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Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars
Tatars
(Tatar: Əsterxan tatarları, Әsterhan tatarlary) are a subgroup of the Tatar people. In the 15th to 17th century the Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars
Tatars
inhabited the Astrakhan Khanate
Astrakhan Khanate
(1459 - 1556), which was also inhabited by the Nogai Horde, and the Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars
Tatars
experienced a profound effect on Nogais. Since the 18th century there has been an increased interaction and ethnic mix of the Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars
Tatars
with Volga Tatars.

Contents

1 Population 2 Culture

2.1 20th century 2.2 Present

3 Well-Known Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars 4 Sources 5 References

Population[edit] The Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars
Tatars
(around 80,000) are a group of Tatars, descendants of the Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Khanate's nomadic population, who live mostly in Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Oblast. For the Russian Census in 2010, most Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars
Tatars
declared themselves simply as Tatars
Tatars
and few declared themselves as Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars. A large number of Volga Tatars
Tatars
live in Astrakhan Oblast
Astrakhan Oblast
and differences between them have been disappearing. The Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars
Tatars
are further divided into the Kundrov, Yurt and Karagash
Karagash
Tatars. The latter are also at times called the Karashi Tatars.[2] Text from Britannica 1911:

The Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars
Tatars
number about 10,000 and are, with the Kalmyks, all that now remains of the once so powerful Astrakhan
Astrakhan
empire. They also are agriculturists and gardeners; while some 12,000 Kundrovsk Tatars
Tatars
still continue the nomadic life of their ancestors.

While Astrakhan
Astrakhan
(Ästerxan) Tatar is a mixed dialect, around 43,000 have assimilated to the Middle (i.e., Kazan) dialect. Their ancestors are Kipchaks, Khazars
Khazars
and some Volga Bulgars. ( Volga Bulgars
Volga Bulgars
had trade colonies in modern Astrakhan
Astrakhan
and Volgograd oblasts of Russia.) The Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars
Tatars
also assimilated the Agrzhan.[3] Culture[edit] 20th century[edit] To 1917, the Astrakhan
Astrakhan
- one of the major centers of Tatar cultural and social life. Some Kazan Tatars
Tatars
settled in Astrakhan. In 1892, the functioning madrassas "lower classes." The newspaper "Azat Halyk" (1917-1919), "Irek" (1917), "Islah" (1907), "tartysh" (1917-1919), "Idel" (1907 - 1914, renewed in 1991). News magazines "Azat Khanum" (1917-1918), "Magarif" (1909), "Wheel" (1907), etc. Since 1907, he has worked Tatar folk theater. In 1919, organized by Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatar drama school. Present[edit] At present, the company operates the Astrakhan
Astrakhan
region of the Tatar national culture "Duslyk" and Tatar youth center "Umid" (founded in 1989). Parallel works "Center of preservation and development of the Tatar culture" at the nonprofit Partnership Tatar business center (NP TDC) Well-Known Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars[edit] Renat Dasaev

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (June 2015)

Sources[edit]

DM Iskhakov Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars, ethnic settlement and population dynamics in the XVIII - beginning of XX century. / / Astrakhan
Astrakhan
Tatars. - Kazan, 1992. - S. 5-33. The Tartars. The people of Russia. Encyclopedia. - M., 1994. - S. 320-321.

References[edit]

^ Russian Census 2010: Population by ethnicity Archived 2012-04-24 at the Wayback Machine. (in Russian) ^ Olson, James S., An Ethnohistorical Dictionary of the Russian and Soviet Empires. (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1994) p. 55 ^ Wixman, Ronald. The Peoples of the USSR: An Ethnographic Handbook. (Armonk, New York: M. E. Sharpe, Inc, 1984) p. 15

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Astrakhan
Tatars

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