HOME
The Info List - Blood Of Christ





Blood
Blood
of Christ
Christ
in Christian theology
Christian theology
refers to (a) the physical blood actually shed by Jesus
Jesus
Christ
Christ
primarily on the Cross, and the salvation which Christianity
Christianity
teaches was accomplished thereby; and (b) the sacramental blood present in the Eucharist
Eucharist
or Lord's Supper, which is considered by Catholic, Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran
Lutheran
Christians to be the same blood of Christ
Christ
shed on the Cross. The Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox churches, the Oriental Orthodox churches, the Assyrian Church of the East, and Lutherans, together with some Anglicans, believe in the Real Presence
Real Presence
of Christ in the Eucharist. The Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
uses the term "Transubstantiation" to describe the change of the bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ. Eastern Orthodox to have authoritatively used the same term to describe the change, as in The Longer Catechism of The Orthodox, Catholic, Eastern Church[1] and in the decrees of the 1672 Synod of Jerusalem.[2] The Lutheran
Lutheran
churches follow the teaching of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
in defining the presence of Christ
Christ
in the eucharistic elements as sacramental union (often misconstrued as consubstantiation), meaning that the fundamental "substance" of the body and blood of Christ
Christ
are literally present alongside the substance of the bread and wine, which remain present. Lutherans too believe in and teach the Real Presence. Most Protestant churches reject the idea of the Real Presence; they observe eucharistic rites as simply memorials.

Contents

1 History 2 Theology

2.1 Roman Catholic

2.1.1 Prayers

2.1.1.1 Precious Blood
Blood
Prayer 2.1.1.2 Litany of the Most Precious Blood

2.2 Eastern Orthodox

2.2.1 Devotion

3 Artistic depictions 4 Relics of the Blood
Blood
around the world 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External links

History[edit] In the early Church, the faithful received the Eucharist
Eucharist
in the form of consecrated bread and wine. Saint Maximus explains that in the Old Law the flesh of the sacrificial victim was shared with the people, but the blood of the sacrifice was merely poured out on the altar. Under the New Law, however, Jesus' blood was the drink shared by all of Christ's faithful. St. Justin Martyr, an early Church father of the 2nd century, speaks of the Eucharist
Eucharist
as the same body and blood of Christ
Christ
that was present in His Incarnation. The tradition continued in the Church in the East to commingle the species of bread and wine, whereas in the West, the Church had the practice of communion under the species of bread and wine separately as the custom, with only a small fraction of bread placed in the chalice. In the West, the communion at the chalice was made less and less efficient, as the dangers of the spread of disease and danger of spillage (which would potentially be sacrilegious) were considered enough of a reason to remove the chalice from common communion altogether, or giving it on only special occasions. However, it was always consecrated and drunk by the priest, regardless of whether or not the laity partook. This was one of the main issues in the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
.[citation needed] As a consequence, the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
first wanted to eliminate ambiguity, reaffirming that Christ
Christ
was present both as body and as blood equally under both species of bread and wine. As time went on, the chalice was made more available to the laity. After the Second Vatican Council, the Catholic Church gave a full permission for all to receive communion from the chalice at every Mass involving a congregation, at the discretion of the priest. See also Shroud of Turin# Blood
Blood
stains for laboratory researches. Theology[edit] Main article: Eucharistic theology Roman Catholic[edit] Main article: Procession of the Holy Blood

Holy Blood
Blood
relic in Santa Maria della Scala, Siena.

The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
teaches that the bread and wine, through transubstantiation, become the body, blood, soul and divinity of Christ—in other words, the whole Christ—when consecrated. Until its removal from the General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
in 1969, the Feast of the Most Precious Blood
Blood
was assigned to July 1. Devotion to the Precious Blood
Blood
was an especial phenomenon of Flemish piety in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, that gave rise to the iconic image of Grace as the "Fountain of Life," filled with blood, pouring from the wounded "Lamb of God" or the "Holy Wounds" of Christ. The image, which was the subject of numerous Flemish paintings was in part spurred by the renowned relic of the Precious Blood, which had been noted in Bruges
Bruges
at least since the twelfth century[3] and which gave rise, from the late thirteenth century, to the observances, particular to Bruges, of the procession of the "Saint Sang" from its chapel.[4] Prayers[edit] Various prayers are part of the Roman Catholic devotion to the Precious Blood. Those that mention the Blood
Blood
include the Anima Christi, the Chaplet of Mercy of the Holy Wounds
Holy Wounds
of Jesus, and the Chaplet of Divine Mercy. Precious Blood
Blood
Prayer[edit] May the most Precious Blood which flowed from the Most Holy Wounds of our loving Lord Jesus
Jesus
pour over us, to wash, cleanse, purify, heal, guide, and protect us from all evil, harm, sickness, and bless and make us as holy as we can be. We ask this in the Holy Name of Jesus and through His Most Precious Blood
Blood
and His Most Holy Wounds. Amen. Litany of the Most Precious Blood[edit] LORD, have mercy on us. Christ, have mercy on us. LORD, have mercy on us. Christ, hear us. Christ, graciously hear us.

