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Biryani
Biryani
(pronounced [bɪr.jaːniː]), also known as biriyani, biriani, birani or briyani, ¨spicy rice¨ is a South Asian mixed rice dish with its origins among the Muslims
Muslims
of the Indian subcontinent.[1][2][3] It is popular throughout the Indian subcontinent and among the diaspora from the region. It is made with spices, rice and meat (chicken, mutton, beef, prawn, or fish) or egg is also added.

Contents

1 Etymology 2 Origin

2.1 Difference between biryani and pulao

3 Ingredients 4 Varieties

4.1 List of varieties by region or culture in the Indian subcontinent 4.2 Varieties outside the Indian subcontinent

4.2.1 Burma 4.2.2 Iraq
Iraq
and Middle East (Arab nations) 4.2.3 Iran 4.2.4 Indonesia 4.2.5 Singapore and Malaysia 4.2.6 Philippines

5 See also 6 References 7 External links

Etymology[edit] Biryani
Biryani
is an Urdu word derived from the Persian language, which was used as an official language in different parts of medieval India, by various Islamic dynasties.[4][5] One theory is that it originates from birinj, the Persian word for rice.[6][7] Another is that it derives from biryan or beriyan, to fry or roast.[8][9] Origin[edit] The exact origin of the dish is uncertain. In North India, different varieties of biryani developed in the Muslim centers of Delhi
Delhi
(Mughlai cuisine), Lucknow
Lucknow
(Awadhi cuisine) and other small principalities. In South India, where rice is more widely used as a staple food, several distinct varieties of biryani emerged from Telangana
Telangana
(specifically Hyderabad), Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
( Ambur
Ambur
), Kerala
Kerala
(Malabar), and Karnataka, where minority Muslim communities were present. Andhra is the only region of South India
South India
that does not have many native varieties of biryani.[6][10] During the Safavid dynasty
Safavid dynasty
(1501–1736) in Persia, a dish called Berian Pilao (Nastaliq script: بریان پلو‬) was made with lamb or chicken, marinated overnight – with yogurt, herbs, spices, dried fruits like raisins, prunes or pomegranate seeds – and later cooked in a tannour oven. It was then served with steamed rice.[11] According to historian Lizzie Collingham, the modern biryani developed in the royal kitchens of the Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
(1526-1857), as a confluence of the native spicy rice dishes of India and the Persian pilaf.[12] Indian restaurateur Kris Dhillon believes that the dish originated in Persia, and was brought to India by the Mughals.[13] However, another theory claims that the dish was known in India before the first Mughal emperor Babur
Babur
came to India.[14] The 16th-century Mughal text Ain-i-Akbari
Ain-i-Akbari
makes no distinction between biryanis and pilaf (or pulao): it states that the word "biryani" is of older usage in India.[15] A similar theory, that biryani came to India with Timur's invasion, appears to be incorrect, because there is no record of biryani having existed in his native land during that period.[14] According to Pratibha Karan, the biryani is of South Indian origin, derived from pilaf varieties brought to the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
by the Arab traders. She speculates that the pulao was an army dish in medieval India. The armies, unable to cook elaborate meals, would prepare a one-pot dish where they cooked rice with whichever meat was available. Over time, the dish became biryani due to different methods of cooking, with the distinction between "pulao" and "biryani" being arbitrary.[6][14] According to Vishwanath Shenoy, the owner of a biryani restaurant chain in India, one branch of biryani comes from the Mughals, while another was brought by the Arab traders to Malabar in South India.[16] Difference between biryani and pulao[edit] Pilaf
Pilaf
or pulao, as it is known in the Indian subcontinent, is another mixed rice dish popular in South Asian and Middle Eastern cuisine. Opinions differ on the differences between pulao and biryani, and whether there is a difference between the two at all.[17] According to Delhi-based historian Sohail Nakhvi, pulao tends to be (comparatively) plainer than the biryani and consists of meat (or vegetables) cooked with rice. Biryani
Biryani
on the other hand contains more gravy (due to the use of yakhni in it), is often cooked for longer (hence yielding more tender meat or vegetables) and with additional condiments.[18] Pratibha Karan states that while the terms are often applied arbitrarily, the main distinction is that a biryani comprises two layers of rice with a layer of meat (or vegetables) in the middle; the pulao is not layered.[14] Colleen Taylor Sen lists the following distinctions between biryani and pulao:[19]

Biryani
Biryani
is the primary dish in a meal, while the pulao is usually a secondary accompaniment to a larger meal In biryani, meat and rice are cooked separately before being layered and cooked together. Pulao is a single-pot dish: meat and rice are simmered in a liquid until the liquid is absorbed. However, some other writers, such as Holly Shaffer (based on her observations in Lucknow), R. K. Saxena and Sangeeta Bhatnagar have reported pulao recipes in which the rice and meat are cooked separately and then mixed before the dum cooking.[17][20] Biryanis have more complex and stronger spices compared to pulao. The British-era author Abdul Halim Sharar mentions this as their primary difference: biryani has a stronger taste of curried rice due to a greater amount of spices.[17][21]

