HOME
The Info List - Althea Gibson





Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(August 25, 1927 – September 28, 2003) was an American tennis player and professional golfer, and the first black athlete to cross the color line of international tennis. In 1956, she became the first person of color to win a Grand Slam title (the French Open). The following year she won both Wimbledon and the U.S. Nationals (precursor of the U.S. Open), then won both again in 1958, and was voted Female Athlete of the Year by the Associated Press
Associated Press
in both years. In all, she won 11 Grand Slam tournaments, including six doubles titles, and was inducted into the International Tennis
Tennis
Hall of Fame and the International Women's Sports Hall of Fame. "She is one of the greatest players who ever lived," said Robert Ryland, a tennis contemporary and former coach of Venus and Serena Williams. "Martina couldn't touch her. I think she'd beat the Williams sisters."[1] In the early 1960s she also became the first black player to compete on the women's professional golf tour. At a time when racism and prejudice were widespread in sports and in society, Gibson was often compared to Jackie Robinson. "Her road to success was a challenging one," said Billie Jean King, "but I never saw her back down."[2] "To anyone, she was an inspiration, because of what she was able to do at a time when it was enormously difficult to play tennis at all if you were black," said former New York City Mayor David Dinkins.[3] "I am honored to have followed in such great footsteps," wrote Venus Williams. "Her accomplishments set the stage for my success, and through players like myself and Serena and many others to come, her legacy will live on."[4]

Contents

1 Biography

1.1 Early life and education 1.2 Amateur career 1.3 Professional career

2 Legacy 3 Grand Slam finals

3.1 Singles: 7 (5 titles, 2 runner-ups) 3.2 Doubles: 7 (5 titles, 2 runner-ups) 3.3 Mixed doubles: 4 (1 titles, 3 runner-ups)

4 Grand Slam singles tournament timeline 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 Bibliography 9 External links

Biography[edit] Early life and education[edit] Gibson was born on August 25, 1927, in the town of Silver, in Clarendon County, South Carolina, to Daniel and Annie Bell Gibson, who worked as sharecroppers on a cotton farm.[5] The Great Depression hit rural southern farmers sooner than much of the rest of the country,[6] so in 1930 the family moved to Harlem, where Althea's three sisters and brother were born.[7] Their apartment was located on a stretch of 143rd Street (between Lenox Avenue
Lenox Avenue
and Seventh Avenue) that had been designated a Police Athletic League
Police Athletic League
play area; during daylight hours it was barricaded so that neighborhood children could play organized sports.[8] Gibson quickly became proficient in paddle tennis, and by 1939, at the age of 12, she was the New York City women's paddle tennis champion.[9][10][11] She was first introduced to tennis at the Harlem
Harlem
River Tennis
Tennis
Club in 1941 by musician Buddy Walker, who noticed her playing paddle tennis.[12] Buddy would buy Althea her first stringed racket since she did not have the money for her own equipment.[13] The first racket that Walker bought for Gibson sold at a Heritage Sports Collectibles Auction on November 16, 2017, which was part of Buddy Walker's estate and consigned by Walker's daughter.[14] In 1940 a group of Gibson's neighbors took up a collection to finance a junior membership and lessons at the Cosmopolitan Tennis
Tennis
Club in the Sugar Hill section of Harlem. Former pro Frederick Johnson gave Gibson her first lesson in the summer of 1941 and entered her in her first tournament in 1942. In 1941 she entered—and won—her first tournament, the American Tennis
Tennis
Association (ATA) New York State Championship.[15] She won the ATA national championship in the girls' division in 1944 and 1945, and after losing in the women's final in 1946, she won her first of ten straight national ATA women's titles in 1947.[16] "I knew that I was an unusual, talented girl, through the grace of God," she wrote. "I didn't need to prove that to myself. I only wanted to prove it to my opponents."[17] Gibson's ATA success drew the attention of Walter Johnson, a Lynchburg, Virginia, physician who was active in the African American tennis community.[18] Under Johnson's patronage—he would later mentor Arthur Ashe
Arthur Ashe
as well—Gibson gained access to more advanced instruction and more important competitions, and later, to the United States Tennis
Tennis
Association (USTA).[19] In 1946 she moved to Wilmington, North Carolina, under the sponsorship of another physician and tennis activist, Hubert A. Eaton[20] and enrolled at Williston High School. In 1949 she became the first black woman, and the second black athlete (after Reginald Weir), to play in the USTA's National Indoor Championships, where she reached the quarter-finals.[21] Later that year she entered Florida A&M University (FAMU) on a full athletic scholarship.[22] Amateur career[edit]

"The loser is always a part of the problem; the winner is always a part of the answer. The loser always has an excuse; the winner always has a program. The loser says it may be possible, but it's difficult; the winner says it may be difficult, but it's possible."

—Althea Gibson, 1991[23]

