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Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(/ˈældə/; born Alphonso Joseph D'Abruzzo; January 28, 1936) is an American actor, director, screenwriter, and author. A seven-time Emmy Award
Emmy Award
and Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
winner, he is widely known for his roles as Captain Hawkeye Pierce
Hawkeye Pierce
in the TV series M*A*S*H (1972–1983), hosting of Scientific American Frontiers, and as Arnold Vinick in The West Wing
The West Wing
(2004–2006). He has also appeared in many feature films, most notably in Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), as pretentious television producer Lester, and The Aviator (2004) as U.S. Senator Owen Brewster, the latter of which saw Alda nominated for the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Supporting Actor.

Contents

1 Family and early life 2 Career

2.1 Early acting 2.2 M*A*S*H series (1972–1983)

2.2.1 Writing and directing credits

2.3 After M*A*S*H

3 Later work 4 Charitable work and other interests 5 Religious views 6 Awards and nominations

6.1 Awards 6.2 Nominations

7 Honorary degrees 8 Filmography

8.1 Film 8.2 Television 8.3 Stage

9 Bibliography 10 See also 11 References 12 External links

Family and early life[edit] Alda was born Alphonso Joseph D'Abruzzo on January 28, 1936, in the Bronx,[2] New York City, and had a peripatetic childhood, as his parents traveled around the United States in support of his father's job as a performer in burlesque theatres.[3] His father, Robert Alda (born Alphonso Giuseppe Giovanni Roberto D'Abruzzo), was an actor and singer, and his mother, Joan Browne, was a homemaker and former beauty-pageant winner.[4] His father was of Italian descent and his mother was of Irish ancestry.[5] His adopted surname, "Alda", is a portmanteau of ALphonso and D'Abruzzo. When Alda was seven years old, he contracted polio. To combat the disease, his parents administered a painful treatment regimen developed by Sister Elizabeth Kenny, consisting of applying hot woolen blankets to his limbs and stretching his muscles.[6] Alda attended Archbishop Stepinac High School
Archbishop Stepinac High School
in White Plains, New York.[7] In 1956, he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Fordham College of Fordham University
Fordham University
in the Bronx, where he was a student staff member of its FM radio
FM radio
station, WFUV. Alda's half-brother, Antony Alda, born that year (1956), also became an actor. During Alda's junior year, he studied in Paris, acted in a play in Rome, and performed with his father on television in Amsterdam. In college, he was a member of the ROTC, and after graduation, he served for a year at Fort Benning, and then six months in the United States Army Reserve on a tour of duty in Korea.[8][9] In 1956, while attending Fordham, he met Arlene Weiss, who was attending Hunter College. They bonded at a mutual friend's dinner party; when a rum cake accidentally fell onto the kitchen floor, they were the only two guests who did not hesitate to eat it.[10] A year after his graduation, on March 15, they were married. They have three daughters: Eve, Elizabeth, and Beatrice. Two of his eight grandchildren are aspiring actors. The Aldas have been longtime residents of Leonia, New Jersey.[11] Alda frequented Sol & Sol Deli on Palisade Avenue in the nearby town of Englewood, New Jersey—a fact mirrored in his character's daydream about eating whitefish from the establishment, in an episode of M*A*S*H in which Hawkeye sustains a head injury.[12] Career[edit] Early acting[edit]

Alan Alda
Alan Alda
circa 1960s

Alda began his career in the 1950s, as a member of the Compass Players comedy revue. He joined the acting company at the Cleveland Play House during the 1958-59 season as part of a grant from the Ford Foundation, appearing in productions such as To Dorothy A Son, Heaven Come Wednesday, Monique, and Job.[13] In the November 1964 world premiere at the ANTA Playhouse
ANTA Playhouse
of the stage version of The Owl and The Pussycat, he played Felix the "Owl" opposite the "Pussycat" which was played by actress/singer Diana Sands.[14] He continued to play Felix the "Owl" for the 1964-65 Broadway season.[15][16] In 1966, he starred in the musical The Apple Tree
The Apple Tree
on Broadway; he was nominated for the Tony Award
Tony Award
as Best Actor in a Musical for that role. Although from away, Alan Alda
Alan Alda
says he became a Mainer in 1957 when he played at the Kennebunkport Playhouse.[17] Alda was part of the cast, along with David Frost, Henry Morgan and Buck Henry, of the American television version of That Was The Week That Was, which ran as a series from January 10, 1964 to May 1965. He made his Hollywood acting debut as a supporting player in Gone are the Days! – a film version of the Broadway play Purlie Victorious, which co-starred Ruby Dee
Ruby Dee
and her husband, Ossie Davis. Other film roles followed, such as his portrayal of author, humorist, and actor George Plimpton in the film Paper Lion (1968),[7] as well as The Extraordinary Seaman (1969), and the occult-murder-suspense thriller The Mephisto Waltz, with actresses Jacqueline Bisset
Jacqueline Bisset
and Barbara Parkins. During this time, Alda frequently appeared as a panelist on the 1968 revival of What's My Line?. He also appeared as a panelist on I've Got a Secret
I've Got a Secret
during its 1972 syndication revival. M*A*S*H series (1972–1983)[edit]

Alda (left of center) as Hawkeye Pierce
Hawkeye Pierce
in M*A*S*H, 1972

In early 1972, Alda auditioned for and was selected to play the role of Hawkeye Pierce
Hawkeye Pierce
in the TV adaptation of the 1970 film MASH.[7] He was nominated for 21 Emmy Awards, and won five. He took part in writing 19 episodes, including the 1983 2½-hour series finale Goodbye, Farewell and Amen, which was also the 32nd episode he directed. It remains the single most-watched episode of any American broadcast network television series.[7] Alda is the only series regular to appear in all 251 episodes.[18]

The cast of M*A*S*H from season two, 1974 (clockwise from left): Loretta Swit, Larry Linville, Wayne Rogers, Gary Burghoff, McLean Stevenson, and Alda

Alda commuted from Los Angeles to his home in New Jersey
New Jersey
every weekend for 11 years while starring in M*A*S*H.[19] His wife and daughters lived in New Jersey, and he did not want to move his family to Los Angeles, especially because he did not know how long the show would last. Alda's father, Robert Alda, and half-brother Antony Alda appeared together in an episode of M*A*S*H, "Lend a Hand", during season eight. Robert had previously appeared in "The Consultant" in season three.

Alan and Robert Alda
Robert Alda
in 1975

During the first five seasons of the series, the tone of M*A*S*H was largely that of a traditional "service comedy", in the vein of shows such as McHale's Navy. However, as the original writers gradually left the series, Alda gained increasing control, and by the final seasons had become a producer and creative consultant. Under his watch, M*A*S*H retained its comedic foundation, but gradually assumed a somewhat more serious tone, openly addressing political issues. As a result, the 11 years of M*A*S*H are generally split into two eras: the Larry Gelbart/ Gene Reynolds
Gene Reynolds
"comedy" years (1972–1977), and the Alan Alda "dramatic" years (1977–1983).[citation needed] Alda disagreed with this assessment. In a 2016 interview he stated, "I don't like to write political messages. I don't like plays that have political messages. I do not think I am responsible for that." [20] For the first three seasons, Alda and his co-stars Wayne Rogers
Wayne Rogers
and McLean Stevenson
McLean Stevenson
worked well together, but later, tensions increased, particularly as Alda's role grew in popularity. Rogers and Stevenson both left the show at the end of the third season.[21] At the beginning of the fourth season, Alda and the producers decided to find a replacement actor to play the surrogate parent role formerly taken by Colonel Blake. They eventually found veteran actor and fan of the series, Harry Morgan, who starred as Colonel Sherman T. Potter, becoming another of the show's protagonists.[22] Mike Farrell
Mike Farrell
was also introduced as Alda's co-star BJ Hunnicutt. In his 1981 autobiography, Jackie Cooper
Jackie Cooper
(who directed several early episodes) wrote that Alda concealed a lot of hostility beneath the surface, and that the two of them barely spoke to each other by the time Cooper’s directing of M*A*S*H ended.[23] During his M*A*S*H years, Alda made several game-show appearances, most notably in The $10,000 Pyramid and as a frequent panelist on What's My Line?
What's My Line?
and To Tell the Truth. His favorite episodes of M*A*S*H are "Dear Sigmund" and "In Love and War".[24] In 1996, Alda was ranked 41st on TV Guide's "50 Greatest TV Stars of All Time".[25] Writing and directing credits[edit] The following is a list of M*A*S*H episodes written and/or directed by Alda.

