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Al-Azhar University
University
(/ˈɑːzhɑːr/ AHZ-har; Arabic: جامعة الأزهر (الشريف)‎ Jāmiʻat al-Azhar (al-Sharīf), IPA: [ˈɡæmʕet elˈʔɑzhɑɾ eʃʃæˈɾiːf], "the (honorable) Azhar University") is a university in Cairo, Egypt. Associated with Al-Azhar Mosque
Al-Azhar Mosque
in Islamic Cairo, it is Egypt's oldest degree-granting university and is renowned as " Sunni
Sunni
Islam’s most prestigious university".[1] In addition to higher education, Al-Azhar oversees a national network of schools with approximately two million students.[2] As of 1996, over 4000 teaching institutes in Egypt
Egypt
were affiliated with the University.[3] Founded in 970 or 972 by the Fatimids
Fatimids
as a centre of Islamic learning, its students studied the Qur'an
Qur'an
and Islamic law
Islamic law
in detail, along with logic, grammar, rhetoric, and how to calculate the phases of the moon.[citation needed] It was one of the first universities in the world, and the only one in the Arabic world to survive as a modern university including secular subjects in the curriculum. Today it is the chief centre of Arabic literature
Arabic literature
and Islamic learning in the world.[4] In 1961 additional non-religious subjects were added to its curriculum.[5] Its mission is to propagate Islam
Islam
and Islamic culture. To this end, its Islamic scholars (ulamas) render edicts (fatwas) on disputes submitted to them from all over the Sunni
Sunni
Islamic world regarding proper conduct for Muslim
Muslim
individuals and societies. Al-Azhar also trains Egyptian government-appointed preachers in proselytization (da'wa).[citation needed] Its library is considered second in importance in Egypt
Egypt
only to the Egyptian National Library and Archives.[citation needed] In May 2005, Al-Azhar in partnership with a Dubai information technology enterprise, IT Education Project (ITEP) launched the H.H. Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Project to Preserve Al Azhar Scripts and Publish Them Online (the "Al-Azhar Online Project") to eventually publish online access to the library's entire rare manuscripts collection, comprising about seven million pages of material.[6][7]

Contents

1 History

1.1 Beginnings under the Fatimids 1.2 Conversion to Sunniism under Saladin 1.3 Modern history

2 Religious ideology 3 Council of Senior Scholars 4 Views

4.1 On freedom of speech 4.2 On Shia Islam

5 Assassination of Farag Foda 6 Notable people associated with the university

6.1 10th – 11th centuries 6.2 19th – early 20th centuries 6.3 1910s–1950s 6.4 1950–present

7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External links

History[edit] Beginnings under the Fatimids[edit]

An entrance to the mosque and university. The Minaret
Minaret
of Qunsah al Ghuri is visible on the right.

Al-Azhar University
University
is one of the relics of the Isma'ili Shi'a Fatimid dynasty era of Egypt, descended from Fatimah, daughter of Muhammad
Muhammad
and wife of Ali
Ali
son-in-law and cousin of Muhammad. Fatimah, was called Al-Zahra (the luminous), and it was named in her honor.[8] It was founded as mosque by the Fatimid
Fatimid
commander Jawhar at the orders of the Caliph and Ismaili
Ismaili
Imam Al-Muizz as he founded the city for Cairo. It was (probably on Saturday) in Jamadi al-Awwal in the year AH 359. Its building was completed on the 9th of Ramadan
Ramadan
in the year AH 361 (AD 972). Both Al-'Aziz Billah and Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah
Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah
added to its premises. It was further repaired, renovated and extended by Al-Mustansir Billah and Al-Hafiz Li-Din-illah. Fatimid
Fatimid
Caliphs always encouraged scholars and jurists to have their study-circles and gatherings in this mosque and thus it was turned into a university which has the claim to be considered as the oldest University
University
still functioning.[9]

Interior of Al-Azhar mosque left

Studies began at Al-Azhar in the month of Ramadan, 975. According to Syed Farid Alatas, the Jami'ah had faculties in Islamic law
Islamic law
and jurisprudence, Arabic grammar, Islamic astronomy, Islamic philosophy, and logic.[10][11] The Fatimids
Fatimids
gave attention to the philosophical studies at the time when rulers in other countries declared those who were engaged in philosophical pursuits as apostates and heretics. The Greek thought found a warm reception with the Fatimids
Fatimids
who expanded the boundaries of such studies. They paid much attention to philosophy and gave support to everyone who was known for being engaged in the study of any branch of philosophy. The Fatimid
Fatimid
Caliph invited many scholars from nearby countries and paid much attention to college books on various branches of knowledge and in gathering the finest writing on various subjects and this in order to encourage scholars and to uphold the cause of knowledge. These books were destroyed by Saladin.[9] Conversion to Sunniism under Saladin[edit]