Despite her growing reputation as an elite-level player, Gibson was effectively barred from entering the premier American tournament, the United States
United States
National Championships (now the U.S. Open) at Forest Hills. (While USTA rules officially prohibited racial or ethnic discrimination, players qualified for the Nationals by accumulating points at sanctioned tournaments, most of which were held at white-only clubs.)[24] In 1950, in response to intense lobbying by ATA officials and retired champion Alice Marble—who published a scathing open letter in the magazine American Lawn Tennis[25]—Gibson became the first black player to receive an invitation to the Nationals, where she made her Forest Hills debut on her 23rd birthday.[26] Although she lost narrowly in the second round in a rain-delayed, three-set match to Louise Brough, the reigning Wimbledon champion and former U.S. National winner, her participation received extensive national and international coverage.[27] "No Negro player, man or woman, has ever set foot on one of these courts," wrote journalist Lester Rodney at the time. "In many ways, it is even a tougher personal Jim Crow-busting assignment than was Jackie Robinson's when he first stepped out of the Brooklyn Dodgers
Brooklyn Dodgers
dugout."[28] In 1951 Gibson won her first international title, the Caribbean Championships in Jamaica,[26] and later that year became the first black competitor at Wimbledon, where she was defeated in the third round by Beverly Baker.[29] In 1952 she was ranked seventh nationally by the USTA.[30] In the spring of 1953 she graduated from Florida A&M and took a job teaching physical education at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri.[31] During her two years at Lincoln she became romantically involved with an Army
Army
officer whom she never named publicly,[32] and considered enlisting in the Women's Army Corps, but decided against it when the State Department
State Department
sent her on a goodwill tour of Asia in 1955 to play exhibition matches with Ham Richardson, Bob Perry, and Karol Fageros.[33] Many Asians in the countries they visited—Burma, Ceylon, India, Pakistan, and Thailand—"...felt an affinity to Althea as a woman of color and were delighted to see her as part of an official U.S. delegation. With the United States
United States
grappling over the question of race, they turned to Althea for answers, or at least to get a firsthand perspective."[34] Gibson, for her part, strengthened her confidence immeasurably during the six-week tour.[35] When it was over, she remained abroad, winning 16 of 18 tournaments in Europe and Asia against many of the world's best players.[36] In 1956 Gibson became the first African-American athlete to win a Grand Slam event, the French Open
French Open
singles championship. She also won the doubles title, partnered with Briton Angela Buxton.[37] Later in the season she won the Wimbledon doubles championship (again with Buxton), the Italian Championships in Rome, the Indian Championships in New Delhi and the Asian championship in Ceylon.[38] She also reached the quarter-finals in singles at Wimbledon and the finals at the U.S. Nationals, losing both to Shirley Fry.[39] 1957 was, in her own words, "Althea Gibson's year".[40] In July she won Wimbledon—considered, at the time, the "world championship of tennis".[41] She was the first black champion in the tournament's 80-year history, and the first champion to receive the trophy personally from Queen Elizabeth II.[42] "Shaking hands with the queen of England," she said, "was a long way from being forced to sit in the colored section of the bus."[43] She won the doubles championship as well, for the second year. Upon her return home Gibson became only the second black American, after Jesse Owens, to be honored with a ticker tape parade in New York City, and Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. presented her with the Bronze Medallion, the city's highest civilian award.[44] A month later she defeated Brough in straight sets to win her first U.S. National championship.[45] "Winning Wimbledon was wonderful," she wrote, "and it meant a lot to me. But there is nothing quite like winning the championship of your own country."[46] In all she reached the finals of eight Grand Slam events in 1957, winning the Wimbledon and U.S. National singles titles, the Wimbledon and Australian doubles championships, and the U.S. mixed doubles crown, and finishing second in Australian singles, U.S. doubles, and Wimbledon mixed doubles. At season's end she broke yet another barrier as the first black player on the U.S. Wightman Cup
Wightman Cup
team, which defeated Great Britain 6–1.[47] In 1958 Gibson successfully defended her Wimbledon and U.S. National singles titles, and won her third straight Wimbledon doubles championship, with a third different partner. She was the number-one-ranked woman in the world[48] and in the United States[49] in both 1957 and 1958, and was named Female Athlete of the Year by the Associated Press
Associated Press
in both years,[50] garnering over 80% of the votes in 1958.[51] She also became the first black woman to appear on the covers of Sports Illustrated[52] and Time.[53] Professional career[edit] In late 1958, having won 56 national and international singles and doubles titles, Gibson retired from amateur tennis. Prior to the Open Era there was no prize money at major tournaments, and direct endorsement deals were prohibited. Players were limited to meager expense allowances, strictly regulated by the USTA. "The truth, to put it bluntly, is that my finances were in heartbreaking shape," she wrote. "Being the Queen of Tennis
Tennis
is all well and good, but you can't eat a crown. Nor can you send the Internal Revenue Service a throne clipped to their tax forms. The landlord and grocer and tax collector are funny that way: they like cold cash ... I reign over an empty bank account, and I'm not going to fill it by playing amateur tennis."[54] Professional tours for women were still 15 years away, so her opportunities were largely limited to promotional events. In 1959 she signed to play a series of exhibition matches against Karol Fageros before Harlem
Harlem
Globetrotter basketball games.[55][19] When the tour ended she won the singles and doubles titles at the Pepsi Cola World Pro Tennis
Tennis
Championships in Cleveland, but received only $500 in prize money.[56] During this period, Gibson also pursued her long-held aspirations in the entertainment industry. A talented vocalist and saxophonist—and runner-up in the Apollo Theater's amateur talent contest in 1943[57]—she made her professional singing debut at W. C. Handy's 84th birthday tribute at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
in 1957.[58] An executive from Dot Records
Dot Records
was impressed with her performance, and signed her to record an album of popular standards. Althea Gibson Sings was released in 1959, and Gibson performed two of its songs on The Ed Sullivan Show
The Ed Sullivan Show
in May and July of that year, but sales were disappointing.[59] She appeared as a celebrity guest on the TV panel show What's My Line?
What's My Line?
and was cast as a slave woman in the John Ford motion picture The Horse Soldiers
The Horse Soldiers
(1959), which was notable for her refusal to speak in the stereotypic "Negro" dialect mandated by the script.[60] She also worked as a sports commentator, appeared in print and television advertisements for various products, and increased her involvement in social issues and community activities.[61] In 1960 her first memoir, I Always Wanted to Be Somebody, written with sportswriter Ed Fitzgerald, was published.[62] Her professional tennis career, however, was going nowhere. "When I looked around me, I saw that white tennis players, some of whom I had thrashed on the court, were picking up offers and invitations," she wrote. "Suddenly it dawned on me that my triumphs had not destroyed the racial barriers once and for all, as I had—perhaps naively—hoped. Or if I did destroy them, they had been erected behind me again."[63] In 1964, at the age of 37, Gibson became the first African-American woman to join the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) tour.[64] Racial discrimination continued to be a problem: Many hotels still excluded people of color, and country club officials throughout the south—and some in the north—routinely refused to allow her to compete. When she did compete, she was often forced to dress for tournaments in her car because she was banned from the clubhouse.[65] Although she was one of the LPGA's top 50 money winners for five years, and won a car at a Dinah Shore tournament, her lifetime golf earnings never exceeded $25,000.[66] She made financial ends meet with various sponsorship deals and the support of her husband, William Darben, brother of best friend and fellow tennis player Rosemary Darben, whom she married in 1965 (and divorced in 1976).[67] While she broke course records during individual rounds in several tournaments, Gibson's highest ranking was 27th in 1966, and her best tournament finish was a tie for second after a three-way playoff at the 1970 Len Immke Buick Open.[68] She retired from professional golf at the end of the 1978 season.[69] "Althea might have been a real player of consequence had she started when she was young," said Judy Rankin. "She came along during a difficult time in golf, gained the support of a lot of people, and quietly made a difference."[70] In 1976 Gibson made it to the finals of the ABC television program Superstars, finishing first in basketball shooting and bowling, and runner-up in softball throwing.[71] With the advent of the Open Era she began entering major tennis tournaments again; but by then, in her forties, she was unable to compete effectively against younger players.[72] She also attempted a golf comeback, in 1987 at age 60, with the goal of becoming the oldest active tour player, but was unable to regain her tour card.[73] In a second memoir, So Much to Live For, she articulated her disappointments, including unfulfilled aspirations, the paucity of endorsements and other professional opportunities, and the many obstacles of all sorts that were thrown in her path over the years.[74] In 1972 she began running Pepsi Cola's national mobile tennis project, which brought portable nets and other equipment to underprivileged areas in major cities.[75] She ran multiple other clinics and tennis outreach programs over the next three decades, and coached numerous rising competitors, including Leslie Allen and Zina Garrison. "She pushed me as if I were a pro, not a junior," wrote Garrison in her 2001 memoir. "I owe the opportunity I received to her."[76] In the early 1970s Gibson began directing women's sports and recreation for the Essex County Parks Commission in New Jersey. In 1976 she was appointed New Jersey's athletic commissioner, the first woman in the country to hold such a role, but resigned after one year due to lack of autonomy, budgetary oversight, and adequate funding. "I don't wish to be a figurehead," she said.[77] In 1977 she challenged incumbent Essex County State Senator Frank J. Dodd in the Democratic primary for his seat.[78] She came in second behind Dodd, but ahead of Assemblyman Eldridge Hawkins. Gibson went on to manage the Department of Recreation in East Orange, New Jersey. She also served on the State Athletic Control Board and became supervisor of the Governor's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.[79] In 1983 she married Sydney Llewellyn, her coach during her peak tennis years. That marriage also ended in divorce, after five years; she had no children.[80] In the late 1980s Gibson suffered two cerebral hemorrhages and in 1992, a stroke. Ongoing medical expenses depleted her financial resources, leaving her unable to afford her rent or medication. Though she reached out to multiple tennis organizations requesting help, none responded.[24] Former doubles partner Angela Buxton made Gibson's plight known to the tennis community, and raised nearly $1 million in donations from around the world.[81][82] In early 2003 Gibson survived a heart attack, but died on September 28, 2003, at the age of 76 from complications following respiratory and bladder infections. She was interred in the Rosedale Cemetery in Orange near her first husband, Will Darben.[83] Legacy[edit] It would be 15 years before another woman of color—Evonne Goolagong, in 1971—won a Grand Slam championship; and 43 years before another African-American woman, Serena Williams, won her first of six U.S. Opens in 1999, not long after faxing a letter and list of questions to Gibson.[84] Serena's sister Venus then won back-to-back titles at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in 2000 and 2001, repeating Gibson's accomplishment of 1957 and 1958. In 1980 Gibson became one of the first six inductees into the International Women's Sports Hall of Fame, placing her on par with such pioneers as Amelia Earhart, Wilma Rudolph, Gertrude Ederle, Babe Didrikson Zaharias, and Patty Berg.[85] Other inductions included the National Lawn Tennis
Tennis
Hall of Fame, the International Tennis
Tennis
Hall of Fame, the Florida Sports Hall of Fame, the Black Athletes Hall of Fame, the Sports Hall of Fame of New Jersey, the New Jersey
New Jersey
Hall of Fame, the International Scholar-Athlete Hall of Fame, and the International Women's Hall of Fame.[86] She received a Candace Award from the National Coalition of 100 Black Women in 1988.[87]

Gibson completes a backhand groundstroke in bronze in Newark, NJ, near the courts (in background) on which she ran clinics for young players in her later years.