Season Episode Credit

One Episode 19: "The Long John Flap" Written

Two Episode 5: "Dr. Pierce and Mr. Hyde" Written with Robert Klane

Episode 23: "Mail Call" Directed

Three Episode 16: "Bulletin Board" Directed

Four Episode 4: "The Late Captain Pierce" Directed

Episode 7: "Dear Mildred" Directed

Episode 8: "The Kids" Directed

Episode 16: "Dear Ma" Directed

Five Episode 2: "Margaret's Engagement" Directed

Episode 7: "Dear Sigmund" Written and directed

Episode 12: "Exorcism" Directed

Episode 19: "Hepatitis" Written and directed

Six Episode 2: "Fallen Idol" Written and directed

Episode 4: "War of Nerves" Written and directed

Episode 7: "In Love and War" Written and directed

Episode 12: "Comrades in Arms, Part 1" Written; directed with Burt Metcalfe

Episode 13: "Comrades in Arms, Part 2" Written; directed with Burt Metcalfe

Seven Episode 5: "The Billfold Syndrome" Directed

Episode 8: "Major Ego" Directed

Episode 14: "Dear Sis" Written and directed

Episode 16: "Inga" Written and directed

Episode 25: "The Party" Written with Burt Metcalfe

Eight Episode 3: "Guerilla My Dreams" Directed

Episode 11: "Life Time" Written with Walter D. Dishell, M.D.; Directed

Episode 15: "Yessir, That's Our Baby" Directed

Episode 20: "Lend a Hand" Written and directed

Episode 22: "Dreams" Teleplay; story with James Jay Rubinfier; Directed

Nine Episode 4: "Father's Day" Directed

Episode 12: "Depressing News" Directed

Episode 15: "Bottoms Up" Directed

Episode 20: "The Life You Save" Written with John Rappaport; Directed

Ten Episode 6: "Communication Breakdown" Directed

Episode 10: "Follies of the Living – Concerns of the Dead" Written and directed

Episode 17: "Where There's a Will, There's a War" Directed

Eleven Episode 1: "Hey, Look Me Over" Written with Karen Hall

Episode 16: "Goodbye, Farewell and Amen" Written with Burt Metcalfe, John Rappaport, Dan Wilcox, Thad Mumford, Elias Davis, David Pollock and Karen Hall; Directed

After M*A*S*H[edit] Alda's prominence in the enormously successful television series M*A*S*H provided him a platform to speak out on political topics. He has been a strong and vocal supporter of women's rights and the feminist movement.[7][26] He co-chaired, with former First Lady Betty Ford, the Equal Rights Amendment
Equal Rights Amendment
Countdown campaign. In 1976, The Boston Globe dubbed him "the quintessential Honorary Woman: a feminist icon" for his activism on behalf of the Equal Rights Amendment.[27] Alda played Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman
Richard Feynman
in the play QED, which had only one other character. Although Peter Parnell wrote the play, Alda both produced and inspired it. Alda has also appeared frequently in the films of Woody Allen, and was a guest star five times on ER, playing Dr. Kerry Weaver's mentor, Gabriel Lawrence. During the later episodes, Dr. Lawrence was revealed to be suffering from the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Alda also had a co-starring role as Dr. Robert Gallo
Robert Gallo
in the 1993 TV movie And the Band Played On. During M*A*S*H's run and continuing through the 1980s, Alda embarked on a successful career as a writer and director, with the ensemble dramedy The Four Seasons being perhaps his most notable hit. Betsy's Wedding is his last directing credit to date. After M*A*S*H, Alda took on a series of roles that either parodied or directly contradicted his "nice guy" image.[7] Later work[edit]

Alda at the 1994 Emmys

In 1993, he co-starred with Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(also the director), Diane Keaton, and Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
in the comedy/mystery Manhattan Murder Mystery. The four play a quartet of amateur crime solvers who become entangled in a murder plot possibly perpetrated by Keaton and Allen's neighbor. Alda's character is Ted, a playwright secretly in love with Keaton's character Carol, but who eventually falls for Huston's character Marcia. From the fall season of 1993 until the show ended in 2005, Alda was the host for Scientific American Frontiers, which began on PBS
PBS
in 1990.[28] In 1995, he starred as the President of the United States in Michael Moore's political satire/comedy film Canadian Bacon. Around this time, rumors circulated that Alda was considering running for the United States Senate in New Jersey, but he denied this. In 1996, Alda played Henry Ford
Henry Ford
in Camping With Henry and Tom, based on the book by Mark St. Germain and appeared in the comedy film Flirting with Disaster. In 1999, Alda portrayed Dr. Gabriel Lawrence in NBC program ER for five episodes and was nominated for Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series.[29] Beginning in 2004, Alda was a regular cast member on the NBC program The West Wing, portraying Republican U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Arnold Vinick, until the show's conclusion in May 2006. He made his premiere in the sixth season's eighth episode, "In The Room", and was added to the opening credits with the 13th episode, "King Corn". In August 2006, Alda won an Emmy for his portrayal of Vinick in the final season of The West Wing. Alda appeared in a total of 28 episodes during the show's sixth and seventh seasons.[30] Alda had been a serious candidate, along with Sidney Poitier, for the role of President Josiah Bartlet before Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
was ultimately cast in the role. In 2004, Alda portrayed conservative Maine Senator Owen Brewster
Owen Brewster
in Martin Scorsese's Academy Award-winning film The Aviator, in which he co-starred with Leonardo DiCaprio. Throughout his career, Alda has received 31 Emmy Award
Emmy Award
nominations and two Tony Award
Tony Award
nominations, and has won seven People's Choice Awards, six Golden Globe Awards, and three Directors Guild of America
Directors Guild of America
awards. Alda received his first Academy Award
Academy Award
nomination, for his role in The Aviator, in 2005. Alda also wrote several of the stories and poems that appeared in Marlo Thomas' television show Free to Be... You and Me. Alda starred in the original Broadway production of the play Art, which opened on March 1, 1998, at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre. The play won the Tony Award
Tony Award
for best original play. Alda also had a part in the 2000 romantic comedy What Women Want, as the CEO of the advertising firm where the main characters worked. In early 2005, Alda starred as Shelly Levene in the Tony Award-winning Broadway revival of David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross, for which he received a Tony Award
Tony Award
nomination for Best Featured Actor in a Play. Throughout 2009 and 2010, he appeared in three episodes of 30 Rock
30 Rock
as Milton Greene, the biological father of Jack Donaghy
Jack Donaghy
(Alec Baldwin). In January 2010, Alda hosted The Human Spark, a three-part series originally broadcast on PBS
PBS
discussing the nature of human uniqueness and recent studies on the human brain. In 2011, Alda was scheduled to guest star on Law & Order: LA, portraying former police and naval officer John Winters, the father of the former main character Rex Winters. It is unknown whether he filmed his role before the series was redesigned and Rex Winters written off. After the release of his movie Tower Heist, Alda was devastated when on December 7, 2011, his decades-long friend Harry Morgan
Harry Morgan
from M*A*S*H died.[31] Alda returned to Broadway in November 2014, playing the role of Andrew Makepeace in the revival of Love Letters at the Brooks Atkinson Theater alongside Candice Bergen.[32] In 2016, Alda appeared in Louis C.K.'s web-based series Horace and Pete as the irascible Uncle Pete in what IndieWire
IndieWire
critic Sam Adams described as "his best role in years" in an otherwise lukewarm review.[33] Charitable work and other interests[edit] Alda has done extensive charity work. He helped narrate a 2005 St. Jude's Children's Hospital-produced one-hour special TV show Fighting for Life.[34] His wife, Arlene, and he are also close friends of Marlo Thomas, who is very active in fund-raising for the hospital her father founded. The special featured Ben Bowen
Ben Bowen
as one of six patients being treated for childhood cancer at Saint Jude. Alda and Marlo Thomas
Marlo Thomas
had also worked together in the early 1970s on a critically acclaimed children's album entitled Free to Be You and Me, which featured Alda, Thomas, and a number of other well-known character actors. This project remains one of the earliest public signs of his support of women's rights. In 2005, Alda published his first round of memoirs, Never Have Your Dog Stuffed: and Other Things I've Learned.[19] Among other stories, he recalls his intestines becoming strangulated while on location in La Serena, Chile, for his PBS
PBS
show Scientific American Frontiers, during which he mildly surprised a young doctor with his understanding of medical procedures, which he had learned from M*A*S*H. He also talks about his mother's battle with schizophrenia. The title comes from an incident in his childhood, when Alda was distraught about his dog dying and his well-meaning father had the animal stuffed. Alda was horrified by the results, and took from this that sometimes we have to accept things as they are, rather than desperately and fruitlessly trying to change them. In 2006, Alda contributed his voice to a part in the audio book of Max Brooks' World War Z. In this book, he voiced Arthur Sinclair, Jr., the director of the United States government's fictional Department of Strategic Resources (DeStRes). His second memoir, Things I Overheard While Talking to Myself, weaves together advice from public speeches he has given with personal recollections about his life and beliefs. For 14 years, he served as the host of Scientific American Frontiers, a television show that explored cutting-edge advances in science and technology. He is[when?] a visiting professor at Stony Brook University and a founder and member of the advisory board of the university's Alan Alda
Alan Alda
Center for Communicating Science[35] and the Future of Life Institute.[36] He serves on the board of the World Science Festival and is a judge for Math-O-Vision. Alda also has an avid interest in cosmology, and participated in BBC coverage of the opening of the Large Hadron Collider, at CERN, Geneva, in September 2008.[37] After years of interviews, Alda helped inspire the creation of the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University
Stony Brook University
in 2009. He remains on the advisory board as of 2013.[38] He was named an Honorary Fellow by the Society for Technical Communication in 2014 for his work with the Center for Communicating Science and the annual Flame Challenge.[39] He is also on the advisory board of the Future of Life Institute.[36] Alda would like to use his expertise in acting and communication to help scientists communicate more effectively to the public.[40] In 2014 Alda was awarded the American Chemical Society's James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public for his work in science communication.[41] He was awarded the National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
Public Welfare Medal in 2016 "for his extraordinary application of the skills honed as an actor to communicating science on television and stage, and by teaching scientists innovative techniques that allow them to tell their stories to the public." Religious views[edit]

