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Bartholomeus Amicus
Bartholomeus Amicus
(1562–1649), or Bartolomeo Amico or Bartholomeo d'Amici, was a Jesuit
Jesuit
priest, teacher and writer who spent his adult life in Naples. The subjects he wrote about include Aristotelian philosophy, mathematics, astronomy, and the concept of vacuum and its relationship with God. He studied law before joining the Jesuits and following the curriculum in their college in Naples, later teaching logic, physics, metaphysics and theology. In his extensive writing he presented alternative theories, including those of Christopher Clavius
Christopher Clavius
and Copernicus, even when he disagreed with them, though theologians of that period did not always explain opposing views. He sought to establish workable science without undermining theology. See also[edit]

List of Roman Catholic scientist-clerics

References[edit]

Scholasticon by Jacob Schmutz Edward Grant, Much Ado about Nothing : Theories of Space and Vacuum
Vacuum
from the Middle Ages to the Scientific Revolution (1981) - Chapter 7

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