In 1991 Gibson became the first woman to receive the Theodore Roosevelt Award, the highest honor from the National Collegiate Athletic Association; she was cited for "symbolizing the best qualities of competitive excellence and good sportsmanship, and for her significant contributions to expanding opportunities for women and minorities through sports."[88] Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
for Women named her to its list of the "100 Greatest Female Athletes".[89] In a 1977 historical analysis of women in sports, New York Times columnist William C. Rhoden
William C. Rhoden
wrote, " Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
and Wilma Rudolph are, without question, the most significant athletic forces among black women in sports history. While Rudolph's accomplishments brought more visibility to women as athletes ... Althea's accomplishments were more revolutionary because of the psychosocial impact on black America. Even to those blacks who hadn't the slightest idea of where or what Wimbledon was, her victory, like Jackie Robinson's in baseball and Jack Johnson's in boxing, proved again that blacks, when given an opportunity, could compete at any level in American society."[90] On opening night of the 2007 U.S. Open, the 50th anniversary of her first victory at its predecessor, the U.S. Championships, in 1957, Gibson was inducted into the US Open Court of Champions.[91][92] "It was the quiet dignity with which Althea carried herself during the turbulent days of the 1950s that was truly remarkable," said USTA president Alan Schwartz, at the ceremony. "[Her] legacy ... lives on not only in the stadiums of professional tournaments, but also in schools and parks throughout the nation. Every time a black child or a Hispanic child or an Islamic child picks up a tennis racket for the first time, Althea touches another life. When she began playing, less than five percent of tennis newcomers were minorities. Today, some 30 percent are minorities, two-thirds of whom are African American. This is her legacy."[93] Gibson's five Wimbledon trophies are displayed at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.[94] The Althea Gibson Cup seniors tournament is held annually in Croatia, under the auspices of the International Tennis
Tennis
Federation (ITF).[95] The Althea Gibson Foundation identifies and supports gifted golf and tennis players who live in urban environments.[96] In 2005 Gibson's friend Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
endowed the Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Scholarship at her alma mater, Florida A&M University.[97] In September 2009, Wilmington, North Carolina, named its new community tennis court facility the Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Tennis
Tennis
Complex at Empie Park.[98] Other tennis facilities named in her honor include those at Manning High School (near her birthplace in Silver, South Carolina),[99] the Family Circle Tennis
Tennis
Center in Charleston, South Carolina,[100] Florida A&M University,[101] and Branch Brook Park in Newark, New Jersey.[102] In 2012 a bronze statue, created by sculptor Thomas Jay Warren,[103] was dedicated to her memory in Branch Brook Park.[104] In August 2013, the United States
United States
Postal Service issued a postage stamp honoring Gibson, the 36th in its Black Heritage series.[105][106] A documentary titled Althea, produced for the American Masters
American Masters
Series on PBS, premiered in September 2015.[107] In November 2016, the Council of Paris named a public multisport gymnasium after her in the 12th arrondissement of Paris. Located in a street named after Gerty Archimede, the first black female lawyer to pass the Guadeloupe
Guadeloupe
bar in 1939 and the second black woman elected to the French National Assembly in 1946, the Gymnase Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
will be inaugurated at the end of 2017.[108] "I hope that I have accomplished just one thing," she said, in 1958, "that I have been a credit to tennis, and to my country."[109] "By all measures," reads the inscription on her Newark statue, "Althea Gibson certainly attained that goal."[110] In 2018, the United States
United States
Tennis
Tennis
Association unanimously voted to erect a statue honoring Gibson on the grounds of the US Open.[111] Grand Slam finals[edit] Singles: 7 (5 titles, 2 runner-ups)[edit]

Althea Gibson's 1956 Wimbledon doubles trophy, her first of three, and the first Wimbledon trophy won by an African American

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent Score

Winner 1956 French Championships Clay Angela Mortimer Barrett 6–0, 12–10

Runner-up 1956 U.S. Championships Grass Shirley Fry 3–6, 4–6

Runner-up 1957 Australian Championships Grass Shirley Fry
Shirley Fry
Irvin 3–6, 4–6

Winner 1957 Wimbledon Grass Darlene Hard 6–3, 6–2

Winner 1957 U.S. Championships Grass Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp 6–3, 6–2

Winner 1958 Wimbledon (2) Grass Angela Mortimer Barrett 8–6, 6–2

Winner 1958 U.S. Championships (2) Grass Darlene Hard 3–6, 6–1, 6–2

Doubles: 7 (5 titles, 2 runner-ups)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score

Winner 1956 French Championships Clay Angela Buxton Darlene Hard Dorothy Head Knode 6–8, 8–6, 6–1

Winner 1956 Wimbledon Grass Angela Buxton Fay Muller Daphne Seeney 6–1, 8–6

Winner 1957 Australian Championships Grass Shirley Fry Mary Bevis Hawton Fay Muller 6–2, 6–1

Winner 1957 Wimbledon (2) Grass Darlene Hard Mary Bevis Hawton Thelma Coyne Long 6–1, 6–2

Runner-up 1957 U.S. Championships Grass Darlene Hard Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp Margaret Osborne duPont 2–6, 5–7

Winner 1958 Wimbledon (3) Grass Maria Bueno Margaret Osborne duPont Margaret Varner Bloss 6–3, 7–5

Runner-up 1958 U.S. Championships Grass Maria Bueno Darlene Hard Jeanne Arth 6–2, 3–6, 4–6

Mixed doubles: 4 (1 titles, 3 runner-ups)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score

Runner-up 1956 Wimbledon Grass Gardnar Mulloy Shirley Fry Vic Seixas 6–2, 2–6, 5–7

Runner-up 1957 Wimbledon Grass Neale Fraser Darlene Hard Mervyn Rose 4–6, 5–7

Winner 1957 U.S. Championships Grass Kurt Nielsen Darlene Hard Robert Howe 6–3, 9–7

Runner-up 1958 Wimbledon Grass Kurt Nielsen Lorraine Coghlan Green Robert Howe 3–6, 11–13

Grand Slam singles tournament timeline[edit]

Key

W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A NH

(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (NH) not held.

Tournament 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 Career SR

Australia A A A A A A A F A 0 / 1

France A A A A A A W A A 1 / 1

Wimbledon A 3R A A A A QF W W 2 / 4

United States 2R 3R 3R QF 1R 3R F W W 2 / 9

SR 0 / 1 0 / 2 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 1 1 / 3 2 / 3 2 / 2 5 / 15

SR = the ratio of the number of Grand Slam singles tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played See also[edit]

List of African American firsts Performance timelines for all female tennis players who reached at least one Grand Slam final

References[edit]