God, the Father of Heaven, have mercy on us. God the Son, Redeemer of the world, have mercy on us. God, the Holy Ghost, have mercy on us. Holy Trinity, One God, have mercy on us.

Blood
Blood
of Christ, only-begotten Son of the Eternal Father, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, Incarnate Word of God, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, of the New and Eternal Testament, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, falling upon the earth in the Agony, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, shed profusely in the Scourging, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, flowing forth in the Crowning with Thorns, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, poured out on the Cross, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, price of our salvation, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, without which there is no forgiveness, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, Eucharistic drink and refreshment of souls, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, stream of mercy, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, victor over demons, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, courage of Martyrs, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, strength of Confessors, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, bringing forth Virgins, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, help of those in peril, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, relief of the burdened, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, solace in sorrow, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, hope of the penitent, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, consolation of the dying, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, peace and tenderness of hearts, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, pledge of eternal life, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, freeing souls from Purgatory, save us. Blood
Blood
of Christ, most worthy of all glory and honor, save us.

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world, spare us, O LORD!. Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world, graciously hear us, O LORD!. Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.

℣ Thou hast redeemed us, O LORD, in Thy Blood. ℟ And made us, for our God, a kingdom. Let us pray. Almighty and everlasting God, Who didst appoint Thine only-begotten Son the Redeemer of the world, and hast willed to be appeased by His Blood; grant unto us, we beseech Thee, so to venerate (with solemn worship) the price of our redemption, and by its power be so defended against the evils of this life, that we may enjoy the fruit thereof forevermore in Heaven. Through the same LORD Jesus
Jesus
Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, world without end. ℟ Amen. Eastern Orthodox[edit] The Orthodox teach that what is received in Holy Communion
Holy Communion
is the actual Resurrected Body and Blood
Blood
of Jesus
Jesus
Christ. In the West, the Words of Institution
Words of Institution
are considered to be the moment at which the bread and wine become the Body and Blood
Blood
of Christ. But for the Orthodox there is no one defined moment; rather, all that Orthodox theology states is that by the end of the Epiklesis, the change has been completed. The Orthodox also do not use the Latin theological term Transubstantiation
Transubstantiation
to define the conversion from bread and wine into the Body and Blood
Blood
of Christ, they use the word metaousia without the precise theological elaboration that accompanies the term transubstantiation.. According to Saint John Damascene, the Sacred Mysteries
Sacred Mysteries
(under the form of bread and wine) do not become incorruptible until they are actually received in faith by a believing Christian in a state of grace. Devotion[edit] In the Eastern Orthodox churches, and those Eastern Catholic Churches which follow the Byzantine Rite, there is no individual devotion to the Blood
Blood
of Christ
Christ
separate from the Body of Christ, or separated from the reception of Holy Communion. When receiving Holy Communion, the clergy (deacons, priests and bishops) will receive the Body of Christ
Christ
separately from the Blood
Blood
of Christ. Then, the remaining portions of the consecrated Lamb (Host) is divided up and placed in the chalice and both the Body and Blood
Blood
of Christ
Christ
are communicated to the faithful using a liturgical spoon (see also Intinction). Artistic depictions[edit] The blood shed by Christ
Christ
was a common theme in early modern Italian art. Paintings of Christ
Christ
depicted on the cross and as the Man of Sorrows have consistently been some of the bloodiest images in Christian art. The blood of Christ
Christ
was a compelling artistic symbol of his incarnation and sacrifice. As a theme for contemplation, it provided worshippers with a means articulate their devotion.[5] Relics of the Blood
Blood
around the world[edit] See also: Relics associated with Jesus