Floor plan of Al Azhar Mosque

In the 12th century, before slavery, following the overthrow of the Isma'ilism Fatimid
Fatimid
dynasty, Saladin
Saladin
(the founder of the Sunni
Sunni
Ayyubid Dynasty) converted Al-Azhar to a Shafi'ite
Shafi'ite
Sunni
Sunni
center of learning.[4][12] Saladin
Saladin
had 'jealousy' for the Fatimids, and therefore, "The Encyclopaedia of Islam" (Leiden, 1936, 3rd vol., p. 353) writes that, "He had all the treasures of the palace, including the books, sold over a period of ten years. Many were burned, thrown into the Nile, or thrown into a great heap, which was covered with sand, so that a regular "hill of books" was formed and the soldiers used to sole their shoes with the fine bindings. The number of books said to have disposed of varies from 120,000 to 2,000,000."[13] Abd-el-latif delivered lectures on Islamic medicine
Islamic medicine
at Al-Azhar, while according to legend the Jewish philosopher
Jewish philosopher
Maimonides delivered lectures on medicine and astronomy there during the time of Saladin
Saladin
though no historical proof has corroborated this.[14] Modern history[edit]

An Azhari institute in Tanta

In 1961, Al-Azhar was re-established as a university under the government of Egypt's second President Gamal Abdel Nasser
Gamal Abdel Nasser
when a wide range of secular faculties were added for the first time, such as business, economics, science, pharmacy, medicine, engineering and agriculture. Before that date, the Encyclopaedia of Islam
Islam
classifies the Al-Azhar variously as madrasa, center of higher learning and, since the 19th century, religious university, but not as a university in the full sense, referring to the modern transition process as "from madrasa to university".[5][15] An Islamic women's faculty was also added in the same year, six years after Zaib-un-Nissa Hamidullah
Zaib-un-Nissa Hamidullah
had been the first woman to speak at the university.[citation needed] Religious ideology[edit]

Gateway

Al-Azhar has a membership that represents the theological schools of Al- Ashari
Ashari
and Al-Maturidi, the four schools of Sunni
Sunni
Islamic jurisprudence (Hanafi, Maliki, Shafi, and Hanbali), and the seven main Sufi
Sufi
orders.[16] Al-Azhar has had an antagonistic relationship with Wahhabism
Wahhabism
and Salafism.[17] According to a 2011 report issued by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Al Azhar is strongly Sufi in character:

"Adherence to a Sufi order
Sufi order
has long been standard for both professors and students in the al-Azhar mosque and university system. Although al-Azhar is not monolithic, its identity has been strongly associated with Sufism. The current Shaykh al-Azhar (rector of the school), Ahmed el-Tayeb, is a hereditary Sufi
Sufi
shaykh from Upper Egypt
Egypt
who has recently expressed his support for the formation of a world Sufi league; the former Grand Mufti
Grand Mufti
of Egypt
Egypt
and senior al-Azhar scholar Ali
Ali
Gomaa is also a highly respected Sufi
Sufi
master."[18]

The nineteenth and current Grand Mufti
Grand Mufti
of Egypt
Egypt
and Al Azhar scholar, Shawki Ibrahim Abdel-Karim Allam is also a Sufi. The university is opposed to liberal reform of Islam
Islam
and issued a fatwa against the liberal Ibn-Rushd-Goethe mosque in Berlin because it banned face-covering veils such as burqa and niqab on its premises while allowing women and men to pray together and accepting homosexual worshippers. The fatwa encompassed all present and future liberal mosques.[19] Council of Senior Scholars[edit]

Interior of a dome in Al-Azhar mosque.