This section contains too many or too-lengthy quotations for an encyclopedic entry. Please help improve the article by presenting facts as a neutrally-worded summary with appropriate citations. Consider transferring direct quotations to Wikiquote. (January 2016)

In Things I Overheard While Talking to Myself, Alda describes how as a teen he was raised as a Roman Catholic and eventually he realized he had begun thinking like an agnostic or atheist:

For a while in my teens, I was sure I had it. It was about getting to heaven. If heaven existed and lasted forever, then a mere lifetime spent scrupulously following orders was a small investment for an infinite payoff. One day, though, I realized I was no longer a believer, and realizing that, I couldn’t go back. Not that I lost the urge to pray. Occasionally, even after I stopped believing, I might send off a quick memo to the Master of the Universe, usually on a matter needing urgent attention, like Oh, God, don’t let us crash. These were automatic expulsions of words, brief SOS messages from the base of my brain. They were similar to the short prayers that were admired by the church in my Catholic boyhood, which they called "ejaculations." I always liked the idea that you could shorten your time in purgatory with each ejaculation; what boy wouldn’t find that a comforting idea? But my effort to keep the plane in the air by talking to God didn’t mean I suddenly was overcome with belief, only that I was scared. Whether I’d wake up in heaven someday or not, whatever meaning I found would have to occur first on this end of eternity.

Speaking further on agnosticism, Alda goes on to say:

I still don't like the word agnostic. It's too fancy. I'm simply not a believer. But, as simple as this notion is, it confuses some people. Someone wrote a entry about me, identifying me as an atheist because I'd said in a book I wrote that I wasn't a believer. I guess in a world uncomfortable with uncertainty, an unbeliever must be an atheist, and possibly an infidel. This gets us back to that most pressing of human questions: why do people worry so much about other people's holding beliefs other than their own?

Alda made these comments in an interview for the 2008 question section of the Edge Foundation website.[42] Awards and nominations[edit]

The handprints and noseprint of Alda in front of The Great Movie Ride at Walt Disney World's Disney's Hollywood Studios
Disney's Hollywood Studios
theme park

Awards[edit]

Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for "Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series" in 2006, for his portrayal of Senator and Presidential candidate Arnold Vinick in The West Wing Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for "Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series" in 1980 for M*A*S*H Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for "Outstanding Writing in a Comedy or Comedy-Variety or Music Series" in 1979 for M*A*S*H: "Inga" Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for "Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series" in 1977 for M*A*S*H: "Dear Sigmund" Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Actor of the Year – Series in 1974 for M*A*S*H Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series in 1974 for M*A*S*H Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series – Musical/Comedy in 1983 for M*A*S*H Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series – Musical/Comedy in 1982 for M*A*S*H Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series – Musical/Comedy in 1981 for M*A*S*H Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best TV Actor – Musical/Comedy in 1980 for M*A*S*H Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best TV Actor – Musical/Comedy" in 1976 for M*A*S*H Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best TV Actor – Musical/Comedy in 1975 for M*A*S*H Directors Guild of America
Directors Guild of America
Award for Outstanding Directorial – Comedy Series in 1983 for M*A*S*H "Where There's a Will, There's a War" Directors Guild of America
Directors Guild of America
Award for Outstanding Directorial – Comedy Series in 1982 for M*A*S*H: "The Life You Save" Directors Guild of America
Directors Guild of America
Award for Outstanding Directorial – Comedy Series in 1977 for M*A*S*H: "Dear Sigmund" Induction into the Television Hall of Fame in 1994 [43][44] Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Ensemble Performance in 2005 for Glengarry Glen Ross Became Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
in 2006[45] Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Carnegie Mellon University
Carnegie Mellon University
in 2015[46] In 1998 the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry
Committee for Skeptical Inquiry
(CSICOP) episode "Beyond Science" hosted by Alda was singled out by the Council for Media Integrity concerned with the "balanced portrayal of science"... and to "reward sound science television programming".[47]

Nominations[edit]

Grammy Award: 2008 Best Spoken Word Album (audiobook version of Things I Overheard While Talking To Myself) Tony Award: 1967 Best Actor in a Musical (The Apple Tree); 1992 Best Actor in a Play (Jake's Women); 2005 Best Actor in a Featured Role in a Play (Glengarry Glen Ross) Academy Award
Academy Award
(Best Supporting Actor) for his role as Senator Ralph Owen Brewster
Owen Brewster
in Martin Scorsese's film The Aviator.

Honorary degrees[edit] Alan Alda
Alan Alda
has been awarded several honorary degrees in recognition of his acting career and promotion of educational initiatives, These Include

Location Date School Degree

 New Jersey 1974 Saint Peter's University Doctorate [48]

 New York 1978 Fordham University Doctorate

 Pennsylvania 17 May 2015 Carnegie Mellon University Doctor of Fine Arts (DFA) [49]

 Scotland June 2017 University of Dundee Doctor of Laws
Doctor of Laws
(LL.D) [50]

This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. Filmography[edit] Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes

1963 Gone Are the Days Charlie Cotchipee

1968 Paper Lion George Plimpton Nominated— Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for New Star of the Year – Actor

1969 The Extraordinary Seaman Lt. Morton Krim

1970 Jenny Delano

1970 The Moonshine War John W. Martin

1971 The Mephisto Waltz Myles Clarkson

1972 To Kill a Clown Major Evelyn Ritchie

1973 The Glass House Jonathan Paige

1978 Same Time, Next Year George Peters Nominated— Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

1978 California Suite Bill Warren

1979 The Seduction of Joe Tynan Joe Tynan

1981 The Four Seasons Jack Burroughs Nominated— Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy Nominated— Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Screenplay

1986 Sweet Liberty Michael Burgess

1988 A New Life Steve Giardino

1989 Crimes and Misdemeanors Lester National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actor New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actor Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role

1990 Betsy's Wedding Eddie Hopper

1992 Whispers in the Dark Leo Green Nominated—Razzie Award for Worst Supporting Actor

1993 Manhattan Murder Mystery Ted

1995 Canadian Bacon President of the United States

1996 Flirting with Disaster Richard Schlichting

1996 Everyone Says I Love You Bob

1997 Murder at 1600 National Security Advisor Alvin Jordan

1997 Mad City Kevin Hollander

1998 The Object of My Affection Sidney Miller

1999 Keepers of the Frame Himself Documentary

2000 What Women Want Dan Wanamaker

2004 The Aviator Senator Ralph Owen Brewster Nominated— Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Supporting Actor Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture

