Zoo Rawson Zoo Temaikèn Zoo
Zoo
Batán Zoo
Zoo
Córdoba Zoo
Zoo
Corrientes Zoo
Zoo
de América Zoo
Zoo
de Varela Zoo
Zoo
La Plata Zoo
Zoo
Luján Zoo
Zoo
Paraiso Zoo
Zoo
Yku Huasi

Aquariums

Mar

.