^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 214. ^ Robert McG. Thomas, Jr. (September 29, 2003). "An Unlikely Champion". New York Times.  ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 188. ^ Lewis, Jone Johnson. Women's History. About.com archive. Retrieved February 19, 2013. ^ "Black tennis pioneer Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
dies at 76". ESPN. September 28, 2003.  ^ Poston, T (August 26, 1957). "The Story of Althea Gibson". New York Post, p. M2. ^ "That Gibson Girl." Time, August 26, 1957, p. 45. ^ Osofsky, G: Harlem: The Making of a Ghetto: Negro New York, 1890–1930. New York: Harper & Row, 1963, p. 129. ^ Gibson 1958, p. 52. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 25. ^ David L. Porter, ed. (1995). African American Sports Greats : A Biographical Dictionary (1. publ. ed.). Westport, Conn. [u.a.]: Greenwood Press. p. 110. ISBN 978-0313289873.  ^ http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/p/index.php?title=Althea_Gibson&oldid=1001466 ^ https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/nothing-but-trouble-sue-stauffacher/1101928022 ^ https://sports.ha.com/itm/other-sports/circa-1941-althea-gibson-match-used-racquet-her-first-racquet-/a/7200-82676.s?ic10=FeaturedPastSalePrices-ItemImageDesc-052317&tab=ArchiveSearchResults-012417 ^ Gibson 1958, p. 30. ^ Gibson 1958, pp. 33–9. ^ "That Gibson Girl." Time, August 26, 1957, p. 46. ^ History of the American Tennis
Tennis
Association. http://www.americantennisassociation.org/ata-history/ Retrieved May 17, 2013. ^ a b Biography of Althea Gibson. altheagibson.com. Retrieved March 18, 2013. ^ Hubert A. Eaton. nhcs.net archive Archived 2013-10-15 at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved March 18, 2013. ^ Ashe, A: A Hard Road to Glory: A History of the African-American Athlete. New York: Amistad/Warner Books, 1988. Vol. 3, p. 167. ^ Gibson 1958, pp. 58–81. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 176. ^ a b Triumphing over prejudice. the guardian.com (July 8, 2001), retrieved April 27, 2017. ^ "We can accept the evasions," Marble wrote, "or we can face the issue squarely and honestly ... It so happens that I tan very easily in the summer—but I doubt that anyone ever questioned my right to play in the Nationals because of it." Let Us Remember Alice Marble, the Catalyst for Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
to Break the Color Barrier. Huffington Post (August 30, 2007), retrieved May 9, 2013. ^ a b "Althea Gibson". United States
United States
Tennis
Tennis
Association. Retrieved 21 August 2013.  ^ "The New Gibson Girl: A Uniquely Difficult Road to Fame" (July 02, 1956). Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
archive. Retrieved May 17, 2013. ^ Rodney, L: "On the Scoreboard: Miss Gibson Plays at Forest Hills". The Daily Worker, August 24, 1950. ^ Phlegar, B: " Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Says Net Play Tough in England", Associated Press, undated, Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Collection, per Gray and Lamb (2004) pp=74–5. ^ Gibson 1958, p. 81. ^ Gibson 1958, pp. 81–3. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 80–1. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 84–7. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 85. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 86–7. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 87. ^ Tingay, L: "Miss Gibson Worthy Champion; Miss Buxton Shares Doubles Win". London Daily Express, May 25, 1956. ^ "Althea Gibson's Net Stock Zooms Higher", Pittsburgh Courier, June 16, 1956. ^ Gibson 1958, p. 125-6. ^ Gibson 1958, p. 126. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 100. ^ "Miss Gibson Wins Wimbledon Title". New York Times, July 7, 1957. ^ Gibson 1958, p. 105. ^ "Her Finest Hour". Newsweek, July 22, 1957. ^ "Althea's Dream is Complete: 3rd Crown Won". The Daily Worker, September 9, 1957. ^ Gibson 1958, p. 145. ^ Harrison, E: "Althea, Pride of One West Side, Becomes the Queen of Another". New York Times, September 9, 1957. ^ Collins, Bud (2008). The Bud Collins History of Tennis: An Authoritative Encyclopedia and Record Book. New York: New Chapter Press. pp. 695, 703. ISBN 0-942257-41-3.  ^ United States
United States
Tennis
Tennis
Association (1988). 1988 Official USTA Tennis Yearbook. Lynn, Massachusetts: H.O. Zimman, Inc. p. 261.  ^ Associated Press
Associated Press
Athlete of the Year (female). NNDB database. Retrieved March 26, 2013. ^ " Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Voted Top Woman Athlete". Christian Science Monitor, May 22, 1958. ^ Sports Illustrated, September 02, 1957. Volume 7, Issue 10. SI archive. Retrieved May 17, 2013. ^ Time Magazine, Aug. 26, 1957. Time.com archive. Retrieved May 17, 2013. ^ Gibson and Curtis 1968, pp. 15–6. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 131–2. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 132–4. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 112. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 114. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 114–7. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 120-1. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 123. ^ Gibson A., Fitzgerald E., I Always Wanted to Be Somebody (1960), New York: Harper & Brothers. ASIN B0007G5SL8 ^ Gibson and Curtis 1968, p. 76. ^ Honoring Pioneers – Althea Gibson ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 154. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 137–61. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 145–6. ^ http://www.golfobserver.com/new/golfstats.php?year=1970&tour=LPGA&tournament=Borden+Classic ^ Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
career record – at golfobserver.com ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 152–3. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 167. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 164. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 167–8. ^ Gibson A., Curtis R., So Much to Live For. New York, Putnam (1968). ASIN: B0006BVL5Q ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 175. ^ Garrison Z: Zina: My Life in Women's Tennis. New York, Frog Books (2001), p. 84. ISBN 1583940146 ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 178–80. ^ Edge, Wally (2008-01-07). "The one that starts in the 1960s and ends with Codey". PolitickerNJ. Retrieved 2009-03-09.  ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 182. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 169–70. ^ Schoenfeld 2005, pp. 220–224. ^ Bloom, N (October 10, 2003). Celebrity Jews in the news. JWeekly.com archive. Retrieved April 2, 2013. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 171, 210. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 191. ^ "International Women's Sports Hall of Fame". Womenssportsfoundation.org. Retrieved 2013-08-29.  ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 182, 203. ^ "CANDACE AWARD RECIPIENTS 1982-1990, Page 1". National Coalition of 100 Black Women. Archived from the original on March 14, 2003.  ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 183–4. ^ Althea Gibson, Tennis. SI For Women archive. Retrieved May 7, 2013. ^ Rhoden, WT: "A Fruitful Past but a Shaky Future". Ebony, Vol. 32, No. 10, August 1977, pp. 60–64. ^ "USTA To Honor Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
on Opening Night of US Open". United States Tennis
Tennis
Association. 2007-08-15. Retrieved 2013-08-24.  ^ Dillman, Lisa (2007-08-27). "Williams sisters part of Gibson tribute". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 2007-10-04. Retrieved 2007-08-28.  ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, pp. 212–3. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 184. ^ ITF Super-Seniors Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Cup. ITFTennis.com Retrieved May 6, 2013. ^ The Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Foundation. AltheaGibson.com Retrieved May 6, 2013. ^ The Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Endowed Scholarship. FAMU.edu. Retrieved May 7, 2013. ^ Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Tennis
Tennis
Complex at Empie Park. WilmingtonNC.gov Archived 2013-04-27 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved May 4, 2013. ^ Jones, D (April 30, 2002): Serving Up an Honor: Manning Tennis Complex Named for Althea Gibson. Google News archive. Retrieved May 7, 2013. ^ Family Circle Tennis
Tennis
Center Archived 2013-06-10 at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved May 7, 2013. ^ Gray and Lamb 2004, p. 203. ^ Branch Brook Park
Branch Brook Park
Alliance Archived 2013-04-07 at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved May 7, 2013. ^ Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Statue, Newark, NJ. warrensculpture.com Retrieved May 7, 2013. ^ Eunice Lee, "Statue of first black woman to win Wimbledon unveiled in Newark park", NJ.com, March 29, 2012. ^ Bigalke, Jay (August 19, 2013). " Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
stamp 36th in Black Heritage series; ceremony to take place Aug. 23 in Flushing, N.Y.". Linn's Stamp News. Sidney, Ohio: Amos Press, Inc. 86 (4425): 1 and 34–36. ISSN 0161-6234.  ^ " Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Stamps - The Postal Store @ USPS.com". Store.usps.com. 2011-03-28. Archived from the original on 2013-12-05. Retrieved 2013-08-29.  ^ "Althea", American Masters
American Masters
Series, PBS.org, retrieved October 10, 2016. ^ http://www.lemonde.fr/tennis/article/2016/11/10/a-althea-gibson-paris-reconnaissant_5029010_1616659.html ^ Gibson and Curtis 1968, p. 27. ^ Bronze statue of civil rights pioneer Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
dedicated in Essex County (March 28, 2012). Independent Press archive. Retrieved May 7, 2013. ^ Statue of Tennis
Tennis
Legend Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Planned for US Open (February 27, 2018). New York Times. Retrieved February 28, 2018.

Further reading[edit]

Lansbury, Jennifer. A spectacular leap: black women athletes in twentieth-century America. University of Arkansas Press, 2014, Fayetteville. ISBN 9781557286581.

Bibliography[edit]

Gibson, Althea (E. Fitzgerald, ed.) (1960). I Always Wanted to Be Somebody (Hardcover ed.). New York: Harper & Brothers. ASIN B0007G5SL8.  Gibson, Althea; Curtis, Richard (1968). So Much to Live For (Hardcover ed.). New York: Putnam. ASIN B0006BVL5Q.  Gray, Frances Clayton; Lamb, Yanick Rice (2004). Born to Win: The Authorized Biography of Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(Hardcover ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 978-0471471653.  Schoenfeld, Bruce (2005). The Match: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
& Angela Buxton: How Two Outsiders—One Black, the Other Jewish—Forged a Friendship and Made Sports History (Paperback ed.). New York: Harper. ISBN 006052653X. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Althea Gibson.

Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
at the International Tennis
Tennis
Hall of Fame Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
biography on American Masters Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
biography (short) U.S. Open mixed doubles page Wimbledon women's doubles page Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
Tennis
Tennis
Center (Wilmington, NC) Black History biography Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
– Womens History.about.com[permanent dead link]

Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
in the Grand Slam Tournaments

v t e

French Championships women's singles champions

(1897) Adine Masson (1898) Adine Masson (1899) Adine Masson (1900) Hélène Prévost (1901) P. Girod (1902) Adine Masson (1903) Adine Masson (1904) Kate Gillou (1905) Kate Gillou (1906) Kate Gillou-Fenwick (1907) Comtesse de Kermel (1908) Kate Gillou-Fenwick (1909) Jeanne Matthey (1910) Jeanne Matthey (1911) Jeanne Matthey (1912) Jeanne Matthey (1913) Marguerite Broquedis (1914) Marguerite Broquedis (1915–1919) No competition (due to World War I) (1920) Suzanne Lenglen (1921) Suzanne Lenglen (1922) Suzanne Lenglen (1923) Suzanne Lenglen (1924) Julie Vlasto (1925) Suzanne Lenglen (1926) Suzanne Lenglen (1927) Kea Bouman (1928) Helen Wills (1929) Helen Wills (1930) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1931) Cilly Aussem (1932) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1933) Margaret Scriven (1934) Margaret Scriven (1935) Hilde Krahwinkel Sperling (1936) Hilde Krahwinkel Sperling (1937) Hilde Krahwinkel Sperling (1938) Simonne Mathieu (1939) Simonne Mathieu (1940–1945) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Margaret Osborne duPont (1947) Patricia Canning Todd (1948) Nelly Adamson Landry (1949) Margaret Osborne duPont (1950) Doris Hart (1951) Shirley Fry (1952) Doris Hart (1953) Maureen Connolly (1954) Maureen Connolly (1955) Angela Mortimer (1956) Althea Gibson (1957) Shirley Bloomer (1958) Zsuzsa Körmöczy (1959) Christine Truman (1960) Darlene Hard (1961) Ann Jones (1962) Margaret Smith (1963) Lesley Turner (1964) Margaret Smith (1965) Lesley Turner (1966) Ann Haydon-Jones (1967) Françoise Dürr

