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The Info List - Billie Jean King





W (1963, 1966, 1967, 1976) (as player and captain) W (1977, 1978, 1979, 1996) (as captain)

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Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (née Moffitt; born November 22, 1943) is an American former World No. 1 professional tennis player. King won 39 Grand Slam titles: 12 in singles, 16 in women's doubles, and 11 in mixed doubles. King won the singles title at the inaugural WTA Tour Championships. King often represented the United States
United States
in the Federation Cup and the Wightman Cup. She was a member of the victorious United States
United States
team in seven Federation Cups and nine Wightman Cups. For three years, King was the United States' captain in the Federation Cup. King is an advocate for gender equality and has long been a pioneer for equality and social justice.[2] In 1973, at age 29, she won the "Battle of the Sexes" tennis match against the 55-year-old Bobby Riggs. King was also the founder of the Women's Tennis Association
Women's Tennis Association
and the Women's Sports Foundation. Regarded by many in the sport as one of the greatest tennis players of all time,[3][4][5][6] King was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1987. The Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Award of Excellence was bestowed on King in 2010. In 1972, King was the joint winner, with John Wooden, of the Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
Sportsman of the Year award and was one of the Time Persons of the Year in 1975. King has also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom
Presidential Medal of Freedom
and the Sunday Times Sportswoman of the Year lifetime achievement award. King was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in 1990, and in 2006, the USTA National Tennis Center in New York City was renamed the USTA Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King National Tennis Center.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Career

2.1 The early years: 1959 through 1963 2.2 1964 2.3 1965 2.4 Prime competitive years: 1966 through 1975

2.4.1 Overview of these years 2.4.2 1966 2.4.3 1967 2.4.4 1968 2.4.5 1969 2.4.6 1970 2.4.7 1971 2.4.8 1972 2.4.9 1973

2.4.9.1 Battle of the Sexes

2.4.10 1974 2.4.11 1975

2.5 The later years: 1976 through 1990

2.5.1 1976 2.5.2 1977 2.5.3 1978 2.5.4 1979 2.5.5 1980–1981 2.5.6 1982–1983 2.5.7 1984 to present

2.6 Activism within the tennis profession

2.6.1 Player compensation 2.6.2 Push for gender equality

2.7 Other activities

3 Awards, honors, and tributes

3.1 Tributes from other players 3.2 Awards and honors

4 Playing style and personality 5 In popular culture 6 Personal life 7 Grand Slam statistics

7.1 Grand Slam single finals 7.2 Grand Slam tournament timeline

8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External links

Early life[edit] King was born in Long Beach, California, into a conservative Methodist family, the daughter of Betty (née Jerman), a housewife, and Bill Moffitt, a firefighter.[7][8] Billie Jean's family was athletic. Her mother excelled at swimming, her father played basketball, baseball and ran track.[9] Her younger brother, Randy Moffitt, became a Major League Baseball pitcher, pitching for 12 years in the major leagues for the San Francisco Giants, Houston
Houston
Astros, and Toronto Blue Jays.[10][11] Billie Jean
Billie Jean
also excelled at baseball and softball as a child, playing shortstop at 10 years old on a team with girls 4–5 years older than her.[9] The team went on to win the Long Beach softball championship.[9] Billie Jean
Billie Jean
switched from softball to tennis at age 11,[12] on a suggestion from her parents, when Billie Jean
Billie Jean
was looking for a more ladylike sport.[9] She saved her own money, $8, to buy her first racket.[9] Billie Jean
Billie Jean
learned tennis on the many free public courts in Long Beach, taking advantage of the free lessons tennis professional Clyde Walker offered at those courts.[9] One of the city's tennis facilities has subsequently been named the Billie Jean Moffitt King Tennis Center.[13] As a kid playing in her first tennis tournaments, Billie Jean
Billie Jean
was often hindered by her aggressive playing style.[9] Bob Martin, sportswriter for the Long Beach, Press-Telegram wrote about Billie Jean's success in a weekly tennis column.[citation needed] Billie Jean
Billie Jean
attended Long Beach Polytechnic High School.[14] After graduating, she attended California
California
State University, Los Angeles (Cal State LA).[12] Billie Jean
Billie Jean
did not graduate, leaving school in 1964 to focus on tennis.[15]:25 While attending Cal State Billie Jean
Billie Jean
met Larry King in a library.[9] The pair became engaged while still in school when Billie Jean
Billie Jean
was 20 and Larry 19 years old and married on September 17, 1965 in Long Beach.[16] Career[edit]

Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King speaking at an event in Des Moines, Iowa

King's triumph at the French Open
French Open
in 1972 made her only the fifth woman in tennis history to win the singles titles at all four Grand Slam events, a "career Grand Slam."[a] King also won a career Grand Slam in mixed doubles. In women's doubles, only the Australian Open eluded her. King won a record 20 career titles at Wimbledon – six in singles, 10 in women's doubles, and four in mixed doubles.[b] King played 51 Grand Slam singles events from 1959 through 1983, reaching at least the semifinals in 27 and at least the quarterfinals in 40 of her attempts. King was the runner-up in six Grand Slam singles events. An indicator of King's mental toughness in Grand Slam singles tournaments was her 11–2 career record in deuce third sets, i.e., third sets that were tied 5–5 before being resolved.[citation needed] King won 129 singles titles,[17] 78 of which were WTA titles, and her career prize money totaled US$1,966,487.[18] In Federation Cup finals, King was on the winning United States
United States
team seven times, in 1963, 1966, 1967, and 1976 through 1979. Her career win–loss record was 52–4.[c] She won the last 30 matches she played,[d] including 15 straight wins in both singles and doubles.[19] In Wightman Cup
Wightman Cup
competition, King's career win–loss record was 22–4,[e] winning her last nine matches.[f] The United States
United States
won the cup ten of the 11 years that King participated. In singles, King was 6–1 against Ann Haydon-Jones, 4–0 against Virginia Wade, and 1–1 against Christine Truman Janes.[20] The early years: 1959 through 1963[edit] As King began competing in 1959, she began working with new coaches including Frank Brennan[9] and Alice Marble, who had won 18 Grand Slam titles as a player herself.[21] King made her Grand Slam debut at the 1959 U.S. Championships at age 15.[22] She lost in the first round.[23] King began playing at local, regional, and international tennis championships.[24]:164 Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
already pegged her as "one of the most promising youngsters on the West Coast."[25] King won her first tournament the next year in Philadelphia at the 1960 Philadelphia and District Grass Court Championships.[26][22] At her second attempt at the U.S. Championships, King made it to the third round, losing to Bernice Carr Vukovich of South Africa.[citation needed] Also in 1960, King reached the final of the National Girl’s 18 and Under Championships, losing to Karen Hantze Susmen.[9] King's national tennis ranking improved from number 19 in 1959 to number 4 1960.[27]:23 Despite the success, Marble terminated her professional relationship with King because for reasons stemming from King's ambition.[27]:23

Billie Jean
Billie Jean
Moffitt (later King) at the Irish Open at Fitzwilliam Lawn Tennis Club, Dublin in the 1960s where she won her first international title

