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Barnabas
Barnabas
(English: bɑrnəbəs; Greek: Βαρνάβας), born Joseph, was an early Christian, one of the prominent Christian disciples in Jerusalem. According to Acts
Acts
4:36, Barnabas
Barnabas
was a Cypriot Jew. Named an apostle in Acts
Acts
14:14, he and Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
undertook missionary journeys together and defended Gentile converts against the Judaizers. They traveled together making more converts (c. 45–47), and participated in the Council of Jerusalem
Council of Jerusalem
(c. 50) Barnabas
Barnabas
and Paul successfully evangelized among the "God-fearing" Gentiles who attended synagogues in various Hellenized cities of Anatolia. Barnabas' story appears in the Acts
Acts
of the Apostles, and Paul mentions him in some of his epistles. Tertullian
Tertullian
named him as the author of the Epistle
Epistle
to the Hebrews, but this and other attributions are conjecture. Clement of Alexandria
Clement of Alexandria
and some scholars have ascribed the Epistle
Epistle
of Barnabas
Barnabas
to him, but his authorship is disputed. Although the date, place, and circumstances of his death are historically unverifiable, Christian
Christian
tradition holds that Barnabas
Barnabas
was martyred at Salamis, Cyprus, in 61 AD. He is traditionally identified as the founder of the Cypriot Orthodox Church. The feast day of Barnabas
Barnabas
is celebrated on June 11. Barnabas
Barnabas
is usually identified as the cousin of Mark the Evangelist
Mark the Evangelist
on the basis of Colossians
Colossians
4. Infrequent occurrence in the Septuagint to its presence in Josephus and Philo, "anepsios" consistently carries the connotation of "cousin". Some traditions hold that Aristobulus of Britannia, one of the Seventy Disciples, was the brother of Barnabas.

Contents

1 Name and etymologies 2 Biblical narrative 3 Barnabas
Barnabas
and Antioch 4 Council of Jerusalem 5 Martyrdom 6 Other sources 7 Alleged writings 8 The Barnabites 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External links

Name and etymologies[edit] His Hellenic Jewish
Jewish
parents called him Joseph (although the Byzantine text-type calls him Ιὠσης, Iōsēs, 'Joses', a Greek variant of 'Joseph'), but when he sold all his goods and gave the money to the apostles in Jerusalem, they gave him a new name: Barnabas. This name appears to be from the Aramaic בר נביא, bar naḇyā, meaning 'the son (of the) prophet'. However, the Greek text of the Acts
Acts
4:36 explains the name as υἱὸς παρακλήσεως, hyios paraklēseōs, meaning "son of consolation" or "son of encouragement". A similar link between ”prophecy” and ”encouragement” is found in Paul’s letter to the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 14:3). Biblical narrative[edit]

Barnabas
Barnabas
curing the sick by Paolo Veronese, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Rouen.

Barnabas
Barnabas
appears mainly in Acts, a history of the early Christian church. He also appears in several of Paul's epistles. Barnabas, a native of Cyprus
Cyprus
and a Levite, is first mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles
Acts of the Apostles
as a member of the early Christian
Christian
community in Jerusalem, who sold some land that he owned and gave the proceeds to the community ( Acts
Acts
4:36-37). When the future Apostle Paul returned to Jerusalem
Jerusalem
after his conversion, Barnabas
Barnabas
introduced him to the apostles (9:27). Easton, in his Bible Dictionary, supposes that they had been fellow students in the school of Gamaliel
Gamaliel
[1]. The successful preaching of Christianity at Antioch
Antioch
to non-Jews led the church at Jerusalem
Jerusalem
to send Barnabas
Barnabas
there to oversee the movement ( Acts
Acts
11:20–22). He found the work so extensive and weighty that he went to Tarsus in search of Paul (still referred to as Saul), "an admirable colleague", to assist him. Paul returned with him to Antioch and labored with him for a whole year ( Acts
Acts
11:25–26). At the end of this period, the two were sent up to Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(44 AD) with contributions from the church at Antioch
Antioch
for the relief of the poorer Christians in Judea. They returned to Antioch
Antioch
taking John Mark
John Mark
with them, the cousin or nephew of Barnabas. Later, they went to Cyprus
Cyprus
and some of the principal cities of Pamphylia, Pisidia, and Lycaonia
Lycaonia
( Acts
Acts
13:14). After recounting what the governor of Cyprus
Cyprus
Sergius Paulus
Sergius Paulus
believed, Acts
Acts
13:9 speaks of Barnabas's companion no longer as Saul, but as Paul, his Roman name, and generally refers to the two no longer as " Barnabas
Barnabas
and Saul" as heretofore (11:30; 12:25; 13:2, 7), but as "Paul and Barnabas" (13:43, 46, 50; 14:20; 15:2, 22, 35). Only in 14:14 and 15:12-25 does Barnabas
Barnabas
again occupy the first place, in the first passage with recollection of 14:12, in the last 2, because Barnabas
Barnabas
stood in closer relation to the Jerusalem
Jerusalem
church than Paul. Paul appears as the more eloquent missionary (13:16; 14:8-9; 19-20), whence the Lystrans regarded him as Hermes
Hermes
and Barnabas
Barnabas
as Zeus.The King James Version
King James Version
renders the Greek name "Zeus" by the Latin
Latin
name "Jupiter" (14:12).