2007 Resurrecting the Champ Ralph Metz

2008 Diminished Capacity Uncle Rollie Zerbs

2008 Flash of Genius Gregory Lawson

2008 Nothing but the Truth Albert Burnside

2011 Tower Heist Arthur Shaw

2012 Wanderlust Carvin

2015 The Longest Ride Ira Levinson

2015 Bridge of Spies Thomas Watters

2017 Izhak Alan Alda

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes

1958 The Phil Silvers
Phil Silvers
Show Carlyle Thomson III Episode: "Bilko the Art Lover"

1962 Naked City Young Poet Episode: "Hold for Gloria Christmas"

1962 The Twilight Zone Character in Country Store Episode: "The Last Rites of Jeff Myrtrlebank"

1963 The Doctors and the Nurses Dr. John Griffin 2 episodes

1963 Route 66 Dr. Glazer Episode: "Soda Pop and Paper Flags"

1963 East Side/West Side Freddie Wilcox Episode: "The Sinner"

1965 The Trials of O'Brien Nick Staphos Episode: "Picture Me a Murder"

1967 Coronet Blue Clay Episode: "Six Months to Mars"

1968 Premiere Frank St. John Episode: "Higher and Higher"

1972 Class of '55 Peter Television movie

1972 The Glass House Jonathan Paige Television movie

1972 Playmates Marshall Barnett Television movie

1972–83 M*A*S*H Captain Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce 251 episodes Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actor – Television Series Musical or Comedy (1975–76, 1980–83) People's Choice Award
People's Choice Award
for Favorite Male Television Performer (1975, 1979–82) Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series (1979) Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series (1974, 1982) Nominated— Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actor – Television Series Musical or Comedy (1973–74, 1977–79) Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series (1975–76, 1978–83) Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series (1973, 1975–81, 1983) Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series (1977-1978, 1982)

1973 Isn't It Shocking? Dan Television movie

1973–75 The New $25,000 Pyramid Himself 7 episodes

1974 The Carol Burnett Show Himself Episode: "#8.13"

1974 Free to Be... You and Me Himself Television movie

1974 6 Rms Riv Vu Paul Friedman Television movie Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie

1977 Kill Me If You Can Caryl W. Chessman Television movie Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie

1993 And the Band Played On Dr. Robert Gallo Television movie Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie

1993–2007 Scientific American Frontiers Himself 81 episodes

1994 White Mile Dan Cutler Television movie Nominated— Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film

1996 Jake's Women Jake Television movie

1999 ER Dr. Gabriel Lawrence 5 episodes Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series

2001 Club Land Willie Walters Television movie Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie

2001 The Killing Yard Ernie Goodman Television movie

2004–06 The West Wing Senator Arnold Vinick 28 episodes Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series Nominated—Television Critics Association Award for Individual Achievement in Drama

2005 Getaway Himself Episode: "Found"

2009–11 30 Rock Milton Greene 3 episodes Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series

2011–13 The Big C Dr. Atticus Sherman 6 episodes

2012 The Human Spark Himself 3 episodes

2013 Brains on Trial with Alan Alda Himself 2 episodes

2013–14 The Blacklist Alan Fitch 5 episodes Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series

2016 Horace and Pete Uncle Pete 5 episodes

2016 Broad City Dr. Jay Heller Episode: "2016"

Stage[edit]

Year Title Role Notes

1959 Only in America Telephone Man

1961–62 Purlie Victorious Charlie Cotchpiee

1964 Fair Game for Lovers Benny

1964 Cafe Crown Dr. Irving Gilbert

1964–65 The Owl and the Pussycat F. Sherman

1966–67 The Apple Tree Various Nominated— Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Actor in a Musical

1992 Jake's Women Jake Nominated— Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Actor in a Play

1998–99 Art Marc

2001–02 QED Richard Feynman

2003 The Play What I Wrote Mystery Guest Star

2005 Glengarry Glen Ross Shelly Levene Nominated— Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Featured Actor in a Play

2014 Love Letters Andrew Makepeace Ladd III

Bibliography[edit]

Alda, Alan (2006). Never Have Your Dog Stuffed. London: Hutchinson. ISBN 978-0-09-179652-5. OCLC 64931144.  — (2007). Things I Overheard While Talking to Myself. New York: Random House. ISBN 978-1-4000-6617-9. OCLC 122309367.  — (2017). If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?. New York: Random House. ISBN 978-0812989144. OCLC 970641564. 

See also[edit]

Biography portal

References[edit]

^ "Alan Alda: Biography". Retrieved 13 October 2013.  ^ Twomey, Bill (June 24, 2016). "Fordham graduate known for award-winning MASH role". Bronx
Bronx
Times Reporter.  ^ Alan Alda, interviewed by Jian Ghomeshi, CBC Radio, March 28, 2013. In response to Ghomeshi's comment that Alda had grown up in the Bronx, Alda said, "No I didn't but I can tell you're a reader." ^ Alda, Alan. " Alan Alda
Alan Alda
TV Legends Interview, Part I (13:25-14:30)". Archive of American Television. Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Foundation. Retrieved 17 February 2014.  ^ Berk, Philip (December 11, 1998). "A question of roots". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved December 10, 2007.  ^ Smiley, Tavis (December 2, 2004). "Alan Alda". PBS. Archived from the original on September 29, 2007. Retrieved May 2, 2007.  ^ a b c d e f Stated on Inside the Actors Studio
Inside the Actors Studio
, 2000 ^ Delach, Brian (May 6, 2013). " Alan Alda
Alan Alda
Gets Personal About Life After MASH". NBC Connecticut.  ^ "Military People : Alan Alda". militaryhub.com. After graduation, Alda joined the U.S. Army Reserve and served a six-month tour of duty in Korea.  ^ Brady, Lois Smith (February 13, 2015). "State of the Unions: There's Always Room for Rum Cake". The New York Times. Retrieved March 12, 2015.  ^ Kolbert, Elizabeth (May 18, 1994). "At Lunch With: Alan Alda; Hawkeye Turns Mean, Sensitively". The New York Times. Retrieved November 24, 2007. Ever since M*A*S*H, Alda has split his time between the East Coast, where he has houses in the Hamptons and Leonia, New Jersey, and the West, where he owns a home in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles.  ^ Kingergan, Ashley (Sep 27, 2010). "Noted Englewood deli closes after 60-plus years". The Record. Archived from the original on September 22, 2012. Retrieved September 27, 2010. Perhaps the greatest tribute to the deli came from the 1970s television show M*A*S*H. Hawkeye, one of the main characters in M*A*S*H*, daydreams about whitefish from Sol & Sol after sustaining a head injury.  ^ Oldenburg, Chloe (1985). Leaps of Faith: History of the Cleveland Play House, 1915-85. Cleveland. p. 85,87.  ^ "Strange Bedfellows" ^ The Owl and the Pussycat on IBDB ^ The Owl and the Pussycat 1964 fall selection playbill cover ^ Alan Alda, interviewed by Diane Russell, Portland Magazine, Feb/March 2014. "Alda Ego" ^ "Hawkeye Trivia and Quotes". Tv.com. Retrieved 2011-05-17. [permanent dead link] ^ a b Alda, Alan (2006). Never Have Your Dog Stuffed: and Other Things I've Learned. New York: Random House. ISBN 1-4000-6409-0.  ^ Maron, Marc. "WTF Podcast #735 – Alan Alda". WTFPOD.com. WTF Podcast. Retrieved 30 August 2016.  ^ "Mclean Stevenson, 'Mash' Star". The Seattle Times. February 17, 1996.  ^ Stassel, Stephanie (December 7, 2011). " Harry Morgan
Harry Morgan
dies at 96; star of TV's 'MASH'". Los Angeles Times.  ^ Jackie Cooper, Please Don’t Shoot My Dog, Page 290, William Morrow & Company, 1981 ^ M*A*S*H: The Martinis & Medicine Collection – Special Features: Disc 1 – "My Favorite MASH" ^ " Special
Special
Collectors' Issue: 50 Greatest TV Stars of All Time". TV Guide (December 14–20). 1996.  ^ Hoffman, Jordan (15 October 2015). " Alan Alda
Alan Alda
Knows His Feminist History". Vanity Fair. Retrieved 2018-01-07.  ^ "Alda, Alan: U.S. Actor". The Museum of Broadcast Communications.  ^ Alan Alda, on season 4 of Scientific American Frontiers. ^ http://www.emmys.com/bios/alan-alda ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0200276/fullcredits/ ^ "Harry Morgan, 1915-2011: Actor most remembered as Col. Potter of 'M*A*S*H'". The Toledo Blade. December 8, 2011. Retrieved April 3, 2014.  ^ Broadway.com: " Candice Bergen
Candice Bergen
& Alan Alda
Alan Alda
Step into A.R. Gurney’s Love Letters on Broadway" ^ Sam Adams, Is There More to Louis C.K.'s 'Horace and Pete' Than Its Surprise Release?, Indiewire, February 1, 2016 ^ Saint Jude Children's Hospital, Web Editor (December 1, 2005). "Saint Jude TV – Fighting For Life". Saint Jude Web Site. Archived from the original on March 16, 2007. Retrieved April 11, 2007. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) ^ " Alan Alda
Alan Alda
Joins SOJ Faculty". December 14, 2010. SUNY Stony Brook School of Journalism. Retrieved 4 March 2012.  ^ a b Who We Are, Future of Life Institute, retrieved 2014-04-20  ^ "Big Bang Day: Physics Rocks". BBC
BBC
Web Site. September 10, 2008. Archived from the original on September 10, 2008. Retrieved September 10, 2008.  ^ "Advisory Board: Alan Alda". November 17, 2010. Center For Communicating Science. Retrieved 3 December 2013.  ^ " Alan Alda
Alan Alda
Named STC Honorary Fellow". Retrieved 16 April 2014.  ^ "Discovering a Common Language with Alan Alda
Alan Alda
The New York Academy of Sciences". www.nyas.org. Retrieved 2015-11-22.  ^ " Alan Alda
Alan Alda
receives James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry Alan Alda
Alan Alda
Center for Communicating Science®". www.centerforcommunicatingscience.org. Retrieved 2016-10-09.  ^ "THE WORLD QUESTION CENTER 2008 – page 8". Edge Foundation Web Site. 2008. Retrieved January 2, 2008.  ^ "Alan Alda" (PDF). Retrieved February 28, 2014.  ^ "2005-06 Primetime Emmy Awards Nominations Announced". Retrieved February 28, 2014.  ^ "Book of Members, 1780–2010: Chapter A" (PDF). American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 10, 2011. Retrieved April 14, 2011.  ^ " Alan Alda
Alan Alda
To Give Keynote Address At Carnegie Mellon, May 17". www.cmu.edu.  ^ Nisbet, Matt (1999). "Candle in the Dark and Snuffed Candle Awards". Skeptical Inquirer. 23 (2): 6.  ^ "Honorary Degree Recipients". saintpeters.edu. Saint Peter's University. Retrieved July 4, 2017.  ^ Walters, Ken (April 23, 2015). " Alan Alda
Alan Alda
to Give Keynote Address at Carnegie Mellon Commencement, May 17". cmu.edu. Carnegie Mellon University News. Retrieved July 4, 2017.  ^ Hill, Grant (May 19, 2017). "University to honour leading international figures". dundee.ac.uk. University of Dundee. Retrieved July 4, 2015. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Alan Alda.