King first gained international recognition in 1961 when the Long Beach Tennis Patrons, Century Club, and Harold Guiver raised $2,000 to send her to Wimbledon.[6] There, she won the women's doubles title in her first attempt while partnering Karen Hantze Susman.[7] King was 17 and Susmen was 18, making them the youngest team to the Wimbledon doubles title.[9] King had less luck that year at 1961 Wimbledon Women's Singles, losing to fifth-seeded Yola Ramírez Ochoa in a two-day match on Centre Court.[28] For the 1962 singles tournament at Wimbledon, King upset Margaret Court, the World No. 1 and top seed, in a second round match by attacking Court's forehand[29][30] This was the first time in Wimbledon history that the women's top seed had lost her first match.[31] That same year, King and Hantze Susman repeated their doubles victory at Wimbledon.[27]:24 In 1963, King again faced Margaret Court
Margaret Court
at Wimbledon.[27]:24 This time they met in the finals with Court prevailing.[27]:24 1964[edit] In 1964, King won four relatively minor titles[citation needed] but lost to Margaret Court
Margaret Court
in the Wimbledon semifinals.[32] She defeated Ann Haydon-Jones
Ann Haydon-Jones
at both the Wightman Cup
Wightman Cup
and Fed Cup
Fed Cup
but lost to Court in the final of the Federation Cup. At the U.S. Championships, fifth-seeded Nancy Richey Gunter upset third-seeded King in the quarterfinals. Late in the year, King decided to make a full-time commitment to tennis. While a history major at Los Angeles State College King made the decision to play full-time when businessman Robert Mitchell, offered to pay her way to Australia
Australia
so that she could train under the great Australian coach Mervyn Rose.[33] While in Australia, King played three tournaments that year and lost in the quarterfinals of the Queensland Grass Court Championships, the final of the New South Wales Championships (to Court), and the third round of the Victorian Championships. 1965[edit] In early 1965, King continued her three-month tour of Australia. She lost in the final of the South Australian Championships and the first round of the Western Australia
Australia
Championships. At the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
in Melbourne, King defeated Ann Haydon-Jones
Ann Haydon-Jones
to help the United States defeat the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the second round. However, Margaret Court again defeated King in the final. At the Australian Championships two weeks later, King lost to Court in the semifinals in two sets. At Wimbledon, King again lost in the semifinals, this time in three sets to Maria Bueno.[9] Her last tournament of the year was the U.S. Championships, where she defeated Jones in the quarterfinals and Bueno in the semifinals. In the final, King led 5–3 in both sets, was two points from winning the first set, and had two set points in the second set[34] before losing to Court in straight sets. King said that losing while being so close to winning was devastating, but the match proved to her that she was "good enough to be the best in the world. I'm going to win Wimbledon next year."[35] King won six tournaments during the year. For the first time in 81 years, the annual convention of the United States Lawn Tennis Association
United States Lawn Tennis Association
overruled its ranking committee's recommendation to award King the sole U.S. No. 1 position and voted 59,810 to 40,966 to rank Nancy Richey Gunter and King as co-U.S. No. 1.[36] Prime competitive years: 1966 through 1975[edit] Overview of these years[edit] Six of King's Grand Slam singles titles were at Wimbledon, four were at the U.S. Championships/Open, one was at the French Open, and one was at the Australian Championships. King reached the final of a Grand Slam singles tournament in 16 out of 25 attempts and had a 12–4 win–loss record in those finals. In the nine tournaments that she failed to reach the final, she was a losing semifinalist twice and a losing quarter finalist five times. From 1971 through 1975, King won seven of the ten Grand Slam singles tournaments she played. She won the last seven Grand Slam singles finals she contested, six of them in straight sets and four of them against Evonne Goolagong. All but one of King's Grand Slam singles titles were on grass. King's Grand Slam record from 1966 through 1975 was comparable to that of Margaret Court, her primary rival during these years. One or both of these women played 35 of the 40 Grand Slam singles tournaments held during this period, and together they won 24 of them. During this period, Court won 31 of her career 64 Grand Slam titles, including 12 of her 24 Grand Slam singles titles, 11 of her 19 Grand Slam women's doubles titles, and eight of her 21 Grand Slam mixed doubles titles. Court reached the final of a Grand Slam singles tournament in 14 out of 25 attempts and had a 12–2 win–loss record in those finals. Court won seven of the 12 Grand Slam finals she played against King during these years, including 2–1 in singles finals, 4–1 in women's doubles finals, and 1–3 in mixed doubles finals. King was the year-ending World No. 1 in six of the ten years from 1966 through 1975. She was the year-ending World No. 2 in three of those years and the World No. 3 in the other year. King won 97 of her career 129 singles titles during this period and was the runner-up in 36 other tournaments. 1966[edit] In 1966, King defeated Dorothy "Dodo" Cheney (then 49 years old) for the first time in five career matches, winning their semifinal at the Southern California
California
Championships 6–0, 6–3. King also ended her nine match losing streak to Margaret Court
Margaret Court
by defeating her in the final of the South African Tennis Championships. At the Wightman Cup just before Wimbledon, King defeated Virginia Wade and Ann Haydon-Jones. After thirteen unsuccessful attempts to win a Grand Slam singles title from 1959 through 1965, King at the age of 22 finally won the first of her six singles titles at Wimbledon and the first of twelve Grand Slam singles titles overall, defeating Court in the semifinals 6–3, 6–3 and Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
in the final. King credited her semifinal victory to her forehand down the line, a new shot in her repertoire.[35] She also said that the strategy for playing Court is, "Simple. Just chip the ball back at her feet."[37] At the U.S. Championships, an ill King was upset by Kerry Melville
Kerry Melville
Reid in the second round.[38] 1967[edit] King successfully defended her title at the South African Tennis Championships in 1967, defeating Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
in the final. She played the French Championships for the first time in her career,[39] falling in the quarterfinals to Annette Van Zyl
Annette Van Zyl
DuPlooy of South Africa. At the Federation Cup one week later in West Germany
West Germany
on clay, King won all four of her matches, including victories over DuPlooy, Ann Haydon-Jones, and Helga Niessen Masthoff. King then successfully switched surfaces and won her second consecutive Wimbledon singles title, defeating Virginia Wade in the quarterfinals 7–5, 6–2 and Jones. At the Wightman Cup, King again defeated Wade and Jones. King won her second Grand Slam singles title of the year when she won the U.S. Championships for the first time and without losing a set, defeating Wade, DuPlooy, Françoise Dürr, and Jones in consecutive matches. Jones pulled her left hamstring muscle early in the final and saved four match points in the second set before King prevailed.[40] King won the singles, women's doubles, and mixed doubles titles at both Wimbledon and the U.S. Championships, the first woman to do that since Alice Marble
Alice Marble
in 1939.[41] King then returned to the Australian summer tour in December for the first time since 1965, playing seven events there and Judy Tegart Dalton in six of those events (winning four of their matches). King lost in the quarterfinals of the New South Wales Championships in Sydney to Dalton after King injured her left knee in the second game of the third set of that match.[42] However, King won the Victorian Championships in Melbourne the following week, defeating Dalton, Reid, and Lesley Turner Bowrey
Lesley Turner Bowrey
in the last three rounds. At a team event in Adelaide, King won all three of her singles and doubles matches to help the U.S. defeat Australia 5–1. To finish the year, King lost to Dalton in the final of the South Australian Championships in Adelaide. 1968[edit] In early 1968, King won three consecutive tournaments to end her Australian tour. In Perth, King won the Western Australia Championships, defeating Margaret Court
Margaret Court
in the final. In Hobart, King won the Tasmanian Championships by defeating Judy Tegart Dalton in the final. King then won the Australian Championships for the first time, defeating Dalton in the semifinals and Court in the final. King continued to win tournaments upon her return to the United States, winning three indoor tournaments before Nancy Richey Gunter defeated King in the semifinals of the Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
Challenge Trophy amateur tournament in New York City before 10,233 spectators.[43] The match started with Gunter taking a 4–2 lead in the first set, before King won 9 of the next 10 games. King served for the match at 5–1 and had a match point at 5–3 in the second set; however, she lost the final 12 games and the match 4–6, 7–5, 6–0.[44] King then won three consecutive tournaments in Europe before losing to Ann Haydon-Jones in the final of a professional tournament at Madison Square Garden. Playing the French Open
French Open
for only the second time in her career and attempting to win four consecutive Grand Slam singles titles (a "non-calendar year Grand Slam"), King defeated Maria Bueno in a quarterfinal before losing to Gunter in a semifinal 2–6, 6–3, 6–4. King rebounded to win her third consecutive Wimbledon singles title, defeating Jones in the semifinals and Dalton in the final. At the US Open, King defeated Bueno in a semifinal before being upset in the final by Virginia Wade. On September 24, she had surgery to repair cartilage in her left knee[45] and did not play in tournaments the remainder of the year. King said that it took eight months (May 1969) for her knee to recover completely from the surgery.[46] In 1977, King said that her doctors predicted in 1968 that her left knee would allow her to play competitive tennis for only two more years.[47] 1969[edit] King participated in the 1969 Australian summer tour for the second consecutive year. Unlike the previous year, King did not win a tournament. She lost in the quarterfinals of the Tasmanian Championships and the semifinals of the New South Wales Championships. At the Australian Open, King defeated 17-year-old Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
in the second round 6–3, 6–1 and Ann Haydon-Jones
Ann Haydon-Jones
in a three-set semifinal before losing to Margaret Court
Margaret Court
in a straight-sets final. The following week, King lost in the semifinals of the New Zealand Championships. Upon her return to the United States, King won the Pacific Coast Pro and the Los Angeles Pro. King then won two tournaments in South Africa, including the South African Open. During the European summer clay court season, King lost in the quarterfinals of both the Italian Open and the French Open. On grass at the Wills Open in Bristol, United Kingdom, King defeated Virginia Wade in the semifinals (6–8, 11–9, 6–2) before losing to Court. At Wimbledon, King lost only 13 points while defeating Rosemary Casals in the semifinals 6–1, 6–0;[48] however, Jones upset King in the final and prevented King from winning her fourth consecutive singles title there. The week after, King again defeated Wade to win the Irish Open for the second time in her career. In the final Grand Slam tournament of the year, King lost in the quarterfinals of the US Open to Nancy Richey Gunter 6–4, 8–6. This was the first year since 1965 that King did not win at least one Grand Slam singles title. King finished the year with titles at the Pacific Southwest Open in Los Angeles, the Stockholm
Stockholm
Indoors, and the Midland (Texas) Pro. She said during the Pacific Southwest Open, "It has been a bad year for me. My left knee has been OK, but I have been bothered by a severe tennis elbow for seven months. I expect to have a real big year in 1970, though, because I really have the motivation now. I feel like a kid again."[49] 1970[edit] In 1970, Margaret Court
Margaret Court
won all four Grand Slam singles tournaments and was clearly the World No. 1. King lost to Court three times in the first four months of the year, in Philadelphia, Dallas, and Johannesburg
Johannesburg
(at the South African Open). Court, however, was not totally dominant during this period as King defeated her in Sydney and Durban, South Africa. Where Court dominated was at the Grand Slam tournaments. King did not play the Australian Open. King had leg cramps and lost to Helga Niessen Masthoff
Helga Niessen Masthoff
of West Germany
West Germany
in the quarter finals of the French Open
French Open
2–6, 8–6, 6–1.[50] At Wimbledon, Court needed seven match points[51] to defeat King in the final 14–12, 11–9 in one of the greatest women's finals in the history of the tournament.[52] On July 22,[53] King had right knee surgery, which forced her to miss the US Open. King returned to the tour in September, where she had a first round loss at the Virginia Slims Invitational in Houston
Houston
and a semifinal loss at the Pacific Coast Championships in Berkeley, California. To close out the year, King in November won the Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
Invitational in Richmond, Virginia and the Embassy Indoor Tennis Championships in London. During the European clay court season, King warmed-up for the French Open
French Open
by playing in Monte Carlo
Monte Carlo
(losing in the semifinals), winning the Italian Open (saving three match points against Virginia Wade in the semifinals),[54] playing in Bournemouth
Bournemouth
(losing to Wade in the quarterfinals), and playing in Berlin (losing to Masthoff in the semifinals). The Italian Open victory was the first important clay court title of King's career. Along the way, she defeated Masthoff in a three-set quarterfinal and Wade in a three-set semifinal, saving two match points at 4–5 in the second set. The twelfth game of that set (with King leading 6–5) had 21 deuces and lasted 22 minutes,[55] with Wade saving seven set points and holding sixteen game points before King won. In Wightman Cup
Wightman Cup
competition two weeks before Wimbledon but played at the All England Club, King defeated both Wade and Ann Haydon-Jones
Ann Haydon-Jones
in straight sets. 1971[edit] Although King won only one Grand Slam singles title in 1971, this was the best year of her career in terms of tournaments won (17). According to the International Tennis Hall of Fame, she played in 31 singles tournaments and compiled a 112–13 win–loss record.[6] She started the year by winning eight of the first thirteen tournaments she played, defeating Rosemary Casals in seven finals. King's five losses during this period were to Françoise Dürr (twice), Casals (once), Ann Haydon-Jones
Ann Haydon-Jones
(once), and Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(in St. Petersburg). At the time, King said that retiring from the match with Evert after splitting the first two sets was necessary because of leg cramps. But in early 1972, King admitted that cramps associated with the abortion caused the retirement.[56] At the tournament in Hurlingham, United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in early May, King lost a second round match to an old rival, Christine Truman Janes (now 30 years old), 6–4, 6–2. But King recovered the next week to win the German Open in Hamburg on clay. Four weeks later at the Queen's Club tournament in London, King played Margaret Court
Margaret Court
for the first time in 1971, losing their final. At Wimbledon, King defeated Janes in the fourth round (6–2, 7–5) and Durr in the quarterfinals before losing unexpectedly to Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
in the semifinals 6–4, 6–4. Two weeks after Wimbledon, King won the grass court tournament in Hoylake, United Kingdom, beating Virginia Wade, Court, and Casals in the last three rounds. She then played two clay court tournaments in Europe, winning neither, before resuming play in the United States. In August, King won the indoor Houston
Houston
tournament and the U.S. Women's Clay Court Championships in Indianapolis. King then switched back to grass and won the US Open without losing a set, defeating Evert in the semifinals (6–3, 6–2) and Casals in the final. King then won the tournaments in Louisville, Phoenix, and London (Wembley Pro). King and Casals both defaulted at 6–6 in the final of the Pepsi Pacific Southwest Open in Los Angeles in September when their request to remove a lineswoman was denied, eventually resulting in the United States Lawn Tennis Association fining both players US$2,500.[57] To end the year, King played two tournaments in New Zealand but did not win either. She lost in Christchurch
Christchurch
to Durr and in Auckland
Auckland
to Kerry Melville Reid. 1972[edit] King won three Grand Slam singles titles in 1972, electing not to play the Australian Open
Australian Open
despite being nearby when she played in New Zealand in late 1971. King said, "I was twenty-eight years old, and I was at the height of my powers. I'm quite sure I could have won the Grand Slam [in] ... 1972, but the Australian was such a minor-league tournament at that time.... More important, I did not want to miss any Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
winter tournaments. I was playing enough as it was."[58] Her dominance was aided by rival Margaret Court's absence from the tour due to childbirth during most of the 1972 season. At the beginning of the year, King failed to win eight of the first ten tournaments she played. She won the title in San Francisco in mid-January. But then King lost in Long Beach to Françoise Dürr (although King claimed in her 1982 autobiography that she intentionally lost the match because of an argument with her husband[59]) and in Fort Lauderdale on clay to Chris Evert
Chris Evert
6–1, 6–0. The inconsistent results continued through mid-April, in Oklahoma City
Oklahoma City
(losing in the quarterfinals); Washington, D.C. (losing in the second round); and Dallas (losing to Nancy Richey Gunter after defeating Evert in the quarterfinals 6–7(4–5), 6–3, 7–5 and Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
in the semifinals 1–6, 6–4, 6–1).[60] King won the title in Richmond; however, one week later, King lost in the semifinals of the tournament in San Juan. This was followed in successive weeks by a loss in the Jacksonville final to Marie Neumannova Pinterova and in a St. Petersburg semifinal to Evert (6–2, 6–3). King did not lose again until mid-August, winning six consecutive tournaments. She won the tournaments in Tucson and Indianapolis. King then won the French Open
French Open
without losing a set and completed a career Grand Slam. She defeated Virginia Wade in the quarterfinals, Helga Niessen Masthoff in the semifinals, and Goolagong in the final.[61] On grass, King then won the Wimbledon warm-up tournaments in Nottingham and Bristol
Bristol
and won Wimbledon itself for the fourth time. She lost only one set during the tournament, to Wade in the quarterfinals. That was followed by straight set wins over Rosemary Casals and Goolagong. When the tour returned to the United States, King did not win any of the three tournaments she played before the US Open, including a straight sets loss to Margaret Court
Margaret Court
in Newport. At the US Open, however, King won the tournament without losing a set, including a quarterfinal win over Wade, a semifinal defeat of Court, and a final win over Kerry Melville
Kerry Melville
Reid. King finished the year by winning the tournaments in Charlotte and Phoenix (defeating Court in the final of both), a runner-up finish in Oakland
Oakland
(losing to Court), and a semifinal finish in Boca Raton (losing to Evert). 1973[edit] 1973 was Margaret Court's turn to win three Grand Slam singles titles, failing to win only Wimbledon, and was the clear World No. 1 for the year; this was her first full season since winning the Grand Slam in 1970, as she had missed significant portions of 1971 and 1972 due to childbirth. As during the previous year, King started 1973 inconsistently. She missed the first three Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
tournaments in January because of a wrist injury.[62] She then lost in the third round at the Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
of Miami
Miami
tournament but won the Virginia Slims of Indianapolis
Indianapolis
tournament, defeating Court in the semifinals 6–7, 7–6, 6–3 and Rosemary Casals in the final. The semifinal victory ended Court's 12-tournament and 59-match winning streaks,[63] with King saving at least three match points when down 5–4 (40–0) in the second set. Indianapolis
Indianapolis
was followed by five tournaments that King failed to win (Detroit, Boston, Chicago, Jacksonville, and the inaugural Family Circle Cup
Family Circle Cup
in Hilton Head, South Carolina). King lost to Court in two of those tournaments. After deciding not to defend her French Open
French Open
singles title, King won four consecutive tournaments, including her fifth Wimbledon singles title when she defeated Kerry Melville Reid in the quarterfinals, Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
in the semifinals on her eighth match point,[64] and Chris Evert
Chris Evert
in the final. King lost only nine points in the 6–0 bageling of Evert in the first set of their final.[65] King also completed the Triple Crown at Wimbledon (winning the singles, women's doubles, and mixed doubles titles in the same year), thus becoming the first, and only, player to do so at Wimbledon in the Open Era. In none of the preceding tournaments, however, did King play Court. Their rivalry resumed in the final of the Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
of Nashville tournament, where Court won for the third time in four matches against King in 1973. (This was the last ever singles match between those players, with Court winning 21 and King 13 of their 34 matches.) Three weeks later at the US Open, King retired from her fourth-round match with Julie Heldman
Julie Heldman
while ill[66] and suffering from the oppressive heat and humidity. When Heldman complained to the match umpire that King was taking too long between games, King reportedly told Heldman, "If you want the match that badly, you can have it!"[67] The Battle of the Sexes match against Bobby Riggs
Bobby Riggs
was held in the middle of the Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
of Houston tournament. King won her first and second round matches three days before playing Riggs, defeated Riggs, won her quarterfinal match the day after the Riggs match, and then lost the following day to Casals in the semifinals 7–6, 6–1. According to King, "I had nothing left to give."[68] To end the year, King won tournaments in Phoenix, Hawaii, and Tokyo and was the runner-up in Baltimore. Battle of the Sexes[edit] Main article: Battle of the Sexes (tennis) In 1973, King defeated Bobby Riggs
Bobby Riggs
in an exhibition match, winning $100,000. Riggs had been a top men's player in the 1930s and 1940s in both the amateur and professional ranks. He won the Wimbledon men's singles title in 1939, and was considered the World No. 1 male tennis player for 1941, 1946, and 1947. He then became a self-described tennis "hustler" who played in promotional challenge matches. In 1973, he took on the role of male chauvinist. Claiming that the women's game was so inferior to the men's game that even a 55-year-old like himself could beat the current top female players, he challenged and defeated Margaret Court
Margaret Court
6–2, 6–1. King, who previously had rejected challenges from Riggs, then accepted a lucrative financial offer to play him for $100,000, winner-take-all. Dubbed "the Battle of the Sexes", the Riggs-King match took place at the Houston
Houston
Astrodome in Texas on September 20, 1973. The match garnered huge publicity. In front of 30,492 spectators and a television audience estimated at 50 million people (U.S.), and 90 million in 37 countries, 29-year-old King beat the 55-year-old Riggs 6–4, 6–3, 6–3. The match is considered a very significant event in developing greater recognition and respect for women's tennis. King said, "I thought it would set us back 50 years if I didn't win that match. It would ruin the women's [tennis] tour and affect all women's self-esteem,"[69] and that "To beat a 55-year-old guy was no thrill for me. The thrill was exposing a lot of new people to tennis."[70] 1974[edit] King won five of the first seven tournaments she contested in 1974. She won the Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
of San Francisco, defeating Nancy Richey Gunter in the semifinals and Chris Evert
Chris Evert
in the final. The following week in Indian Wells, California, King again defeated Gunter in the semifinals but lost to Evert in the final. King then won tournaments in Fairfax, Virginia
Fairfax, Virginia
and Detroit before losing a semifinal match to Virginia Wade in Chicago. King won both tournaments she played in March, defeating Gunter in the Akron, Ohio
Akron, Ohio
final and Evert at the U.S. Indoor Championships final. Olga Morozova then upset King in her next two tournaments, at Philadelphia in the final and at Wimbledon in a quarterfinal 7–5, 6–2. Afterward, King did not play a tour match until the US Open, where she won her fourth singles title and third in the last four years. She defeated Rosemary Casals in a straight sets quarterfinal, avenged in the semifinals her previous year's loss to Julie Heldman, and narrowly defeated Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
in the final. King did not reach a tournament final during the remainder of the year, losing to Heldman in an Orlando semifinal, Wade in a Phoenix semifinal, and Goolagong in a semifinal of the tour-ending Virginia Slims Championships in Los Angeles. 1975[edit] In 1975, King played singles only half the year, as she retired (temporarily, as it turned out) from tournament singles competition immediately after winning her sixth Wimbledon singles title. She began the year in San Francisco, defeating Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
and Virginia Wade before losing to Chris Evert
Chris Evert
in the final. The following week, King won the Sarasota, Florida
Sarasota, Florida
tournament, defeating Evert in the final 6–3, 6–2. Evert said immediately after the final, which was her thirteenth career match with King, "I think that's the best that Billie Jean
Billie Jean
has ever played. I hit some great shots but they just kept coming back at me."[71] Looking back at that match, King said, "I probably played so well because I had to, for the money. Out of frustration comes creativity. Right?"[72] Two months later, Wade defeated King in the semifinals of the Philadelphia tournament. At the Austin, Texas
Austin, Texas
tournament in April, King defeated Evonne Goolagong 6–1, 6–3 before losing to Evert in the final. As King was serving for the match at 6–5 in the third set, a disputed line call went in Evert's favor. King said after the match that she was cheated out of the match and that she had never been angrier about a match.[73] King played only one of the Wimbledon warm-up tournaments, defeating Olga Morozova in the Eastbourne semifinals before losing to Wade in the final. Seeded third at Wimbledon, King defeated seventh seeded Morozova in the quarterfinals (6–3, 6–3) and then top seeded Evert in the semifinals (2–6, 6–2, 6–3) after being down 3–0 (40–15) in the final set.[74] Evert blamed her semifinal defeat on a loss of concentration when she saw Jimmy Connors, her former fiancé, escorting Susan George into Centre Court. King, however, believes that the match turned around because King planned for and totally prepared for Wimbledon that year and told herself when she was on the verge of defeat, "Hey, Billie Jean, this is ridiculous. You paid the price. For once, you looked ahead. You're supposed to win. Get your bahoola in gear."[74] King then defeated fourth seeded Goolagong Cawley in the second most lopsided women's final ever at Wimbledon (6–0, 6–1). King called her performance a "near perfect match" and said to the news media, "I'm never coming back."[75] The later years: 1976 through 1990[edit] 1976[edit] Except for five Federation Cup singles matches that she won in straight sets in August, King played only in doubles and mixed doubles events from January through September. She partnered Phil Dent to the mixed doubles title at the US Open. She lost to Dianne Fromholtz Balestrat in both of the singles tournaments she played the remainder of the year. Looking back, King said, "I wasted 1976. After watching Chris Evert
Chris Evert
and Evonne [Goolagong] Cawley play the final at Wimbledon I asked myself what I was doing. So, despite my age and the operations, the Old Lady came back...."[76] King had knee surgery for the third time on November 9,[77] this time on her right knee,[78] and did not play the remainder of the year. 1977[edit] King spent the first three months of the year rehabilitating her right knee after surgery in November 1976.[79] In March 1977, King requested that the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) exercise its right to grant a wild card entry to King for the eight-player Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
Championships at Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
in New York City. Margaret Court, who finished in sixth place on the Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
points list, failed to qualify for the tournament because she did not play enough Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
tournaments leading up to the championships. This left a spot open in the draw, which the WTA filled with Mima Jaušovec. King then decided to play the Lionel Cup tournament in San Antonio, Texas, which the WTA harshly criticized because tournament officials there had allowed transsexual Renée Richards to enter.[80] Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova, and Betty Stöve (president of the WTA) criticized King's decision because of Richards's unresolved and highly controversial status on the women's tennis tour. Evert said she was disappointed with King and that until Richards's status was resolved, "all of the women should stick together." Navratilova said, " Billie Jean
Billie Jean
is a bad girl pouting. She made a bad decision. She's mad because she could not get what she wanted." Stöve said that if King had wanted the competition, "[T]here are plenty of men around here she could've played with. She didn't have to choose a 'disputed' tournament."[81] The draw in San Antonio called for King to play Richards in the semifinals had form held; however, Richards lost in the quarterfinals. King eventually won the tournament. At the clay court Family Circle Cup
Family Circle Cup
in late March, King played for the last time her long-time rival Nancy Richey Gunter in the first round. King won 0–6, 7–6, 6–2. She defeated another clay court specialist, Virginia Ruzici, in the second round before winning only one game from Evert in the final. At Wimbledon in the third round, King played Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
for the last time, with King winning 6–2, 7–5. In the quarterfinals, Evert defeated King for the first time at a Grand Slam singles tournament and for the first time on grass 6–1, 6–2 in just 46 minutes. Evert said it was the best match she had ever played on grass up to that point in her career,[82] and King said, "No excuses. Let's forget knees, ankles, toes, everything else. She just played beautiful tennis. I don't think many players would've beaten her today."[83] King also said after the match, "Maybe I can be happy being number eight instead of number one. At this stage, just playing, that's winning enough for me."[84] But when asked about retirement, King said, "Retire? Quit tournament tennis? You gotta be kidding. It just means I've got a lot more work. I've got to make myself match tough ... mentally as well as physically. I gotta go out and kill myself for the next six months. It's a long, arduous process. I will suffer. But I will be back."[85] There was a small historic note at Wimbledon 1977 in that it was the first time ever that King competed at the championships that she did not reach a final. From her debut in 1961 until 1976, she had played in the final of one of the three championship events for women every year. Perhaps there was irony in this in that as the Wimbledon champion with the most titles in its history, the event was celebrating its centenary in the year King failed to make a final for the first time. The only other years she competed at the championship and did not feature in a final were 1980 and 1982. In her entire Wimbledon career of 22 competitions, King never failed to be a semi-finalist in at least one event every year.[86] Evert repeated her Wimbledon quarterfinal victory over King at the clay court US Open, winning 6–2, 6–0. This loss prompted King to say, "I better get it together by October or November or that's it. I'll have to make some big decisions. I'm not 20-years-old and I can't just go out and change my game. It's only the last four weeks I haven't been in [knee] pain. [But if] I keep using that as a copout, I shouldn't play."[87] The remainder of the year, King's win–loss record was 31–3, losing only to Evert, Dianne Fromholtz
Dianne Fromholtz
Balestrat, and Michelle Tyler Wilson. King won five of the eight tournaments she entered plus both of her Wightman Cup
Wightman Cup
matches. She defeated Navratilova all four times they played, including three times in three consecutive weeks, and beat Wimbledon champion Virginia Wade twice. Beginning September 26, King played seven consecutive weeks. She lost to Tyler in the second round in Palm Harbor, Florida
Palm Harbor, Florida
and Fromholtz Balestrat in the semifinals in Atlanta. She then won three hard court tournaments in three consecutive weeks. She defeated Navratilova and Wendy Turnbull
Wendy Turnbull
to win in Phoenix, losing only four points to Turnbull in the third set of the final.[88] The next week, she defeated Navratilova, Fromholtz Balestrat, and Wimbledon runner-up Stöve to win in São Paulo. The third week, she defeated Ruzici, Stöve, and Janet Newberry Wright to win in San Juan. In November, Evert snapped King's 18-match winning streak in the final of the Colgate Series Championships in Mission Hills, California. King then won her Wightman Cup
Wightman Cup
matches, defeated Navratilova to win the tournament in Japan, and beat Wade to win the Bremar Cup in London. King said, "I have never had a run like this, even in the years when I was Wimbledon champion. At 34, I feel fitter than when I was 24."[89] 1978[edit]

King in 1978 photographed by Lynn Gilbert
Lynn Gilbert
(1978)