Ingredients[edit] Ingredients vary according to the type of meat used and the region the biryani is from. Meat
Meat
(of either chicken, mutton, beef, prawn or fish)) is the prime ingredient with rice. As is common in dishes of the Indian subcontinent, some vegetables are also used when preparing biryani. Corn
Corn
may be used depending on the season and availability. Navratan biryani tends to use sweeter richer ingredients such as cashew, kismis and fruits such as apples and pineapples.[18] The spices and condiments used in biryani may include ghee (clarified butter), nutmeg, mace,[22] pepper, cloves,[22] cardamom, cinnamon, bay leaves, coriander, mint leaves, ginger, onions, tomatoes, and garlic. The premium varieties include saffron.[22] In all biryani, the main ingredient that accompanies the spices is the chicken and mutton; special varieties also use beef and seafood. The dish may be served with dahi chutney or raita, korma, curry, a sour dish of aubergine (brinjal), boiled egg (optional), and salad. Varieties[edit] Kacchi Biryani

In the kacchi biryani, raw marinated meat is layered with raw rice before being cooked together. It is also known as kacchi yeqni. It is cooked typically with chicken and mutton but rarely with fish and prawns. The dish is cooked layered with the meat and the yogurt based marinade at the bottom of the cooking pot and the layer of rice (usually basmati rice or chinigura rice) placed over it. Potatoes are often added before adding the rice layer. The pot is usually sealed (typically with wheat dough) to allow cooking in its own steam and not opened until it is ready to serve.

Tehari

Tehari, Tehri or Tehari are variants on the name given to the vegetarian version of biryani. It was developed for the Hindu bookkeepers of the Muslim Nawabs. It is prepared by adding the potatoes to the rice as opposed to the case of traditional biryani, where the rice is added to the meat. In Kashmir, tehari is sold as street food. Tehri became more popular during World War II, when meat prices increased substantially and potatoes became the popular substitute in biryani. It is not really considered to be part of the biryani family in its true sense.[23]

Beef
Beef
biryani

Beef
Beef
biryani in Kolkata

Beef
Beef
biryani, as the name implies, uses beef as meat. In Hyderabad, it is famous as Kalyani biryani, in which beef (buffalo meat) is used.[24][25] This meal was started after the Kalyani Nawabs of Bidar came to Hyderabad
Hyderabad
sometime in the 18th century. The Kalyani biryani is made with small cubes of beef, regular spices, onions and lots of tomatoes. It has a distinct tomato, jeera, dhania flavour.[26] In Kerala, beef biryani is very famous.[27] The Bhatkali biryani is a special biryani where main ingredient is onion. It was started by the Arab settlers who married the local Jain women. Its variants include beef, mutton, chicken, titar, egg, fish, crab, prawn and vegetable biryani.

List of varieties by region or culture in the Indian subcontinent[edit]

Hyderabadi vegetable biryani served in Tampa, U.S.

Depending on the region and the condiments available and popular in that region, there are different varieties of biryani. The variety often takes the name of the region (for example, Sindhi biryani developed in the Sindh
Sindh
region of what is now Pakistan, Hyderabadi biryani developed in the city of Hyderabad
Hyderabad
in South India, etc.). Some have taken the name of the shop that sells it (for example: Haji Biriyani, Haji Nanna Biriyani in Old Dhaka[28], Fakhruddin Biriyani in Dhaka[29][30], Students biryani in Karachi, Lucky biryani in Bandra, Mumbai and Baghdadi biryani in Colaba, Mumbai).[18] Biryanis are often specific to the respective Muslim community from where it comes, as it is usually the defining dish of that community. Cosmopolitanism has also created these native versions to suit the tastes of others as well.[31] Delhi
Delhi
biryani

The Delhi
Delhi
version of the biryani developed with a unique local flavour as the Mughal kings shifted their political capital to the North Indian city of Delhi. Till the 1950s, most people cooked biryani in their house and rarely ate out. Hence, restaurants primarily catered to travellers and merchants, hence any region that saw more of these two classes of people nurtured more restaurants, and thus their own versions of biryani. As per Nakhwi, this was the reason why most shops historically selling biryani in Delhi
Delhi
tend to be near mosques such as Jama Masjid
Jama Masjid
(for travelers) or traditional shopping districts (such as Chandni Chowk). Each part of Delhi
Delhi
has its own style of biryani, often based on its original purpose thus giving rise to Nizamuddin Biryani, Shahjahanabad biryani, etc. The Nizamuddin biryani is usually sparse in the more expensive meat and spices as it was primarily meant to be made in bulk for offering at the Nizamuddin Dargah
Nizamuddin Dargah
shrine and thereafter to distribute to devotees.[18] A non-dum using a lot of green chillies variety of biryani popularized by the Babu Shahi Bawarchi shop located outside National Sports Club, Delhi
Delhi
is informally called Babu Shahi biryani. Another version of Delhi
Delhi
biryani uses achaar (pickles) and is called achaari biryani.[32]

Sindhi biryani

Sindhi biryani

The exotic and aromatic Sindhi biryani
Sindhi biryani
is known in Pakistan for its spicy taste, fragrant rice and delicate meat. Sindhi biryani
Sindhi biryani
is a beloved staple in food menus in the Pakistani cuisine
Pakistani cuisine
and Sindhi cuisine. Sindhi biryani
Sindhi biryani
is prepared with meat and an amalgamation of Basmati rice, vegetables and various types of spices. Sindhi Biryani is often served by Pakistan International Airlines
Pakistan International Airlines
(PIA) in most of their international flights. A special version of Sindhi biryani
Sindhi biryani
sold by a shop in Karachi
Karachi
called "Students center" is popularly called "Students biryani".[33]