Wikiquote
Wikiquote
has quotations related to: Alan Alda

Alan Alda
Alan Alda
at AllMovie Alan Alda
Alan Alda
on IMDb 69315 Alan Alda
Alan Alda
at the Internet Broadway Database
Internet Broadway Database
Alan Alda
Alan Alda
at the Internet Off-Broadway Database Alan Alda
Alan Alda
interview video at the Archive of American Television Alan Alda
Alan Alda
interview on BBC
BBC
Radio 4 Desert Island Discs, November 1, 1991 Alan Alda
Alan Alda
at TVArchive.ca

v t e

Films directed by Alan Alda

The Four Seasons (1981) Sweet Liberty
Sweet Liberty
(1986) A New Life (1988) Betsy's Wedding
Betsy's Wedding
(1990)

Awards for Alan Alda

v t e

Directors Guild of America
Directors Guild of America
Award for Outstanding Directing – Comedy Series

1971–2000

John Rich for "All in the Family" (1971) Gene Reynolds
Gene Reynolds
for "Pilot" (M*A*S*H) (1972) Gene Reynolds
Gene Reynolds
for "Deal Me Out" (1973) Hy Averback for "Alcoholics Unanimous" (1974) Hy Averback for "Bombed" (1975) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
for "Dear Sigmund" (1976) Paul Bogart for "Edith's 50th Birthday" (1977) Paul Bogart for "California, Here We Are" (1978) Paul Bogart for "Too Good Edith" (1979) Noam Pitlik for "Fog" (1980) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
for "The Life You Save" (1981) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
for "Where There's a Will, There's a War" (1982) James Burrows for "Showdown: Part II" (1983) Jay Sandrich for "Pilot" (The Cosby Show) (1984) Jay Sandrich for "Pilot" (The Golden Girls) (1985) Terry Hughes for "Isn't It Romantic?" (1986) Will Mackenzie
Will Mackenzie
for "A, My Name is Alex" (1987) Steve Miner for "Pilot" (The Wonder Years) (1988) Barnet Kellman for "Brown Like Me" (1989) James Burrows for "Woody Interruptus" (1990) Peter Bonerz
Peter Bonerz
for "Uh Oh: Part II" (1991) Tom Cherones for "The Contest" (1992) James Burrows for "The Good Son" (1993) David Lee for "The Matchmaker" (1994) Gordon Hunt for "The Alan Brady Show" (1995) Andy Ackerman for "The Rye" (1996) Andy Ackerman for "The Betrayal" (1997) Thomas Schlamme for "Pilot" (Sports Night) (1998) Thomas Schlamme for "Small Town" (1999) James Burrows for "Lows in the Mid-Eighties" (2000)

2001–present

Todd Holland for "Bowling" (2001) Bryan Gordon for " Special
Special
Section" (2002) Tim Van Patten for "Boy Interrupted" (2003) Tim Van Patten for "An American Girl in Paris: Part Deux" (2004) Marc Buckland for "Pilot" (My Name Is Earl) (2005) Richard Shepard for "Pilot" (Ugly Betty) (2006) Barry Sonnenfeld
Barry Sonnenfeld
for "Pie-lette" (2007) Paul Feig for "Dinner Party" (2008) Jason Winer
Jason Winer
for "Pilot" (Modern Family) (2009) Michael Spiller for "Halloween" (2010) Robert B. Weide for "Palestinian Chicken" (2011) Lena Dunham
Lena Dunham
for "Pilot" (Girls) (2012) Beth McCarthy-Miller for "Hogcock!" / "Last Lunch" (2013) Jill Soloway
Jill Soloway
for "Best New Girl" (2014) Chris Addison
Chris Addison
for "Election Night" (2015) Becky Martin for "Inauguration" (2016) Beth McCarthy-Miller for "Chicklet" (2017)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series

Peter Tewksbury (1959) Ralph Levy / Bud Yorkin (1960) Sheldon Leonard
Sheldon Leonard
(1961) Nat Hiken (1962) John Rich (1963) Jerry Paris (1964) William Asher
William Asher
(1966) James Frawley for "Royal Flush" (1967) Bruce Bilson for "Maxwell Smart, Private Eye" (1968) Greg Garrison for "October 17, 1968" (1969) Dwight Hemion for "The Sound of Burt Bacharach" (1970) Jay Sandrich for "Toulouse-Lautrec is One of My Favorite Artists" (1971) John Rich for "Sammy's Visit" (1972) Jay Sandrich for "It's Whether You Win or Lose" (1973) Jackie Cooper
Jackie Cooper
for "Carry on, Hawkeye" (1974) Gene Reynolds
Gene Reynolds
for "O.R." (1975) Gene Reynolds
Gene Reynolds
for "Welcome to Korea" (1976) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
for "Dear Sigmund" (1977) Paul Bogart for "Edith's 50th Birthday" (1978) Noam Pitlik for "The Harris Incident" (1979) James Burrows for "Louie and the Nice Girl" (1980) James Burrows for "Elaine's Strange Triangle" (1981) Alan Rafkin for "Barbara's Crisis" (1982) James Burrows for "Showdown", Part 2 (1983) Bill Persky for "A Very Loud Family" (1984) Jay Sandrich for "The Younger Woman" (1985) Jay Sandrich for "Denise's Friend" (1986) Terry Hughes for "Isn't it Romantic" (1987) Gregory Hoblit for "Pilot" (1988) Peter Baldwin for "Our Miss White" (1989) Michael Dinner for "Good-bye" (1990) James Burrows for "Woody Interruptus" (1991) Barnet Kellman for "Birth 101" (1992) Betty Thomas
Betty Thomas
for "For Peter's Sake" (1993) James Burrows for "The Good Son" (1994) David Lee for "The Matchmaker" (1995) Michael Lembeck for "The One After the Superbowl" (1996) David Lee for "To Kill a Talking Bird" (1997) Todd Holland for "Flip" (1998) Thomas Schlamme for "Pilot" (Sports Night) (1999) Todd Holland for "Pilot" (Malcolm in the Middle) (2000) Todd Holland for "Bowling" (2001) Michael Patrick King for "The Real Me" (2002) Robert B. Weide for "Krazee-Eyez Killa" (2003) Anthony and Joe Russo for "Pilot" (Arrested Development) (2004) Charles McDougall for "Pilot" (Desperate Housewives) (2005) Marc Buckland for "Pilot" (My Name Is Earl) (2006) Richard Shepard for "Pilot" (Ugly Betty) (2007) Barry Sonnenfeld
Barry Sonnenfeld
for "Pie-lette" (2008) Jeffrey Blitz
Jeffrey Blitz
for "Stress Relief" (2009) Ryan Murphy for "Pilot" (Glee) (2010) Michael Spiller for "Halloween" (2011) Steven Levitan
Steven Levitan
for "Baby on Board" (2012) Gail Mancuso for "Arrested" (2013) Gail Mancuso for "Las Vegas" (2014) Jill Soloway
Jill Soloway
for "Best New Girl" (2015) Jill Soloway
Jill Soloway
for "Man on the Land" (2016) Donald Glover
Donald Glover
for "B.A.N." (2017)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series