King played ten singles tournaments during the first half of 1978, limiting herself to doubles after Wimbledon. To start the year, King was the runner-up in Houston
Houston
and Kansas City (losing to Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
in both) and in Philadelphia (losing to Chris Evert). At the Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
Championships, King lost her first round robin match to Virginia Wade and defaulted her two remaining round robin matches because of a leg injury sustained during the first match. At Wimbledon, King played with a painful heel spur in her left foot and lost to Evert in the quarterfinals for the second consecutive year 6–3, 3–6, 6–2. The match was on-serve in the third set with King serving at 2–3 (40–0) before Evert won five consecutive points to break serve. King won a total of only two points during the last two games. King said after the match, "I don't think my mobility is very good and that's what I need to beat her. Physically, she [Evert] tears your guts apart unless you can stay with her. I'm really disappointed. I really wanted to play well. I just couldn't cut it because of my heel."[90] King and her partner Ray Ruffels
Ray Ruffels
lost in the final of mixed doubles in straight sets. King teamed with Navratilova to win the women's doubles title at the US Open, King's fourth women's doubles title at that tournament and fourteenth Grand Slam women's doubles title overall. To end the year, King was undefeated in five doubles matches (four with Evert and one with Rosemary Casals) as the U.S. won the Federation Cup in Melbourne, Australia. During the Federation Cup competition, King hinted at retirement from future major singles competitions and said that she was "sick and tired of continued surgery" in trying to get fit enough for those events.[91] Nevertheless, King had foot surgery on December 22 in an attempt to regain mobility for a return to the tennis tour.[92] 1979[edit] During the first half of 1979, King played only one event – doubles in the Federation Cup tie against Spain
Spain
– because of major surgery to her left foot during December 1978. King returned to singles competition at the Wimbledon warm-up tournament in Chichester. She defeated the reigning Wimbledon champion, Martina Navratilova, in a 48-minute quarterfinal 6–1, 6–2[93] before losing to Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
Cawley in the semifinals 1–6, 6–4, 10–8. Seeded seventh at Wimbledon, King defeated Hana Mandlíková in the fourth round before losing the last six games[94] of the quarterfinal match with fourth-seeded Tracy Austin
Tracy Austin
6–4, 6–7(5), 6–2. King partnered with Navratilova at Wimbledon to win King's 20th and final Wimbledon title, breaking Elizabeth Ryan's longstanding record of 19 Wimbledon titles just one day after Ryan collapsed and died at Wimbledon.[95] At the US Open, the ninth-seeded King reached the quarterfinals without dropping a set, where she upset the fourth-seeded Virginia Wade 6–3, 7–6(4). Next up was a semifinal match with the four-time defending champion and top-seeded Chris Evert; however, with King hampered by a neck injury sustained during a bear hug with a friend the day before the match, Evert won 6–1, 6–0, including the last eleven games and 48 of the last 63 points.[96] This was Evert's eighth consecutive win over King, with Evert during those matches losing only one set and 31 games and winning four 6–0 sets.[96] Evert said after the match, "Psychologically, I feel very confident when I ... play her."[96] The following week in Tokyo, King won her first singles title in almost two years, defeating Goolagong Cawley in the final. In November in Stockholm, King defeated Betty Stöve
Betty Stöve
in the final after Stöve lost her concentration while serving for the match at 5–4 in the third set.[97] Three weeks later in Brighton, King lost a semifinal match with Navratilova 7–5, 0–6, 7–6(3) after King led 6–5 in the third set.[98] She ended the year with a quarterfinal loss in Melbourne (not the Australian Open), a second round loss in Sydney, and a three-set semifinal loss to Austin in Tokyo. 1980–1981[edit] King won the tournament in Houston
Houston
that began in February, snapping Martina Navratilova's 28-match winning streak in the straight-sets final.[99] At the winter series-ending Avon Championships in March, King defeated Virginia Wade in her first round robin match 6–1, 6–3. After Wade held serve at love to open the match, King won nine consecutive games and lost only nine points during those games.[100] King then lost her second round robin match to Navratilova and defeated Wendy Turnbull
Wendy Turnbull
in an elimination round match, before losing to Tracy Austin
Tracy Austin
in the semifinals King played the 1980 French Open, her first time since she won the event in 1972 and completed a career singles Grand Slam.[citation needed] She was seeded second but lost in the quarterfinals to fifth-seeded Dianne Fromholtz Balestrat
Dianne Fromholtz Balestrat
of Australia.[101] At Wimbledon, King defeated Pam Shriver in a two-hour, forty minute fourth round match after King saved a match point in the second set and recovered from a 4–2 (40–0) deficit in the third set with Shriver serving.[102] In a quarterfinal that took two days to complete, King lost to two-time defending champion and top-seeded Navratilova 7–6, 1–6, 10–8. The beginning of the match was delayed until late afternoon because of rain. Because she wore eyeglasses, King agreed to start the match then on condition that tournament officials immediately suspend the match if the rain resumed. During the first set, drizzle began to fall; however, the chair umpire refused to suspend the match. King led in the tiebreaker 5–1 before Navratilova came back to win the set, whereupon the umpire then agreed to the suspension. When the match resumed the next day, King won 20 of the first 23 points to take a 5–0 lead in the second set and lost a total of seven points while winning the set in just 17 minutes. In the third set, Navratilova broke serve to take a 2–0 lead before King broke back twice and eventually served for the match at 6–5. King then hit four volley errors, enabling Navratilova to break serve at love and even the match. King saved three match points while serving at 6–7 and three more match points while serving at 7–8. During the change-over between games at 8–9, King's eyeglasses broke for the first time in her career. She had a spare pair, but they did not feel the same. King saved two match points before Navratilova broke serve to win the match. King said, "I think that may be the single match in my career that I could have won if I hadn't had bad eyes."[103][104][105] King teamed with Navratilova to win King's 39th and final Grand Slam title at the US Open. Navratilova then decided she wanted a new doubles partner and started playing with Shriver but refused to discuss the change directly with King. She finally confronted Navratilova during the spring of 1981, reportedly saying to her, "Tell me I'm too old ... but tell me something." Navratilova refused to talk about it.[106] King had minor knee surgery on November 14 in San Francisco to remove adhesions and cartilage.[107] 1982–1983[edit] In 1982, King was 38 years old and the twelfth-seed at Wimbledon. In her third round match with Tanya Harford of South Africa, King was down 7–5, 5–4 (40–0) before saving three match points[108] to win the second set 7–6(2) and then the third set 6–3. King said in her post-match press conference, "I can't recall the previous time I have been so close to defeat and won. When I was down 4–5 and love–40, I told myself, 'You have been here 21 years, so use that experience and hang on.'"[109] In the fourth round, King upset sixth-seeded Australian Wendy Turnbull
Wendy Turnbull
in straight sets. King then upset third-seeded Tracy Austin
Tracy Austin
in the quarterfinals 3–6, 6–4, 6–2 to become the oldest female semifinalist at Wimbledon since Dorothea Douglass Lambert Chambers in 1920. This was King's first career victory over Austin after five defeats and reversed the result of their 1979 Wimbledon quarterfinal. King said in her post-match press conference, "Today, I looked at the scoreboard when I was 2–0 in the third set and the '2' seemed to be getting bigger and bigger. In 1979, when I was up 2–0 at the same stage, I was tired and didn't have anything left. But today I felt so much better and was great mentally."[110] Two days later in the semifinals, which was King's 250th career match at Wimbledon in singles, women's doubles, and mixed doubles,[111] the second-seeded Chris Evert
Chris Evert
defeated King on her fifth match point 7–6(4), 2–6, 6–3. King was down a set and 2–1 in the second set before winning five consecutive games to even the match.[112] King explained that she actually lost the match in the first set by failing to convert break points at 15–40 in the second and fourth games.[113] She reached the semifinals in her final appearance at Wimbledon, losing to Andrea Jaeger 6–1, 6–1 after beating Kathy Jordan in the quarterfinals, seventh-seeded Wendy Turnbull
Wendy Turnbull
in the fourth round, and Rosemary Casals, her longtime doubles partner, in the third round. Jaeger claims that she was highly motivated to defeat King because King had defeated Turnbull, a favorite of Jaeger's, and because King refused a towel from an attendant just before her match with Jaeger, explaining, "I'm not going to sweat in this match."[114] King became the oldest WTA player to win a singles tournament when she won the Edgbaston Cup grass court tournament in Birmingham at 39 years, 7 months and 23 days after a straight-sets victory in the final against Alycia Moulton.[115] The final official singles match of King's career was a second round loss to Catherine Tanvier at the 1983 Australian Open. 1984 to present[edit] King played doubles sporadically from 1984 through 1990. She retired from competitive play in doubles in March 1990. In her last competitive doubles match, King and her partner, Jennifer Capriati, lost a second round match to Brenda Schultz-McCarthy and Andrea Temesvári 6–3, 6–2 at the Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
of Florida tournament. King became the captain of the United States
United States
Fed Cup
Fed Cup
team and coach of its women's Olympic tennis squad. She guided the U.S. to the Fed Cup championship in 1996 and helped Lindsay Davenport, Gigi Fernández, and Mary Joe Fernández
Mary Joe Fernández
capture Olympic gold medals. In 2002, King dismissed Capriati from the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
team, saying Capriati had violated rules that forbade bringing along and practicing with personal coaches.[116] Opinion was sharply divided, with many supporting King's decision but many feeling the punishment was too harsh, especially in hindsight when Monica Seles
Monica Seles
and Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
were defeated by lower-ranked Austrians Barbara Schett
Barbara Schett
and Barbara Schwartz. The following year, Zina Garrison
Zina Garrison
succeeded King as Fed Cup captain. Activism within the tennis profession[edit] Player compensation[edit] Before the start of the open era in 1968, King earned US$100 a week as a playground instructor and student at Los Angeles State College
Los Angeles State College
when not playing in major tennis tournaments.[69] In 1967, King criticized the United States
United States
Lawn Tennis Association (USLTA) in a series of press conferences, denouncing what she called the USLTA's practice of "shamateurism", where top players were paid under the table to guarantee their entry into tournaments. King argued that this was corrupt and kept the game highly elitist. King quickly became a significant force in the opening of tennis to professionalism. King said this about the amateur game,

In America, tennis players are not people. If you are in tennis, you are a cross between a panhandler and a visiting in-law. You're not respected, you're tolerated. In England, you're respected as an artist. In Europe, you're a person of importance. Manuel Santana
Manuel Santana
gets decorated by Franco. The Queen leads the applause. How many times have I been presented at the White House? You work all your life to win Wimbledon and Forest Hills and all the people say is, "That's nice. Now what are you going to do with your life?" They don't ask Mickey Mantle that. Stop 12 people on the street and ask them who Roy Emerson is and they're stuck for an answer, but they know the third-string right guard for the Rams. I'd like to see tennis get out of its "sissy" image and see some guy yell, "Hit it, ya bum" and see it be a game you don't have to have a lorgnette or a sash across your tuxedo to get in to watch.[117]

Push for gender equality[edit] When the open era began, King campaigned for equal prize money in the men's and women's games. In 1971, with ideas for the formation of an eight player women's group from her husband, Larry King, financial backing of World Tennis magazine founder, Gladys Heldman, and the sponsorship of Virginia Slims
Virginia Slims
Chairman Joe Coleman, King became the first woman athlete to earn over US$100,000 in prize money;[118] however, inequalities continued. King won the US Open in 1972 but received US$15,000 less than the men's champion Ilie Năstase. She stated that she would not play the next year if the prize money were not equal. In 1973, the US Open became the first major tournament to offer equal prize money for men and women. King led player efforts to support the first professional women's tennis tour in the 1970s called the Virginia Slims, founded by Gladys Heldman and funded by Joseph Cullman of Philip Morris.[119] Once the tour took flight, King worked tirelessly to promote it even though many of the other top players were not supportive. "For three years we had two tours and because of their governments [Martina] Navratilova and Olga Morozova had to play the other tour. Chris [Evert], Margaret [Court], Virginia [Wade], they let us do the pioneering work and they weren't very nice to us. If you go back and look at the old quotes; they played for the love of the game, we played for the money. When we got backing and money, we were all playing together – I wonder why? I tried not to get upset with them. Forgiveness is important. Our job was to have one voice and win them over."[120] In 1973, King became the first President of the women's players union – the Women's Tennis Association. In 1974, she, with husband Larry King and Jim Jorgensen, founded womenSports magazine and started the Women's Sports Foundation.[121] Also in 1974, World TeamTennis
World TeamTennis
began, founded by Larry King, Dennis Murphy, Frank Barman and Jordan Kaiser.[122] She became league commissioner in 1982 and major owner in 1984. King is a member of the Board of Honorary Trustees for the Sports Museum of America,[123] which opened in 2008. The museum is the home of the Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King International Women's Sports Center, a comprehensive women's sports hall of fame and exhibit.[124] Other activities[edit] King and her then-husband Larry co-founded World Team Tennis in 1974.[125] The couple used their savings to put on a team tennis event at the Oakland
Oakland
Coliseum.[125] King remained involved with World Team Tennis for decades, eventually sharing ownership with her ex-husband, her life partner Ilana Kloss
Ilana Kloss
and USTA.[125] In 1999, King was elected to serve on the Board of Directors of Philip Morris Incorporated, garnering some criticism from anti-tobacco groups.[126] She no longer serves in that capacity. As of 2012 King was involved in the Women's Sports Foundation and the Elton John
Elton John
AIDS Foundation.[127] She also served on the President's Council for Fitness, Sports and Nutrition as a way to encourage young people to stay active[127] In 2008, King published the book Pressure is a Privilege: Lessons I've Learned from Life and the Battle of the Sexes.[128] In December 2013, US President Barack Obama
Barack Obama
appointed King and openly gay ice hockey player Caitlin Cahow
Caitlin Cahow
to represent the United States
United States
at the 2014 Winter Olympics
2014 Winter Olympics
in Sochi, Russia. This has been interpreted as a signal on gay rights, in the context of concerns and controversies at the 2014 Winter Olympics
2014 Winter Olympics
regarding LGBT
LGBT
rights in Russia.[129] King was forced to drop out of the delegation due to her mother's ill health. Betty Moffitt, King's mother, died on February 7, 2014, the day of the 2014 Winter Olympics
2014 Winter Olympics
opening ceremonies.[130] Billie Jean
Billie Jean
was selected to deliver the Northwestern University commencement address on June 16, 2017 in Evanston, Illinois.[131] She attended the 75th Golden Globe Awards
75th Golden Globe Awards
in 2018 as a guest of Emma Stone.[132] Awards, honors, and tributes[edit] Tributes from other players[edit] Margaret Court, who won more Grand Slam titles than anyone, has said that King was "the greatest competitor I've ever known".[5] Chris Evert, winner of 18 Grand Slam singles titles, has said, "She's the wisest human being that I've ever met and has vision people can only dream about. Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King is my mentor and has given me advice about my tennis and my boyfriends. On dealing with my parents and even how to raise children. And she doesn't have any."[133] In 1979, several top players were asked who they would pick to help them recover from a hypothetical deficit of 1–5 (15–40) in the third set of a match on Wimbledon's Centre Court. Martina Navratilova, Rosemary Casals, and Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
all picked King. Navratilova said, "I would have to pick Billie Jean
Billie Jean
at her best. Consistently, Chris [Evert] is hardest to beat but for one big occasion, one big match, one crucial point, yes, it would have to be Billie Jean." Casals said, "No matter how far down you got her, you never could be sure of beating her."[134] Awards and honors[edit]

King was the Associated Press
Associated Press
Female Athlete of the Year in 1967.[135] In 1972, King became the first tennis player to be named Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year. She was also the first female athlete ever to receive that honor.[136][137] In 1975, Seventeen magazine found that King was the most admired woman in the world from a poll of its readers. Golda Meir, who had been Israel's prime minister until the previous year, finished second.[69] In a May 19, 1975, Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
article about King, Frank Deford noted that she had become something of a sex symbol.[72] King was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame
International Tennis Hall of Fame
in 1987.[6] Life magazine in 1990 named her one of the "100 Most Important Americans of the 20th Century".[69] King was the recipient of the 1999 Arthur Ashe
Arthur Ashe
Courage Award.[138] In 1999 King was inducted into the Chicago Gay and Lesbian
Lesbian
Hall of Fame.[139] In 2000, King received an award from GLAAD, an organization devoted to reducing discrimination against gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgender people, for "furthering the visibility and inclusion of the community in her work".[140] In 2006, the Women's Sports Foundation began to sponsor the Billie Awards, which are named after and hosted by King.[141]

The USTA National Tennis Center
USTA National Tennis Center
in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park was rededicated as the USTA Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King National Tennis Center

On August 28, 2006, the USTA National Tennis Center
USTA National Tennis Center
in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park was rededicated as the USTA Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King National Tennis Center.[142] John McEnroe, Venus Williams, Jimmy Connors, and Chris Evert
Chris Evert
were among the speakers during the rededication ceremony. In 2006, California
California
Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
Arnold Schwarzenegger
and his wife Maria Shriver inducted King into the California
California
Hall of Fame located at The California
California
Museum for History, Women, and the Arts.[143][144] On November 20, 2007, King was presented with the 2007 Sunday Times Sports Women of the Year Lifetime Achievement award for her contribution to sport both on and off the court.[120] She was honored by the Office of the Manhattan Borough President
Manhattan Borough President
in March 2008 and was included in a map of historical sites related or dedicated to important women.[145] On August 12, 2009, President Barack Obama
Barack Obama
awarded King the Presidential Medal of Freedom
Presidential Medal of Freedom
for her work advocating for the rights of women and the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community.[146][147] She was inducted into the Southern California
California
Tennis Hall of Fame on August 5, 2011.[148] On August 2, 2013, King was among the first class of inductees into the National Gay and Lesbian
Lesbian
Sports Hall of Fame.[149] In 2014, she was named one of ESPNW's Impact 25.[150] King was shown in Marie Claire magazine's "The 8 Greatest Moments for Women in Sports".[151]

Playing style and personality[edit] King learned to play tennis on the public courts of Long Beach, California, and was coached by tennis teacher Clyde Walker.[9] She furthered her tennis career at the Los Angeles Tennis Club. She was an aggressive, hard-hitting net-rusher with excellent speed,[69] Chris Evert, however, said about King, "Her weakness is her impatience."[152] Concerning her motivations in life and tennis, King said,

I'm a perfectionist much more than I'm a super competitor, and there's a big difference there.... I've been painted as a person who only competes.... But most of all, I get off on hitting a shot correctly. ... Any woman who wants to achieve anything has to be aggressive and tough, but the press never sees us as multidimensional. They don't see the emotions, the downs....[153]

In a 1984 interview, just after she had turned 40, King said,

Sometimes when I'm watching someone like Martina [Navratilova], I remember how nice it was to be No. 1. Believe me, it's the best time in your life. Don't let anyone ever tell you different. ... My only regret is that I had to do too much off the court. Deep down, I wonder how good I really could have been if I [had] concentrated just on tennis.[154]

Julie Heldman, who frequently played King but never felt close to her, said about King's personality,

One of the reasons I've never gotten close to Billie Jean
Billie Jean
is that I've never felt strong enough to survive against that overwhelming personality of hers. She talks about me being the smart one. Let me tell you, Billie Jean's the smartest one, the cleverest one you'll ever see. She was the one who was able to channel everything into winning, into being the most consummate tennis player.[72]

Kristen Kemmer Shaw, another frequent opponent of King, said,

For a time, I think I was as close to Billie Jean
Billie Jean
as anyone ever was. But as soon as I got to the point where I could read her too well, she tried to dissociate the relationship. She doesn't want to risk appearing weak in front of anybody. She told me once that if you want to be the best, you must never let anyone, anyone, know what you really feel. You see, she told me, they can't hurt you if they don't know.[72]

Concerning the qualities of a champion tennis player, King said,

The difference between me at my peak and me in the last few years of my career is that when I was the champion I had the ultimate in confidence. When I decided, under pressure ... that I had to go with my very weakest shot – forehand down the line – I was positive that I could pull it off ... when it mattered the most. Even more than that; going into a match, I knew it was my weakest shot, and I knew in a tight spot my opponent was going to dare me to hit it, and I knew I could hit it those two or three or four times in a match when I absolutely had to. ... The cliché is to say that ... champions play the big points better. Yes, but that's only the half of it. The champions play their weaknesses better....[155]

In popular culture[edit] King's friend Elton John
Elton John
wrote the song “Philadelphia Freedom”, a nod to her World TeamTennis
World TeamTennis
team, for King. Released New Year's Day 1975, became a number 1 hit.[6] Charles M. Schulz, creator of the Peanuts
Peanuts
comic strip, was an admirer and close friend.[156] Schulz referred to King several times in Peanuts
Peanuts
and used the comic strip to support women’s sports movement after becoming friends with King.[157] Actress Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
portrayed King in the 2001 ABC television film When Billie Beat Bobby.[158] King played a judge on Law & Order in 2007, [159] and appeared as herself on The Odd Couple in 1973, Ugly Betty
Ugly Betty
in May 2009, and Fresh Off The Boat
Fresh Off The Boat
in 2016.[160] Actress Emma Stone
Emma Stone
portrayed King in the 2017 biopic Battle of the Sexes.[161] The Ted Tinling
Ted Tinling
designed dress King wore for the real Battle of the Sexes match is part of a Smithsonian Museum collection.[162] Personal life[edit] Billie Jean
Billie Jean
and Larry King were engaged in fall of 1964[9] and married in Long Beach, California, on September 17, 1965.[163] Billie Jean credited Larry with introducing her to feminism and for pushing her to pursue tennis as a career.[16] Billie Jean
Billie Jean
later said she "was totally in love with Larry" when they married.[120] By 1968, King realized that she was attracted to women,[164] and in 1971, began an intimate relationship with her secretary, Marilyn Barnett (born Marilyn Kathryn McRae on January 28, 1948). King acknowledged the relationship when it became public in a May 1981 'palimony' lawsuit filed by Barnett, making King the first prominent professional female athlete to come out as a bisexual.[120] Feeling she could not admit to the extent of the relationship, King publicly called it a fling and a mistake.[16] She remained married to Larry.[16] The lawsuit caused King to lose an estimated $2 million in endorsements and forced her to prolong her tennis career to pay attorneys.[133] Concerning the personal cost of concealing her sexuality for so many years, King said:

I wanted to tell the truth but my parents were homophobic and I was in the closet. As well as that, I had people tell me that if I talked about what I was going through, it would be the end of the women's tour. I couldn't get a closet deep enough. One of my big goals was always to be honest with my parents and I couldn't be for a long time. I tried to bring up the subject but felt I couldn't. My mother would say, "We're not talking about things like that", and I was pretty easily stopped because I was reluctant anyway. I ended up with an eating disorder that came from trying to numb myself from my feelings. I needed to surrender far sooner than I did. At the age of 51, I was finally able to talk about it properly with my parents and no longer did I have to measure my words with them. That was a turning point for me as it meant I didn't have regrets any more.[120]

Billie Jean
Billie Jean
and Larry remained married through the palimony suit fallout.[16] The marriage ended in 1987 after Billie Jean
Billie Jean
fell in love with her doubles partner, Ilana Kloss.[16] Billie Jean
Billie Jean
and Larry remained on good terms, with Billie Jean
Billie Jean
serving as godmother to Larry's son from his subsequent marriage.[16] King has residences in New York City and Chicago[165] with Kloss, her life partner.[166] Grand Slam statistics[edit] Main article: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King career statistics Grand Slam single finals[edit] 18 finals (12 titles, 6 runner-ups)

Result Year Tournament Surface Opponent Score

Loss 1963 Wimbledon Grass Margaret Court 6–3, 6–4

Loss 1965 U.S. Championships Grass Margaret Court 8–6, 7–5

Win 1966 Wimbledon (1) Grass Maria Bueno 6–3, 3–6, 6–1

Win 1967 Wimbledon (2) Grass Ann Haydon-Jones 6–3, 6–4

Win 1967 U.S. Championships (1) Grass Ann Haydon-Jones 11–9, 6–4

Win 1968 Australian Championships (1) Grass Margaret Court 6–1, 6–2

Win 1968 Wimbledon (3) Grass Judy Tegart Dalton 9–7, 7–5

Loss 1968 US Open Grass Virginia Wade 6–4, 6–2

Loss 1969 Australian Open Grass Margaret Court 6–4, 6–1

Loss 1969 Wimbledon Grass Ann Haydon-Jones 3–6, 6–3, 6–2

Loss 1970 Wimbledon Grass Margaret Court 14–12, 11–9

Win 1971 US Open (2) Grass Rosemary Casals 6–4, 7–6

Win 1972 French Open Clay Evonne Goolagong 6–3, 6–3

Win 1972 Wimbledon (4) Grass Evonne Goolagong 6–3, 6–3

Win 1972 US Open (3) Grass Kerry Melville
Kerry Melville
Reid 6–3, 7–5

Win 1973 Wimbledon (5) Grass Chris Evert 6–0, 7–5

Win 1974 US Open (4) Grass Evonne Goolagong 3–6, 6–3, 7–5

Win 1975 Wimbledon (6) Grass Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
Cawley 6–0, 6–1

Grand Slam tournament timeline[edit]

Key

W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A NH

(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (NH) not held. Singles

Tournament '59 '60 '61 '62 '63 '64 '65 '66 '67 '68 '69 '70 '71 '72 '73 '74 '75 '76 '77 '78 '79 '80 '81 '82 '83 '84 SR W–L

Australian Open A A A A A A SF A A W F A A A A A A A A/A A A A A QF 2R A 1 / 5 16–4

French Open A A A A A A A A QF SF QF QF A W A A A A A A A QF A 3R A A 1 / 7 21–6

Wimbledon A A 2R QF F SF SF W W W F F SF W W QF W A QF QF QF QF A SF SF A 6 / 21 95–15

US Open 1R 3R 2R 1R 4R QF F 2R W F QF A W W 3R W A A QF A SF A A 1R A A 4 / 18 63–14

SR 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 2 0 / 2 0 / 2 0 / 2 0 / 3 1 / 2 2 / 3 2 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 2 1 / 2 3 / 3 1 / 2 1 / 2 1 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 2 0 / 1 0 / 2 0 / 2 0 / 0 0 / 4 0 / 2 0 / 0 12 / 51 195–39

SR = the ratio of the number of singles tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played Note: The Australian Open
Australian Open
was held twice in 1977, in January and December.

See also[edit]

Tennis portal Women's sport portal

List of Grand Slam women's singles champions List of Wimbledon mixed doubles champions List of French Open
French Open
mixed doubles champions List of US Open mixed doubles champions List of French Open
French Open
women's singles champions List of Wimbledon ladies' singles champions List of US Open women's singles champions List of French Open
French Open
women's doubles champions List of Wimbledon ladies' doubles champions List of US Open women's doubles champions List of Open Era tennis records All-time tennis records – women's singles WTA Tour records Open Era tennis records – women's singles Homosexuality in sports in the United States Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King Leadership Initiative

Notes[edit]

^ Five additional women have completed a career Grand Slam since King. ^ Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
also has 20 career titles at Wimbledon. ^ 26–3 in singles and 26–1 in doubles ^ excluding two unfinished matches ^ 14–2 in singles and 8–2 in women's doubles ^ six in singles and three in doubles

References[edit]

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King - Speaker - TED".  ^ Jason Le Miere (August 28, 2015). "Top 10 Women's Tennis Players Of All-Time: Where Does Serena Williams
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Rank On List Of Greatest Ever?". International Business Times. Retrieved January 30, 2017.  ^ "Serena Williams: Is she your greatest female player of the Open era?". BBC Sport. January 28, 2017. Retrieved January 30, 2017.  ^ a b Who Is the Greatest Female Player Ever? Archived December 28, 2008, at the Wayback Machine. ^ a b c d e " International Tennis Hall of Fame
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King". Archived from the original on February 25, 2007. Retrieved February 15, 2007.  ^ "King, Billie Jean
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(1943—) – Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia". Encyclopedia.com. Retrieved June 29, 2014.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Higdon, Hal (August 23, 2013). "Plays Tennis Like a Man, Speaks Out Like — Billie Jean
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- National Women's Hall of Fame". National Women’s Hall of Fame. Retrieved September 15, 2017.  ^ " Billie Jean
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King: Racquet Revolutionary - Page 4 of 5 - Philadelphia Magazine". Philadelphia Magazine. Retrieved 2017-09-30.  ^ Nelson, Murry R. (May 23, 2013). American Sports: A History of Icons, Idols, and Ideas [4 Volumes]: A History of Icons, Idols, and Ideas. ABC-CLIO. p. 665. ISBN 0313397538.  ^ " Billie Jean
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King record in Federation Cup Archived July 23, 2015, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Hollander, Zander; Collins, Bud (1994). Bud Collins' Modern Encyclopedia of Tennis. Detroit, Michigan: Visible Ink Press. pp. 580–1. ISBN 0-8103-9443-X. CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) ^ Teele, Jack, "The Sports Beat", Long Beach Press-Telegram, November 12, 1959, page D-3 ^ a b " Billie Jean
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Lawn Tennis Association prohibited her from playing the French Championships earlier in her career because the association needed her to play grass court tournaments in the United States
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to draw crowds. Starr, Cynthia; King, Billie Jean
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(1988). We Have Come a Long Way: The Story of Women's Tennis. New York: McGraw-Hill. p. 114. ISBN 0-07-034625-9.  ^ "Aussie, Billie Jean
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Tribune, September 11, 1967, page 40-E ^ "News Archive; 1967: Tennis". News.elementfx.com. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ Injury May Force King Out Of Tennis Tourney", Florence Morning News, November 25, 1967, page 6 ^ Anderson, Dave (March 30, 1968). "Miss Richey Upsets Mrs. King, 4–6, 7–5, 6–0, to Gain Garden Tennis Final". The New York Times. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ "News Archive; 1968: Tennis". News.elementfx.com. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ "Mrs. King Undergoes Successful Surgery". The New York Times. June 3, 2011. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ "Surgery for Billie Jean". Independent Press-Telegram. Long Beach, California. July 11, 1970. p. C-1.  ^ "King Will Resume Singles Competition". The Pocono Record. Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. January 20, 1977. p. 14.  ^ "Mrs. King Crushes Foe", Abilene (Texas) Reporter-News, July 3, 1969, page 12-A ^ Billie Jean, Pancho Gain Pacific Southwest Finals", Independent Press-Telegram, Long Beach, California, September 28, 1969, page S-6 ^ Michael Katz (June 4, 1970). "Mrs. King, Hobbled by Leg Cramps, Loses to Miss Niessen in French Tennis". The New York Times. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ "Classic women's singles finals". BBC News. June 11, 2000. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ Margaret Court/Smith (Wimbledon official website) Archived May 15, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. ^ " Billie Jean
Billie Jean
Has Knee Surgery", Wisconsin State Journal, July 23, 1970, section 2, page 3 ^ " Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King, Julia Heldman score victories", Winona (Minnesota) Daily News, April 26, 1970, page 7b ^ Tingay, Lance (1983). The Guinness Book
Book
of Tennis Facts & Feats. Enfield, Middlesex: Guinness Superlatives. p. 26. ISBN 0-85112-268-X.  ^ "Tennis Pro Favors Abortion", Tucson (Arizona) Daily-Citizen, February 23, 1972, page 16. ^ "Female tennis stars 'even'", The Idaho Free Press, January 5, 1972, page 12 ^ Deford, Frank; King, Billie Jean
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(1982). Billie Jean. New York, N.Y.: Viking. p. 20. ISBN 0-670-47843-1.  ^ Deford, Frank; King, Billie Jean
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(1982). Billie Jean. New York, N.Y.: Viking. p. 93. ISBN 0-670-47843-1.  ^ For a description of the Dallas tournanment in 1972, see the Sports Illustrated article "Shoot-Out at the T Bar M" Archived December 9, 2008, at the Wayback Machine. ^ After winning the French Open
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Tribune, February 26, 1973, page E27 ^ "Evert Shatters Court, Sets Up American Finals", Abilene (Texas) Reporter-News, July 5, 1973, page 2-C ^ Joe Jares (July 16, 1973). "A Bloomin' Winner". Vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.com. Archived from the original on June 25, 2009. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ Starr, Cynthia; King, Billie Jean
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(1988). We Have Come a Long Way: The Story of Women's Tennis. New York: McGraw-Hill. p. 144. ISBN 0-07-034625-9.  ^ Hollander, Zander; Collins, Bud (1994). Bud Collins' Modern Encyclopedia of Tennis. Detroit, Michigan: Visible Ink Press. p. 196. ISBN 0-8103-9443-X. CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) ^ Starr, Cynthia; King, Billie Jean
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(1988). We Have Come a Long Way: The Story of Women's Tennis. New York: McGraw-Hill. p. 145. ISBN 0-07-034625-9.  ^ a b c d e Schwartz, Larry. " Billie Jean
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Won for All Women". Retrieved February 15, 2007.  ^ Gilbert, Lynn (December 10, 2012). Particular Passions: Billie Jean King. Women of Wisdom Series (1st ed.). New York: Lynn Gilbert
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Inc. ISBN 978-1-61979-354-5. [permanent dead link] ^ " Billie Jean
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Dumps Evert at Sarasota", Daily Times-News, Burlington, North Carolina, January 20, 1975, page 5B ^ a b c d Frank Deford
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(May 19, 1975). "Mrs. Billie Jean
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King!". Vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.com. Archived from the original on December 9, 2008. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ "Cool Chris Edges Angry Billie Jean", Star-News, Pasadena, California, April 21, 1975, page B-2 ^ a b Deford, Frank; King, Billie Jean
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(1982). Billie Jean. New York, N.Y.: Viking. p. 95. ISBN 0-670-47843-1.  ^ Lannin, Joanne (1999). Billie Jean
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King: Tennis Trailblazer. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. p. 99. ISBN 0-8225-4959-X.  ^ Brace, Reginald; King, Billie Jean
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(1981). Play Better Tennis: With Billie Jean
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Undergoes Knee Surgery", Tyrone (Pennsylvania) Daily Herald, November 10, 1976, page 12 ^ "King Will Resume Singles Competition", The Pocono Record, Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, January 20, 1977, page 14 ^ "King to Command McFarlin Spotlight", San Antonio Light, March 21, 1977, page 1-B ^ " Billie Jean
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King: Tennis Trailblazer. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Company. p. 101. ISBN 0-8225-4959-X.  ^ "Tennis' Joe Frazier", Idaho State Journal, Pocatello, Idaho, June 28, 1977, page A6 ^ Barrett, John. Wimbledon: The Official History. Vision Sports Publishing, 2014 (revised edition). ISBN 978-1909534230 ^ "Comeback Soon Over for King?", News Tribune, Fort Pierce, Florida, September 8, 1977, page 10 ^ "King Wins 1st Major Tourney in 2 Years", Raleigh Register, Beckley, West Virginia, October 17, 1977, page 8 ^ "King, Wade London Finalists", Star-News, Pasadena, California, December 11, 1977, page D-7 ^ "Evert Enters Grudge Match With Wade", Galveston (Texas) Daily News, July 5, 1978, page 1-B ^ "U.S. wins Federation Cup opener", European Stars and Stripes, November 29, 1978, page 28 ^ "Surgery for King", Valley Independent, Monessen, Pennsylvania, December 22, 1978, page 9 ^ "Sports Shorts", The Capital, Annapolis, Maryland, June 16, 1979, page 25 ^ Radosta, John S. (July 3, 1979). " Tracy Austin
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King and Reginald Brace. Octopus. p. 46. ISBN 0-7064-1223-0.  ^ "Navratilova-Lloyd Final". The New York Times. November 25, 1979.  ^ Martina and Billie advance", Daily Press, Escanaba, Michigan, March 20, 1980, page 3-B ^ Martina and Billie advance", Daily Press, Escanaba, Michigan, March 20, 1980, page 3-B ^ "WTA Tournament Archives" (PDF). WTA. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 24, 2016. Retrieved September 23, 2017.  ^ "This Is a Wimbly to Remember for Veteran King", Abilene (Texas) Reporter-News, July 1, 1980, page 1-C ^ Deford, Frank; King, Billie Jean
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(1982). Billie Jean. New York, N.Y.: Viking. p. 82. ISBN 0-670-47843-1.  ^ "Navratilova downs veteran King", Daily Intelligencer, Doylestown, Pennsylvania, July 2, 1980, page 21 ^ "Martina Edges King; Borg, Connors Win", Syracuse (New York) Herald-Journal, July 2, 1980, page C-1 ^ Lannin, Joanne (1999). Billie Jean
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King: Tennis Trailblazer. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. p. 103. ISBN 0-8225-4959-X.  ^ "Surgery for King", Valley Independent, Monessen, Pennsylvania, November 15, 1980, page 6 ^ "Wimbledon Under the Weather". Time. July 12, 1982. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ Associated Press, June 27, 1982 ^ Associated Press, July 1, 1982 ^ Knight-Ridder Wire, July 3, 1982 ^ Associated Press, July 3, 1982 ^ Dallas Morning News, "Lloyd spoils King's hopes", July 3, 1982, pages 1B, 9B; Dallas Times Herald, "Evert stops King rally in Wimbledon replay", July 3, 1982, page B-7 ^ "Why I became a nun, by former tennis star Andrea Jaeger". Daily Mail. UK. April 19, 2008. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ " Billie Jean
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King retained the $90,000 Edgbaston Women's Tennis..." UPI. UPI. June 12, 1983.  ^ Dillman, Lisa (April 27, 2002). "King Dismisses Capriati From Fed Cup". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved October 15, 2017.  ^ "Huck Finn of Tennis: That's Billie Jean", Oakland
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King: Founder, Leader, Legend Archived October 13, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. ^ " Billie Jean
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King co-founder". Wtt.com. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ "Board of Honorary Trustees". Thesportsmuseum.com. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ The Billie Jean
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King Still Got Game". ABILITY magazine. Retrieved October 22, 2012.  ^ " Billie Jean
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King Remembers 'Battle Of The Sexes'". NPR.org. August 25, 2008. Retrieved October 15, 2017.  ^ Eddie Pells (December 17, 2013). "Obama picks gay athletes for delegation to Sochi Olympics, sending signal on gay rights". Associated Press. Archived from the original on December 19, 2013.  ^ "Tennis Great Billie Jean
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King's Mother Dies in Arizona". February 7, 2014. Retrieved February 8, 2014.  ^ "Equality advocate and sports icon to address Class of 2017 - Northwestern Now". news.northwestern.edu.  ^ Yam, Kimberly. "Here's What You Should Know About The 8 Activists Who Went To The Golden Globes HuffPost". Huffingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2018-01-11.  ^ a b Grossfeld, Stan (December 3, 2006). "No royalty like King". The Boston Globe. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ Billie Jean
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King toughest in tight spot: Durr says", Daily Leader, Pontiac, Illinois, March 22, 1979, page 13 ^ " Billie Jean
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King Named 'Woman Athlete of the Year'", Daily Capital News, Jefferson City, Missouri, January 13, 1968, page 6 ^ SI.com (December 4, 2006). "''Sports Illustrated'' honors Wade". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ " Billie Jean
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King, Dennis & Judy Shepard, Doonesbury, Harper's and Many Others Honored at the 11th Annual GLAAD Media Awards Presented by Absolut Vodka Archived December 9, 2008, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Murphy, Melissa (April 15, 2006). "Documentary focuses on tennis great Billie Jean
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Office of the Press Secretary, July 30, 2009 ^ "Hall Of Fame Southern California". Retrieved October 15, 2017.  ^ "National Gay & Lesbian
Lesbian
Sports Hall of Fame's Inaugural Class Announced Out Magazine". Out.com. June 18, 2013. Retrieved December 4, 2013.  ^ "2014 espnW Impact 25".  ^ Friedman, Megan. "Historic Moments in Female Sports – Athletic Women". Marieclaire.com. Retrieved April 16, 2015.  ^ "Chris Evert: Miss Cool on the Court". Time. August 27, 1973. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ " Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King a perfectionist", New Mexican, Santa Fe, New Mexico, June 1, 1980, page C-7 ^ "The Challenge of Her Life – Billie Jean
Billie Jean
at 40", Parade magazine, Syracuse Herald Journal, January 8, 1984, page 7 ^ Deford, Frank; King, Billie Jean
Billie Jean
(1982). Billie Jean. New York, N.Y.: Viking. pp. 96–7. ISBN 0-670-47843-1.  ^ Kanzenberg, Corry (November 5, 2015). "10 Facts About Charles Schulz, the Creator of the 'Peanuts' Gang". Biography.com. Retrieved October 9, 2017.  ^ Kay, Stanley (August 19, 2016). "How Peppermint Patty became an advocate for female athletes". SI.com. Retrieved October 9, 2017.  ^ Oxman, Steven (April 11, 2001). "When Billie Beat Bobby". Variety. Retrieved October 9, 2017.  ^ "Law & Order - Fallout - Full Cast & Crew". IMDb. Retrieved 2018-02-05.  ^ " Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King". TVGuide.com. Retrieved October 13, 2017.  ^ Sage, Alyssa (September 17, 2017). " Emma Stone
Emma Stone
Imagines a World Where 'Everyone Is Absolutely Equal' at 'Battle of the Sexes' Premiere". Variety. Retrieved September 22, 2017.  ^ Leibowitz, Ed (September 2003). "How Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King Picked Her Outfit for the Battle of the Sexes Match". Smithsonian. Retrieved October 9, 2017.  ^ " Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King of Her Family", Long Beach Press-Telegram, November 23, 1965, page C-4 ^ "The Legacy of an Athlete Who Demanded Equal Play". The New York Times. April 26, 2006.  ^ " Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King, Mother of Modern Sports" (PDF). Imgspeakers.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 29, 2011. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ Associated, The (April 23, 2006). "Evert, Navratilova weigh in on tennis legend Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King". Pittsburghlive.com. Archived from the original on April 22, 2009. Retrieved July 4, 2011. 