Hyderabadi biryani

Hyderabadi biryani
Hyderabadi biryani
is one of India's most famous biryanis; some say biryani is synonymous with Hyderabad.[34] The crown dish of the Hyderabadi Muslims, Hyderabadi biryani
Hyderabadi biryani
developed under the rule of Asaf Jah I, who had been appointed as the Governor of Deccan by the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb. It is made with basmati rice, spices and goat. Popular variations use chicken instead of goat. There are various forms of Hyderabadi biryani. One such biryani is the kachay gosht ki biryani or the dum biryani, where the mutton is marinated and cooked along with the rice. It is left on slow fire or dum for a fragrant and aromatic flavour.[35]

Thalassery
Thalassery
biryani

Thalassery
Thalassery
biryani

Thalassery
Thalassery
biryani, is the only variation of biryani found in the Indian state of Kerala. It is one of the many dishes of the Malabar Muslim community, and a very popular one at that.[36] The ingredients are chicken, spices and the specialty is the choice of rice named Khyma. Khyma rice is generally mixed with ghee. Although a huge amount of spices such as mace, cashew nuts, sultana raisins, fennel-cumin seeds, tomato, onion, ginger, garlic, shallot, cloves and cinnamon are used,[37] there is only a small amount of chili (or chili powder) used in the preparation. A pakki biryani, the Thalassery
Thalassery
biryani uses a small-grained thin (not round) fragrant variety of rice known as Khyma or Jeerakasala. The dum method of preparation (sealing the lid with dough (maida) or cloth and placing red-hot charcoal above the lid) is applied here.

Kolkata
Kolkata
biryani

Calcutta or Kolkata
Kolkata
biryani evolved from the Lucknow
Lucknow
style, when Awadh's last Nawab
Nawab
Wajid Ali Shah
Wajid Ali Shah
was exiled in 1856 to the Kolkata suburb of Metiabruz.[16] Shah brought his personal chef with him. The poorer households of Kolkata, which could not afford meat, used potatoes instead, which went on to become a specialty of the Calcutta biryani. The Calcutta biryani primarily uses meat, potatoes and eggs.[18] The Calcutta biryani is much lighter on spices. The marinate primarily uses nutmeg, cinnamon, mace along with cloves and cardamom in the yoghurt based marinade for the meat which is cooked separately from rice. This combination of spices gives it a distinct flavour as compared to other styles of biryani. The rice is flavoured with ketaki water or rose water along with saffron to give it flavour and light yellowish colour.

Ambur/ Vaniyambadi
Vaniyambadi
biryani

Ambur/ Vaniyambadi
Vaniyambadi
biryani is a type of biryani cooked in neighboring towns of Ambur
Ambur
& Vaniyambadi
Vaniyambadi
in the Vellore district
Vellore district
in the north-eastern part of Tamil Nadu, which has a high Muslim population. It was introduced by the Nawabs of Arcot who once ruled the place.[38]

The Ambur/ Vaniyambadi
Vaniyambadi
biryani is accompanied with 'dhalcha', a sour brinjal curry and 'pachadi' or raitha, which is sliced onions mixed with plain curd, tomato, chillies and salt. It has a distinctive aroma and is considered light on the stomach. The usage of spice is moderate and curd is used as a gravy base. It also has a higher ratio of meat to rice.[39]

Chettinad biryani

Chettinad biryani is famous in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. It is made of jeeraka samba rice, smells of spices and ghee. It is best taken with nenju elumbu kuzhambu, a spicy and tangy mutton gravy. The podi kozhi is usually topped with fried onions and curry leaves.[40][41][42][43]

Bhatkali/Navayathi biryani

This is an integral part of the Navayath cuisine and a speciality of Bhatkal, a coastal town in Karnataka. Its origins are traced to the Persian traders who left behind not only biryani but a variation of kababs and Indian breads. In Bhatkali biryani the meat is cooked in an onion and green chilli based masala and layered with fragrant rice. It has a unique spicy and heady flavour, and the rice is overwhelmingly white with mild streaks of orange. Though similar to the ones in Thalassery
Thalassery
and Kozhikode, this biryani differs with lingering after-notes of mashed onions laced with garlic, and a few chillies and spices littered with curry leaves lends a unique flavour to Bhatkal biryani. No oil is used.[44]

Memoni/Kutchi biryani

Memoni biryani is an extremely spicy variety developed by the Memons of Gujarat- Sindh
Sindh
region in India and Pakistan.[16] It is made with lamb, yogurt, fried onions, and potatoes, and fewer tomatoes compared to Sindhi biryani. Memoni biryani also uses less food colouring compared to other biryanis, allowing the rich colours of the various meats, rice, and vegetables to blend without too much of the orange colouring.[citation needed]

Dindigul
Dindigul
biryani

The Dindigul
Dindigul
town of Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
is noted for its biryani, which uses a little curd and lemon juice to get a tangy taste.[45]

Bohri biryani

The Bohri biryani, prepared by the Bohris is flavoured with a lot of tomatoes.[16] It is very popular in Karachi.