v t e

Pre Open Era Wimbledon ladies' singles champions

(1884) Maud Watson (1885) Maud Watson (1886) Blanche Bingley (1887) Lottie Dod (1888) Lottie Dod (1889) Blanche Bingley
Blanche Bingley
Hillyard (1890) Lena Rice (1891) Lottie Dod (1892) Lottie Dod (1893) Lottie Dod (1894) Blanche Bingley
Blanche Bingley
Hillyard (1895) Charlotte Cooper (1896) Charlotte Cooper (1897) Blanche Bingley
Blanche Bingley
Hillyard (1898) Charlotte Cooper (1899) Blanche Bingley
Blanche Bingley
Hillyard (1900) Blanche Bingley
Blanche Bingley
Hillyard (1901) Charlotte Sterry (1902) Muriel Robb (1903) Dorothea Douglass (1904) Dorothea Douglass (1905) May Sutton (1906) Dorothea Lambert Chambers (1907) May Sutton (1908) Charlotte Sterry (1909) Dora Boothby (1910) Dorothea Lambert Chambers (1912) Dorethea Lambert Chambers (1913) Ethel Thomson Larcombe (1914) Dorothea Lambert Chambers (1915) Dorothea Lambert Chambers (1915-18) No competition (due to World War I) (1919) Suzanne Lenglen (1920) Suzanne Lenglen (1921) Suzanne Lenglen (1922) Suzanne Lenglen (1923) Suzanne Lenglen (1924) Kathleen McKane (1925) Suzanne Lenglen (1926) Kathleen McKane Godfree (1927) Helen Wills (1928) Helen Wills (1929) Helen Wills (1930) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1931) Cilly Aussem (1932) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1933) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1934) Dorothy Round (1935) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1936) Helen Jacobs (1937) Dorothy Round (1938) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1939) Alice Marble (1940–45) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Pauline Addie (1947) Margaret Osborne (1948) Louise Brough (1949) Louise Brough (1950) Louise Brough (1951) Doris Hart (1952) Maureen Connolly (1953) Maureen Connolly (1954) Maureen Connolly (1955) Louise Brough (1956) Shirley Fry (1957) Althea Gibson (1958) Althea Gibson (1959) Maria Bueno (1960) Maria Bueno (1961) Angela Mortimer (1962) Karen Hantze Susman (1963) Margaret Smith (1964) Maria Bueno (1965) Margaret Smith (1966) Billie Jean King (1967) Billie Jean King

v t e

U.S. National Championships women's singles champions

(1887) Ellen Hansell (1888) Bertha Townsend (1889) Bertha Townsend (1890) Ellen Roosevelt (1891) Mabel Cahill (1892) Mabel Cahill (1893) Aline Terry (1894) Helen Hellwig (1895) Juliette Atkinson (1896) Elisabeth Moore (1897) Juliette Atkinson (1898) Juliette Atkinson (1899) Marion Jones (1900) Myrtle McAteer (1901) Elisabeth Moore (1902) Marion Jones (1903) Elisabeth Moore (1904) May Sutton (1905) Elisabeth Moore (1906) Helen Homans (1907) Evelyn Sears (1908) Maud Barger-Wallach (1909) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman (1910) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman (1911) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman (1912) Mary Browne (1913) Mary Browne (1914) Mary Browne (1915) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1916) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1917) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1918) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1919) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman (1920) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1921) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1922) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1923) Helen Wills (1924) Helen Wills (1925) Helen Wills (1926) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1927) Helen Wills (1928) Helen Wills (1929) Helen Wills (1930) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
Shoemaker (1931) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (1932) Helen Jacobs (1933) Helen Jacobs (1934) Helen Jacobs (1935) Helen Jacobs (1936) Alice Marble (1937) Anita Lizana (1938) Alice Marble (1939) Alice Marble (1940) Alice Marble (1941) Sarah Palfrey Cooke (1942) Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (1943) Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (1944) Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (1945) Sarah Palfrey Cooke (1946) Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (1947) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp (1948) Margaret Osborne duPont (1949) Margaret Osborne duPont (1950) Margaret Osborne duPont (1951) Maureen Connolly (1952) Maureen Connolly (1953) Maureen Connolly (1954) Doris Hart (1955) Doris Hart (1956) Shirley Fry
Shirley Fry
Irvin (1957) Althea Gibson (1958) Althea Gibson (1959) Maria Bueno (1960) Darlene Hard (1961) Darlene Hard (1962) Margaret Court (1963) Maria Bueno (1964) Maria Bueno (1965) Margaret Court (1966) Maria Bueno (1967) Billie Jean King

v t e

Australasian and Australian Championships women's doubles champions

(1922) Esna Boyd
Esna Boyd
Robertson / Marjorie Mountain (1923) Esna Boyd
Esna Boyd
Robertson / Sylvia Lance Harper (1924) Daphne Akhurst
Daphne Akhurst
Cozens / Sylvia Lance Harper (1925) Sylvia Lance Harper
Sylvia Lance Harper
/ Daphne Akhurst
Daphne Akhurst
Cozens (1926) Meryl O'Hara Wood
Meryl O'Hara Wood
/ Esna Boyd
Esna Boyd
Robertson (1927) Meryl O'Hara Wood
Meryl O'Hara Wood
/ Louie Bickerton (1928) Daphne Akhurst
Daphne Akhurst
Cozens / Esna Boyd
Esna Boyd
Robertson (1929) Daphne Akhurst
Daphne Akhurst
Cozens / Louie Bickerton (1930) Margaret Molesworth / Emily Hood Westacott (1931) Daphne Akhurst
Daphne Akhurst
Cozens / Louise Bickerton (1932) Coral McInnes Buttsworth / Marjorie Cox Crawford (1933) Margaret Molesworth / Emily Hood Westacott (1934) Margaret Molesworth / Emily Hood Westacott (1935) Evelyn Dearman
Evelyn Dearman
/ Nancy Lyle Glover (1936) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Nancye Wynne Bolton (1937) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Nancye Wynne Bolton (1938) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Nancye Wynne Bolton (1939) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Nancye Wynne Bolton (1940) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Nancye Wynne Bolton (1941 - 1945) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Joyce Fitch / Mary Bevis (1947) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Nancye Wynne Bolton (1948) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Nancye Wynne Bolton (1949) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Nancye Wynne Bolton (1950) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Doris Hart (1951) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Nancye Wynne Bolton (1952) Thelma Coyne Long
Thelma Coyne Long
/ Nancye Wynne Bolton (1953) Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
/ Julia Sampson Hayward (1954) Mary Hawton / Thelma Coyne Long (1955) Mary Hawton / Beryl Penrose (1956) Mary Hawton / Thelma Coyne Long (1957) Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
/ Shirley Fry
Shirley Fry
Irvin (1958) Mary Hawton / Thelma Coyne Long (1959) Renée Schuurman / Sandra Reynolds Price (1960) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Christine Truman Janes (1961) Mary Carter Reitano / Margaret Court (1962) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Robyn Ebbern (1963) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Robyn Ebbern (1964) Judy Tegart / Lesley Turner (1965) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Lesley Turner (1966) Carole Caldwell Graebner
Carole Caldwell Graebner
/ Nancy Richey (1967) Lesley Turner / Judy Tegart (1968) Karen Krantzcke / Kerry Melville

v t e

French Championships women's doubles champions

(1907) Adine Masson / Yvonne de Ploffel (1908) Kate Gillou-Fenwick / Cecile Matthey (1909) Jeanne Matthey
Jeanne Matthey
/ Daisy Speranza (1910) Jeanne Matthey
Jeanne Matthey
/ Daisy Speranza (1911) Jeanne Matthey
Jeanne Matthey
/ Daisy Speranza (1912) Jeanne Matthey
Jeanne Matthey
/ Daisy Speranza (1913) Blanche Amblard / Suzanne Amblard (1914) Blanche Amblard / Suzanne Amblard (1915–1919) No competition (due to World War I) (1920) Élisabeth d'Ayen / Suzanne Lenglen (1921) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Geramine Pigueron (1922) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Geramine Pigueron (1923) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Julie Vlasto (1924) Marguerite Broquedis
Marguerite Broquedis
/ Yvonne Bourgeois (1925) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Julie Vlasto (1926) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Julie Vlasto (1927) Irene Bowder Peacock
Irene Bowder Peacock
/ Bobbie Heine (1928) Phoebe Holcroft Watson
Phoebe Holcroft Watson
/ Eileen Bennett (1929) Lilí Álvarez
Lilí Álvarez
/ Kea Bouman (1930) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody / Elizabeth Ryan (1931) Eileen Bennett Whittingstall
Eileen Bennett Whittingstall
/ Betty Nuthall (1932) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody / Elizabeth Ryan (1933) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1934) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1935) Margaret Scriven
Margaret Scriven
/ Kay Stammers (1936) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Billie Yorke (1937) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Billie Yorke (1938) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Billie Yorke (1939) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Jadwiga Jędrzejowska (1940–1945) No competition (due to World War II) (1945) Paulette Fritz / Simone Lafargue (1946) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne (1947) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1948) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Patricia Canning Todd (1949) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1950) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Shirley Fry (1951) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Shirley Fry (1952) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Shirley Fry (1953) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Shirley Fry (1954) Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
/ Nell Hall Hopman (1955) Beverly Baker Fleitz / Darlene Hard (1956) Angela Buxton / Althea Gibson (1957) Shirley Bloomer / Darlene Hard (1958) Rosie Reyes / Yola Ramírez Ochoa (1959) Sandra Reynolds / Renée Schuurman (1960) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Darlene Hard (1961) Sandra Reynolds / Renée Schuurman (1962) Sandra Reynolds Price / Renée Schuurman (1963) Ann Haydon-Jones / Renée Schuurman (1964) Margaret Smith / Lesley Turner (1965) Margaret Smith / Lesley Turner (1966) Margaret Smith / Judy Tegart (1967) Françoise Dürr
Françoise Dürr
/ Gail Chanfreau