Further reading[edit]

Fein, Paul (2005). You Can Quote Me On That: Greatest Tennis Quips, Insights And Zingers. Washington: Potomac Books. ISBN 1-57488-925-7.  Jones, Ann, A Game of Love, 1971 King, Billie Jean
Billie Jean
(2008). Pressure is a Privilege: Lessons I've Learned from Life and the Battle of the Sexes. New York: LifeTime Media Inc. ISBN 0981636802.  Overman, Steven J. and K. B. Sagert, Icons of Women's Sport. Greenwood Press, 2012, Vol. 1. Roberts, Selena (2005). A Necessary Spectacle : Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King, Bobby Riggs, and the Tennis Match That Leveled the Game. New York: Crown. ISBN 1-4000-5146-0.  Ware, Susan. Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King and the Revolution in Women's Sports (University of North Carolina Press; 2011) 282 pages; Combines biography and history in a study of the tennis player, liberal feminism, and Title IX.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King.

Official website Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King at the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King at the International Tennis Hall of Fame

v t e

Women's Sports Foundation

Founders

Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King Jim Jorgensen Larry King

Awards

Sportswoman of the Year Billie Awards Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King Contribution Award Flo Hyman Award

Related articles

Title IX Timeline of women's sports in the United States womenSports

Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King in the Grand Slam Tournaments

v t e

Women's tennis players who won two or more Grand Slam singles titles in one calendar year

Four wins

1953: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker 1970: Margaret Court 1988: Steffi Graf

Three wins

1928: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI&US) 1929: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI&US) 1962: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1965: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&WI&US) 1969: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1972: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (FO&WI&US) 1973: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1983: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(AO&WI&US) 1984: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(FO&WI&US) 1989: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(AO&WI&US) 1991: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(AO&FO&US) 1992: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(AO&FO&US) 1993: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1995: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1996: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1997: Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
(AO&WI&US) 2002: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(FO&WI&US) 2015: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&FO&WI)

Two wins

1925: Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
(FO&WI) 1927: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (WI&US) 1930: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI) 1931: Cilly Aussem
Cilly Aussem
(FO&WI) 1932: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI) 1939: Alice Marble
Alice Marble
(WI&US) 1946: Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (WI&US) 1949: Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
(FO&US) 1950: Louise Bough Clapp (AO&WI) 1952: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (WI&US) 1954: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (FO&WI) 1956: Shirley Fry Irvin
Shirley Fry Irvin
(WI&US) 1957: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(WI&US) 1958: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(WI&US) 1959: Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
(WI&US) 1960: Darlene Hard (FO&US) 1963: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&WI) 1964: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO) 1964: Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
(WI&US) 1967: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (WI&US) 1968: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (AO&WI) 1971: Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
Cawley (FO&WI) 1974: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&WI) 1975: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&US) 1976: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(WI&US) 1980: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&US) 1982: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(FO&WI) 1982: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(AO&US) 1985: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(AO&WI) 1986: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(WI&US) 1987: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(WI&US) 1994: Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
(FO&US) 2000: Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(WI&US) 2001: Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
(AO&FO) 2001: Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(WI&US) 2003: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2003: Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(FO&US) 2006: Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
(AO&WI) 2007: Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(FO&US) 2009: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2010: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2012: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(WI&US) 2013: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(FO&US) 2016: Angelique Kerber
Angelique Kerber
(AO&US)

AO=Australian Open, FO=French Open, WI=Wimbledon, US=US Open

v t e

Australasian and Australian Championships women's singles champions

(1922) Margaret Molesworth (1923) Margaret Molesworth (1924) Sylvia Lance (1925) Daphne Akhurst (1926) Daphne Akhurst (1927) Esna Boyd (1928) Daphne Akhurst (1929) Daphne Akhurst (1930) Daphne Akhurst (1931) Coral McInnes Buttsworth (1932) Coral McInnes Buttsworth (1933) Joan Hartigan (1934) Joan Hartigan (1935) Dorothy Round (1936) Joan Hartigan (1937) Nancye Wynne (1938) Dorothy Bundy (1939) Emily Hood Westacott (1940) Nancye Wynne (1941–1945) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Nancye Wynne Bolton (1947) Nancye Wynne Bolton (1948) Nancye Wynne Bolton (1949) Doris Hart (1950) Louise Brough (1951) Nancye Wynne Bolton (1952) Thelma Coyne Long (1953) Maureen Connolly (1954) Thelma Coyne Long (1955) Beryl Penrose (1956) Mary Carter (1957) Shirley Fry (1958) Angela Mortimer (1959) Mary Carter Reitano (1960) Margaret Smith (1961) Margaret Smith (1962) Margaret Smith (1963) Margaret Smith (1964) Margaret Smith (1965) Margaret Smith (1966) Margaret Smith (1967) Nancy Richey (1968) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King

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Pre Open Era Wimbledon ladies' singles champions

(1884) Maud Watson (1885) Maud Watson (1886) Blanche Bingley (1887) Lottie Dod (1888) Lottie Dod (1889) Blanche Bingley
Blanche Bingley
Hillyard (1890) Lena Rice (1891) Lottie Dod (1892) Lottie Dod (1893) Lottie Dod (1894) Blanche Bingley
Blanche Bingley
Hillyard (1895) Charlotte Cooper (1896) Charlotte Cooper (1897) Blanche Bingley
Blanche Bingley
Hillyard (1898) Charlotte Cooper (1899) Blanche Bingley
Blanche Bingley
Hillyard (1900) Blanche Bingley
Blanche Bingley
Hillyard (1901) Charlotte Sterry (1902) Muriel Robb (1903) Dorothea Douglass (1904) Dorothea Douglass (1905) May Sutton (1906) Dorothea Lambert Chambers (1907) May Sutton (1908) Charlotte Sterry (1909) Dora Boothby (1910) Dorothea Lambert Chambers (1912) Dorethea Lambert Chambers (1913) Ethel Thomson Larcombe (1914) Dorothea Lambert Chambers (1915) Dorothea Lambert Chambers (1915-18) No competition (due to World War I) (1919) Suzanne Lenglen (1920) Suzanne Lenglen (1921) Suzanne Lenglen (1922) Suzanne Lenglen (1923) Suzanne Lenglen (1924) Kathleen McKane (1925) Suzanne Lenglen (1926) Kathleen McKane Godfree (1927) Helen Wills (1928) Helen Wills (1929) Helen Wills (1930) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1931) Cilly Aussem (1932) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1933) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1934) Dorothy Round (1935) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1936) Helen Jacobs (1937) Dorothy Round (1938) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1939) Alice Marble (1940–45) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Pauline Addie (1947) Margaret Osborne (1948) Louise Brough (1949) Louise Brough (1950) Louise Brough (1951) Doris Hart (1952) Maureen Connolly (1953) Maureen Connolly (1954) Maureen Connolly (1955) Louise Brough (1956) Shirley Fry (1957) Althea Gibson (1958) Althea Gibson (1959) Maria Bueno (1960) Maria Bueno (1961) Angela Mortimer (1962) Karen Hantze Susman (1963) Margaret Smith (1964) Maria Bueno (1965) Margaret Smith (1966) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1967) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King

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U.S. National Championships women's singles champions

(1887) Ellen Hansell (1888) Bertha Townsend (1889) Bertha Townsend (1890) Ellen Roosevelt (1891) Mabel Cahill (1892) Mabel Cahill (1893) Aline Terry (1894) Helen Hellwig (1895) Juliette Atkinson (1896) Elisabeth Moore (1897) Juliette Atkinson (1898) Juliette Atkinson (1899) Marion Jones (1900) Myrtle McAteer (1901) Elisabeth Moore (1902) Marion Jones (1903) Elisabeth Moore (1904) May Sutton (1905) Elisabeth Moore (1906) Helen Homans (1907) Evelyn Sears (1908) Maud Barger-Wallach (1909) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman (1910) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman (1911) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman (1912) Mary Browne (1913) Mary Browne (1914) Mary Browne (1915) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1916) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1917) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1918) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1919) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman (1920) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1921) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1922) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1923) Helen Wills (1924) Helen Wills (1925) Helen Wills (1926) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1927) Helen Wills (1928) Helen Wills (1929) Helen Wills (1930) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
Shoemaker (1931) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1932) Helen Jacobs (1933) Helen Jacobs (1934) Helen Jacobs (1935) Helen Jacobs (1936) Alice Marble (1937) Anita Lizana (1938) Alice Marble (1939) Alice Marble (1940) Alice Marble (1941) Sarah Palfrey Cooke (1942) Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (1943) Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (1944) Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (1945) Sarah Palfrey Cooke (1946) Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (1947) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp (1948) Margaret Osborne duPont (1949) Margaret Osborne duPont (1950) Margaret Osborne duPont (1951) Maureen Connolly (1952) Maureen Connolly (1953) Maureen Connolly (1954) Doris Hart (1955) Doris Hart (1956) Shirley Fry
Shirley Fry
Irvin (1957) Althea Gibson (1958) Althea Gibson (1959) Maria Bueno (1960) Darlene Hard (1961) Darlene Hard (1962) Margaret Court (1963) Maria Bueno (1964) Maria Bueno (1965) Margaret Court (1966) Maria Bueno (1967) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King

v t e

Pre Open Era Wimbledon ladies' doubles champions

(1913) Winifred McNair / Dora Boothby (1914) Agnes Morton / Elizabeth Ryan (1915-18) No competition (due to World War I) (1919) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1920) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1921) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1922) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1923) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1924) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Helen Wills (1925) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1926) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1927) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1928) Peggy Saunders Michel / Phoebe Holcroft Watson (1929) Peggy Saunders Michel / Phoebe Holcroft Watson (1930) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody / Elizabeth Ryan (1931) Phyllis Mudford / Dorothy S. Barron (1932) Doris Metaxa / Josane Sigart (1933) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1934) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1935) Freda James
Freda James
/ Kay Stammers (1936) Freda James
Freda James
/ Kay Stammers (1937) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Billie Yorke (1938) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Alice Marble (1939) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Alice Marble (1940-45) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1947) Patricia Canning Todd / Doris Hart (1948) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1949) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1950) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1951) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Shirley Fry (1952) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Shirley Fry (1953) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Shirley Fry (1954) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1955) Angela Mortimer Barrett / Anne Shilcock (1956) Angela Buxton / Althea Gibson (1957) Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
/ Darlene Hard (1958) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Althea Gibson (1959) Jeanne Arth / Darlene Hard (1960) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Darlene Hard (1961) Karen Hantze Susman / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
Moffitt (1962) Karen Hantze Susman / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
Moffitt (1963) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Darlene Hard (1964) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Lesley Turner Bowrey (1965) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Billie Jean
Billie Jean
Moffitt (1966) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Nancy Richey (1967) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King

v t e

U.S. National Championships women's doubles champions

(1889) Margarette Ballard / Bertha Townsend (1890) Ellen Roosevelt
Ellen Roosevelt
/ Grace Roosevelt (1891) Mabel Cahill
Mabel Cahill
/ Emma Leavitt Morgan (1892) Mabel Cahill
Mabel Cahill
/ Adeline McKinlay (1893) Aline Terry
Aline Terry
/ Harriet Butler (1894) Helen Hellwig / Juliette Atkinson (1895) Helen Hellwig / Juliette Atkinson (1896) Elisabeth Moore
Elisabeth Moore
/ Juliette Atkinson (1897) Juliette Atkinson / Kathleen Atkinson (1898) Juliette Atkinson / Kathleen Atkinson (1899) Jane Craven / Myrtle McAteer (1900) Edith Parker / Hallie Champlin (1901) Juliette Atkinson / Myrtle McAteer (1902) Juliette Atkinson / Marion Jones (1903) Elisabeth Moore
Elisabeth Moore
/ Carrie Neely (1904) May Sutton
May Sutton
Bundy / Miriam Hall (1905) Helen Homans / Carrie Neely (1906) Ann Burdette Coe / Ethel Bliss Platt (1907) Marie Wimer / Carrie Neely (1908) Evelyn Sears / Margaret Curtis (1909) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Edith Rotch (1910) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Edith Rotch (1911) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Eleonora Sears (1912) Dorothy Green / Mary Browne (1913) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Louise Riddell Williams (1914) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Louise Riddell Williams (1915) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Eleonora Sears (1916) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Eleonora Sears (1917) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Eleonora Sears (1918) Marion Jessup
Marion Jessup
/ Eleanor Goss (1919) Marion Jessup
Marion Jessup
/ Eleanor Goss (1920) Marion Jessup
Marion Jessup
/ Eleanor Goss (1921) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Louise Riddell Williams (1922) Marion Jessup
Marion Jessup
/ Helen Wills (1923) Kathleen McKane Godfree
Kathleen McKane Godfree
/ Phyllis Howkins Covell (1924) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Helen Wills (1925) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Helen Wills (1926) Elizabeth Ryan
Elizabeth Ryan
/ Eleanor Goss (1927) Kathleen McKane Godfree
Kathleen McKane Godfree
/ Ermyntrude Harvey (1928) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Helen Wills (1929) Phoebe Holcroft Watson
Phoebe Holcroft Watson
/ Peggy Mitchell (1930) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
Shoemaker / Sarah Palfrey Cooke (1931) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
Shoemaker / Eileen Bennett Whittingstall (1932) Helen Jacobs
Helen Jacobs
/ Sarah Palfrey Cooke (1933) Betthy Nutthall Shoemaker / Freda James (1934) Helen Jacobs
Helen Jacobs
/ Sarah Palfrey Cooke (1935) Helen Jacobs
Helen Jacobs
/ Sarah Palfrey Cooke (1936) Marjorie Gladman Van Ryn / Carolin Babcock Stark (1937) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Alice Marble (1938) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Alice Marble (1939) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Alice Marble (1940) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Alice Marble (1941) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1942) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1943) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1944) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1945) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1946) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1947) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1948) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1949) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1950) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1951) Shirley Fry Irvin
Shirley Fry Irvin
/ Doris Hart (1952) Shirley Fry Irvin
Shirley Fry Irvin
/ Doris Hart (1953) Shirley Fry Irvin
Shirley Fry Irvin
/ Doris Hart (1954) Shirley Fry Irvin
Shirley Fry Irvin
/ Doris Hart (1955) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1956) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1957) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Margaret Osborne duPont (1958) Jeanne Arth / Darlene Hard (1959) Jeanne Arth / Darlene Hard (1960) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Darlene Hard (1961) Darlene Hard / Lesley Turner Bowrey (1962) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Darlene Hard (1963) Robyn Ebbern
Robyn Ebbern
/ Margaret Smith (1964) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
Moffitt / Karen Hantze Susman (1965) Carole Caldwell Graebner
Carole Caldwell Graebner
/ Nancy Richey (1966) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Nancy Richey (1967) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King

v t e

Australasian and Australian Championships mixed doubles champions

(1922) Esna Boyd
Esna Boyd
Robertson / Jack Hawkes (1923) Sylvia Lance Harper
Sylvia Lance Harper
/ Horace Rice (1924) Daphne Akhurst
Daphne Akhurst
Cozens / Jim Willard (1925) Daphne Akhurst
Daphne Akhurst
Cozens / Jim Willard (1926) Esna Boyd
Esna Boyd
Robertson / Jack Hawkes (1927) Esna Boyd
Esna Boyd
Robertson / Jack Hawkes (1928) Daphne Akhurst
Daphne Akhurst
Cozens / Jean Borotra (1929) Daphne Akhurst
Daphne Akhurst
Cozens / Edgar Moon (1930) Nell Hall Hopman
Nell Hall Hopman
/ Harry Hopman (1931) Marjorie Cox Crawford
Marjorie Cox Crawford
/ Jack Crawford (1932) Marjorie Cox Crawford
Marjorie Cox Crawford
/ Jack Crawford (1933) Marjorie Cox Crawford
Marjorie Cox Crawford
/ Jack Crawford (1934) Joan Hartigan
Joan Hartigan
Bathurst / Edgar Moon (1935) Louie Bickerton
Louie Bickerton
/ Christian Boussus (1936) Nell Hall Hopman
Nell Hall Hopman
/ Harry Hopman (1937) Nell Hall Hopman
Nell Hall Hopman
/ Harry Hopman (1938) Margaret Wilson / John Bromwich (1939) Nell Hall Hopman
Nell Hall Hopman
/ Harry Hopman (1940) Nancye Wynne Bolton
Nancye Wynne Bolton
/ Colin Long (1941 - 1945) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Nancye Wynne Bolton
Nancye Wynne Bolton
/ Colin Long (1947) Nancye Wynne Bolton
Nancye Wynne Bolton
/ Colin Long (1948) Nancye Wynne Bolton
Nancye Wynne Bolton
/ Colin Long (1949) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Frank Sedgman (1950) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Frank Sedgman (1951) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ George Worthington (1952) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ George Worthington (1953) Julia Sampson Hayward / Rex Hartwig (1954) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Rex Hartwig (1955) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ George Worthington (1956) Beryl Penrose / Neale Fraser (1957) Fay Muller / Malcolm Anderson (1958) Mary Hawton / Bob Howe (1959) Sandra Reynolds Price / Bob Mark (1960) Jan Lehane / Trevor Fancutt (1961) Jan Lehane / Bob Hewitt (1962) Lesley Turner Bowrey
Lesley Turner Bowrey
/ Fred Stolle (1963) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Ken Fletcher (1964) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Ken Fletcher (1965) Robyn Ebbern
Robyn Ebbern
/ Owen Davidson
Owen Davidson
& Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ John Newcombe (1966) Judy Tegart Dalton / Tony Roche (1967) Lesley Turner Bowrey
Lesley Turner Bowrey
/ Owen Davidson (1968) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Dick Crealy

v t e

Pre Open Era Wimbledon mixed doubles champions

1913: Hope Crisp / Agnes Tuckey 1914: James Parke / Ethel Thomson Larcombe 1915–18: No competition (due to World War I) 1919: Randolph Lycett / Elizabeth Ryan 1920: Gerald Patterson
Gerald Patterson
/ Suzanne Lenglen 1921: Randolph Lycett / Elizabeth Ryan 1922: Pat O'Hara Wood
Pat O'Hara Wood
/ Suzanne Lenglen 1923: Randolph Lycett / Elizabeth Ryan 1924: John Gilbert / Kathleen McKane Godfree 1925: Jean Borotra
Jean Borotra
/ Suzanne Lenglen 1926: Leslie Godfree / Kathleen McKane Godfree 1927: Francis Hunter
Francis Hunter
/ Elizabeth Ryan 1928: Patrick Spence
Patrick Spence
/ Elizabeth Ryan 1929: Frank Hunter / Helen Wills 1930: Jack Crawford / Elizabeth Ryan 1931: George Lott / Anna McCune Harper 1932: Enrique Maier
Enrique Maier
/ Elizabeth Ryan 1933: Gottfried von Cramm
Gottfried von Cramm
/ Hilde Krahwinkel Sperling 1934: Ryuki Miki
Ryuki Miki
/ Dorothy Round
Dorothy Round
Little 1935: Fred Perry
Fred Perry
/ Dorothy Round
Dorothy Round
Little 1936: Fred Perry
Fred Perry
/ Dorothy Round
Dorothy Round
Little 1937: Don Budge
Don Budge
/ Alice Marble 1938: Don Budge
Don Budge
/ Alice Marble 1939: Bobby Riggs
Bobby Riggs
/ Alice Marble 1940–45: No competition (due to World War II) 1946: Tom Brown / Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp 1947: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp 1948: John Bromwich
John Bromwich
/ Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp 1949: Eric Sturgess / Sheila Piercey Summers 1950: Eric Sturgess / Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp 1951: Frank Sedgman
Frank Sedgman
/ Doris Hart 1952: Frank Sedgman
Frank Sedgman
/ Doris Hart 1953: Vic Seixas
Vic Seixas
/ Doris Hart 1954: Vic Seixas
Vic Seixas
/ Doris Hart 1955: Vic Seixas
Vic Seixas
/ Doris Hart 1956: Vic Seixas
Vic Seixas
/ Shirley Fry
Shirley Fry
Irvin 1957: Mervyn Rose
Mervyn Rose
/ Darlene Hard 1958: Robert Howe / Lorraine Coghlan Robinson 1959: Rod Laver
Rod Laver
/ Darlene Hard 1960: Rod Laver
Rod Laver
/ Darlene Hard 1961: Fred Stolle / Lesley Turner Bowrey 1962: Neale Fraser
Neale Fraser
/ Margaret Osborne duPont 1963: Ken Fletcher
Ken Fletcher
/ Margaret Smith 1964: Fred Stolle / Lesley Turner Bowrey 1965: Ken Fletcher
Ken Fletcher
/ Margaret Smith 1966: Ken Fletcher
Ken Fletcher
/ Margaret Smith 1967: Owen Davidson
Owen Davidson
/ Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King