Basilica of the Holy Blood, Bruges, Belgium Weingarten Abbey, Germany Abbey of the Holy Trinity, Fécamp, France St. James's Church, Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Germany Basilica di Sant'Andrea di Mantova, Mantua, Italy The Sudarium of Oviedo The Shroud of Turin The Relic of the Holy Blood, Westminster, England

See also[edit]

Anglican
Anglican
eucharistic theology Blood
Blood
of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
Christ
(military order) Body of Christ Eucharist Missionaries of the Precious Blood Precious Blood
Blood
Catholic Church Feast of the Most Precious Blood New Covenant Ichor[6]

Religion portal Christianity
Christianity
portal Catholicism portal

References[edit]

^ "The bread and wine are changed, or transubstantiated, into the very Body of Christ, and into the very Blood
Blood
of Christ" (question 339). ^ "In the celebration (of the Eucharist) we believe the Lord Jesus Christ
Christ
to be present, not typically, nor figuratively, nor by superabundant grace, as in the other Mysteries, nor by a bare presence, as some of the Fathers have said concerning Baptism, or by impanation, so that the Divinity of the Word is united to the set forth bread of the Eucharist
Eucharist
hypostatically, as the followers of Luther most ignorantly and wretchedly suppose, but truly and really, so that after the consecration of the bread and of the wine, the bread is transmuted, transubstantiated, converted and transformed into the true Body Itself of the Lord, Which was born in Bethlehem of the ever-Virgin, was baptized in the Jordan, suffered, was buried, rose again, was received up, sitteth at the right hand of the God and Father, and is to come again in the clouds of Heaven; and the wine is converted and transubstantiated into the true Blood
Blood
Itself of the Lord, Which as He hung upon the Cross, was poured out for the life of the world" (Decree XVII). ^ Evelyn Underhill, "The Fountain of Life: An Iconographical Study," The Burlington Magazine 17.86 (May 1910, pp. 99-101) p.100. ^ The first historian of the "Saint Sang" was the Abbé Carton, "Essai sur l'histoire du Saint Sang," Bruges, 1857. (noted Underhill 1910:100 note). ^ Hiller, Diana (2015). "Saintly blood: absence, presence, and the alter Christus". Parergon. 32 (Journal Article): 183–. ISSN 0313-6221.  – via Academic OneFile (subscription required) ^ Origenes Theol., Contra Celsum Book 1, section 66, line 13 Παίζων γοῦν τὸ ἐπὶ τῷ σταυρῷ προχυθὲν αἷμα τοῦ Ἰησοῦ φησιν ὅτι οὐκ ἦν ἰχώρ, οἷός περ τε ῥέει μακάρεσσι θεοῖσιν.

Further reading[edit]

Faber, Frederick William. The Precious Blood: or, The Price of Our Salvation. 5th ed. 1860. London: Burns & Oates; Baltimore: John Murphy. Reprint: Rockford, Ill.: TAN Books, 1979. ISBN 0-895-55075-X  Sollier, J.F. (1913). "Precious Blood". In Herbermann, Charles. Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.  access-date= requires url= (help) Vincent, Nicholas (2001). The Holy Blood: King Henry III and the Westminster Blood
Blood
relic. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-57128-6.  Heinlen, Michael (1998). "An Early Image of a Mass of St. Gregory and Devotion to the Holy Blood
Blood
at Weingarten Abbey". Gesta. 37 (1): 55–62. JSTOR 767212.  Bynum, Caroline Walker (2002). "The Blood
Blood
of Christ
Christ
in the Later Middle Ages". Church History. 71 (4): 685–71. doi:10.1017/S0009640700096268. 

External links[edit]

Precious Blood
Blood
devotions Missionaries of the Precious Blood

v t e

Structure of the Mass of the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
of the Catholic Church

Forms

Pre-Tridentine Mass Tridentine Mass

Extraordinary form

Mass of Paul VI

Types

Low Mass Missa Cantata Solemn Mass Pontifical High Mass Papal Mass Ritual Masses

Blue Mass Chapter and Conventual Mass Coronation Mass Nuptial Mass Red Mass Requiem
Requiem
Mass

sine populo Votive Mass

Order of Mass

Pre-Mass

Vesting prayers in the sacristy Asperges
Asperges
me

Vidi aquam in Eastertide

Liturgy of the Word

Sign of the Cross Psalm 43 Entrance Antiphon Penitential Rite

Confiteor
Confiteor
/ Kyrie

Gloria Dominus vobiscum Collect

Oremus

First Reading Responsorial Psalm or Gradual Epistle Alleluia

Gospel verse / sequence

Gospel Homily Credo

Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed
Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed
or Apostles' Creed