v t e

Pre Open Era Wimbledon ladies' doubles champions

(1913) Winifred McNair / Dora Boothby (1914) Agnes Morton / Elizabeth Ryan (1915-18) No competition (due to World War I) (1919) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1920) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1921) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1922) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1923) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1924) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Helen Wills (1925) Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1926) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1927) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1928) Peggy Saunders Michel / Phoebe Holcroft Watson (1929) Peggy Saunders Michel / Phoebe Holcroft Watson (1930) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody / Elizabeth Ryan (1931) Phyllis Mudford / Dorothy S. Barron (1932) Doris Metaxa / Josane Sigart (1933) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1934) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Elizabeth Ryan (1935) Freda James
Freda James
/ Kay Stammers (1936) Freda James
Freda James
/ Kay Stammers (1937) Simonne Mathieu
Simonne Mathieu
/ Billie Yorke (1938) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Alice Marble (1939) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Alice Marble (1940-45) No competition (due to World War II) (1946) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1947) Patricia Canning Todd / Doris Hart (1948) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1949) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1950) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1951) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Shirley Fry (1952) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Shirley Fry (1953) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Shirley Fry (1954) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
/ Margaret Osborne duPont (1955) Angela Mortimer Barrett / Anne Shilcock (1956) Angela Buxton / Althea Gibson (1957) Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
/ Darlene Hard (1958) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Althea Gibson (1959) Jeanne Arth / Darlene Hard (1960) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Darlene Hard (1961) Karen Hantze Susman / Billie Jean Moffitt (1962) Karen Hantze Susman / Billie Jean Moffitt (1963) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Darlene Hard (1964) Margaret Court
Margaret Court
/ Lesley Turner Bowrey (1965) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Billie Jean Moffitt (1966) Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
/ Nancy Richey (1967) Rosemary Casals / Billie Jean King

v t e

U.S. National Championships mixed doubles champions

(1892) Mabel Cahill
Mabel Cahill
/ Clarence Hobart (1893) Ellen Roosevelt
Ellen Roosevelt
/ Clarence Hobart (1894) Juliette Atkinson / Edwin P. Fischer (1895) Juliette Atkinson / Edwin P. Fischer (1896) Juliette Atkinson / Edwin P. Fischer (1897) Laura Henson / D.L. Magruder (1898) Carrie Neely
Carrie Neely
/ Edwin P. Fischer (1899) Elizabeth Rastall / Albert Hoskins (1900) Margaret Hunnewell / Alfred Codman (1901) Marion Jones
Marion Jones
/ Raymond Little (1902) Elisabeth Moore
Elisabeth Moore
/ Wylie Grant (1903) Helen Chapman / Harry Allen (1904) Elisabeth Moore
Elisabeth Moore
/ Wylie Grant (1905) Augusta Schultz Hobart / Clarence Hobart (1906) Sarah Coffin / Edward Dewhurst (1907) May Sayers / Wallace Johnson (1908) Edith Rotch / Nathaniel Niles (1909) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Wallace Johnson (1910) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Joseph Carpenter, Jr. (1911) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Wallace Johnson (1912) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ R. Norris Williams (1913) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Bill Tilden (1914) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Bill Tilden (1915) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Harry Johnson (1916) Eleonora Sears
Eleonora Sears
/ Willis E. Davis (1917) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Irving Wright (1918) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Irving Wright (1919) Marion Jessup
Marion Jessup
/ Vincent Richards (1920) Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
/ Wallace Johnson (1921) Mary Browne
Mary Browne
/ Bill Johnston (1922) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Bill Tilden (1923) Molla Bjurstedt Mallory / Bill Tilden (1924) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
/ Vincent Richards (1925) Kathleen McKane Godfree
Kathleen McKane Godfree
/ John Hawkes (1926) Elizabeth Ryan
Elizabeth Ryan
/ Jean Borotra (1927) Eileen Bennett Whittingstall
Eileen Bennett Whittingstall
/ Henri Cochet (1928) Helen Wills
Helen Wills
/ John Hawkes (1929) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
Shoemaker / George Lott (1930) Edith Cross / Wilmer Allison (1931) Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall
Shoemaker / George Lott (1932) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Fred Perry (1933) Elizabeth Ryan
Elizabeth Ryan
/ Ellsworth Vines (1934) Helen Jacobs
Helen Jacobs
/ George Lott (1935) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Enrique Maier (1936) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Gene Mako (1937) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Don Budge (1938) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Don Budge (1939) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Harry Hopman (1940) Alice Marble
Alice Marble
/ Bobby Riggs (1941) Sarah Palfrey Cooke
Sarah Palfrey Cooke
/ Jack Kramer (1942) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Ted Schroeder (1943) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1944) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1945) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1946) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Bill Talbert (1947) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / John Bromwich (1948) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Tom Brown (1949) Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp / Eric Sturgess (1950) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Ken McGregor (1951) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Frank Sedgman (1952) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Frank Sedgman (1953) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Vic Seixas (1954) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Vic Seixas (1955) Doris Hart
Doris Hart
/ Vic Seixas (1956) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Ken Rosewall (1957) Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
/ Kurt Nielsen (1958) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Neale Fraser (1959) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Neale Fraser (1960) Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
/ Neale Fraser (1961) Margaret Smith / Bob Mark (1962) Margaret Smith / Fred Stolle (1963) Margaret Smith / Ken Fletcher (1964) Margaret Smith / John Newcombe (1965) Margaret Smith / Fred Stolle (1966) Donna Floyd Fales / Owen Davidson (1967) Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
/ Owen Davidson

v t e

Grand Slam / non-calendar year / career Grand Slam-winning singles/doubles tennis players

Grand Slam

Men's singles

1938: Don Budge 1962: Rod Laver 1969: Rod Laver

Women's singles

1953: Maureen Connolly 1970: Margaret Court 1988: Steffi Graf

Men's doubles

1951: Ken McGregor/ Frank Sedgman

Women's doubles

1960: Maria Bueno 1984: Martina Navratilova/ Pam Shriver 1998: Martina Hingis

Mixed doubles

1963: Margaret Court/ Ken Fletcher 1965: Margaret Court 1967: Owen Davidson

Non-calendar year Grand Slam

Men's singles

2015–16: Novak Djokovic

Women's singles

1983–84: Martina Navratilova 1993–94: Steffi Graf 2002–03: Serena Williams 2014–15: Serena Williams

Men's doubles

2012–13: Bob Bryan/ Mike Bryan

Women's doubles

1949–50: Louise Brough 1986–87: Martina Navratilova/ Pam Shriver 1992–93: Gigi Fernández/ Natasha Zvereva 1996–97: Natasha Zvereva 2009–10: Serena Williams/ Venus Williams

Mixed doubles

1967–68 Billie Jean King

Career Grand Slam

Men's singles

1933-34-35: Fred Perry 1937-38: Don Budge 1960-61-62: Rod Laver 1961-63-64: Roy Emerson 1992-94-95-99: Andre Agassi 2003-04-09: Roger Federer 2005-08-09-10: Rafael Nadal 2008-11-16: Novak Djokovic

Women's singles

1951-52-53: Maureen Connolly 1949-50-51-54: Doris Hart 1951-56-57: Shirley Fry
Shirley Fry
Irvin 1960-62-63: Margaret Court 1966-67-68-72: Billie Jean King 1974-75-82: Chris Evert 1978-81-82-83: Martina Navratilova 1987-88: Steffi Graf 1999-2002-03: Serena Williams 2004-06-08-12: Maria Sharapova