v t e

French Championships mixed doubles champions

(1902) Helene Prevost / Réginald Forbes (1903) Helene Prevost / Réginald Forbes (1904) Kate Gillou / Max Decugis (1905) Yvonne de Pfooffel / Max Decugis (1906) Yvonne de Pfooffel / Max Decugis (1907) A. Péan / Robert Wallet (1908) Kate Gillou / Max Decugis (1909) Jeanne Matthey
Jeanne Matthey
/ Max Decugis (1910) Marguerite Mény / Édouard Mény de Marangue (1911) Marguerite Broquedis
Marguerite Broquedis
/ Andre Gobert (1912) Daisy Speranza / William Laurentz (1913) Daisy Speranza / William Laurentz (1914) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Max Decugis (1915–1919) No competition (due to World War I) (1920) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Max Decugis (1921) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Jacques Brugnon (1922) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Jacques Brugnon (1923) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Jacques Brugnon (1924) Marguerite Broquedis
Marguerite Broquedis
/ Jean Borotra (1925) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Jacques Brugnon (1926) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Jacques Brugnon (1927) Marguerite Broquedis
Marguerite Broquedis
Bordes / Jean Borotra (1928) Eileen Bennett / Henri Cochet (1929) Eileen Bennett / Henri Cochet (1930) Cilly Aussem
Cilly Aussem
/ Bill Tilden (1931) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
/ Pat Spence (1932) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
/ Fred Perry (1933) Margaret Scriven
Margaret Scriven
/ Jack Crawford (1934) Colette Rosambert / Jean Borotra (1935) Lolette Payot / Marcel Bernard (1936) Billie Yorke / Marcel Bernard (1937) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Yvon Petra (1938) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Dragutin Mitić (1939) Sarah Palfrey Fabyan / Elwood Cooke (1940–1945) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
/ Budge Patty (1947) Sheila Piercey / Eric Sturgess (1948) Patricia Canning Todd / Jaroslav Drobný (1949) Sheila Piercey / Eric Sturgess (1950) Barbara Scofield / Enrique Morea (1951) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Frank Sedgman (1952) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Frank Sedgman (1953) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Vic Seixas (1954) Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
/ Lew Hoad (1955) Darlene Hard / Gordon Forbes (1956) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Luis Ayala (1957) Věra Pužejová / Jiří Javorský (1958) Shirley Bloomer / Nicola Pietrangeli (1959) Yola Ramírez Ochoa / William Knight (1960) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Robert Howe (1961) Darlene Hard / Rod Laver (1962) Renée Schuurman / Robert Howe (1963) Margaret Smith / Ken Fletcher (1964) Margaret Smith / Ken Fletcher (1965) Margaret Smith / Ken Fletcher (1966) Annette Van Zyl
Annette Van Zyl
/ Frew McMillan (1967) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Owen Davidson

v t e

U.S. National Championships mixed doubles champions

(1892) Mabel Cahill
Mabel Cahill
/ Clarence Hobart (1893) Ellen Roosevelt
Ellen Roosevelt
/ Clarence Hobart (1894) Juliette Atkinson / Edwin P. Fischer (1895) Juliette Atkinson / Edwin P. Fischer (1896) Juliette Atkinson / Edwin P. Fischer (1897) Laura Henson / D.L. Magruder (1898) Carrie Neely
Carrie Neely
/ Edwin P. Fischer (1899) Elizabeth Rastall / Albert Hoskins (1900) Margaret Hunnewell / Alfred Codman (1901) Marion Jones
Marion Jones
/ Raymond Little (1902) Elisabeth Moore
Elisabeth Moore
/ Wylie Grant (1903) Helen Chapman / Harry Allen (1904) Elisabeth Moore
Elisabeth Moore
/ Wylie Grant (1905) Augusta Schultz Hobart / Clarence Hobart (1906) Sarah Coffin / Edward Dewhurst (1907) May Sayers / Wallace Johnson (1908) Edith Rotch / Nathaniel Niles (1909) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Wallace Johnson (1910) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Joseph Carpenter, Jr. (1911) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Wallace Johnson (1912) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ R. Norris Williams (1913) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Bill Tilden (1914) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Bill Tilden (1915) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Harry Johnson (1916) Eleonora Sears
Eleonora Sears
/ Willis E. Davis (1917) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Irving Wright (1918) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Irving Wright (1919) Marion Jessup
Marion Jessup
/ Vincent Richards (1920) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Wallace Johnson (1921) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Bill Johnston (1922) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Bill Tilden (1923) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Bill Tilden (1924) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
/ Vincent Richards (1925) Kathleen McKane Godfree
Kathleen McKane Godfree
/ John Hawkes (1926) Elizabeth Ryan
Elizabeth Ryan
/ Jean Borotra (1927) Eileen Bennett Whittingstall
Eileen Bennett Whittingstall
/ Henri Cochet (1928) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
/ John Hawkes (1929) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
Shoemaker / George Lott (1930) Edith Cross / Wilmer Allison (1931) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
Shoemaker / George Lott (1932) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Fred Perry (1933) Elizabeth Ryan
Elizabeth Ryan
/ Ellsworth Vines (1934) Helen Jacobs
Helen Jacobs
/ George Lott (1935) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Enrique Maier (1936) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Gene Mako (1937) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Don Budge (1938) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Don Budge (1939) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Harry Hopman (1940) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Bobby Riggs (1941) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Jack Kramer (1942) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Ted Schroeder (1943) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1944) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1945) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1946) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1947) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / John Bromwich (1948) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Tom Brown (1949) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Eric Sturgess (1950) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Ken McGregor (1951) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Frank Sedgman (1952) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Frank Sedgman (1953) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Vic Seixas (1954) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Vic Seixas (1955) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Vic Seixas (1956) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Ken Rosewall (1957) Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
/ Kurt Nielsen (1958) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Neale Fraser (1959) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Neale Fraser (1960) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Neale Fraser (1961) Margaret Smith / Bob Mark (1962) Margaret Smith / Fred Stolle (1963) Margaret Smith / Ken Fletcher (1964) Margaret Smith / John Newcombe (1965) Margaret Smith / Fred Stolle (1966) Donna Floyd Fales / Owen Davidson (1967) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Owen Davidson

v t e

French Open
French Open
women's singles champions

(1968) Nancy Richey (1969) Margaret Court (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Evonne Goolagong (1972) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1973) Margaret Court (1974) Chris Evert (1975) Chris Evert (1976) Sue Barker (1977) Mima Jaušovec (1978) Virginia Ruzici (1979) Chris Evert (1980) Chris Evert (1981) Hana Mandlíková (1982) Martina Navratilova (1983) Chris Evert (1984) Martina Navratilova (1985) Chris Evert (1986) Chris Evert (1987) Steffi Graf (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Arantxa Sánchez (1990) Monica Seles (1991) Monica Seles (1992) Monica Seles (1993) Steffi Graf (1994) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1995) Steffi Graf (1996) Steffi Graf (1997) Iva Majoli (1998) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1999) Steffi Graf (2000) Mary Pierce (2001) Jennifer Capriati (2002) Serena Williams (2003) Justine Henin (2004) Anastasia Myskina (2005) Justine Henin (2006) Justine Henin (2007) Justine Henin (2008) Ana Ivanovic (2009) Svetlana Kuznetsova (2010) Francesca Schiavone (2011) Li Na (2012) Maria Sharapova (2013) Serena Williams (2014) Maria Sharapova (2015) Serena Williams (2016) Garbiñe Muguruza (2017) Jeļena Ostapenko

v t e

Wimbledon (Open era) ladies' singles champions

(1968) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1969) Ann Haydon-Jones (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Evonne Goolagong (1972) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1973) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1974) Chris Evert (1975) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1976) Chris Evert (1977) Virginia Wade (1978) Martina Navratilova (1979) Martina Navratilova (1980) Evonne Goolagong (1981) Chris Evert (1982) Martina Navratilova (1983) Martina Navratilova (1984) Martina Navratilova (1985) Martina Navratilova (1986) Martina Navratilova (1987) Martina Navratilova (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Steffi Graf (1990) Martina Navratilova (1991) Steffi Graf (1992) Steffi Graf (1993) Steffi Graf (1994) Conchita Martínez (1995) Steffi Graf (1996) Steffi Graf (1997) Martina Hingis (1998) Jana Novotná (1999) Lindsay Davenport (2000) Venus Williams (2001) Venus Williams (2002) Serena Williams (2003) Serena Williams (2004) Maria Sharapova (2005) Venus Williams (2006) Amélie Mauresmo (2007) Venus Williams (2008) Venus Williams (2009) Serena Williams (2010) Serena Williams (2011) Petra Kvitová (2012) Serena Williams (2013) Marion Bartoli (2014) Petra Kvitová (2015) Serena Williams (2016) Serena Williams (2017) Garbiñe Muguruza

v t e

US Open women's singles champions

(1968) Virginia Wade (1969) Margaret Court (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1972) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1973) Margaret Court (1974) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1975) Chris Evert (1976) Chris Evert (1977) Chris Evert (1978) Chris Evert (1979) Tracy Austin (1980) Chris Evert (1981) Tracy Austin (1982) Chris Evert (1983) Martina Navratilova (1984) Martina Navratilova (1985) Hana Mandlíková (1986) Martina Navratilova (1987) Martina Navratilova (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Steffi Graf (1990) Gabriela Sabatini (1991) Monica Seles (1992) Monica Seles (1993) Steffi Graf (1994) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1995) Steffi Graf (1996) Steffi Graf (1997) Martina Hingis (1998) Lindsay Davenport (1999) Serena Williams (2000) Venus Williams (2001) Venus Williams (2002) Serena Williams (2003) Justine Henin (2004) Svetlana Kuznetsova (2005) Kim Clijsters (2006) Maria Sharapova (2007) Justine Henin (2008) Serena Williams (2009) Kim Clijsters (2010) Kim Clijsters (2011) Samantha Stosur (2012) Serena Williams (2013) Serena Williams (2014) Serena Williams (2015) Flavia Pennetta (2016) Angelique Kerber (2017) Sloane Stephens

v t e

French Open
French Open
women's doubles champions

(1968) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Ann Haydon-Jones (1969) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Ann Haydon-Jones (1970) Gail Chanfreau / Françoise Dürr (1971) Gail Chanfreau / Françoise Dürr (1972) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Betty Stöve (1973) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Virginia Wade (1974) Chris Evert
Chris Evert
/ Olga Morozova (1975) Chris Evert
Chris Evert
/ Martina Navratilova (1976) Fiorella Bonicelli / Gail Chanfreau (1977) Regina Maršíková / Pam Teeguarden (1978) Mima Jaušovec / Virginia Ruzici (1979) Betty Stöve
Betty Stöve
/ Wendy Turnbull (1980) Kathy Jordan / Anne Smith (1981) Rosalyn Fairbank Nideffer / Tanya Harford (1982) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Anne Smith (1983) Rosalyn Fairbank Nideffer / Candy Reynolds (1984) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1985) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1986) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Andrea Temesvári (1987) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1988) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1989) Larisa Savchenko Neiland / Natalia Zvereva (1990) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Helena Suková (1991) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Jana Novotná (1992) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1993) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1994) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1995) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1996) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
/ Mary Joe Fernández (1997) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1998) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Jana Novotná (1999) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2000) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Mary Pierce (2001) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2002) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2003) Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
/ Ai Sugiyama (2004) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2005) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2006) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Samantha Stosur (2007) Alicia Molik
Alicia Molik
/ Mara Santangelo (2008) Anabel Medina Garrigues
Anabel Medina Garrigues
/ Virginia Ruano Pascual (2009) Anabel Medina Garrigues
Anabel Medina Garrigues
/ Virginia Ruano Pascual (2010) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2011) Andrea Hlaváčková
Andrea Hlaváčková
/ Lucie Hradecká (2012) Sara Errani
Sara Errani
/ Roberta Vinci (2013) Ekaterina Makarova
Ekaterina Makarova
/ Elena Vesnina (2014) Hsieh Su-wei
Hsieh Su-wei
/ Peng Shuai (2015) Bethanie Mattek-Sands
Bethanie Mattek-Sands
/ Lucie Šafářová (2016) Caroline Garcia
Caroline Garcia
/ Kristina Mladenovic (2017) Bethanie Mattek-Sands
Bethanie Mattek-Sands
/ Lucie Šafářová

v t e

Wimbledon (Open Era) ladies' doubles champions

(1968) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1969) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Judy Tegart Dalton (1970) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1971) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1972) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Betty Stöve (1973) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1974) Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
Cawley / Peggy Michel (1975) Ann Kiyomura / Kazuko Sawamatsu (1976) Chris Evert
Chris Evert
/ Martina Navratilova (1977) Helen Gourlay Cawley / JoAnne Russell (1978) Kerry Melville
Kerry Melville
Reid / Wendy Turnbull (1979) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Martina Navratilova (1980) Kathy Jordan / Anne Smith (1981) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1982) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1983) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1984) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1985) Kathy Jordan / Elizabeth Sayers Smylie (1986) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1987) Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
/ Helena Suková (1988) Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
/ Gabriela Sabatini (1989) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Helena Suková (1990) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Helena Suková (1991) Larisa Savchenko Neiland / Natalia Zvereva (1992) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1993) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1994) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1995) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1996) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Helena Suková (1997) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natasha Zvereva (1998) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Jana Novotná (1999) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
/ Corina Morariu (2000) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2001) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Rennae Stubbs (2002) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2003) Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
/ Ai Sugiyama (2004) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Rennae Stubbs (2005) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Liezel Huber (2006) Yan Zi / Zheng Jie (2007) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Liezel Huber (2008) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2009) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2010) Vania King
Vania King
/ Yaroslava Shvedova (2011) Květa Peschke
Květa Peschke
/ Katarina Srebotnik (2012) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2013) Hsieh Su-wei
Hsieh Su-wei
/ Peng Shuai (2014) Sara Errani
Sara Errani
/ Roberta Vinci (2015) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Sania Mirza (2016) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2017) Ekaterina Makarova
Ekaterina Makarova
/ Elena Vesnina

v t e

US Open women's doubles champions

(1968) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Margaret Court (1969) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Darlene Hard (1970) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Judy Tegart Dalton (1971) Rosemary Casals / Judy Tegart Dalton (1972) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Betty Stöve (1973) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Virginia Wade (1974) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1975) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Virginia Wade (1976) Delina Boshoff / Ilana Kloss (1977) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Betty Stöve (1978) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Martina Navratilova (1979) Betty Stöve
Betty Stöve
/ Wendy Turnbull (1980) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Martina Navratilova (1981) Kathy Jordan / Anne Smith (1982) Rosemary Casals / Wendy Turnbull (1983) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1984) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1985) Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
/ Helena Suková (1986) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1987) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1988) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Robin White (1989) Hana Mandlíková
Hana Mandlíková
/ Martina Navratilova (1990) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Martina Navratilova (1991) Pam Shriver / Natalia Zvereva (1992) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1993) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
/ Helena Suková (1994) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1995) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1996) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1997) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
/ Jana Novotná (1998) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Jana Novotná (1999) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2000) Julie Halard-Decugis / Ai Sugiyama (2001) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Rennae Stubbs (2002) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2003) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2004) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2005) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Samantha Stosur (2006) Nathalie Dechy
Nathalie Dechy
/ Vera Zvonareva (2007) Nathalie Dechy
Nathalie Dechy
/ Dinara Safina (2008) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Liezel Huber (2009) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Venus Williams (2010) Vania King
Vania King
/ Yaroslava Shvedova (2011) Liezel Huber
Liezel Huber
/ Lisa Raymond (2012) Sara Errani
Sara Errani
/ Roberta Vinci (2013) Andrea Hlaváčková
Andrea Hlaváčková
/ Lucie Hradecká (2014) Ekaterina Makarova
Ekaterina Makarova
/ Elena Vesnina (2015) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Sania Mirza (2016) Bethanie Mattek-Sands
Bethanie Mattek-Sands
/ Lucie Šafářová

v t e

French Open
French Open
mixed doubles champions

1968–1970

(1968) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Jean-Claude Barclay (1969) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Marty Riessen (1970) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Bob Hewitt

1971–1980

(1971) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Jean-Claude Barclay (1972) Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
Cawley / Kim Warwick (1973) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Jean-Claude Barclay (1974) Martina Navrátilová / Iván Molina (1975) Fiorella Bonicelli / Thomas Koch (1976) Ilana Kloss
Ilana Kloss
/ Kim Warwick (1977) Mary Carillo / John McEnroe (1978) Renáta Tomanová / Pavel Složil (1979) Wendy Turnbull
Wendy Turnbull
/ Bob Hewitt (1980) Anne Smith / Billy Martin

1981–1990

(1981) Andrea Jaeger / Jimmy Arias (1982) Wendy Turnbull
Wendy Turnbull
/ John Lloyd (1983) Barbara Jordan
Barbara Jordan
/ Eliot Teltscher (1984) Anne Smith / Dick Stockton (1985) Martina Navrátilová / Heinz Günthardt (1986) Kathy Jordan / Ken Flach (1987) Pam Shriver / Emilio Sánchez
Emilio Sánchez
Vicario (1988) Lori McNeil / Jorge Lozano (1989) Manon Bollegraf / Tom Nijssen (1990) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
/ Jorge Lozano

1991–2000

(1991) Helena Suková
Helena Suková
/ Cyril Suk (1992) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
/ Mark Woodforde (1993) Eugenia Maniokova / Andrei Olhovskiy (1994) Kristie Boogert
Kristie Boogert
/ Menno Oosting (1995) Larisa Neiland / Todd Woodbridge (1996) Patricia Tarabini / Javier Frana (1997) Rika Hiraki / Mahesh Bhupathi (1998) Venus Williams
Venus Williams
/ Justin Gimelstob (1999) Katarina Srebotnik
Katarina Srebotnik
/ Piet Norval (2000) Mariaan de Swardt / David Adams

2001–2010

(2001) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Tomas Carbonell (2002) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Wayne Black (2003) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Mike Bryan (2004) Tatiana Golovin
Tatiana Golovin
/ Richard Gasquet (2005) Daniela Hantuchová
Daniela Hantuchová
/ Fabrice Santoro (2006) Katarina Srebotnik
Katarina Srebotnik
/ Nenad Zimonjić (2007) Nathalie Dechy
Nathalie Dechy
/ Andy Ram (2008) Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
/ Bob Bryan (2009) Liezel Huber
Liezel Huber
/ Bob Bryan (2010) Katarina Srebotnik
Katarina Srebotnik
/ Nenad Zimonjić