General Intercessions

Liturgy of the Eucharist

Offertory

Orate fratres / prayer over the gifts

Preface

Sursum corda / Sanctus
Sanctus
/ Hosanna

Eucharistic Prayer/Canon of the Mass

oblation / epiclesis / Words of Institution
Words of Institution
/ elevation / anamnesis texts and rubrics Roman Canon

history

Eucharistic Prayer II

Memorial Acclamation Lord's Prayer

embolism / doxology

Pax Sign of peace Agnus Dei Fraction Holy Communion

Communion antiphon

Ablutions Postcommunion Dismissal

Ite, missa est
Ite, missa est
/ Benedicamus Domino

Last Gospel

Post-Mass

Leonine Prayers Recessional hymn

Participants

Acolyte Altar server

female

Bishop Boat boy Cantor Choir Crucifer Deacon Extraordinary minister of Holy Communion Laity

Eucharistic Congress

Lector Priest Subdeacon Usher

Parts of the Sanctuary / Altar

Altar crucifix Altar rails Ambo Communion bench Credence table Kneeler Lavabo Misericord Piscina Tabernacle

Altar cloths

Altar linens Antependium Burse Chalice veil Corporal Lavabo
Lavabo
towel Pall Purificator

Candles and lamps

Altar candle Altar candlestick Paschal candle Sanctuary lamp Triple candlestick Votive candle

Liturgical objects

Altar bell Aspergillum Censer Chalice Ciborium Collection basket Cruet Flabellum Funghellino Holy water Incense

use

Manuterge Paten Processional cross Pyx Sacramental bread

wafer

Sacramental wine
Sacramental wine
(or must) Thurible Water

Liturgical books of the Roman Rite

Ceremonial of Bishops Evangeliary

Gospel Book

Graduale Lectionary Roman Missal

Vestments

Alb Amice Chasuble Dalmatic Episcopal sandals Liturgical colours Headcover Humeral veil Pallium Pontifical Stole Surplice Tunicle Vimpa

Liturgical year (Roman Calendar)

Advent Christmastide Ordinary Time Septuagesima Lent Passiontide Holy Week

Paschal Triduum

Eastertide Ascensiontide

Eucharistic discipline

Abstemius Anima Christi Concelebration Church etiquette Closed communion Communion and the developmentally disabled Communion under both kinds Denial of Communion

Canon 915

Eucharistic fast First Communion Frequent Communion Genuflection Host desecration Infant communion Intinction Reserved sacrament Thanksgiving after Communion Viaticum

Eucharistic theology

Body and Blood
Blood
of Christ Corpus Christi (feast) Crucifixion of Jesus
Jesus
and substitutionary atonement Epiousios Grace ex opere operato In persona Christi Historical roots of Catholic Eucharistic theology Koinonia Last Supper Mirae caritatis Mysterium fidei (encyclical) Origin of the Eucharist Real presence Transubstantiation Year of the Eucharist Stercoranism

Regulations and concepts

Ad orientem
Ad orientem
and versus populum Calendar of saints Canon law Code of Rubrics Commemoration Ecclesiastical Latin General Instruction of the Roman Missal Holy day of obligation Intercession of saints Ordinary and propers Pro multis Sunday

Lord's Day

Vernacular

Related

Agape feast Catholic liturgy Christian prayer

effects of prayer

Congregation for Divine Worship Council of Trent Ecclesia de Eucharistia Eucharistic adoration
Eucharistic adoration
and benediction

Dominicae Cenae
Dominicae Cenae
/ Holy Hour

Eucharistic miracle Fermentum Fourth Council of the Lateran Gelineau psalmody Gregorian chant History of the Roman Canon Lex orandi, lex credendi Liturgical Movement Liturgical reforms of Pope Pius XII Mediator Dei Missale Romanum (apostolic constitution) Pope Paul VI Catholic theology Sacraments of the Catholic Church Second Vatican Council

Sacrosanctum Concilium

Summorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudini

Cathol

.