Kalyani biryani

Kalyani biryani is a typical biryani from old state of Hyderabad.[46] Also known as the 'poor man's' Hyderabadi biryani, the Kalyani biryani is always made from small cubes of buffalo meat. The meat is flavoured with ginger, garlic, turmeric, red chili, cumin, coriander powder, lots of onion and tomato. It is first cooked as a thick curry and then cooked along with rice. Then given dum (the Indian method of steaming in a covered pot). The Kalyani biryani is supposed to have originated in the Bidar
Bidar
during the reign of the Kalyani Nawabs, who migrated to Hyderabad
Hyderabad
after one of the nawabs, Ghazanfur Jang married into the Asaf Jahi family. The Kalyani biryani was served by the Kalyani nawabs to all of their subjects who came from Bidar
Bidar
to Hyderabad
Hyderabad
and stayed or visited their devdi or noble mansion. This was the practice for many decades. But after Operation Polo
Operation Polo
in which the Indian army took over Hyderabad
Hyderabad
State, the state of the nobles went into decline. Some of their illustrious cooks set up their own stalls and introduced the Kalyani biryani to the local populace of Hyderabad
Hyderabad
state.[citation needed]

Afghan biryani

A different dish called biryan is popular in Afghanistan. Biryan traces its origins to the same source as biryani, and is today sold in Afghanistan
Afghanistan
as well as in Bhopal, India. Biryan is prepared by cooking gosht and rice together, but without the additional gravy (yakhni) and other condiments that are used in biryani. The Delhi-based historian Sohail Hashmi refers to the biryan as midway between the pulao and biryani. The Afghani biryani tends to use a lot of dry fruit and lesser amounts of meat, often cut into tiny pieces.[18]

Sri Lankan biryani

Sri Lankan chicken biryani

Biryani
Biryani
was brought into Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
by the South Indian Muslims
Muslims
who were trading in the Northern part of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and in Colombo in the early 1900s.[citation needed] In Sri Lanka, it is Buryani, a colloquial word which generated from Buhari Biryani. In many cases, Sri Lankan biryani is much spicier than most Indian varieties. Side dishes may include acchar, Malay pickle, cashew curry and mint sambol.[citation needed]

Rawther biryani

The type of biriyani popular in region around palakkad & Coimbatore
Coimbatore
regions. This was most commonly prepared by rawther family in Kerala
Kerala
and Tamil Nadu. This type of biriyani is cooked in a different style. Mutton
Mutton
is most commonly used in this type of biriyani. The biryani is entirely different from malabar biryani.[citation needed]

Varieties outside the Indian subcontinent[edit] Burma[edit]

A dish of Burmese biryani (locally known as danpauk), as served at Kyet Shar

In Myanmar
Myanmar
(Burma), biryani is known in Burmese as danpauk or danbauk, from Persian dum pukht. Featured ingredients include cashew nuts, yogurt, raisins and peas, chicken, cloves, cinnamon, saffron and bay leaf. In Burmese biryani, the chicken is cooked with the rice.[47][better source needed] biryani is also eaten with a salad of sliced onions and cucumber. Iraq
Iraq
and Middle East (Arab nations)[edit] One form of "Arabic" biryani is the Iraqi preparation (برياني: "biryani"), where the rice is usually saffron-based with chicken usually being the meat or poultry of choice. Most variations also include vermicelli, fried onions, fried potato cubes, almonds and raisins spread liberally over the rice.[16] Sometimes, a sour/spicy tomato sauce is served on the side (maraq). Iran[edit]

Biryani
Biryani
of Isfahan

During the Safavid dynasty
Safavid dynasty
(1501–1736), a dish called Berian (Nastaliq script: بریان پلو‬) was made with lamb or chicken, marinated overnight – with yogurt, herbs, spices, dried fruits like raisins, prunes or pomegranate seeds – and later cooked in a tannour oven. It was then served with steamed rice.[48] Indonesia[edit] Nasi kebuli
Nasi kebuli
is an Indonesian spicy steamed rice dish cooked in goat broth, milk and ghee. Nasi kebuli
Nasi kebuli
is descended from Kabuli Palaw
Kabuli Palaw
which is an Afghani rice dish, similar to biryani served in the Indian subcontinent.[49] Singapore and Malaysia[edit] Nasi Briyani
Briyani
dishes are very popular in Malaysia and Singapore. As an important part of Malaysian Indian cuisine, they are popularized through Mamak stalls, hawker centres, food courts as well as fine dining restaurants.