2011–present

(2011) Casey Dellacqua
Casey Dellacqua
/ Scott Lipsky (2012) Sania Mirza
Sania Mirza
/ Mahesh Bhupathi (2013) Lucie Hradecká
Lucie Hradecká
/ František Čermák (2014) Anna-Lena Grönefeld
Anna-Lena Grönefeld
/ Jean-Julien Rojer (2015) Bethanie Mattek-Sands
Bethanie Mattek-Sands
/ Mike Bryan (2016) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Leander Paes (2017) Gabriela Dabrowski
Gabriela Dabrowski
/ Rohan Bopanna

v t e

Wimbledon (Open Era) mixed doubles champions

(1968) Ken Fletcher
Ken Fletcher
/ Margaret Court (1969) Fred Stolle / Ann Haydon-Jones (1970) Ilie Năstase
Ilie Năstase
/ Rosemary Casals (1971) Owen Davidson
Owen Davidson
/ Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1972) Ilie Năstase
Ilie Năstase
/ Rosemary Casals (1973) Owen Davidson
Owen Davidson
/ Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1974) Owen Davidson
Owen Davidson
/ Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1975) Marty Riessen
Marty Riessen
/ Margaret Court (1976) Tony Roche
Tony Roche
/ Françoise Dürr (1977) Bob Hewitt
Bob Hewitt
/ Greer Stevens (1978) Frew McMillan
Frew McMillan
/ Betty Stöve (1979) Bob Hewitt
Bob Hewitt
/ Greer Stevens (1980) John Austin / Tracy Austin (1981) Frew McMillan
Frew McMillan
/ Betty Stöve (1982) Kevin Curren
Kevin Curren
/ Anne Smith (1983) John Lloyd / Wendy Turnbull (1984) John Lloyd / Wendy Turnbull (1985) Paul McNamee
Paul McNamee
/ Martina Navratilova (1986) Ken Flach / Kathy Jordan (1987) Jeremy Bates / Jo Durie (1988) Sherwood Stewart / Zina Garrison (1989) Jim Pugh / Jana Novotná (1990) Rick Leach
Rick Leach
/ Zina Garrison (1991) John Fitzgerald / Elizabeth Sayers Smylie (1992) Cyril Suk / Larisa Savchenko Neiland (1993) Mark Woodforde
Mark Woodforde
/ Martina Navratilova (1994) Todd Woodbridge
Todd Woodbridge
/ Helena Suková (1995) Jonathan Stark / Martina Navratilova (1996) Cyril Suk / Helena Suková (1997) Cyril Suk / Helena Suková (1998) Max Mirnyi
Max Mirnyi
/ Serena Williams (1999) Leander Paes
Leander Paes
/ Lisa Raymond (2000) Donald Johnson / Kimberly Po (2001) Leoš Friedl
Leoš Friedl
/ Daniela Hantuchová (2002) Mahesh Bhupathi
Mahesh Bhupathi
/ Elena Likhovtseva (2003) Leander Paes
Leander Paes
/ Martina Navratilova (2004) Wayne Black / Cara Black (2005) Mahesh Bhupathi
Mahesh Bhupathi
/ Mary Pierce (2006) Andy Ram
Andy Ram
/ Vera Zvonareva (2007) Jamie Murray
Jamie Murray
/ Jelena Janković (2008) Bob Bryan
Bob Bryan
/ Samantha Stosur (2009) Mark Knowles
Mark Knowles
/ Anna-Lena Grönefeld (2010) Leander Paes
Leander Paes
/ Cara Black (2011) Jürgen Melzer
Jürgen Melzer
/ Iveta Benešová (2012) Mike Bryan
Mike Bryan
/ Lisa Raymond (2013) Daniel Nestor
Daniel Nestor
/ Kristina Mladenovic (2014) Nenad Zimonjić
Nenad Zimonjić
/ Samantha Stosur (2015) Leander Paes
Leander Paes
/ Martina Hingis (2016) Henri Kontinen
Henri Kontinen
/ Heather Watson (2017) Jamie Murray
Jamie Murray
/ Martina Hingis

v t e

US Open mixed doubles champions

(1968) Mary Ann Eisel / Peter Curtis (1969) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Marty Riessen (1970) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Marty Riessen (1971) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Owen Davidson (1972) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Marty Riessen (1973) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Owen Davidson (1974) Pam Teeguarden / Geoff Masters (1975) Rosemary Casals / Dick Stockton (1976) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Phil Dent (1977) Betty Stöve
Betty Stöve
/ Frew McMillan (1978) Betty Stöve
Betty Stöve
/ Frew McMillan (1979) Greer Stevens / Bob Hewitt (1980) Wendy Turnbull
Wendy Turnbull
/ Marty Riessen (1981) Anne Smith / Kevin Curren (1982) Anne Smith / Kevin Curren (1983) Elizabeth Sayers Smylie / John Fitzgerald (1984) Manuela Maleeva
Manuela Maleeva
/ Tom Gullikson (1985) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Heinz Günthardt (1986) Raffaella Reggi
Raffaella Reggi
/ Sergio Casal (1987) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Emilio Sánchez
Emilio Sánchez
Vicario (1988) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Jim Pugh (1989) Robin White / Shelby Cannon (1990) Elizabeth Sayers Smylie / Todd Woodbridge (1991) Manon Bollegraf / Tom Nijssen (1992) Nicole Provis / Mark Woodforde (1993) Helena Suková
Helena Suková
/ Todd Woodbridge (1994) Elna Reinach / Patrick Galbraith (1995) Meredith McGrath / Matt Lucena (1996) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Patrick Galbraith (1997) Manon Bollegraf / Rick Leach (1998) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
/ Max Mirnyi (1999) Ai Sugiyama
Ai Sugiyama
/ Mahesh Bhupathi (2000) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
/ Jared Palmer (2001) Rennae Stubbs
Rennae Stubbs
/ Todd Woodbridge (2002) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Mike Bryan (2003) Katarina Srebotnik
Katarina Srebotnik
/ Bob Bryan (2004) Vera Zvonareva
Vera Zvonareva
/ Bob Bryan (2005) Daniela Hantuchová
Daniela Hantuchová
/ Mahesh Bhupathi (2006) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Bob Bryan (2007) Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
/ Max Mirnyi (2008) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Leander Paes (2009) Carly Gullickson
Carly Gullickson
/ Travis Parrott (2010) Liezel Huber
Liezel Huber
/ Bob Bryan (2011) Melanie Oudin
Melanie Oudin
/ Jack Sock (2012) Ekaterina Makarova
Ekaterina Makarova
/ Bruno Soares (2013) Andrea Hlaváčková
Andrea Hlaváčková
/ Max Mirnyi (2014) Sania Mirza
Sania Mirza
/ Bruno Soares (2015) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Leander Paes (2016) Laura Siegemund
Laura Siegemund
/ Mate Pavić (2017) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Jamie Murray

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Grand Slam / non-calendar year / career Grand Slam-winning singles/doubles tennis players

Grand Slam

Men's singles

1938: Don Budge 1962: Rod Laver 1969: Rod Laver

Women's singles

1953: Maureen Connolly 1970: Margaret Court 1988: Steffi Graf

Men's doubles

1951: Ken McGregor/ Frank Sedgman

Women's doubles

1960: Maria Bueno 1984: Martina Navratilova/ Pam Shriver 1998: Martina Hingis

Mixed doubles

1963: Margaret Court/ Ken Fletcher 1965: Margaret Court 1967: Owen Davidson

Non-calendar year Grand Slam

Men's singles

2015–16: Novak Djokovic

Women's singles

1983–84: Martina Navratilova 1993–94: Steffi Graf 2002–03: Serena Williams 2014–15: Serena Williams

Men's doubles

2012–13: Bob Bryan/ Mike Bryan

Women's doubles

1949–50: Louise Brough 1986–87: Martina Navratilova/ Pam Shriver 1992–93: Gigi Fernández/ Natasha Zvereva 1996–97: Natasha Zvereva 2009–10: Serena Williams/ Venus Williams

Mixed doubles

1967–68 Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King

Career Grand Slam

Men's singles

1933-34-35: Fred Perry 1937-38: Don Budge 1960-61-62: Rod Laver 1961-63-64: Roy Emerson 1992-94-95-99: Andre Agassi 2003-04-09: Roger Federer 2005-08-09-10: Rafael Nadal 2008-11-16: Novak Djokovic

Women's singles

1951-52-53: Maureen Connolly 1949-50-51-54: Doris Hart 1951-56-57: Shirley Fry
Shirley Fry
Irvin 1960-62-63: Margaret Court 1966-67-68-72: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King 1974-75-82: Chris Evert 1978-81-82-83: Martina Navratilova 1987-88: Steffi Graf 1999-2002-03: Serena Williams 2004-06-08-12: Maria Sharapova

Men's doubles

1935-36-39: Adrian Quist 1948-50-51 Frank Sedgman 1951: Ken McGregor 1953–56: Lew Hoad/ Ken Rosewall 1957-58-59: Neale Fraser 1959-60-62: Roy Emerson 1965–67: John Newcombe/ Tony Roche 1962-64-67-77: Bob Hewitt 1982-84-86-89: John Fitzgerald 1983-87-89: Anders Järryd 1994-95-98: Jacco Eltingh/ Paul Haarhuis 1989-92–93-2000: Mark Woodforde 1992–93-95-2000: Todd Woodbridge 1998-2002-03-05: Jonas Björkman 2003-05-06: Bob Bryan/ Mike Bryan 2002-04-07-08: Daniel Nestor 1999-2006-12: Leander Paes

Women's doubles

1942-46-50: Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp 1947-48-50-51: Doris Hart 1950-51-57: Shirley Fry
Shirley Fry
Irvin 1956–1957: Althea Gibson 1958–60: Maria Bueno 1961–64: Lesley Turner Bowrey 1961-63-64: Margaret Court 1964-66-69-70: Judy Tegart Dalton 1980–81: Kathy Jordan/ Anne Smith 1975-76-77-80: / Martina Navratilova 1981-82-83-84: Pam Shriver 1989-90-93: Helena Suková 1988–90-91-92: Gigi Fernández 1989-90-91-93: / Natasha Zvereva 1989-90-94: Jana Novotná 1996-97-98: Martina Hingis 1999-2000-01: Serena Williams/ Venus Williams 2000-01-06: Lisa Raymond 2012-13-14: Sara Errani/ Roberta Vinci

Mixed doubles

1925-26-27-28 Jean Borotra 1949–51: Doris Hart/ Frank Sedgman 1961-1963: Margaret Court 1962-1963: Ken Fletcher 1965-66-67: Owen Davidson 1967–68: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King 1969–75: Marty Riessen 1961-70-77-79: Bob Hewitt 1992–93-95: Mark Woodforde 1990-93-94-95: Todd Woodbridge 1974-85-2003: Martina Navratilova 2001-02-05: Daniela Hantuchová 1997-99-2005-06: Mahesh Bhupathi 2002-04-08-10: Cara Black 1999-2003-08-16: Leander Paes 2006-15-16: Martina Hingis

v t e

Female tennis players who have won 3 or more Grand Slam singles titles in one year

1928–29: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (3) 1953: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (4) 1962–65–69–70–73: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(3–3–3–4–3) 1972: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (3) 1983–84: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(3) 1988–89–93–95–96: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(4–3–3–3–3) 1991–92: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(3) 1997: Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
(3) 2002–15: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(3)

Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King achievements

v t e

WTA Year-end championships winners doubles

(1972) not held (1973) Rosemary Casals / Margaret Court (1974) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King (1975) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Virginia Wade (1976) not held (1977) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Betty Stöve (1978) not held (1979) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Betty Stöve (1980) Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Martina Navratilova (1981) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1982) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1983) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1984) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1985) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1986 (1)) Hana Mandlíková
Hana Mandlíková
/ Wendy Turnbull (1986 (2)) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1987) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1988) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1989) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1990) Kathy Jordan / Elizabeth Smylie (1991) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
/ Pam Shriver (1992) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
/ Helena Suková (1993) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natalia Zvereva (1994) Gigi Fernández
Gigi Fernández
/ Natasha Zvereva (1995) Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1996) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
/ Mary Joe Fernández (1997) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
/ Jana Novotná (1998) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
/ Natasha Zvereva (1999) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Anna Kournikova (2000) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Anna Kournikova (2001) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Rennae Stubbs (2002) Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva
/ Janette Husárová (2003) Virginia Ruano Pascual
Virginia Ruano Pascual
/ Paola Suárez (2004) Nadia Petrova
Nadia Petrova
/ Meghann Shaughnessy (2005) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Samantha Stosur (2006) Lisa Raymond
Lisa Raymond
/ Samantha Stosur (2007) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Liezel Huber (2008) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Liezel Huber (2009) Nuria Llagostera Vives
Nuria Llagostera Vives
/ María José Martínez Sánchez (2010) Gisela Dulko
Gisela Dulko
/ Flavia Pennetta (2011) Liezel Huber
Liezel Huber
/ Lisa Raymond (2012) Maria Kirilenko
Maria Kirilenko
/ Nadia Petrova (2013) Hsieh Su-wei
Hsieh Su-wei
/ Peng Shuai (2014) Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Sania Mirza (2015) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
/ Sania Mirza (2016) Ekaterina Makarova
Ekaterina Makarova
/ Elena Vesnina (2017) Tímea Babos
Tímea Babos
/ Andrea Hlaváčková

v t e

Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
Sportsperson of the Year

1954: Roger Bannister 1955: Johnny Podres 1956: Bobby Morrow 1957: Stan Musial 1958: Rafer Johnson 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Arnold Palmer 1961: Jerry Lucas 1962: Terry Baker 1963: Pete Rozelle 1964: Ken Venturi 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Jim Ryun 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Bill Russell 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: Bobby Orr 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King & John Wooden 1973: Jackie Stewart 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Pete Rose 1976: Chris Evert 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Jack Nicklaus 1979: Terry Bradshaw
Terry Bradshaw
& Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: Sugar Ray Leonard 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Mary Decker 1984: Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
& Mary Lou Retton 1985: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Joe Paterno 1987: Bob Bourne, Judi Brown King, Kipchoge Keino, Dale Murphy, Chip Rives, Patty Sheehan, Rory Sparrow, & Reggie Williams 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Greg LeMond 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Arthur Ashe 1993: Don Shula 1994: Bonnie Blair
Bonnie Blair
& Johann Olav Koss 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Tiger Woods 1997: Dean Smith 1998: Mark McGwire
Mark McGwire
& Sammy Sosa 1999: U.S. Women's Soccer Team 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
& Randy Johnson 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: David Robinson & Tim Duncan 2004: Boston Red Sox 2005: Tom Brady 2006: Dwyane Wade 2007: Brett Favre 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Derek Jeter 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Mike Krzyzewski
Mike Krzyzewski
& Pat Summitt 2012: LeBron James 2013: Peyton Manning 2014: Madison Bumgarner 2015: Serena Williams 2016: LeBron James 2017: José Altuve
José Altuve
& J. J. Watt

v t e

Time Persons of the Year

1927–1950

Charles Lindbergh
Charles Lindbergh
(1927) Walter Chrysler
Walter Chrysler
(1928) Owen D. Young
Owen D. Young
(1929) Mohandas Gandhi (1930) Pierre Laval
Pierre Laval
(1931) Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt
(1932) Hugh S. Johnson
Hugh S. Johnson
(1933) Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt
(1934) Haile Selassie
Haile Selassie
(1935) Wallis Simpson
Wallis Simpson
(1936) Chiang Kai-shek
Chiang Kai-shek
/ Soong Mei-ling
Soong Mei-ling
(1937) Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler
(1938) Joseph Stalin
Joseph Stalin
(1939) Winston Churchill
Winston Churchill
(1940) Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt
(1941) Joseph Stalin
Joseph Stalin
(1942) George Marshall
George Marshall
(1943) Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D. Eisenhower
(1944) Harry S. Truman
Harry S. Truman
(1945) James F. Byrnes
James F. Byrnes
(1946) George Marshall
George Marshall
(1947) Harry S. Truman
Harry S. Truman
(1948) Winston Churchill
Winston Churchill
(1949) The American Fighting-Man (1950)

1951–1975

Mohammed Mosaddeq (1951) Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
(1952) Konrad Adenauer
Konrad Adenauer
(1953) John Foster Dulles
John Foster Dulles
(1954) Harlow Curtice
Harlow Curtice
(1955) Hungarian Freedom Fighters (1956) Nikita Khrushchev
Nikita Khrushchev
(1957) Charles de Gaulle
Charles de Gaulle
(1958) Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D. Eisenhower
(1959) U.S. Scientists: George Beadle / Charles Draper / John Enders / Donald A. Glaser / Joshua Lederberg
Joshua Lederberg
/ Willard Libby
Willard Libby
/ Linus Pauling
Linus Pauling
/ Edward Purcell / Isidor Rabi / Emilio Segrè
Emilio Segrè
/ William Shockley
William Shockley
/ Edward Teller / Charles Townes / James Van Allen
James Van Allen
/ Robert Woodward (1960) John F. Kennedy
John F. Kennedy
(1961) Pope John XXIII
Pope John XXIII
(1962) Martin Luther King Jr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
(1963) Lyndon B. Johnson
Lyndon B. Johnson
(1964) William Westmoreland
William Westmoreland
(1965) The Generation Twenty-Five and Under (1966) Lyndon B. Johnson
Lyndon B. Johnson
(1967) The Apollo 8
Apollo 8
Astronauts: William Anders
William Anders
/ Frank Borman
Frank Borman
/ Jim Lovell (1968) The Middle Americans (1969) Willy Brandt
Willy Brandt
(1970) Richard Nixon
Richard Nixon
(1971) Henry Kissinger
Henry Kissinger
/ Richard Nixon
Richard Nixon
(1972) John Sirica
John Sirica
(1973) King Faisal (1974) American Women: Susan Brownmiller / Kathleen Byerly
Kathleen Byerly
/ Alison Cheek / Jill Conway / Betty Ford
Betty Ford
/ Ella Grasso / Carla Hills / Barbara Jordan / Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King / Susie Sharp / Carol Sutton / Addie Wyatt (1975)

1976–2000

Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
(1976) Anwar Sadat
Anwar Sadat
(1977) Deng Xiaoping
Deng Xiaoping
(1978) Ayatollah Khomeini (1979) Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan
(1980) Lech Wałęsa
Lech Wałęsa
(1981) The Computer (1982) Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan
/ Yuri Andropov
Yuri Andropov
(1983) Peter Ueberroth
Peter Ueberroth
(1984) Deng Xiaoping
Deng Xiaoping
(1985) Corazon Aquino
Corazon Aquino
(1986) Mikhail Gorbachev
Mikhail Gorbachev
(1987) The Endangered Earth (1988) Mikhail Gorbachev
Mikhail Gorbachev
(1989) George H. W. Bush
George H. W. Bush
(1990) Ted Turner
Ted Turner
(1991) Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
(1992) The Peacemakers: Yasser Arafat
Yasser Arafat
/ F. W. de Klerk
F. W. de Klerk
/ Nelson Mandela
Nelson Mandela
/ Yitzhak Rabin
Yitzhak Rabin
(1993) Pope John Paul II
Pope John Paul II
(1994) Newt Gingrich
Newt Gingrich
(1995) David Ho
David Ho
(1996) Andrew Grove
Andrew Grove
(1997) Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
/ Ken Starr
Ken Starr
(1998) Jeffrey P. Bezos (1999) George W. Bush
George W. Bush
(2000)