, Saints Paul and Barnabas
Barnabas
at Lystra (Sacrifice at Lystra), Bartholomeus Breenberg,1637,Princeton University Art Museum

Returning from this first missionary journey to Antioch, they were again sent up to Jerusalem
Jerusalem
to consult with the church there regarding the relation of Gentiles to the church ( Acts
Acts
15:2; Galatians 2:1). According to Galatians 2:9-10, Barnabas
Barnabas
was included with Paul in the agreement made between them, on the one hand, and James, Peter, and John, on the other, that the two former should in the future preach to the pagans, not forgetting the poor at Jerusalem. This matter having been settled, they returned again to Antioch, bringing the agreement of the council that Gentiles were to be admitted into the church without having to adopt Jewish
Jewish
practices. After they had returned to Antioch
Antioch
from the Jerusalem
Jerusalem
council, they spent some time there (15:35). Peter came and associated freely there with the Gentiles, eating with them, until criticized for this by some disciples of James, as against Mosaic law. Upon their remonstrances, Peter yielded apparently through fear of displeasing them, and refused to eat any longer with the Gentiles. Barnabas
Barnabas
followed his example. Paul considered that they "walked not uprightly according to the truth of the gospel" and upbraided them before the whole church (Galatians 2:11-15). Paul then asked Barnabas
Barnabas
to accompany him on another journey (15:36). Barnabas
Barnabas
wished to take John Mark
John Mark
along, but Paul did not, as he had left them on the earlier journey (15:37-38). The dispute ended by Paul and Barnabas
Barnabas
taking separate routes. Paul took Silas
Silas
as his companion, and journeyed through Syria
Syria
and Cilicia; while Barnabas
Barnabas
took John Mark to visit Cyprus
Cyprus
(15:36-41). John Francis Fenlon suggests that Paul may have been somewhat influenced by the attitude recently taken by Barnabas, which might have proven prejudicial to their work. Barnabas
Barnabas
is not mentioned again in the Acts
Acts
of the Apostles. However, Gal. 2:11-13 says, "And when Kephas
Kephas
came to Antioch, I opposed him to his face because he clearly was wrong. For, until some people came from James, he used to eat with the Gentiles; but when they came, he began to draw back and separated himself, because he was afraid of the circumcised. And the rest of the Jews (also) acted hypocritically along with him, with the result that even Barnabas
Barnabas
was carried away by their hypocrisy." Barnabas
Barnabas
is also mentioned in the First Epistle
Epistle
to the Corinthians, in which it is mentioned that he and Paul funded their missions by working side jobs and (it is implied) went without wives and other benefits other apostles received (1 Cor. 9:6); Paul states that he and Barnabas
Barnabas
forsook those benefits "that we may cause no hindrance to the Good News of Christ" (1 Cor. 9:12). Barnabas
Barnabas
and Antioch[edit] Antioch, the third-most important city of the Roman Empire,[2] then the capital city of Syria
Syria
province, today Antakya, Turkey, was where Christians were first called thus.[3] Some of those who had been scattered by the persecution that arose because of Stephen went to Antioch, which became the site of an early Christian
Christian
community.[4] A considerable minority of the Antioch
Antioch
church of Barnabas's time belonged to the merchant class, and they provided support to the poorer Jerusalem
Jerusalem
church.[5] Council of Jerusalem[edit] Main article: Council of Jerusalem Barnabas
Barnabas
participated in the Council of Jerusalem, which dealt with the admission of Gentiles into the Christian
Christian
community, a crucial problem in early Christianity.[5] Paul and Barnabas
Barnabas
proposed that Gentiles be allowed into the community without being circumcised. Martyrdom[edit] Main article: Christian
Christian
martyrs Church tradition developed outside of the canon of the New Testament describes the martyrdom of many saints, including the legend of the martyrdom of Barnabas.[6] It relates that certain Jews coming to Syria and Salamis, where Barnabas
Barnabas