Alan Young
Alan Young
(1950) Sid Caesar
Sid Caesar
(1951) Jimmy Durante
Jimmy Durante
(1952) Donald O'Connor
Donald O'Connor
(1953) Danny Thomas
Danny Thomas
(1954) Phil Silvers
Phil Silvers
(1955) Sid Caesar
Sid Caesar
(1956) Jack Benny
Jack Benny
(1957) Jack Benny
Jack Benny
(1959) Dick Van Dyke
Dick Van Dyke
(1964) Dick Van Dyke
Dick Van Dyke
(1965) Dick Van Dyke
Dick Van Dyke
(1966) Don Adams
Don Adams
(1967) Don Adams
Don Adams
(1968) Don Adams
Don Adams
(1969) William Windom (1970) Jack Klugman
Jack Klugman
(1971) Carroll O'Connor
Carroll O'Connor
(1972) Jack Klugman
Jack Klugman
(1973) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1974) Tony Randall
Tony Randall
(1975) Jack Albertson
Jack Albertson
(1976) Carroll O'Connor
Carroll O'Connor
(1977) Carroll O'Connor
Carroll O'Connor
(1978) Carroll O'Connor
Carroll O'Connor
(1979) Richard Mulligan
Richard Mulligan
(1980) Judd Hirsch
Judd Hirsch
(1981) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1982) Judd Hirsch
Judd Hirsch
(1983) John Ritter
John Ritter
(1984) Robert Guillaume
Robert Guillaume
(1985) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
(1986) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
(1987) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
(1988) Richard Mulligan
Richard Mulligan
(1989) Ted Danson
Ted Danson
(1990) Burt Reynolds
Burt Reynolds
(1991) Craig T. Nelson
Craig T. Nelson
(1992) Ted Danson
Ted Danson
(1993) Kelsey Grammer
Kelsey Grammer
(1994) Kelsey Grammer
Kelsey Grammer
(1995) John Lithgow
John Lithgow
(1996) John Lithgow
John Lithgow
(1997) Kelsey Grammer
Kelsey Grammer
(1998) John Lithgow
John Lithgow
(1999) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
(2000) Eric McCormack
Eric McCormack
(2001) Ray Romano
Ray Romano
(2002) Tony Shalhoub
Tony Shalhoub
(2003) Kelsey Grammer
Kelsey Grammer
(2004) Tony Shalhoub
Tony Shalhoub
(2005) Tony Shalhoub
Tony Shalhoub
(2006) Ricky Gervais
Ricky Gervais
(2007) Alec Baldwin
Alec Baldwin
(2008) Alec Baldwin
Alec Baldwin
(2009) Jim Parsons
Jim Parsons
(2010) Jim Parsons
Jim Parsons
(2011) Jon Cryer
Jon Cryer
(2012) Jim Parsons
Jim Parsons
(2013) Jim Parsons
Jim Parsons
(2014) Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
(2015) Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
(2016) Donald Glover
Donald Glover
(2017)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Dennis Weaver
Dennis Weaver
(1959) Roddy McDowall
Roddy McDowall
(1961) Albert Paulsen (1964) James Daly (1966) Eli Wallach
Eli Wallach
(1967) Milburn Stone
Milburn Stone
(1968) James Brolin
James Brolin
(1970) David Burns (1971) Jack Warden
Jack Warden
(1972) Scott Jacoby (1973) Michael Moriarty (1974) Will Geer
Will Geer
(1975) Anthony Zerbe
Anthony Zerbe
(1976) Gary Frank (1977) Robert Vaughn
Robert Vaughn
(1978) Stuart Margolin (1979) Stuart Margolin (1980) Michael Conrad (1981) Michael Conrad (1982) James Coco
James Coco
(1983) Bruce Weitz
Bruce Weitz
(1984) Edward James Olmos
Edward James Olmos
(1985) John Karlen (1986) John Hillerman
John Hillerman
(1987) Larry Drake
Larry Drake
(1988) Larry Drake
Larry Drake
(1989) Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits
(1990) Timothy Busfield (1991) Richard Dysart
Richard Dysart
(1992) Chad Lowe (1993) Fyvush Finkel
Fyvush Finkel
(1994) Ray Walston
Ray Walston
(1995) Ray Walston
Ray Walston
(1996) Héctor Elizondo
Héctor Elizondo
(1997) Gordon Clapp (1998) Michael Badalucco (1999) Richard Schiff
Richard Schiff
(2000) Bradley Whitford
Bradley Whitford
(2001) John Spencer (2002) Joe Pantoliano
Joe Pantoliano
(2003) Michael Imperioli
Michael Imperioli
(2004) William Shatner
William Shatner
(2005) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(2006) Terry O'Quinn
Terry O'Quinn
(2007) Željko Ivanek (2008) Michael Emerson
Michael Emerson
(2009) Aaron Paul
Aaron Paul
(2010) Peter Dinklage
Peter Dinklage
(2011) Aaron Paul
Aaron Paul
(2012) Bobby Cannavale
Bobby Cannavale
(2013) Aaron Paul
Aaron Paul
(2014) Peter Dinklage
Peter Dinklage
(2015) Ben Mendelsohn
Ben Mendelsohn
(2016) John Lithgow
John Lithgow
(2017)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series (1970–79)

1970–1973

Gary Belkin, Peter Bellwood, Thomas Meehan, Herb Sargent and Judith Viorst (1970) Herbert Baker, Hal Goodman, Larry Klein, Bob Schiller, Norman Steinberg, Bob Weiskopf and Flip Wilson
Flip Wilson
/ Bob Ellison and Marty Farrell (1971) Art Baer, Roger Beatty, Stan Burns, Stan Hart, Don Hinkley, Ben Joelson, Woody Kling, Mike Marmer, Arnie Rosen and Larry Siegel
Larry Siegel
/ Anne Howard Bailey (1972) Bill Angelos, Roger Beatty, Stan Hart, Robert Hilliard, Woody Kling, Arnie Kogen, Buz Kohan, Gail Parent, Tom Patchett, Larry Siegel
Larry Siegel
and Jay Tarses / Joseph Bologna
Joseph Bologna
and Renee Taylor (1973)

1974–1978

Specials

Rosalyn Drexler, Ann Elder, Karyl Geld Miller, Robert Illes, Lorne Michaels, Richard Pryor, Jim Rusk, Herb Sargent, James R. Stein, Lily Tomlin, Jane Wagner, Rod Warren and George Yanok (1974) John Bradford, Cy Coleman
Cy Coleman
and Bob Wells (1975) Ann Elder, Christopher Guest, Lorne Michaels, Earl Pomerantz, Jim Rusk, Lily Tomlin, Jane Wagner, Rod Warren and George Yanok (1976) Buz Kohan and Ted Strauss (1977) Chevy Chase, Tom Davis, Al Franken, Charles Grodin, Lorne Michaels, Paul Simon, Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
and Alan Zweibel
Alan Zweibel
(1978)