2001–present

Rudolph Giuliani (2001) The Whistleblowers: Cynthia Cooper / Coleen Rowley
Coleen Rowley
/ Sherron Watkins (2002) The American Soldier (2003) George W. Bush
George W. Bush
(2004) The Good Samaritans: Bono
Bono
/ Bill Gates
Bill Gates
/ Melinda Gates
Melinda Gates
(2005) You (2006) Vladimir Putin
Vladimir Putin
(2007) Barack Obama
Barack Obama
(2008) Ben Bernanke
Ben Bernanke
(2009) Mark Zuckerberg
Mark Zuckerberg
(2010) The Protester (2011) Barack Obama
Barack Obama
(2012) Pope Francis
Pope Francis
(2013) Ebola Fighters: Dr. Jerry Brown / Dr. Kent Brantly
Kent Brantly
/ Ella Watson-Stryker / Foday Gollah / Salome Karwah
Salome Karwah
(2014) Angela Merkel
Angela Merkel
(2015) Donald Trump
Donald Trump
(2016) The Silence Breakers (2017)

Book

v t e

Inductees to the National Women's Hall of Fame

1970–1979

1973

Jane Addams Marian Anderson Susan B. Anthony Clara Barton Mary McLeod Bethune Elizabeth Blackwell Pearl S. Buck Rachel Carson Mary Cassatt Emily Dickinson Amelia Earhart Alice Hamilton Helen Hayes Helen Keller Eleanor Roosevelt Florence Sabin Margaret Chase Smith Elizabeth Cady Stanton Helen Brooke Taussig Harriet Tubman

1976

Abigail Adams Margaret Mead Mildred "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias

1979

Dorothea Dix Juliette Gordon Low Alice Paul Elizabeth Bayley Seton

1980–1989

1981

Margaret Sanger Sojourner Truth

1982

Carrie Chapman Catt Frances Perkins

1983

Belva Lockwood Lucretia Mott

1984

Mary "Mother" Harris Jones Bessie Smith

1986

Barbara McClintock Lucy Stone Harriet Beecher Stowe

1988

Gwendolyn Brooks Willa Cather Sally Ride Ida B. Wells-Barnett

1990–1999

1990

Margaret Bourke-White Barbara Jordan Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King Florence B. Seibert

1991

Gertrude Belle Elion

1993

Ethel Percy Andrus Antoinette Blackwell Emily Blackwell Shirley Chisholm Jacqueline Cochran Ruth Colvin Marian Wright Edelman Alice Evans Betty Friedan Ella Grasso Martha Wright Griffiths Fannie Lou Hamer Dorothy Height Dolores Huerta Mary Jacobi Mae Jemison Mary Lyon Mary Mahoney Wilma Mankiller Constance Baker Motley Georgia O'Keeffe Annie Oakley Rosa Parks Esther Peterson Jeannette Rankin Ellen Swallow Richards Elaine Roulet Katherine Siva Saubel Gloria Steinem Helen Stephens Lillian Wald Madam C. J. Walker Faye Wattleton Rosalyn S. Yalow Gloria Yerkovich

1994

Bella Abzug Ella Baker Myra Bradwell Annie Jump Cannon Jane Cunningham Croly Catherine East Geraldine Ferraro Charlotte Perkins Gilman Grace Hopper Helen LaKelly Hunt Zora Neale Hurston Anne Hutchinson Frances Wisebart Jacobs Susette La Flesche Louise McManus Maria Mitchell Antonia Novello Linda Richards Wilma Rudolph Betty Bone Schiess Muriel Siebert Nettie Stevens Oprah Winfrey Sarah Winnemucca Fanny Wright

1995

Virginia Apgar Ann Bancroft Amelia Bloomer Mary Breckinridge Eileen Collins Elizabeth Hanford Dole Anne Dallas Dudley Mary Baker Eddy Ella Fitzgerald Margaret Fuller Matilda Joslyn Gage Lillian Moller Gilbreth Nannerl O. Keohane Maggie Kuhn Sandra Day O'Connor Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin Pat Schroeder Hannah Greenebaum Solomon

1996

Louisa May Alcott Charlotte Anne Bunch Frances Xavier Cabrini Mary A. Hallaren Oveta Culp Hobby Wilhelmina Cole Holladay Anne Morrow Lindbergh Maria Goeppert-Mayer Ernestine Louise Potowski Rose Maria Tallchief Edith Wharton

1998

Madeleine Albright Maya Angelou Nellie Bly Lydia Moss Bradley Mary Steichen Calderone Mary Ann Shadd
Mary Ann Shadd
Cary Joan Ganz Cooney Gerty Cori Sarah Grimké Julia Ward Howe Shirley Ann Jackson Shannon Lucid Katharine Dexter McCormick Rozanne L. Ridgway Edith Nourse Rogers Felice Schwartz Eunice Kennedy Shriver Beverly Sills Florence Wald Angelina Grimké
Angelina Grimké
Weld Chien-Shiung Wu

2000–2009

2000

Faye Glenn Abdellah Emma Smith DeVoe Marjory Stoneman Douglas Mary Dyer Sylvia A. Earle Crystal Eastman Jeanne Holm Leontine T. Kelly Frances Oldham Kelsey Kate Mullany Janet Reno Anna Howard Shaw Sophia Smith Ida Tarbell Wilma L. Vaught Mary Edwards Walker Annie Dodge Wauneka Eudora Welty Frances E. Willard

2001

Dorothy H. Andersen Lucille Ball Rosalynn Carter Lydia Maria Child Bessie Coleman Dorothy Day Marian de Forest Althea Gibson Beatrice A. Hicks Barbara Holdridge Harriet Williams Russell Strong Emily Howell Warner Victoria Woodhull

2002

Paulina Kellogg Wright Davis Ruth Bader Ginsburg Katharine Graham Bertha Holt Mary Engle Pennington Mercy Otis Warren

2003

Linda G. Alvarado Donna de Varona Gertrude Ederle Martha Matilda Harper Patricia Roberts Harris Stephanie L. Kwolek Dorothea Lange Mildred Robbins Leet Patsy Takemoto Mink Sacagawea Anne Sullivan Sheila E. Widnall

2005

Florence Ellinwood Allen Ruth Fulton Benedict Betty Bumpers Hillary Clinton Rita Rossi Colwell Mother Marianne Cope Maya Y. Lin Patricia A. Locke Blanche Stuart Scott Mary Burnett Talbert

2007

Eleanor K. Baum Julia Child Martha Coffin Pelham Wright Swanee Hunt Winona LaDuke Elisabeth Kübler-Ross Judith L. Pipher Catherine Filene Shouse Henrietta Szold

2009

Louise Bourgeois Mildred Cohn Karen DeCrow Susan Kelly-Dreiss Allie B. Latimer Emma Lazarus Ruth Patrick Rebecca Talbot Perkins Susan Solomon Kate Stoneman

2010–2019

2011

St. Katharine Drexel Dorothy Harrison Eustis Loretta C. Ford Abby Kelley
Abby Kelley
Foster Helen Murray Free Billie Holiday Coretta Scott King Lilly Ledbetter Barbara A. Mikulski Donna E. Shalala Kathrine Switzer

2013

Betty Ford Ina May Gaskin Julie Krone Kate Millett Nancy Pelosi Mary Joseph Rogers Bernice Sandler Anna Schwartz Emma Willard

2015

Tenley Albright Nancy Brinker Martha Graham Marcia Greenberger Barbara Iglewski Jean Kilbourne Carlotta Walls LaNier Philippa Marrack Mary Harriman Rumsey Eleanor Smeal

2017

Matilda Cuomo Temple Grandin Lorraine Hansberry Victoria Jackson Sherry Lansing Clare Boothe Luce Aimee Mullins Carol Mutter Janet Rowley Alice Waters

v t e

Associated Press
Associated Press
Female Athlete of the Year

1931: Helene Madison 1932: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1933: Helen Jacobs 1934: Virginia Van Wie 1935: Helen Wills 1936: Helen Stephens 1937: Katherine Rawls 1938: Patty Berg 1939: Alice Marble 1940: Alice Marble 1941: Betty Hicks 1942: Gloria Callen 1943: Patty Berg 1944: Ann Curtis 1945: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1946: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1947: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1948: Fanny Blankers-Koen 1949: Marlene Hagge 1950: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1951: Maureen Connolly 1952: Maureen Connolly 1953: Maureen Connolly 1954: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1955: Patty Berg 1956: Pat McCormick 1957: Althea Gibson 1958: Althea Gibson 1959: Maria Bueno 1960: Wilma Rudolph 1961: Wilma Rudolph 1962: Dawn Fraser 1963: Mickey Wright 1964: Mickey Wright 1965: Kathy Whitworth 1966: Kathy Whitworth 1967: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King 1968: Peggy Fleming 1969: Debbie Meyer 1970: Chi Cheng 1971: Evonne Goolagong 1972: Olga Korbut 1973: Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King 1974: Chris Evert 1975: Chris Evert 1976: Nadia Comăneci 1977: Chris Evert 1978: Nancy Lopez 1979: Tracy Austin 1980: Chris Evert 1981: Tracy Austin 1982: Mary Decker 1983: Martina Navratilova 1984: Mary Lou Retton 1985: Nancy Lopez 1986: Martina Navratilova 1987: Jackie Joyner-Kersee 1988: Florence Griffith Joyner 1989: Steffi Graf 1990: Beth Daniel 1991: Monica Seles 1992: Monica Seles 1993: Sheryl Swoopes 1994: Bonnie Blair 1995: Rebecca Lobo 1996: Amy Van Dyken 1997: Martina Hingis 1998: Pak Se-ri 1999: United States
United States
women's national soccer team 2000: Marion Jones 2001: Jennifer Capriati 2002: Serena Williams 2003: Annika Sörenstam 2004: Annika Sörenstam 2005: Annika Sörenstam 2006: Lorena Ochoa 2007: Lorena Ochoa 2008: Candace Parker 2009: Serena Williams 2010: Lindsey Vonn 2011: Abby Wambach 2012: Gabby Douglas 2013: Serena Williams 2014: Mo'ne Davis 2015: Serena Williams 2016: Simone Biles 2017: Katie Ledecky

v t e

Arthur Ashe Courage Award
Arthur Ashe Courage Award
winners

Named after Arthur Ashe

1993: Valvano 1994: Palermo 1995: Cosell 1996: Claiborne 1997: Ali 1998: D. Smith 1999: King 2000: Sanders 2001: Freeman 2002:

Beamer Bingham Burnett Glick

2003: Pat & Kevin Tillman 2004: Weah 2005: MacLaren & Yeboah 2006: Ahmad & Kohestani 2007: Cullen & Ringland 2008: Carlos & T. Smith 2009: Mandela 2010: Thomas 2011: Bozella 2012: Summitt 2013: Roberts 2014: Sam 2015: Jenner 2016: Dobson 2017: Shriver

v t e

Chicago Gay and Lesbian
Lesbian
Hall of Fame

1990–1999

1991

Ortez Alderson (posthumous) Jon-Henri Damski James W. Flint Gay Chicago Renee C. Hanover Howard Brown Health Center Judith S. Johns Carol A. Johnson William B. Kelley Marie J. Kuda Chuck Renslow Adrienne J. Smith Max C. Smith Richard B. Turner

1992

Gary Chichester Ann Christophersen Thom Dombkowski Henry Gerber
Henry Gerber
(posthumous) Richard Lee Gray Vernita Gray Peg Grey Pearl M. Hart
Pearl M. Hart
(posthumous) Horizons Community Services Harley McMillen Scott McPherson Metropolitan Sports Association Dom Orejudos
Dom Orejudos
(posthumous) Mary D. Powers Daniel Sotomayor (posthumous) Valerie Taylor

1993

Ad Hoc Committee of Proud Black Lesbians and Gays Robert Sloane Basker E. Kitch Childs (Posthumous) Jerrold Cohen (posthumous) Robert T. Ford Richard Garrin Jeff Graubart-Cervone Joel Hall Nancy Lanoue Sid L. Mohn Mountain Moving Coffeehouse Kathy Osterman (posthumous) Richard W. Pfeiffer Linda S. Rodgers Ron Sable Bruce C. Scott Marge Summit Joanne E. Trapani Al Wardell

1994

Robert J. Adams Tracy Baim George S. Buse James A. Bussen Lori Cannon John Chester Chicago House and Social Service Agency Samuel F. Davis Jr. (posthumous) Adrienne J. Goodman Earnest E. Hite Jr. Bruce Koff Ellis B. Levin Lionheart Gay Theatre Company Open Hand Chicago Gregory A. Sprague (posthumous) Elizabeth E. Tocci Steven F. Wakefield

1995

Caryn Berman Samson Chan (posthumous) T. Chris Cothran Sarah Craig (posthumous) Frontrunners Frontwalkers Chicago Jean V. Hardisty Nick Kelly Dawn Clark Netsch José Pena Queer Nation
Queer Nation
Chicago David B. Sindt (posthumous) Armando L. Smith James Monroe Smith (lawyer) Tom Tunney Yvonne Zipter

1996

Jacqueline Anderson Bailiwick Repertory's Pride Series Jack Delaney Gerber/Hart Library and Archives Arlene Halko Greg Harris Frankie Knuckles Tony Midnite Mary Morten Ifti Nasim Charlotte Newfeld Norm Sloan Tiffani St. Cloud

1997

Toni Armstrong Jr. Miguel Ayala Roger Chaffin James C. Darby Dignity Chicago Ida Greathouse (posthumous) John Hammell (posthumous) Rick Karlin Corinne J. Kawecki Larry McKeon David G. Ostrow Mary Ann Smith

1998

Carrie Barnett Thomas Chiola Laurie J. Dittman Jeannette Howard Foster
Jeannette Howard Foster
(posthumous) Jorjet Harper Arthur L. Johnston Ira H. Jones (posthumous) Clifford P. Kelley Dorothy Klefstad LesBiGay Radio Renae Ogletree Dean Robert Ogren Victor A. Salvo Jr. Modesto "Tico" Valle Luule Vess

1999

Ava Allen John J. Balester David Brian Bell (posthumous) Randy Duncan Rick Garcia Lorraine Hansberry
Lorraine Hansberry
(posthumous) Derrick Allen Hicks Billie Jean
Billie Jean
King Lesbian
Lesbian
Community Cancer Project Adrene Perom Norman L. Sandfield Gregg Shapiro Jesse White Phill Wilson

2000–2009

2000

ACT UP/Chicago Association of Latin Men for Action Lorrainne Sade Baskerville Henry Blake Fuller Chicago Chapter of GLSEN Phil A. Hannema Sarah Hoagland Nancy J. Katz Danny Kopelson Patricia S. McCombs Helen Shiller Rene A. Van Hulle Jr. Israel Wright

2001

Lora Branch Robert Castillo Chicago Gay Men's Chorus Keith Elliott Sara Feigenholtz Frank Goley (posthumous) and Robert Maddox Chuck Hyde Antonio David Jimenez Michael A. Leppen Ellen A. Meyers Kathryn Munzer Studs Terkel

2002

Affinity Community Services Evette Cardona C. C. Carter Jim Gates (Chicago businessman) Louis I. Lang Mattachine Midwest NAMES Project
NAMES Project
Chicago Chapter Charles Edward Nelson II Mona Noriega Christina Smith Lauren Sugerman

2003

Angel Abcede About Face Theatre AIDS Legal Council of Chicago Buddies' Restaurant and Bar Tania Callaway (posthumous) Armand R. Cerbone Chicago Black Lesbians and Gays R. Sue Connolly Robert Bonvouloir Foster (posthumous) The Graham Family Tonda L. Hughes Patricia M. Logue John Pennycuff Laurence E. Spang Sheron Denise Webb Albert N. Williams

2004

Roger Brown (posthumous) Christopher Clason (posthumous) Charles E. Clifton (posthumous) Frank Galati Ralph Paul Gernhardt Suzanne Marie Kraus Lincoln Park Lagooners Mulryan and York, Attorneys at Law PFLAG/Chicago Julio Rodriguez Nan Schaffer Terri Worman

2005

Alexandra Scott Billings Megan Carney Aldo Castillo John D'Emilio Equality Illinois Merry Mary Mike McHale Jim Pickett Juan Reed Carol Ronen C. Michael Savage (posthumous) Catherine Sikora Lawrence E. Sloan (posthumous) Test Positive Aware Network

2006

Margaret C. Anderson
Margaret C. Anderson
and Jane Heap
Jane Heap
(posthumous) Congregation Or Chadash Jacques Cristion (posthumous) Richard M. Daley Marigold Bowl Jill M. Metz Charles R. Middleton Edward Negron Laird Petersen Sidetrack Star Gaze Richard M. Uyvari

2007

American Veterans for Equal Rights David Blatt and David Moore Carol Moseley Braun Robbin Burr Chicago Games, Inc. Tarrina Dikes Martin Gapshis Jeffrey E. McCour (posthumous) Carlos T. Mock Chilli Pepper A Real Read Karen C. Sendziak Patrick Sheahan Harold Washington
Harold Washington
(posthumous) Vera Washington

2008

Jane Addams
Jane Addams
(posthumous) Suzanne Arnold Artemis Singers Kevin G. Boyer Michal Brody Sam Coady Gregory R. Dell Katherine (Kit) Duffy Eddie Dugan (posthumous) Murray Edelman Wanda Lust (posthumous) Joe La Pat (posthumous) Jesus Salgueiro and Art Smith Guy Warner

2009

AIDS Foundation of Chicago Paula Basta Lou Conte Lori A. Cooper Marcia J. Lipetz Amy Maggio Joey McDonald Mike Quigley Frank M. Robinson Jane M. Hussein Saks Zaida Sanabia Patrick Sinozich Marilyn Urso

2010–2019

2010

Claudia Allen American Civil Liberties Union
American Civil Liberties Union
of Illinois Asians & Friends – Chicago Chicago History Museum Dan Di Leo (Posthumous) Scot Free Bob Gammie International Mr. Leather E. Patrick Johnson David Ernesto Munar Achy Obejas Paul G. Oostenbrug Jose R. Rios Stan Sloan Mark E. Wojcik

2011

Paul Adams (posthumous) Greg Cameron Antonia Flores (posthumous) Grant Lynn Ford Robert Garofalo Good Shepherd Parish Metropolitan Community Church Ted Grady Marcia Hill Tony Jackson (posthumous) Jenner & Block LLP Owen Keehnen Lakeside Pride Music Ensembles The Night Ministry Brett Shingledecker Jon Simmons (posthumous)

2012

Lois L. Bates (posthumous) Chi-Town Squares Chicago Black Gay Men's Caucus St. Sukie de la Croix Sanford E. Gaylord William W. Greaves Keith R. Green Mark Ishaug David Orr Proud to Run, Chicago Bill Pry Chuck Rodocker Heather C. Sawyer Laura S. Washington Honey West

2013

Gaylon Alcaraz James L. Alexander James L. Bennett Jorge Cestou Rocco J. Claps Rudolph Johnson Jr. (posthumous) Lambda Legal
Lambda Legal
- Midwest Regional Office Lee A. Newell II Paté Andrew Patner POW-WOW Laura Ricketts Neil Steinberg Burr Tillstrom
Burr Tillstrom
(posthumous) Brenda Webb David Zak

2014

Gerald Arpino Jennifer Brier Kelly Cassidy Terry Cosgrove Christina Kahrl Edward Mogul Lisa Marie Pickens Debra Shore Ross A. Slotten, M.D. Bennet Williams Out & Proud in Chicago Silk Road Rising Lucretia Clay-Ward Heather A. Steans Clarence N. Wood

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 91963648 LCCN: n80013088 ISNI: 0000 0001 1451 8626 GND: 128823895 SELIBR: 321597 BNF: cb16262991p (data) NDL: 00445690 NKC: xx0112055 SN

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