Al-Azhar University's Council of Senior Scholars was founded in 1911 but was replaced in 1961 by the Center for Islamic Research. In July 2012, after the law restricting Al-Azhar University's autonomy was modified by the incoming president Mohamed Morsi, the Council was reformed.[20] The Council consists of 40 members and as of February 2013 had 14 vacancies[21] all appointed by the current imam of Al-Azhar, Ahmed El-Tayeb,[22] who was appointed by the prior president, Hosni Mubarak. Once the remaining 14 vacancies are filled, new vacancies will be appointed by the existing Council itself.[21] All four madhahib (schools) of Sunni
Sunni
Islamic jurisprudence are proportionally represented on the Council (Hanafi, Shafi'i, Hanbali, Maliki) and voting is on a majority basis.[20] In addition to El-Tayeb, other prominent members of the Council include the outgoing Grand Mufti
Grand Mufti
Ali
Ali
Gomaa.[23] The Council is tasked with nominating the Grand Mufti
Grand Mufti
of Egypt
Egypt
(subject to presidential approval), electing the next Grand Imam of Al-Azhar Mosque, and is expected to be the final authority in determining if new legislation is compliant with Islamic law.[20] Although the Council's decisions are not binding (absent new legislation), it is expected that it would be difficult for the parliament to pass legislation deemed by the Council as against Islamic law.[20] In January 2013, Al-Tayeb referred a relatively minor issue related to Islamic bonds to the Council, for the first time asserting the Council's jurisdiction.[20] In 2013, the Council elected Shawki Ibrahim Abdel-Karim Allam to be the next Grand Mufti
Grand Mufti
of Egypt. This marks the first time that the Grand Mufti
Grand Mufti
would be elected by Islamic scholars since the position was created in 1895. Prior to this, the Egyptian head of state made the appointment.[22] Views[edit]

A chandelier adorns the woodworked ceiling of a prayer hall.

Sheikh Muhammad
Muhammad
Sayyid Tantawy noted that among the priorities of Muslims are "to master all knowledge of the world and the hereafter, not least the technology of modern weapons to strengthen and defend the community and faith". He added that "mastery over modern weaponry is important to prepare for any eventuality or prejudices of the others, although Islam
Islam
is a religion of peace".[24] Sheikh Tantawy also reasserted that his is the best faith to follow and that Muslims have the duty of active da'wa. He has made declarations about Muslims interacting with non-Muslims who are not a threat to Muslims. There are non-Muslims living apart from Muslims and who are not enemies of Islam
Islam
("Muslims are allowed to undertake exchanges of interests with these non-Muslims so long as these ties do not tarnish the image of the faith"), and there are "the non-Muslims who live in the same country as the Muslims in cooperation and on friendly terms, and are not enemies of the faith" ("in this case, their rights and responsibilities are the same as the Muslims so long as they do not become enemies of Islam"). Shi'a fiqh (according to a fatwa by Al-Azhar, the most respected authority in Sunni
Sunni
Islam)[25] is accepted as a fifth school of Islamic thought. On freedom of speech[edit] In October 2007, Muhammad
Muhammad
Sayyid Tantawy, then the Grand Imam of Al-Azhar, drew allegations of stifling freedom of speech when he asked the Egyptian government to toughen its rules and punishments against journalists. During a Friday sermon in the presence of Egyptian Prime Minister Ahmed Nazif
Ahmed Nazif
and a number of ministers, Tantawy was alleged to have stated that journalism which contributes to the spread of false rumours rather than true news deserved to be boycotted, and that it was tantamount to sinning for readers to purchase such newspapers. Tantawy, a supporter of then Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, also called for a punishment of eighty lashes to "those who spread rumors" in an indictment of speculation by journalists over Mubarak's ill health and possible death.[26][27] This was not the first time that he had criticized the Egyptian press regarding its news coverage nor the first time he in return had been accused by the press of opposing freedom of speech. During a religious celebration in the same month, Tantawy had released comments alluding to "the arrogant and the pretenders who accuse others with the ugliest vice and unsubstantiated charges". In response, Egypt's press union issued a statement suggesting that Tantawy appeared to be involved in inciting and escalating a campaign against journalists and freedom of the press.[28] Tantawy died in 2010 and was succeeded by Mohamed Ahmed el-Tayeb. On Shia Islam[edit]

A study hall

The NGOs report that violence and propaganda against the country's Shia minority continues. Shia Muslims are frequently denied services in addition to being called derogatory names. Anti-Shia sentiment is spread through education at all levels. Clerics educated at Al-Azhar University
University
publicly promote sectarian beliefs by calling Shia Muslims infidels and encourage isolation and marginalization of Shia Muslims in Egypt.[29][30] Assassination of Farag Foda[edit]