Mutton
Mutton
Briyani
Briyani
at Little India, Singapore

Philippines[edit] Kapampangan cuisine
Kapampangan cuisine
of Philippines (often in Pampanga) features a special dish called Nasing Biringyi (chicken saffron rice), that is typically prepared only during special occasions such as weddings, family get-togethers or fiestas. It is not a staple diet as it is difficult to prepare compared to other usual dishes. Nasing Biringyi is similar to the Nasi Briyani
Briyani
dish of Malaysia in style and taste, but is also compared to a saffron-cooked version of Spanish Paella.[50] See also[edit]

Food portal

List of rice dishes

References[edit]

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Biryani
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Biryani
Recipes - NDTV Food". Retrieved 24 June 2016.  ^ Farhang-e Iranzamin by Iraj Afshar[page needed] ^ Collingham, Lizzie (6 February 2006). Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors. Oxford University Press. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-19-988381-3.  ^ Dhillon, Kris (2013). The New Curry
Curry
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Biryani
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Ambur
Biryani". The Hindu. Retrieved 24 August 2014.  ^ a b c d e Ganapti, Priya (9 April 2004). "Of biryani, history and entrepreneurship". rediff.com. Retrieved 27 August 2014.  ^ a b c Shaffer, Holly (2012). "6: Dum Pukht". In Ray, Krishnendu; Srinivas, Tulasi. Curried Cultures: Globalization, Food, and South Asia. University of California Press. pp. 124–. ISBN 978-0-520-27011-4.  ^ a b c d e f Ravish Kumar interviews historian Sohali Hashmi (9 September 2016). प्राइम टाइम : क्या-क्या अलग करेंगे बिरयानी से? [Prime Time: What will separate from Biryani?] (Television production) (in Hindi). Old Delhi: NDTV. Retrieved 19 October 2016.  ^ Taylor Sen, Colleen (2014). Feasts and Fasts: A History of Food in India. Reaktion Books. pp. 194–195. ISBN 9781780233918.  ^ Sangeeta Bhatnagar; R. K. Saxena (1 January 1997). Dastarkhwan-e-Awadh. HarperCollins Publishers, India. ISBN 978-81-7223-230-6.  ^ ʻAbdulḥalīm Sharar (1989) [1913]. Lucknow: The Last Phase of an Oriental Culture (Hindustan Men Mashriqi Tamaddun ka Akhri Namuna). Translated by ES Harcourt; Fakhir Hussain. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-562364-2.  ^ a b c Brown, Ruth. (17 August 2011) "The Melting Pot – A Local Prep Kitchen Incubates Portland's Next Generation of Food Businesses." Willamette Week. Volume 37, #41. ^ "Veg Biryani
Biryani
Is Not Biryani. I Wish People Would Just Stop Calling It That". ScoopWhoop. 24 September 2016. Retrieved 29 October 2016.  ^ "The Other Hyderabadi Biryani
Hyderabadi Biryani
With a 300-Year-Old Past".  ^ "A tale of two biryanis".  ^ "Why Kalyani Beef
Beef
Biryani
Biryani
Is a Favourite of Many Hyderabadis, Muslim and Hindu".  ^ "In fact: How beef became Malayalis' object of desire".  ^ http://www.espncricinfo.com/page2/content/story/489063.html ^ https://www.nibizsoft.com/dhakas-biryani-a-taste-of-aristocracy/ ^ https://bdnews24.com/lifestyle/2016/03/28/dhakas-biryani-can-be-unesco-world-heritage-says-food-critic-matt-preston ^ "Where does biryani come from?  : Rude Hotels". blogs.hindustantimes.com. Archived from the original on 24 June 2016. Retrieved 20 October 2016.  ^ Karan, Pratibha (2009). Biryani. Random House (India). ISBN 8184000936. Retrieved 19 October 2016.  ^ "Interview with Karachi
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based historian Salim Mohammed, Karachi, August 1999". Institute for Business, Innovation and Strategic Studies.  Missing or empty url= (help) ^ "10 Cities In India For The Food Lover's Soul". 5 December 2014. Retrieved 26 July 2016.  ^ Staff, WSJ. "India's Best City For Biryani
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Is..." WSJ. Retrieved 16 May 2016.  ^ Karan, Pratibha (2012). Biryani. Random House India. ISBN 9788184002546.  ^ Abdulla, Ummi (1993). Malabar Muslim Cookery. Orient Blackswan. p. 2. ISBN 8125013490.  ^ Ambur
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and Vaniyambadi
Vaniyambadi
Special
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Easy chicken Biriyani Recipe 03-02-2017 ^ Mukund Padmanabhan, Subash Jeyan and Subajayanthi Wilson (26 May 2012). Food Safari: In search of Ambur
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External links[edit]

Media related to Biryani
Biryani
at Wikimedia Commons Biryani
Biryani
at Wikibook Cookbooks

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Rice
Rice
dishes

List of rice dishes List of fried rice dishes

North America

Charleston red rice Diri ak djon djon Dirty rice Glorified rice Gumbo Hawaiian haystack Hoppin' John Jambalaya Loco moco Red beans and rice Rice
Rice
Krispies Rice Krispies
Rice Krispies
Treats Rice
Rice
and gravy Rice
Rice
cereal Rice-A-Roni Shrimp Creole

Latin America

Arroz à grega Arroz a la cubana Arroz a la tumbada Arroz a la valenciana Arroz chaufa Arroz con gandules Arroz con pollo Arroz poblano Arroz tapado Bandeja paisa Gallo pinto Moros y Cristianos Pabellón criollo Rice
Rice
and beans Spanish rice

Europe

Arancini Arròs negre Arròs a banda Kedgeree Paella Rijsttafel Risalamande Risotto Supplì

Africa

Jollof rice Thieboudienne

Middle East

Kabsa Kateh Kushari Lâpa Mandi Mansaf Maqluba Mujaddara Pilaf Sabzi polo Sütlaç Tahdig Tbeet Tahri Zerde