was then preaching the gospel, being highly exasperated at his extraordinary success, fell upon him as he was disputing in the synagogue, dragged him out, and, after the most inhumane tortures, stoned him to death. His kinsman, John Mark, who was a spectator of this barbarous action, privately interred his body.[7] Although it is believed he was martyred of faith by being stoned, the Catholic- Apocryphal
Apocryphal
Acts
Acts
of Barnabas
Barnabas
states that he was bound with a rope by the neck, and then being dragged only to the site where he would be burned to death. This is highly unlikely since the apocryphal Acts
Acts
states that his bones were burnt to dust and that relics of some of his bones are stored in a church today; on the other hand, the fire in the apocryphal Acts
Acts
could have cremated only some of his bones. According to the History of the Cyprus
Cyprus
Church,[8] in 478 Barnabas appeared in a dream to the Archbishop of Constantia (Salamis, Cyprus) Anthemios and revealed to him the place of his sepulchre beneath a carob-tree. The following day Anthemios found the tomb and inside it the remains of Barnabas
Barnabas
with a manuscript of Matthew's Gospel
Gospel
on his breast. Anthemios presented the Gospel
Gospel
to Emperor Zeno at Constantinople
Constantinople
and received from him the privileges of the Greek Orthodox Church of Cyprus, that is, the purple cloak which the Greek Archbishop of Cyprus
Cyprus
wears at festivals of the church, the imperial sceptre and the red ink with which he affixes his signature. Anthemios then placed the venerable remains of Barnabas
Barnabas
in a church which he founded near the tomb. Excavations near the site of a present-day church and monastery, have revealed an early church with two empty tombs, believed to be that of St. Barnabas
Barnabas
and Anthemios.[9] St. Barnabas
Barnabas
is venerated as the Patron Saint
Patron Saint
of Cyprus. Other sources[edit] Although many assume that the biblical Mark the Cousin of Barnabas ( Colossians
Colossians
4:10) is the same as John Mark
John Mark
( Acts
Acts
12:12, 25; 13:5, 13; 15: 37) and Mark the Evangelist, the traditionally believed author of the Gospel
Gospel
of Mark, according to Hippolytus of Rome,[10] the three "Mark"s are distinct persons. They were all members of the Seventy Apostles
Apostles
of Christ, including Barnabas
Barnabas
himself. There are two people named Barnabas
Barnabas
among Hippolytus' list of Seventy Disciples, one (#13) became the bishop of Milan, the other (#25) the bishop of Heraclea. Most likely one of these two is the biblical Barnabas; the first one is more likely, because the numbering by Hippolytus seems to indicate a level of significance. Clement of Alexandria
Clement of Alexandria
(Stromata, ii, 20) also makes Barnabas
Barnabas
one of the Seventy Disciples
Seventy Disciples
that are mentioned in the Gospel of Luke
Gospel of Luke
10:1ff. Other sources bring Barnabas
Barnabas
to Rome
Rome
and Alexandria. In the "Clementine Recognitions" (i, 7) he is depicted as preaching in Rome even during Christ's lifetime. Not older than the 3rd century is the tradition of the later activity and martyrdom of Barnabas
Barnabas
in Cyprus, where his remains are said to have been discovered under the Emperor Zeno. The question whether Barnabas
Barnabas
was an apostle was often discussed during the Middle Ages.[11] Alleged writings[edit] Tertullian
Tertullian
and other Western writers regard Barnabas
Barnabas
as the author of the Letter to the Hebrews. This may have been the Roman tradition—which Tertullian
Tertullian
usually follows—and in Rome
Rome
the epistle may have had its first readers. But the tradition has weighty considerations against it.[clarification needed] “Photius of the ninth century, refers to some in his day who were uncertain whether the Acts
Acts
was written by Clement of Rome, Barnabas, or Luke. Yet Photius is certain that the work must be ascribed to Luke.” [12] He is also traditionally associated with the Epistle
Epistle
of Barnabas, although some modern scholars think it more likely that that epistle was written in Alexandria in the 130s. John Dominic Crossan quotes Koester as stating that New Testament writings are used "neither explicitly nor tacitly" in the Epistle
Epistle
of Barnabas
Barnabas
and that this "would argue for an early date, perhaps even before the end of I C.E." Crossan continues (The Cross that Spoke, p. 121): Richardson and Shukster have also argued for a first-century date. Among several arguments they point to the detail of "a little king, who shall subdue three of the kings under one" and "a little crescent horn, and that it subdued under one three of the great horns" in Barnabas