Series

Roger Beatty, Gary Belkin, Dick Clair, Rudy De Luca, Arnie Kogen, Barry Harman, Barry Levinson, Jenna McMahon, Gene Perret, Bill Richmond and Ed Simmons (1974) Roger Beatty, Gary Belkin, Dick Clair, Rudy De Luca, Arnie Kogen, Barry Levinson, Jenna McMahon, Gene Perret, Bill Richmond and Ed Simmons (1975) Anne Beatts, Chevy Chase, Tom Davis, Al Franken, Lorne Michaels, Marilyn Suzanne Miller, Michael O'Donoghue, Herb Sargent, Tom Schiller, Rosie Shuster and Alan Zweibel
Alan Zweibel
(1976) Dan Aykroyd, John Belushi, Tom Davis, James Downey, Al Franken, Lorne Michaels, Marilyn Suzanne Miller, Bill Murray, Michael O'Donoghue, Herb Sargent, Tom Schiller, Rosie Shuster and Alan Zweibel
Alan Zweibel
(1977) Roger Beatty, Dick Clair, Tim Conway, Rick Hawkins, Robert Illes, Jenna McMahon, Gene Perret, Bill Richmond, Liz Sage, Larry Siegel, Franelle Silver, Ed Simmons and James Stein (1978)

1979

Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1979)

Complete list (1957–1969) (1970–1979) (1980–1989) (1990–1999) (2000–2009) (2010–2019)

v t e

Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actor – Television Series Musical or Comedy

1970–2000

Flip Wilson
Flip Wilson
(1970) Carroll O'Connor
Carroll O'Connor
(1971) Redd Foxx
Redd Foxx
(1972) Jack Klugman
Jack Klugman
(1973) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1974) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1975) Henry Winkler
Henry Winkler
(1976) Ron Howard/ Henry Winkler
Henry Winkler
(1977) Robin Williams
Robin Williams
(1978) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1979) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1980) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1981) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1982) John Ritter
John Ritter
(1983) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(1984) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(1985) Bruce Willis
Bruce Willis
(1986) Dabney Coleman
Dabney Coleman
(1987) Michael J. Fox/Judd Hirsch/ Richard Mulligan
Richard Mulligan
(1988) Ted Danson
Ted Danson
(1989) Ted Danson
Ted Danson
(1990) Burt Reynolds
Burt Reynolds
(1991) John Goodman
John Goodman
(1992) Jerry Seinfeld
Jerry Seinfeld
(1993) Tim Allen
Tim Allen
(1994) Kelsey Grammer
Kelsey Grammer
(1995) John Lithgow
John Lithgow
(1996) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
(1997) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
(1998) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
(1999) Kelsey Grammer
Kelsey Grammer
(2000)

2001–present

Charlie Sheen
Charlie Sheen
(2001) Tony Shalhoub
Tony Shalhoub
(2002) Ricky Gervais
Ricky Gervais
(2003) Jason Bateman
Jason Bateman
(2004) Steve Carell
Steve Carell
(2005) Alec Baldwin
Alec Baldwin
(2006) David Duchovny
David Duchovny
(2007) Alec Baldwin
Alec Baldwin
(2008) Alec Baldwin
Alec Baldwin
(2009) Jim Parsons
Jim Parsons
(2010) Matt LeBlanc
Matt LeBlanc
(2011) Don Cheadle
Don Cheadle
(2012) Andy Samberg
Andy Samberg
(2013) Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
(2014) Gael García Bernal
Gael García Bernal
(2015) Donald Glover
Donald Glover
(2016) Aziz Ansari
Aziz Ansari
(2017)

v t e

Hasty Pudding Men of the Year

Bob Hope
Bob Hope
(1967) Paul Newman
Paul Newman
(1968) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(1969) Robert Redford
Robert Redford
(1970) James Stewart
James Stewart
(1971) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
(1972) Jack Lemmon
Jack Lemmon
(1973) Peter Falk
Peter Falk
(1974) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Robert Blake (1976) Johnny Carson
Johnny Carson
(1977) Richard Dreyfuss
Richard Dreyfuss
(1978) Robert De Niro
Robert De Niro
(1979) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1980) John Travolta
John Travolta
(1981) James Cagney
James Cagney
(1982) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1983) Sean Connery
Sean Connery
(1984) Bill Murray
Bill Murray
(1985) Sylvester Stallone
Sylvester Stallone
(1986) Mikhail Baryshnikov
Mikhail Baryshnikov
(1987) Steve Martin
Steve Martin
(1988) Robin Williams
Robin Williams
(1989) Kevin Costner
Kevin Costner
(1990) Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood
(1991) Michael Douglas
Michael Douglas
(1992) Chevy Chase
Chevy Chase
(1993) Tom Cruise
Tom Cruise
(1994) Tom Hanks
Tom Hanks
(1995) Harrison Ford
Harrison Ford
(1996) Mel Gibson
Mel Gibson
(1997) Kevin Kline
Kevin Kline
(1998) Samuel L. Jackson
Samuel L. Jackson
(1999) Billy Crystal
Billy Crystal
(2000) Anthony Hopkins
Anthony Hopkins
(2001) Bruce Willis
Bruce Willis
(2002) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(2003) Robert Downey Jr.
Robert Downey Jr.
(2004) Tim Robbins
Tim Robbins
(2005) Richard Gere
Richard Gere
(2006) Ben Stiller
Ben Stiller
(2007) Christopher Walken
Christopher Walken
(2008) James Franco
James Franco
(2009) Justin Timberlake
Justin Timberlake
(2010) Jay Leno
Jay Leno
(2011) Jason Segel
Jason Segel
(2012) Kiefer Sutherland
Kiefer Sutherland
(2013) Neil Patrick Harris
Neil Patrick Harris
(2014) Chris Pratt
Chris Pratt
(2015) Joseph Gordon-Levitt
Joseph Gordon-Levitt
(2016) Ryan Reynolds
Ryan Reynolds
(2017) Paul Rudd
Paul Rudd
(2018)

v t e

National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actor

John Williams (1954) Charles Bickford
Charles Bickford
(1955) Richard Basehart
Richard Basehart
(1956) Sessue Hayakawa
Sessue Hayakawa
(1957) Albert Salmi
Albert Salmi
(1958) Hugh Griffith
Hugh Griffith
(1959) George Peppard
George Peppard
(1960) Jackie Gleason
Jackie Gleason
(1961) Burgess Meredith
Burgess Meredith
(1962) Melvyn Douglas
Melvyn Douglas
(1963) Martin Balsam
Martin Balsam
(1964) Harry Andrews
Harry Andrews
(1965) Robert Shaw (1966) Paul Ford
Paul Ford
(1967) Leo McKern
Leo McKern
(1968) Philippe Noiret
Philippe Noiret
(1969) Frank Langella
Frank Langella
(1970) Ben Johnson (1971) Joel Grey
Joel Grey
/ Al Pacino
Al Pacino
(1972) John Houseman
John Houseman
(1973) Holger Löwenadler
Holger Löwenadler
(1974) Charles Durning
Charles Durning
(1975) Jason Robards
Jason Robards
(1976) Tom Skerritt
Tom Skerritt
(1977) Richard Farnsworth
Richard Farnsworth
(1978) Paul Dooley
Paul Dooley
(1979) Joe Pesci
Joe Pesci
(1980) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1981) Robert Preston (1982) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1983) John Malkovich
John Malkovich
(1984) Klaus Maria Brandauer
Klaus Maria Brandauer
(1985) Daniel Day-Lewis
Daniel Day-Lewis
(1986) Sean Connery
Sean Connery
(1987) River Phoenix
River Phoenix
(1988) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1989) Joe Pesci
Joe Pesci
(1990) Anthony Hopkins
Anthony Hopkins
(1991) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1992) Leonardo DiCaprio
Leonardo DiCaprio
(1993) Gary Sinise
Gary Sinise
(1994) Kevin Spacey
Kevin Spacey
(1995) Edward Norton
Edward Norton
(1996) Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear
(1997) Ed Harris
Ed Harris
(1998) Philip Seymour Hoffman
Philip Seymour Hoffman
(1999) Joaquin Phoenix
Joaquin Phoenix
(2000) Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
(2001) Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper
(2002) Alec Baldwin
Alec Baldwin
(2003) Thomas Haden Church
Thomas Haden Church
(2004) Jake Gyllenhaal
Jake Gyllenhaal
(2005) Djimon Hounsou
Djimon Hounsou
(2006) Casey Affleck
Casey Affleck
(2007) Josh Brolin
Josh Brolin
(2008) Woody Harrelson
Woody Harrelson
(2009) Christian Bale
Christian Bale
(2010) Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
(2011) Leonardo DiCaprio
Leonardo DiCaprio
(2012) Will Forte
Will Forte
(2013) Edward Norton
Edward Norton
(2014) Sylvester Stallone
Sylvester Stallone
(2015) Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
(2016) Willem Dafoe
Willem Dafoe
(2017)