Central Asia

Plov Kabuli palaw Osh

South Asia

Bagara khana Baji Banana leaf rice Bhuni Khicuhri Biryani Bisi Bele Bath Bora saul Curd rice Dal
Dal
bhat Flattened rice Idli Jaa Jeera rice Khichdi Kiribath Kori rotti Pakistani rice dishes Paniyaram Panta bhat Pulao Pongal Pulihora Puliyogare Rice
Rice
and curry Sindhi biryani Saffron
Saffron
rice Sambar

East Asia

China

Boluo fan Claypot chicken rice Erkuai Fried rice Gaifan Guoba Migan Mixian Minced pork rice Rice
Rice
noodle roll Siu mei
Siu mei
rice Sticky rice Wa Dan Oyok rice Zongzi

Taiwan

Bamboo rice pudding Bíhún Bípang Bítaibak Donfan Fried rice Glutinous rice Inn-á Khongbahpn̄g Koé Lōbahpn̄g Milkfish maw porridge Mixian Muáhji Pn̄gtang Tainan Yufan Taiwanese sweet sticky rice Tea'ban Tihoéhkoé Turkey rice bowls Uánnkué Zàng

Japan

Agemochi Chahan Chazuke Chūkadon Donburi Gyūdon Hayashi rice Ikameshi Kamameshi Katsudon Mochi Okayu Omurice Onigiri Oyakodon Sushi Takikomi gohan Tamago kake gohan Tekkadon Unadon Yakimochi Zosui

Korea

Bap Bibimbap Bokkeum-bap Garae-tteok Gimbap Gyeongdan Heotjesatbap Hobak-juk Hoe-deopbap Injeolmi Jatjuk Jeonbok-juk Kimchi bokkeumbap Kongbap Nurungji Ogok-bap Sundae Tarak-juk Tteok Yaksik

Southeast Asia

Indonesia/Malaysia

Bubur ayam Burasa Chwee kueh Hainanese chicken rice Kelupis Ketupat Lamban Lemang Lemper Lepet Lontong Nasi ambeng Nasi bogana Nasi campur Nasi dagang Nasi goreng Nasi goreng
Nasi goreng
pattaya Nasi gurih Nasi kandar Nasi kebuli Nasi kerabu Nasi kuning Nasi kucing Nasi lemak Nasi liwet Nasi paprik Nasi pecel Nasi tim Nasi tumpang Nasi uduk Nasi ulam Pulot tartal Rijsttafel Serabi Tinutuan Tumpeng Wajik

Vietnam

Bánh lá Bánh bèo Bánh canh Bánh cuốn Bánh chưng Bánh đúc Bánh hỏi Bánh tráng Bánh xèo Bun cha Bún riêu Bún bò Huế Bún thịt nướng Cơm tấm Cơm nắm Cơm rượu Gỏi cuốn Pho Rice
Rice
noodles Xôi

Philippines

Baye baye Bibingka Biko Champorado Espasol Kalamay Kutsinta Palitaw Puto Sapin-sapin Suman

Other

American fried rice Kralan Thai fried rice

Other

Brown rice Coconut
Coconut
rice Congee Instant rice Parboiled rice Puffed rice
Puffed rice
cakes Puffed rice Rice
Rice
pudding Rice
Rice
vermicelli White rice

Category WikiProject Food and drink

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Pakistani dishes by cuisine and region

Balochi

Kaak Sajji

Kashmiri

Dum Aloo Kahwah Kashmiri tea Rogan josh Wazwan

Muhajir

Mughlai

Biryani Kebab Korma Nargisi Kofta Pasanda Rumali roti Shami kebab Sheer korma

Miscellaneous

Aloo tikki Baingan ka bartha Balushahi Bhalla Dahi chutney Golgappa Hyderabadi biryani Haleem Paya Masala chai Panipuri Nihari Paan Sheermal

Pashtun

Afghan bread Bolani Chapli kebab Gosh Feel Kabuli pulao Kadchgall Kadu bouranee Kahwah Mantu Peshwari naan

Punjabi

Lahori

Chargha Lahori fried fish Gosht karahi Murgh cholay Kata-kat

Miscellaneous

Bhatoora Chana masala Chicken
Chicken
tikka Chole bhature Lassi Makki di roti Panjiri Punjabi pulao Sarson da saag Sugarcane juice Tandoori chicken Tikka

Saraiki

Sohan halwa

Sindhi

Beh Hyderabadi pickle Sai bhaji Sindhi biryani Sindhi pulao Sindhi karhi

Common dishes

Aloo gobi Aloo gosht Aloo paratha Bun kebab Chaat Chapati Chutney Dal Falooda Flattened rice Gajar ka halwa Gulab jamun Halwa Halwa poori Kheer Kulfi Puri Pakistani pickle Pakistani rice dishes Jalebi Khagina Kheer Khichra Khichri Laddu Magaj Naan Pakora Papadum Paratha Pulao Roti Saalan Samosa Chorba Tandoor
Tandoor
bread Tea Zarda