Barnabas
4:4-5. They propose a composition "date during or immediately after the reign of Nerva (96-8 C.E.) . . . viewed as bringing to an end the glorious Flavian dynasty of Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian . . . when a powerful, distinguished, and successful dynasty was brought low, humiliated by an assassin's knife" (33, 40). In 16:3-4, the Epistle
Epistle
of Barnabas
Barnabas
says: "Furthermore he says again, 'Lo, they who destroyed this temple shall themselves build it.' That is happening now. For owing to the war it was destroyed by the enemy; at present even the servants of the enemy will build it up again." This clearly places Barnabas
Barnabas
after the destruction of the temple in 70 CE. But it also places Barnabas
Barnabas
before the Bar Kochba revolt in 132 CE, after which there could have been no hope that the Romans would help to rebuild the temple. This shows that the document comes from the period between these two revolts. Jay Curry Treat states on the dating of Barnabas (The Anchor Bible Dictionary, v. 1, pp. 613–614): Since Barnabas
Barnabas
16:3 refers to the destruction of the temple, Barnabas
Barnabas
must be written after 70 C.E. It must be written before its first indisputable use in Clement of Alexandria, ca. 190. Since 16:4 expects the temple to be rebuilt, it was most likely written before Hadrian built a Roman temple on the site ca. 135. Attempts to use 4:4-5 and 16:1-5 to specify the time of origin more exactly have not won wide agreement. It is important to remember that traditions of varying ages have been incorporated into this work. Treat comments on the provenance of the Epistle
Epistle
of Barnabas
Barnabas
(op. cit., p. 613): Barnabas
Barnabas
does not give enough indications to permit confident identification of either the teacher's location or the location to which he writes. His thought, hermeneutical methods, and style have many parallels throughout the known Jewish
Jewish
and Christian
Christian
worlds. Most scholars have located the work's origin in the area of Alexandria, on the grounds that it has many affinities with Alexandrian Jewish
Jewish
and Christian
Christian
thought and because its first witnesses are Alexandrian. Recently, Prigent (Prigent and Kraft 1971: 20-24), Wengst (1971: 114-18), and Scorza Barcellona (1975: 62-65) have suggested other origins based on affinities in Palestine, Syria, and Asia Minor. The place of origin must remain an open question, although the Gk-speaking E. Mediterranean appears most probable. Concerning the relationship between Barnabas
Barnabas
and the New Testament, Treat writes (op. cit., p. 614): Although Barnabas
Barnabas
4:14 appears to quote Matt 22:14, it must remain an open question whether the Barnabas
Barnabas
circle knew written gospels. Based on Koester's analysis (1957: 125-27, 157), it appears more likely that Barnabas
Barnabas
stood in the living oral tradition used by the written gospels. For example, the reference to gall and vinegar in Barnabas
Barnabas
7:3, 5 seems to preserve an early stage of tradition that influenced the formation of the passion narratives in the Gospel
Gospel
of Peter and the synoptic gospels. The 5th century Decretum Gelasianum includes a Gospel
Gospel
of Barnabas amongst works condemned as apocryphal; but no certain text or quotation from this work has been identified. Another book using that same title, the Gospel
Gospel
of Barnabas, survives in two post-medieval manuscripts in Italian and Spanish.[13] Contrary to the canonical Christian
Christian
Gospels, and in accordance with the Islamic view of Jesus, this later Gospel of Barnabas
Gospel of Barnabas
states that Jesus
Jesus
was not the son of God, but a prophet and messenger. Though the exact dating is disputed, the work is not regarded as authentic by any scholar (in other words, it is pseudepigraphical or apocryphal).[14] The Barnabites[edit] The Catholic religious order officially known as "Regular Clerics of St. Paul" (Clerici Regulares Sancti Pauli), founded in the 16th Century, was in 1538 given the grand old Monastery of Saint Barnabas by the city wall of Milan. This becoming their main seat, the Order was thenceforth known by the popular name of Barnabites[15]. See also[edit]

