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Banknotes of the Canadian dollar are the banknotes or bills (in common lexicon) of Canada, denominated in Canadian dollars (CAD, C$, or $ locally). Currently, they are issued in $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100 denominations. All current notes are issued by the Bank of Canada, which released its first series of notes in 1935. The Bank of Canada has contracted the Canadian Bank Note Company to produce the Canadian notes since then. The current series of polymer banknotes were introduced into circulation between November 2011 and November 2013.[citation needed] Banknotes issued in Canada can be viewed at the Currency Museum of the Bank of Canada in Ottawa.

Beginning in 2011, the Bank of Canada introduced a new series of polymer banknotes. The $100 note was issued on November 14, 2011; the $50 was issued on March 26, 2012; the $20 banknote was issued on November 7, 2012, and the $10 and $5 denominations were issued on November 7, 2013.

These are the first Canadian notes produced on polymer. In place of a watermark are two visual features: a translucent maple leaf and a transparent window. The leaf includes a security feature that, when viewed close to the eye with a single-point light source behind, produces a circular image displaying the note's denomination. The window is fringed by maple leaves; at its top is a smaller version of the portrait, and at its bottom a light-refracting metallic likeness of an architectural feature from the parliament buildings. The portraits on the face are more centred on the note. The backs of the notes introduce new cultural and thematic imagery, but the literary quotation is not continued. The polymer notes continue the tactile feature, from the Canadian Journey series.polymer banknotes. The $100 note was issued on November 14, 2011; the $50 was issued on March 26, 2012; the $20 banknote was issued on November 7, 2012, and the $10 and $5 denominations were issued on November 7, 2013.

These are the first Canadian notes produced on polymer. In place of a watermark are two visual features: a translucent maple leaf and a transparent window. The leaf includes a security feature that, when viewed close to the eye with a single-point light source behind, produces a circular image displaying the note's denomination. The window is fringed by maple leaves; at its top is a smaller version of the portrait, and at its bottom a light-refracting metallic likeness of an architectural feature from the

These are the first Canadian notes produced on polymer. In place of a watermark are two visual features: a translucent maple leaf and a transparent window. The leaf includes a security feature that, when viewed close to the eye with a single-point light source behind, produces a circular image displaying the note's denomination. The window is fringed by maple leaves; at its top is a smaller version of the portrait, and at its bottom a light-refracting metallic likeness of an architectural feature from the parliament buildings. The portraits on the face are more centred on the note. The backs of the notes introduce new cultural and thematic imagery, but the literary quotation is not continued. The polymer notes continue the tactile feature, from the Canadian Journey series.[17]

On International Women's Day 2016, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that an "iconic" Canadian woman would be featured on one of the upcoming notes.[18]

On December 8, 2016, the Government of Canada and the Bank of Canada announced that civil rights activist Viola Desmond would replace Sir John A. Macdonald (who had been on the face of the $10 note since 1971) as the first non-roy

On December 8, 2016, the Government of Canada and the Bank of Canada announced that civil rights activist Viola Desmond would replace Sir John A. Macdonald (who had been on the face of the $10 note since 1971) as the first non-royal woman to appear alone on a regularly circulated Bank of Canada note.[19] This note was released to the public on November 19, 2018.[20]

‡ Withdrawn from circulation. Currency withdrawn from circulation is still legal tender. Despite the introduction of new notes, older notes are still in use.

+ Two varieties were printed, the first with conventional serial numbers, the second with the double date "1867-1967" appearing twice instead. Neither type is scarce. Both varieties also have on the obverse a stylized maple leaf with the double date below it.[21]

All notes of 1954 series or later measure 152.4 mm by 69.85 mm (6 by 2¾ inches).

See also Withdrawn Canadian banknotes.

Myths

A number of myths have circulated regarding Canadian banknotes.