Pakistani diaspora

Balti (food) Chicken
Chicken
tikka masala Pakistani Chinese

Category Commons Cookbook Food portal Pakistan portal

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Indian dishes by region

North

Aloo gobi Aloo Mutter Amritsari Papar Warian Baati Baingan bartha Barfi
Barfi
( Kaju barfi
Kaju barfi
/ Kaju katli) Bhatura Butter chicken Chana masala Chapati Chicken
Chicken
tikka Chole bhature Churma Dum Aloo Dal
Dal
makhani Dopiaza Egg curry Haleem Jeera aloo Kachori Kadai Kadai chicken Kadhi Kahwah Keema Khichra Khichdi Kulcha Korma Kulfi Laal maans Mattar paneer Makki di roti Mirchi Bada Mutton
Mutton
curry Murgh Musallam Naan Nihari Palak Paneer Pakora Paneer tikka Pasanda Raita Rajma Rogan josh Rumali roti Sai bhaji Sarson ka saag Shahi paneer Shami Kebab Tandoori chicken Paneer Tikka Masala

South

Appam Aviyal Baghara baingan Benne Dose Bhajji Bisi bele bath Bonda Chicken
Chicken
65 Chicken
Chicken
Chettinad Chakna Curd rice Dahi chutney Dopiaza Dosa Double ka meetha Fish
Fish
molee Hyderabadi biryani Hyderabadi haleem Idiappam Idli Injipuli Kaalan Kanji Kerala
Kerala
porotta Koottu Kozhakkattai Kuzhambu Lukhmi Mirchi ka salan Murukku Mysore Pak Pachadi Paniyaram Parotta Payasam Pongal Poriyal Pulihora Puttu Rasam Rice
Rice
and curry Sakinalu Sambar Sheer korma Sevai Upma Uttapam Thalassery
Thalassery
biryani Vada

West

Akuri Basundi Bhakri Bhelpuri Bombil fry Chinese bhel Chivda Chouriço Dahi vada Dhansak Dhokla Doodhpak Handvo Kadboli Khatkhate Khandvi Khichdi Kombdi vade Kuswar Misal Misal
Misal
Pav Pav bhaji Patoleo Patra ni machhi Pohe Sabudana Khichadi Sanna Sevpuri Shrikhand Solkadhi Sorpotel Thalipeeth Vada pav Veg Kolhapuri Vindaloo Xacuti

East

Alu Potala Rasa Beguni Bel Pana Bhuna Khicuhri Chakuli pitha Cham cham Chandrakanti Charchari Chhena gaja Chhena jalebi Chhena kheeri Chhena poda Chingudi Jhola Dahi baigana Dahi Machha Jalfrezi Indian Chinese cuisine Kati roll Luchi Machha Jhola Maachha Bihana Mathapuli Mishti Doi Ouu khatta Pakhala Pantua Pitha Prawn
Prawn
malai curry Rasabali Rasgulla Ras malai Sandesh Santula Sorshe Ilish

Miscellaneous

Biryani Chaat Chutney Dal Falooda Flattened rice Gulab Jamun Halwa Indian pickle Jalebi Kheer Kofta Laddu Mango pudding Panipuri Papadum Paratha Puri Qeema Roti Sindhi biryani Samosa Shankarpali Sabzi Zarda Puri Bhaji

Indian diaspora

Chicken
Chicken
tikka masala Fish
Fish
head curry Phall Nasi kandar Pasembur Roti
Roti
canai

Category Commons Cookbook Food portal India portal

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Sri Lankan cuisine

Dishes

Rice

Biryani Diyabath Idli Kaha bath Kiribath

Imbul Kiribath

Lamprais Nasi goreng Pittu Rice
Rice
and curry

Roti

Gothamba roti Kottu Pol roti Uraippu roti

Other

Dosa Hoppers Kola kandha Kool Mee goreng Sathe String hoppers Upma

Side dishes

Bread

Gal Banis Jam paan Kimbula Banis Maalu paan Roast Paan Sri Lankan tea bun Theti Paan

Curry

Curry

Brinjal
Brinjal
paal curry Chicken
Chicken
curry Kakuluwo curry (Crab curry) Elumas (Lamb curry) Ismoru ( Beef
Beef
Curry) Jaffna lamb curry Malu Mirisata
Malu Mirisata
( Fish
Fish
Curry) Moju (Pork Curry) Murunga curry

Other

Malay Achcharu Babath Cutlet Dal Ekor soup Gotukola Gova Kaldu Kiri hodi Mallung Papadum Rasam Sambol

Katta sambal Pol sambola Seeni Banis Sini sambal Vaalai kai sambal

Sri Lankan omelette Thakkadi

Snacks

Chinese rolls Kadala Lavariya Odiyal Pol Pani Sanja Sathe Surul appam Tapioca chips Vade

Isso vade Parippu vade Ulundu vade

Beverages

Arrack Beer Faluda Koththamalli Masala chai Tea Toddy

Sweets & desserts

Aasmi Aggala Alpal Aluwa Athirasa Bibikkan Bolo Fiado Bombai muttai Breudher Chocolate biscuit pudding Surul appam Dodol

Kalu dodol Kiri Dodol

Dosi

Inguru dosi Kiri dosi Puhul dosi

Hakuru Kevum

Konda kevum Mung kevum Naran kevum Thala kevum Undu kevum

Kiri Toffee Kokis Love cake Modakam Mudavāpu meekiri Pandan cake Pani Kaju Pani walalu Pushnambu Sakkarai Muttai Seenakku Sukiri Thala Guli Undu Walalu Watalappam Weli Thalapa