Lectionary 214 - apocryphal Apodemia of Barnabas

Notes[edit]

^ http://eastonsbibledictionary.org/453-Barnabas.php ^ Cross, F. L., ed. The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian
Christian
Church. New York: Oxford University Press. 2005, article Antioch ^ Acts
Acts
11:26 ^ Arbez, Edward. "Antioch." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. 2 Dec. 2014 ^ a b Durant, Will. Caesar and Christ. New York: Simon and Schuster. 1972 ^ "Barnabas." Cross, F. L., ed. The Oxford dictionary of the Christian church. New York: Oxford University Press. 2005 ^ "The Life of our Blessed Lord and Savior Jesus
Jesus
Christ: And the Lives and Sufferings of His Holy Evangelists and Apostles," p.455, 1857 AD, Miller, Orton & Co., 25 Park Row, New York. ^ Church of Cyprus, History of Cyprus
Cyprus
Church, The Autocephaly of the Cyprus
Cyprus
Church churchofcyprus.org Archived 2011-07-23 at the Wayback Machine. ^ Cyprus
Cyprus
Commemorative Stamp issue: 1900th Death Anniversary of Apostle Barnabas, philatelism.com ^ Ante-Nicean Fathers, ed. Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson and A. Cleaveland Coxe, vol. 5 (Peabody MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 1999), 255-6 ^ Compare C. J. Hefele, Das Sendschreiben des Apostels Barnabas, Tübingen, 1840; Otto Braunsberger, "Der Apostel Barnabas," Mainz, 1876. ^ Commentary on the Acts
Acts
Edwin Wilbur Rice, 1900, p.7. Adolf Harnack mistakenly wrote that Photius believed Barnabas
Barnabas
was the author in the 1908 Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge, Volume 1, p. 487 ^ Compare T. Zahn, Geschichte des neutestamentlichen Kanons, ii, 292, Leipsig, 1890. ^ Cyril Glass. The Concise Encyclopedia of Islam, Harper & Row, 1989, p. 64. Quoted at http://answering-islam.org/Barnabas/ ^ Schaff, Philip. "Barnabites", The New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge, Vol. I: Aachen - Basilians, p.488, Baker Book House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1951

References[edit]

Attwater, Donald and Catherine Rachel John. "The Penguin Dictionary of Saints," 3rd edition, New York: Penguin Books, 1993. ISBN 0-14-051312-4.  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Jackson, Samuel
Samuel
Macauley, ed. (1914). "article name needed". New Schaff–Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge (third ed.). London and New York: Funk and Wagnalls. 

Further reading[edit]

Die Apostolischen Väter. Griechisch-deutsche Parallelausgabe. J.C.B. Mohr Tübingen 1992. ISBN 3-16-145887-7 Der Barnabasbrief. Übersetzt und erklärt von Ferdinand R. Prostmeier. Series: Kommentar zu den Apostolischen Vätern (KAV, Vol. 8). Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht: Göttingen 1999. ISBN 3-525-51683-5

External links[edit]

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Media related to Saint Barnabas
Barnabas
at Wikimedia Commons Biography of St Barnabas Gospel
Gospel
of Barnabas  Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). " Epistle
Epistle
of Barnabas". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.   Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Barnabas". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.  The École Glossary about Barnabas The Epistle
Epistle
of Barnabas St. Barnabas
Barnabas
the Apostle Jewish
Jewish
Encyclopedia: Barnabas Parish of St Barnabas
Barnabas
in Tunbridge Wells, England, UK Barnabas
Barnabas
Community Church, Shrewsbury, England, UK St Barnabas
Barnabas
Monastery and Icon Museum, Famagusta, Cyprus St. Barnabas, Patron Against Hailstorms, Invoked as Peacemaker St. Barnabas
Barnabas
at the Christian
Christian
Iconography web site. The Life of St. Barnabas
Barnabas
the Apostle in Caxton's translation of the Golden Legend