Men's doubles

1935-36-39: Adrian Quist 1948-50-51 Frank Sedgman 1951: Ken McGregor 1953–56: Lew Hoad/ Ken Rosewall 1957-58-59: Neale Fraser 1959-60-62: Roy Emerson 1965–67: John Newcombe/ Tony Roche 1962-64-67-77: Bob Hewitt 1982-84-86-89: John Fitzgerald 1983-87-89: Anders Järryd 1994-95-98: Jacco Eltingh/ Paul Haarhuis 1989-92–93-2000: Mark Woodforde 1992–93-95-2000: Todd Woodbridge 1998-2002-03-05: Jonas Björkman 2003-05-06: Bob Bryan/ Mike Bryan 2002-04-07-08: Daniel Nestor 1999-2006-12: Leander Paes

Women's doubles

1942-46-50: Louise Brough
Louise Brough
Clapp 1947-48-50-51: Doris Hart 1950-51-57: Shirley Fry
Shirley Fry
Irvin 1956–1957: Althea Gibson 1958–60: Maria Bueno 1961–64: Lesley Turner Bowrey 1961-63-64: Margaret Court 1964-66-69-70: Judy Tegart Dalton 1980–81: Kathy Jordan/ Anne Smith 1975-76-77-80: / Martina Navratilova 1981-82-83-84: Pam Shriver 1989-90-93: Helena Suková 1988–90-91-92: Gigi Fernández 1989-90-91-93: / Natasha Zvereva 1989-90-94: Jana Novotná 1996-97-98: Martina Hingis 1999-2000-01: Serena Williams/ Venus Williams 2000-01-06: Lisa Raymond 2012-13-14: Sara Errani/ Roberta Vinci

Mixed doubles

1925-26-27-28 Jean Borotra 1949–51: Doris Hart/ Frank Sedgman 1961-1963: Margaret Court 1962-1963: Ken Fletcher 1965-66-67: Owen Davidson 1967–68: Billie Jean King 1969–75: Marty Riessen 1961-70-77-79: Bob Hewitt 1992–93-95: Mark Woodforde 1990-93-94-95: Todd Woodbridge 1974-85-2003: Martina Navratilova 2001-02-05: Daniela Hantuchová 1997-99-2005-06: Mahesh Bhupathi 2002-04-08-10: Cara Black 1999-2003-08-16: Leander Paes 2006-15-16: Martina Hingis

v t e

Women's tennis players who won two or more Grand Slam singles titles in one calendar year

Four wins

1953: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker 1970: Margaret Court 1988: Steffi Graf

Three wins

1928: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI&US) 1929: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI&US) 1962: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1965: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&WI&US) 1969: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1972: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(FO&WI&US) 1973: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1983: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(AO&WI&US) 1984: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(FO&WI&US) 1989: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(AO&WI&US) 1991: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(AO&FO&US) 1992: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(AO&FO&US) 1993: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1995: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1996: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1997: Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
(AO&WI&US) 2002: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(FO&WI&US) 2015: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&FO&WI)

Two wins

1925: Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
(FO&WI) 1927: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (WI&US) 1930: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI) 1931: Cilly Aussem
Cilly Aussem
(FO&WI) 1932: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI) 1939: Alice Marble
Alice Marble
(WI&US) 1946: Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (WI&US) 1949: Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
(FO&US) 1950: Louise Bough Clapp (AO&WI) 1952: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (WI&US) 1954: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (FO&WI) 1956: Shirley Fry Irvin
Shirley Fry Irvin
(WI&US) 1957: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(WI&US) 1958: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(WI&US) 1959: Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
(WI&US) 1960: Darlene Hard (FO&US) 1963: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&WI) 1964: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO) 1964: Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
(WI&US) 1967: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(WI&US) 1968: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(AO&WI) 1971: Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
Cawley (FO&WI) 1974: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&WI) 1975: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&US) 1976: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(WI&US) 1980: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&US) 1982: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(FO&WI) 1982: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(AO&US) 1985: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(AO&WI) 1986: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(WI&US) 1987: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(WI&US) 1994: Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
(FO&US) 2000: Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(WI&US) 2001: Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
(AO&FO) 2001: Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(WI&US) 2003: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2003: Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(FO&US) 2006: Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
(AO&WI) 2007: Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(FO&US) 2009: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2010: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2012: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(WI&US) 2013: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(FO&US) 2016: Angelique Kerber
Angelique Kerber
(AO&US)

AO=Australian Open, FO=French Open, WI=Wimbledon, US=US Open

Awards and achievements

v t e

Theodore Roosevelt Award winners

1967: Eisenhower 1968: Saltonstall 1969: White 1970: Hovde 1971: Kraft Jr. 1972: Holland 1973: Bradley 1974: Owens 1975: Ford 1976: Hamilton 1977: Bradley 1978: Zornow 1979: Chandler 1980: Cooley 1981: Linkletter 1982: Cosby 1983: Palmer 1984: Lawrence 1985: Fleming 1986: Bush 1987: Zable 1988: Not presented 1989: Ebert 1990: Reagan 1991: Gibson 1992: Kemp 1993: Alexander 1994: Johnson 1995: Mathias 1996: Wooden 1997: Payne 1998: Dole 1999: Richardson 2000: Staubach 2001: Cohen 2002: Shriver 2003: de Varona 2004: Page 2005: Ride 2006: Kraft 2007: Tagliabue 2008: Glenn 2009: Albright 2010: Mitchell 2011: Dunwoody 2012: Allen 2013: Dungy 2014: Mills 2015: Jackson 2016: Ueberroth 2017: Brooke-Marciniak

v t e

Florida Women's Hall of Fame administered by the Florida Commission on the Status of Women

1980–1989

1982

Mary McLeod Bethune Helene S. Coleman Elaine Gordon Wilhelmina Celeste Goehring Harvey Paula Mae Milton Barbara Jo Palmer

1984

Roxcy O’Neal Bolton Barbara Landstreet Frye Lena B. Smithers Hughes Zora Neale Hurston Sybil Collins Mobley Helen Muir Gladys Pumariega Soler Julia DeForest Sturtevant Tuttle

1986

Annie Ackerman Rosemary Barkett Gwendolyn Sawyer Cherry Dorothy Dodd Marjory Stoneman Douglas Elsie Jones Hare Elizabeth McCullough Johnson Frances Bartlett Kinne Arva Moore Parks McCabe Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Florence Barbara Seibert Marilyn K. Smith Eartha M. M. White

1990–1999

1992

Jacqueline Cochran Carrie P. Meek Ruth Bryan Owen

1993

Betty Skelton Frankman Erde Paulina Pedroso Janet Reno

1994

Nikki Beare Betty Mae Jumper Gladys Nichols Milton

1995

Evelyn Stocking Crosslin JoAnn Hardin Morgan Sarah Brooks Pryor

1996

Marjorie Harris Carr Betty Castor Ivy Julia Cromartie Stranahan

1997

Alicia Baro Carita Doggett Corse M. Athalie Range

1998

Helen Gordon Davis Mattie Belle Davis Christine Fulwylie-Bankston

1999

Althea Gibson Sister Jeanne O’Laughlin Dessie Smith Prescott

2000–2009

2000

Chris Evert Paula Fickes Hawkins Marianne Mathewson-Chapman

2001

Jessie Ball duPont Lenore Carrero Nesbitt Lynda Keever

2002

Victoria Joyce Ely Toni Jennings Frances Langford
Frances Langford
Stuart

2003

Sarah Ann Blocker Gloria Estefan Mary R. Grizzle

2004/2005

Shirley D. Coletti Judith Kersey Marion Hammer

2005/2006

Caridad Asensio Tillie Fowler Lucy W. Morgan

2006/2007

Maryly VanLeer Peck Peggy A. Quince

2007/2008

Barbara J. Pariente Pallavi Patel Ileana Ros-Lehtinen

2008/2009

Louise H. Cortelis Gwen Margolis Betty Schlesinger Sembler

2009/2010

Eugenie Clark Claudine Dianne Ryce Dara Grace Torres

2010–2019

2010/2011

Mary Brennan Karl Anna I. Rodriguez

2011/2012

Ruth H. Alexander Elizabeth "Budd" Bell Vicki Bryant Burke

2012/2013

Clara C. Frye Aleene Pridgen Kidd MacKenzie Lillie Pierce Voss

2013/2014

Susan Benton Louise Jones Gopher Dottie Berger MacKinnon

2014/2015

Mary Lee Farrior Evelyn Cahn Keiser Charlotte Edwards Maguire

2016

Carol Jenkins Barnett Helen Aguirre Ferré Elmira Louise Leto

2017

Mary Lou Baker Kathleen Scott Robertson Katherine Fernandez Rundle

v t e

Inductees to the National Women's Hall of Fame

1970–1979

1973

Jane Addams Marian Anderson Susan B. Anthony Clara Barton Mary McLeod Bethune Elizabeth Blackwell Pearl S. Buck Rachel Carson Mary Cassatt Emily Dickinson Amelia Earhart Alice Hamilton Helen Hayes Helen Keller Eleanor Roosevelt Florence Sabin Margaret Chase Smith Elizabeth Cady Stanton Helen Brooke Taussig Harriet Tubman