Condiments

Chinese chili paste Lunumiris Thuna paha

Ingredients

Cardamom Cashew Chili pepper Cinnamon Coconut Coconut
Coconut
milk Condensed milk Fish Karapincha Kangkung Kithull Lemongrass Pandan Rice Treacle Turmeric

Cuisine of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
at Wikimedia Commons Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
portal Food portal Drink portal

v t e

Burmese cuisine

Bamar
Bamar
dishes

Salads

Khauk swè thoke Nan gyi thohk Papaya salad Lahpet

Rice
Rice
dishes

Glutinous rice Htamane Coconut
Coconut
rice Fried rice Nga thalaut paung

Noodle dishes

Baik kut kyee kaik Kya zan hinga Mohinga Ohn no khao swè

Ngapi

Ngapi
Ngapi
kyaw Ngapi
Ngapi
gyet Balachaung

Fritters

Fried banana

Chinese dishes

Kawpyan Kawyay khao swe Konbaunggyi Sigyet khauk swè Wet Tha Dote Htoe Misua Congee Kyay oh

Indian dishes

Chapati Paratha Puri Nanbya Danpauk Toshay Samuza Butter rice Mango pickle Baya gyaw Thizone hin

Shan dishes

Khow suey Htamin jin Meeshay Nam ngiao Mohnyin tjin Burmese tofu

Rakhine dishes

Mont di

Mon dishes

Thingyan rice Htamane Ngapyaw baung Durian jam

Desserts

Halawa Phaluda Kyaukkyaw Montletsaung Thagu Shwegyi mont Htoe mont Malaing lone Mont kalama Pashu mont Gyalabi Kulfi Yogurt

Beverages

Palm wine

Miscellaneous

Daunglan Pon ye gyi

List of Burmese dishes

v t e

Malaysian cuisine
Malaysian cuisine
by ethnicity

Common dishes

Malay

Ambuyat Ayam bakar Ayam goreng Ayam masak kicap Ayam masak merah Asam pedas Porridge

Bubur asyura Bubur kacang hijau Bubur lambuk Bubur pedas Bubur pulut hitam

Gulai Ikan bakar Ikan goreng Kangkung belacan Ketupat Laksa Lemang Lontong Mee bandung Muar Nasi ambeng Nasi campur Nasi dagang Nasi goreng Nasi goreng
Nasi goreng
pattaya Nasi kandar Nasi kerabu Nasi lemak Nasi tumpang Nasi ulam Otak-otak Pasembur Pulot tartal Roti
Roti
Jala Rendang Rojak Sata Satay

Satay
Satay
celup

Sup Kambing Ulam

Chinese

Bakkwa Bak kut teh Banmian Bean sprouts chicken Char kway teow Char siu Chai tow kway Chee cheong fun Chwee Claypot chicken rice Duck soup noodles Economy rice/Mixed rice Fish
Fish
ball Hainanese chicken rice Heong peng Hokkien mee Kaya toast Kolo mee Loh bak Lor mee Mee pok Oyster omelette Pan mee Pao Popiah Tong sui Wonton mee Yong tau foo Yusheng Yutiao

Peranakan

Asam laksa/ Laksa
Laksa
lemak Bubur cha cha Cap cai Curry
Curry
Mee Mee siam Nyonya Bak Chang

Indian

Banana leaf rice Chapati Fish
Fish
head curry Fish
Fish
molee Idli Mee goreng

Maggi goreng Mee goreng mamak

Mee rebus Mamak Rojak
Rojak
( Rojak
Rojak
Klang) Murtabak Nasi biryani Puri Putu mayam Roti
Roti
canai Roti
Roti
prata Roti
Roti
tissue Sup kambing Thosai

Indigenous (Sabah and Sarawak)

Bosou Hinava Linatan Linongot Manok pansoh Midin Nasi kombos Nasi laru Nasik aruk Sinalau bakas Tonokon Tuhau Umai

Other

American fried rice Nasi paprik Pecal Ramly burger Soto

Mee soto

Tauhu goreng

Snacks

Cakes

Ang Ku/Ku Batik cake Sarawak layer cake

Keropok

Amplang Lekor Rempeyek

Kuih

Apam balik Bahulu Bingka Borasa Cakoi Cincin Cucur

Jemput-jemput Penyaram Pisang goreng

Dodol Jala Jelurut Karipap Kelupis Kochi Gelang Goyang Gulung Kasturi Lapis Lidah Makmur Ondeh-ondeh Otokon Pais Pie tee Pulut inti Pulut panggang Puto

Putu bambu/Putu bumbong Putu mangkuk/piring

Sapit/Gulong/Kapit Seri Muka Tat/Tae

Desserts

Lamban Punjung Roti
Roti
john Tapai Wajid

Drinks

Non-alcoholic

ABC Bandung Cendol Cincau Chrysanthemum tea Ginger
Ginger
tea Ipoh white coffee Janda pulang Milo

Milo Dinosaur

Sarsi Soy milk Teh tarik Tenom coffee

Alcoholic

Bahar Jaz Lihing Montoku Sikat Talak Tapai Tuak

Condiments

Acar Kaya Sambal

Belacan Budu Cincalok Tempoyak

Taucu Tuhau

See also: List o

.