v t e

New Testament people

Jesus
Jesus
Christ

In Christianity Historical Life in the New Testament

Gospels

Individuals

Alphaeus Anna the Prophetess Annas Barabbas Bartimaeus Blind man (Bethsaida) Caiaphas Man born blind ("Celidonius") Cleopas Clopas Devil Penitent thief
Penitent thief
("Dismas") Elizabeth Gabriel Impenitent thief
Impenitent thief
("Gestas") Jairus' daughter Joanna John the Baptist Joseph Joseph of Arimathea Joses Jude Lazarus Legion Luke Lysanias Malchus Martha Mary, mother of Jesus Mary Magdalene Mary, mother of James Mary of Bethany Mary of Clopas Naked fugitive Son of Nain's widow Nathanael Nicodemus ( Nicodemus
Nicodemus
ben Gurion) Salome Samaritan woman Satan Simeon Simon, brother of Jesus Simon of Cyrene Simon the Leper Simon the Pharisee Susanna Syrophoenician woman Theophilus Zacchaeus Zebedee Zechariah

Groups

Angels Jesus's brothers Demons Disciples Evangelists Female disciples of Jesus God-fearers Herodians Magi Myrrhbearers Nameless Pharisees Proselytes Sadducees Samaritans Sanhedrin Scribes Seventy disciples Shepherds Zealots

Apostles

Andrew Bartholomew James of Alphaeus (James the Less) James of Zebedee John

Evangelist Patmos "Disciple whom Jesus
Jesus
loved"

Judas Iscariot Jude Thaddeus Matthew Philip Simon Peter Simon the Zealot Thomas

Acts

Aeneas Agabus Ananias (Damascus) Ananias (Judaea) Ananias son of Nedebeus Apollos Aquila Aristarchus Barnabas Blastus Cornelius Demetrius Dionysius Dorcas Elymas Egyptian Ethiopian eunuch Eutychus Gamaliel James, brother of Jesus Jason Joseph Barsabbas Judas Barsabbas Judas of Galilee Lucius Luke Lydia Manaen (John) Mark

Evangelist cousin of Barnabas

Mary, mother of (John) Mark Matthias Mnason Nicanor Nicholas Parmenas Paul Philip Priscilla Prochorus Publius Rhoda Sapphira Sceva Seven Deacons Silas / Silvanus Simeon Niger Simon Magus Sopater Sosthenes Stephen Theudas Timothy Titus Trophimus Tychicus Zenas

Romans Herod's family

Gospels

Antipas Archelaus Herod the Great Herodias Longinus Philip Pilate Pilate's wife Quirinius Salome Tiberius

Acts

Agrippa Agrippa II Berenice Cornelius Drusilla Felix Festus Gallio Lysias Paullus

Epistles

Achaicus Alexander Andronicus Archippus Aretas IV Carpus Claudia Crescens Demas Diotrephes Epaphras Epaphroditus Erastus Eunice Euodia and Syntyche Herodion Hymenaeus Jesus
Jesus
Justus John the Presbyter Junia Lois Mary Michael Nymphas Olympas Onesimus Onesiphorus Pudens Philemon Philetus Phoebe Quartus Sosipater Tertius

Revelation

Antipas Four Horsemen Apollyon Two witnesses Woman Beast Three Angels Whore of Babylon

v t e

Prophets in the New Testament

Canonical gospels

Anna Elizabeth Jesus John the Baptist Joseph Mary Simeon Zechariah

Acts
Acts
of the Apostles

Agabus Ananias of Damascus Barnabas Judas Barsabbas Lucius of Cyrene Manahen Paul Philip the Evangelist Silas Simeon Niger

Epistles and Revelation

John of Patmos The Two Witnesses

Note: Italics denote that the status as a prophet is not universally accepted.

v t e

Saints of the Catholic Church

Virgin Mary

Mother of God (Theotokos) Immaculate Conception Perpetual virginity Assumption Marian apparition

Guadalupe Laus Miraculous Medal Lourdes Fatima

Titles of Mary

Apostles

Andrew Barnabas Bartholomew James of Alphaeus James the Greater John Jude Matthew Matthias Paul Peter Philip Simon Thomas

Archangels

Gabriel Michael Raphael

Confessors

Anatolius Chariton the Confessor Edward the Confessor Maximus the Confessor Michael of Synnada Paphnutius the Confessor Paul I of Constantinople Salonius Theophanes the Confessor

Disciples

Apollos Mary Magdalene Priscilla and Aquila Silvanus Stephen Timothy Titus Seventy disciples