1976

Abigail Adams Margaret Mead Mildred "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias

1979

Dorothea Dix Juliette Gordon Low Alice Paul Elizabeth Bayley Seton

1980–1989

1981

Margaret Sanger Sojourner Truth

1982

Carrie Chapman Catt Frances Perkins

1983

Belva Lockwood Lucretia Mott

1984

Mary "Mother" Harris Jones Bessie Smith

1986

Barbara McClintock Lucy Stone Harriet Beecher Stowe

1988

Gwendolyn Brooks Willa Cather Sally Ride Ida B. Wells-Barnett

1990–1999

1990

Margaret Bourke-White Barbara Jordan Billie Jean King Florence B. Seibert

1991

Gertrude Belle Elion

1993

Ethel Percy Andrus Antoinette Blackwell Emily Blackwell Shirley Chisholm Jacqueline Cochran Ruth Colvin Marian Wright Edelman Alice Evans Betty Friedan Ella Grasso Martha Wright Griffiths Fannie Lou Hamer Dorothy Height Dolores Huerta Mary Jacobi Mae Jemison Mary Lyon Mary Mahoney Wilma Mankiller Constance Baker Motley Georgia O'Keeffe Annie Oakley Rosa Parks Esther Peterson Jeannette Rankin Ellen Swallow Richards Elaine Roulet Katherine Siva Saubel Gloria Steinem Helen Stephens Lillian Wald Madam C. J. Walker Faye Wattleton Rosalyn S. Yalow Gloria Yerkovich

1994

Bella Abzug Ella Baker Myra Bradwell Annie Jump Cannon Jane Cunningham Croly Catherine East Geraldine Ferraro Charlotte Perkins Gilman Grace Hopper Helen LaKelly Hunt Zora Neale Hurston Anne Hutchinson Frances Wisebart Jacobs Susette La Flesche Louise McManus Maria Mitchell Antonia Novello Linda Richards Wilma Rudolph Betty Bone Schiess Muriel Siebert Nettie Stevens Oprah Winfrey Sarah Winnemucca Fanny Wright

1995

Virginia Apgar Ann Bancroft Amelia Bloomer Mary Breckinridge Eileen Collins Elizabeth Hanford Dole Anne Dallas Dudley Mary Baker Eddy Ella Fitzgerald Margaret Fuller Matilda Joslyn Gage Lillian Moller Gilbreth Nannerl O. Keohane Maggie Kuhn Sandra Day O'Connor Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin Pat Schroeder Hannah Greenebaum Solomon

1996

Louisa May Alcott Charlotte Anne Bunch Frances Xavier Cabrini Mary A. Hallaren Oveta Culp Hobby Wilhelmina Cole Holladay Anne Morrow Lindbergh Maria Goeppert-Mayer Ernestine Louise Potowski Rose Maria Tallchief Edith Wharton

1998

Madeleine Albright Maya Angelou Nellie Bly Lydia Moss Bradley Mary Steichen Calderone Mary Ann Shadd
Mary Ann Shadd
Cary Joan Ganz Cooney Gerty Cori Sarah Grimké Julia Ward Howe Shirley Ann Jackson Shannon Lucid Katharine Dexter McCormick Rozanne L. Ridgway Edith Nourse Rogers Felice Schwartz Eunice Kennedy Shriver Beverly Sills Florence Wald Angelina Grimké
Angelina Grimké
Weld Chien-Shiung Wu

2000–2009

2000

Faye Glenn Abdellah Emma Smith DeVoe Marjory Stoneman Douglas Mary Dyer Sylvia A. Earle Crystal Eastman Jeanne Holm Leontine T. Kelly Frances Oldham Kelsey Kate Mullany Janet Reno Anna Howard Shaw Sophia Smith Ida Tarbell Wilma L. Vaught Mary Edwards Walker Annie Dodge Wauneka Eudora Welty Frances E. Willard

2001

Dorothy H. Andersen Lucille Ball Rosalynn Carter Lydia Maria Child Bessie Coleman Dorothy Day Marian de Forest Althea Gibson Beatrice A. Hicks Barbara Holdridge Harriet Williams Russell Strong Emily Howell Warner Victoria Woodhull

2002

Paulina Kellogg Wright Davis Ruth Bader Ginsburg Katharine Graham Bertha Holt Mary Engle Pennington Mercy Otis Warren

2003

Linda G. Alvarado Donna de Varona Gertrude Ederle Martha Matilda Harper Patricia Roberts Harris Stephanie L. Kwolek Dorothea Lange Mildred Robbins Leet Patsy Takemoto Mink Sacagawea Anne Sullivan Sheila E. Widnall

2005

Florence Ellinwood Allen Ruth Fulton Benedict Betty Bumpers Hillary Clinton Rita Rossi Colwell Mother Marianne Cope Maya Y. Lin Patricia A. Locke Blanche Stuart Scott Mary Burnett Talbert

2007

Eleanor K. Baum Julia Child Martha Coffin Pelham Wright Swanee Hunt Winona LaDuke Elisabeth Kübler-Ross Judith L. Pipher Catherine Filene Shouse Henrietta Szold

2009

Louise Bourgeois Mildred Cohn Karen DeCrow Susan Kelly-Dreiss Allie B. Latimer Emma Lazarus Ruth Patrick Rebecca Talbot Perkins Susan Solomon Kate Stoneman

2010–2019

2011

St. Katharine Drexel Dorothy Harrison Eustis Loretta C. Ford Abby Kelley
Abby Kelley
Foster Helen Murray Free Billie Holiday Coretta Scott King Lilly Ledbetter Barbara A. Mikulski Donna E. Shalala Kathrine Switzer

2013

Betty Ford Ina May Gaskin Julie Krone Kate Millett Nancy Pelosi Mary Joseph Rogers Bernice Sandler Anna Schwartz Emma Willard

2015

Tenley Albright Nancy Brinker Martha Graham Marcia Greenberger Barbara Iglewski Jean Kilbourne Carlotta Walls LaNier Philippa Marrack Mary Harriman Rumsey Eleanor Smeal

2017

Matilda Cuomo Temple Grandin Lorraine Hansberry Victoria Jackson Sherry Lansing Clare Boothe Luce Aimee Mullins Carol Mutter Janet Rowley Alice Waters

v t e

Associated Press
Associated Press
Female Athlete of the Year

1931: Helene Madison 1932: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1933: Helen Jacobs 1934: Virginia Van Wie 1935: Helen Wills 1936: Helen Stephens 1937: Katherine Rawls 1938: Patty Berg 1939: Alice Marble 1940: Alice Marble 1941: Betty Hicks 1942: Gloria Callen 1943: Patty Berg 1944: Ann Curtis 1945: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1946: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1947: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1948: Fanny Blankers-Koen 1949: Marlene Hagge 1950: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1951: Maureen Connolly 1952: Maureen Connolly 1953: Maureen Connolly 1954: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1955: Patty Berg 1956: Pat McCormick 1957: Althea Gibson 1958: Althea Gibson 1959: Maria Bueno 1960: Wilma Rudolph 1961: Wilma Rudolph 1962: Dawn Fraser 1963: Mickey Wright 1964: Mickey Wright 1965: Kathy Whitworth 1966: Kathy Whitworth 1967: Billie Jean King 1968: Peggy Fleming 1969: Debbie Meyer 1970: Chi Cheng 1971: Evonne Goolagong 1972: Olga Korbut 1973: Billie Jean King 1974: Chris Evert 1975: Chris Evert 1976: Nadia Comăneci 1977: Chris Evert 1978: Nancy Lopez 1979: Tracy Austin 1980: Chris Evert 1981: Tracy Austin 1982: Mary Decker 1983: Martina Navratilova 1984: Mary Lou Retton 1985: Nancy Lopez 1986: Martina Navratilova 1987: Jackie Joyner-Kersee 1988: Florence Griffith Joyner 1989: Steffi Graf 1990: Beth Daniel 1991: Monica Seles 1992: Monica Seles 1993: Sheryl Swoopes 1994: Bonnie Blair 1995: Rebecca Lobo 1996: Amy Van Dyken 1997: Martina Hingis 1998: Pak Se-ri 1999: United States
United States
women's national soccer team 2000: Marion Jones 2001: Jennifer Capriati 2002: Serena Williams 2003: Annika Sörenstam 2004: Annika Sörenstam 2005: Annika Sörenstam 2006: Lorena Ochoa 2007: Lorena Ochoa 2008: Candace Parker 2009: Serena Williams 2010: Lindsey Vonn 2011: Abby Wambach 2012: Gabby Douglas 2013: Serena Williams 2014: Mo'ne Davis 2015: Serena Williams 2016: Simone Biles 2017: Katie Ledecky

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 57714535 LCCN: n79114046 ISNI: 0000 0001 1445 1214 GND: 130256692 SUDOC: 074243632 BNF: cb114714196 (data) SN

.