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New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actor

Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1969) Chief Dan George
Chief Dan George
(1970) Ben Johnson (1971) Robert Duvall
Robert Duvall
(1972) Robert De Niro
Robert De Niro
(1973) Charles Boyer
Charles Boyer
(1974) Alan Arkin
Alan Arkin
(1975) Jason Robards
Jason Robards
(1976) Maximilian Schell
Maximilian Schell
(1977) Christopher Walken
Christopher Walken
(1978) Melvyn Douglas
Melvyn Douglas
(1979) Joe Pesci
Joe Pesci
(1980) John Gielgud
John Gielgud
(1981) John Lithgow
John Lithgow
(1982) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1983) Ralph Richardson
Ralph Richardson
(1984) Klaus Maria Brandauer
Klaus Maria Brandauer
(1985) Daniel Day-Lewis
Daniel Day-Lewis
(1986) Morgan Freeman
Morgan Freeman
(1987) Dean Stockwell
Dean Stockwell
(1988) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1989) Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison
(1990) Samuel L. Jackson
Samuel L. Jackson
(1991) Gene Hackman
Gene Hackman
(1992) Ralph Fiennes
Ralph Fiennes
(1993) Martin Landau
Martin Landau
(1994) Kevin Spacey
Kevin Spacey
(1995) Harry Belafonte
Harry Belafonte
(1996) Burt Reynolds
Burt Reynolds
(1997) Bill Murray
Bill Murray
(1998) John Malkovich
John Malkovich
(1999) Benicio del Toro
Benicio del Toro
(2000) Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
(2001) Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
(2002) Eugene Levy
Eugene Levy
(2003) Clive Owen
Clive Owen
(2004) William Hurt
William Hurt
(2005) Jackie Earle Haley
Jackie Earle Haley
(2006) Javier Bardem
Javier Bardem
(2007) Josh Brolin
Josh Brolin
(2008) Christoph Waltz
Christoph Waltz
(2009) Mark Ruffalo
Mark Ruffalo
(2010) Albert Brooks
Albert Brooks
(2011) Matthew McConaughey
Matthew McConaughey
(2012) Jared Leto
Jared Leto
(2013) J. K. Simmons
J. K. Simmons
(2014) Mark Rylance
Mark Rylance
(2015) Mahershala Ali
Mahershala Ali
(2016) Willem Dafoe
Willem Dafoe
(2017)

v t e

Satellite Award for Best Cast – Television Series

2000

The West Wing Alan Alda Stockard Channing Kristin Chenoweth Dulé Hill Allison Janney Moira Kelly Rob Lowe Joshua Malina Mary McCormack Janel Moloney Richard Schiff Martin Sheen Jimmy Smits John Spencer Bradley Whitford

2001

Buffy the Vampire Slayer Amber Benson Marc Blucas David Boreanaz Nicholas Brendon Charisma Carpenter Emma Caulfield Sarah Michelle Gellar Seth Green Alyson Hannigan Anthony Stewart Head James Marsters Michelle Trachtenberg

2005

Rescue Me Denis Leary John Scurti Daniel Sunjata Mike Lombardi Steven Pasquale Andrea Roth Callie Thorne Adam Ferrara Larenz Tate James McCaffrey Dean Winters

2006

Grey's Anatomy Justin Chambers Eric Dane Patrick Dempsey Katherine Heigl T. R. Knight Sandra Oh James Pickens Jr. Ellen Pompeo Sara Ramirez Kate Walsh Isaiah Washington Chandra Wilson

2007

Mad Men Bryan Batt Anne Dudek Michael Gladis Jon Hamm Christina Hendricks January Jones Vincent Kartheiser Robert Morse Elisabeth Moss Kiernan Shipka Maggie Siff John Slattery Rich Sommer Aaron Staton

2009

True Blood Chris Bauer Mehcad Brooks Anna Camp Nelsan Ellis Michelle Forbes Mariana Klaveno Ryan Kwanten Todd Lowe Michael McMillian Stephen Moyer Anna Paquin Jim Parrack Carrie Preston William Sanderson Alexander Skarsgård Sam Trammell Rutina Wesley Deborah Ann Woll

2012

The Walking Dead Andrew Lincoln Sarah Wayne Callies Laurie Holden Norman Reedus Steven Yeun Lauren Cohan Chandler Riggs Melissa McBride Scott Wilson Danai Gurira Michael Rooker David Morrissey

2013

Orange Is the New Black Taylor Schilling Laura Prepon Michael J. Harney Michelle Hurst Kate Mulgrew Jason Biggs

2014

The Knick Clive Owen André Holland Jeremy Bobb Juliet Rylance Eve Hewson Michael Angarano Chris Sullivan Cara Seymour Eric Johnson David Fierro Maya Kazan Leon Addison Brown Grainger Hines Matt Frewer

2015

American Crime Felicity Huffman Timothy Hutton W. Earl Brown Richard Cabral Regina King Caitlin Gerard Benito Martinez Penelope Ann Miller Elvis Nolasco Johnny Ortiz

2016

Outlander Caitriona Balfe Sam Heughan Tobias Menzies Lotte Verbeek Laura Donnelly Steven Cree Duncan Lacroix Grant O'Rourke Gary Lewis Graham McTavish Stephen Walters Simon Callow Nell Hudson Dominique Pinon Stanley Weber Richard Rankin Sophie Skelton Andrew Gower Rosie Day Clive Russell Frances de la Tour

v t e

Television Hall of Fame Class of 1994

Alan Alda Howard Cosell Barry Diller Fred W. Friendly William Hanna
William Hanna
and Joseph Barbera Oprah Winfrey

v t e

International Emmy Founders Award

Jim Henson
Jim Henson
(1980) Shaun Sutton / Roone Arledge (1981) Michael Landon
Michael Landon
(1982) Herbert Brodkin (1983) David L. Wolper (1984) David Attenborough
David Attenborough
(1985) Donald L. Taffner (1986) Jacques Cousteau
Jacques Cousteau
(1987) Goar Mestre (1988) Paul Fox (1989) Joan Ganz Cooney
Joan Ganz Cooney
(1990) Adrian Cowell (1991) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(1992) Richard Dunn (1993) Film on Four (1994) Don Hewitt
Don Hewitt
(1995) Reg Grundy
Reg Grundy
(1996) Jac Venza
Jac Venza
(1997) Robert Halmi Sr. (1998) Hisashi Hieda
Hisashi Hieda
(1999) John Hendricks (2000) Pierre Lescure
Pierre Lescure
(2001) Howard Stringer
Howard Stringer
(2002) HBO
HBO
(2003) MTV International
MTV International
(2004) Oprah Winfrey
Oprah Winfrey
(2005) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(2006) Al Gore
Al Gore
(2007) Dick Wolf
Dick Wolf
(2008) David Frost
David Frost
(2009) Simon Cowell
Simon Cowell
(2010) Nigel Lythgoe
Nigel Lythgoe
(2011) Ryan Murphy / Norman Lear
Norman Lear
/ Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(2012) J. J. Abrams
J. J. Abrams
(2013) Matthew Weiner
Matthew Weiner
(2014) Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2015) Shonda Rhimes
Shonda Rhimes
(2016)

v t e

Writers Guild of America Award for Television: Episodic Comedy (1970–1979)

Richard DeRoy for "The Valediction" (1970) Martin Cohan for "Thoroughly Unmilitant Mary" (1971) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
for "Chief Surgeon Who?" (1972) Robert Schiller & Robert Weiskopf for "Walter's Problem" (1973) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
& Laurence Marks for "O.R." (1974) James Fritzell & Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
& Everett Greenbaum for "Welcome to Korea" (1975) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
for "Dear Sigmund" (1976) Larry Rhine & Mel Tolkin for "Archie Gets the Business" (1977) Gary David Goldberg for "Baby, It's Cold Outside" (1978) Thad Mumford & Dan Wilcox for "Are You Now, Margaret?" / Ken Estin for "The Reluctant Fighter" (1979)

Complete list 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 84955669 LCCN: n83017186 ISNI: 0000 0001 1030 337X GND: 130826006 SUDOC: 059505044 BNF: cb139295828 (data) MusicBrainz: 2be4ad6b-d15e-4c22-a67c-e520bf4bb207 NKC: ola2002143820 SN