Doctors

Gregory the Great Ambrose Augustine of Hippo Jerome John Chrysostom Basil of Caesarea Gregory of Nazianzus Athanasius of Alexandria Cyril of Alexandria Cyril of Jerusalem John of Damascus Bede
Bede
the Venerable Ephrem the Syrian Thomas Aquinas Bonaventure Anselm of Canterbury Isidore of Seville Peter Chrysologus Leo the Great Peter Damian Bernard of Clairvaux Hilary of Poitiers Alphonsus Liguori Francis de Sales Peter Canisius John of the Cross Robert Bellarmine Albertus Magnus Anthony of Padua Lawrence of Brindisi Teresa of Ávila Catherine of Siena Thérèse of Lisieux John of Ávila Hildegard of Bingen Gregory of Narek

Evangelists

Matthew Mark Luke John

Church Fathers

Alexander of Alexandria Alexander of Jerusalem Ambrose
Ambrose
of Milan Anatolius Athanasius of Alexandria Augustine of Hippo Caesarius of Arles Caius Cappadocian Fathers Clement of Alexandria Clement of Rome Cyprian
Cyprian
of Carthage Cyril of Alexandria Cyril of Jerusalem Damasus I Desert Fathers Desert Mothers Dionysius of Alexandria Dionysius of Corinth Dionysius Ephrem the Syrian Epiphanius of Salamis Fulgentius of Ruspe Gregory the Great Gregory of Nazianzus Gregory of Nyssa Hilary of Poitiers Hippolytus of Rome Ignatius of Antioch Irenaeus
Irenaeus
of Lyons Isidore of Seville Jerome
Jerome
of Stridonium John Chrysostom John of Damascus Maximus the Confessor Melito of Sardis Quadratus of Athens Papias of Hierapolis Peter Chrysologus Polycarp
Polycarp
of Smyrna Theophilus of Antioch Victorinus of Pettau Vincent of Lérins Zephyrinus

Martyrs

Canadian Martyrs Carthusian Martyrs Forty Martyrs of England and Wales Four Crowned Martyrs Great Martyr The Holy Innocents Irish Martyrs Joan of Arc Lübeck martyrs Korean Martyrs Martyrology Martyrs of Albania Martyrs of China Martyrs of Japan Martyrs of Laos Martyrs of Natal Martyrs of Otranto Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War Maximilian Kolbe Perpetua and Felicity Saints of the Cristero War Stephen Three Martyrs of Chimbote Uganda Martyrs Vietnamese Martyrs

Patriarchs

Adam Abel Abraham Isaac Jacob Joseph Joseph (father of Jesus) David Noah Solomon Matriarchs

Popes

Adeodatus I Adeodatus II Adrian III Agapetus I Agatho Alexander I Anacletus Anastasius I Anicetus Anterus Benedict II Boniface I Boniface IV Caius Callixtus I Celestine I Celestine V Clement I Cornelius Damasus I Dionysius Eleuterus Eugene I Eusebius Eutychian Evaristus Fabian Felix I Felix III Felix IV Gelasius I Gregory I Gregory II Gregory III Gregory VII Hilarius Hormisdas Hyginus Innocent I John I John XXIII John Paul II Julius I Leo I Leo II Leo III Leo IV Leo IX Linus Lucius I Marcellinus Marcellus I Mark Martin I Miltiades Nicholas I Paschal I Paul I Peter Pius I Pius V Pius X Pontian Sergius I Silverius Simplicius Siricius Sixtus I Sixtus II Sixtus III Soter Stephen I Stephen IV Sylvester I Symmachus Telesphorus Urban I Victor I Vitalian Zachary Zephyrinus Zosimus

Prophets

Agabus Amos Anna Baruch ben Neriah David Dalua Elijah Ezekiel Habakkuk Haggai Hosea Isaiah Jeremiah Job Joel John the Baptist Jonah Judas Barsabbas Malachi Melchizedek Micah Moses Nahum Obadiah Samuel Seven Maccabees and their mother Simeon Zechariah (prophet) Zechariah (NT) Zephaniah

Virgins

Agatha of Sicily Agnes of Rome Bernadette Soubirous Brigid of Kildare Cecilia Clare of Assisi Eulalia of Mérida Euphemia Genevieve Kateri Tekakwitha Lucy of Syracuse Maria Goretti Mother Teresa Narcisa de Jesús Rose of Lima

See also

Military saints Virtuous pagan

Catholicism portal S

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