Farag Foda, second from the right with then Sudanese president Gaffat Nimiri

Farag Foda (also Faraj Fawda; 1946 – 9 June 1992), was a prominent professor, writer, columnist,[31] and human rights activist.[32] He was assassinated on 9 June 1992 by members of Islamist group al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya after being accused of blasphemy by a committee of clerics (ulama) at Al-Azhar University.[31] Foda was one of 202 people killed by "politically motivated assaults" in Egypt between March 1992 and September 1993.[32] In December 1992, his collected works were banned.[33] The Al-Azhar ulama had thereby adopted a previous fatwā by Sheikh al-Azhar, Jadd al-Haqq, accusing Foda and other secularist writers of being "enemies of Islam".[34] In a statement claimed responsibility for the killing, Al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya
Al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya
accused Foda of being an apostate from Islam, advocating the separation of religion from the state, and favouring the existing legal system in Egypt
Egypt
rather than the application of Shari’a
Shari’a
(Islamic law).[31] The group explicitly referred to the Al-Azhar fatwā when claiming responsibility.[35] An Al-Azhar scholar, Mohammed al-Ghazali, later asserted as a witness before the court that it was not wrong to kill an apostate. Al-Ghazali said: "The killing of Farag Foda was in fact the implementation of the punishment against an apostate which the imam (the Islamic leader in Egypt) has failed to implement."[36] Eight of the thirteen Islamists brought to trial for the murder were subsequently acquitted.[37] Notable people associated with the university[edit] 10th – 11th centuries[edit]

Fatimid
Fatimid
commander Jawhar at the orders of the Caliph Al-Muizz (972) Al-'Aziz Billah (975–996) and Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah
Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah
(996–1021) Al-Mustansir Billah (1021–1036) and Al-Hafiz Li-Din-illah

19th – early 20th centuries[edit]

Muhammad
Muhammad
Abduh and Sayd Jamal edin Afghani, founder of Islamic Modernism Izz ad-Din al-Qassam, founder and leader of Black Hand Mohammad Amin al-Husayni, Mufti
Mufti
of Jerusalem Ahmed Orabi, Egyptian nationalist and army general who led the Urabi Revolt against Khedive Tewfik

1910s–1950s[edit]

Hassan al-Banna, founder of the Muslim
Muslim
Brotherhood (he graduated from Dar al-Ulum
Dar al-Ulum
which is an affiliate of Cairo
Cairo
University) Mehmed Handžić, a leader of Bosnian revivalists, one of authors of Resolution of Sarajevo Muslims and chairman of the Committee of National Salvation Omar Abdel Rahman, leader of Al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya, which has been designated a terrorist group by the governments of the United States and Egypt; currently serving a life term for the 1993 World Trade Center bombing Taqiuddin al-Nabhani, the leader and founder of The Islamic Political Party, Hizb ut-Tahrir (The Party of Liberation) Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, co-founder and leader of Hamas Saad Zaghlul, leader of 1919 revolution in Egypt Taha Hussein, Influential Egyptian writer and intellectual Muhammad
Muhammad
Ma Jian, translator of the Qur'an
Qur'an
into the Chinese language Ahmad Meshari Al-Adwani, Kuwaiti poet and writer of Kuwait's national anthem Al-Nasheed Al-Watani Ahmad al-Ghumari, Moroccan cleric, enrolled in 1921, dropped out due to a death in the family Abdullah al-Ghumari, Moroccan cleric, graduated from Azhar in 1931 Abu Turab al-Zahiri, Indian-born Saudi Arabian writer

1950–present[edit]

This article's list of alumni may not follow's verifiability or notability policies. Please improve this article by removing names that do not have independent reliable sources showing they are notable AND alumni, or by incorporating the relevant publications into the body of the article through appropriate citations. (May 2012)

Aliko Dangote, Nigerian business mogul and richest man in Africa studied Business
Business
at Al-Azhar Akhtar Raza Khan, the de facto grand mufti of India.[38] Mohammed Burhanuddin, Dai of Dawoodi Bohra researched and rediscovered Al-Azhar University's past History and was Awarded Ph.d from Al-Azhar University.[39] Abdullah Yusuf Azzam
Abdullah Yusuf Azzam
Founder of the terrorist group Al-Qaeda, and a Palestinian Sunni
Sunni
Islamic scholar and theologian Shire Jama Ahmed, Somali linguist who devised a Latin script for the Somali language.[40] Mahmud Shaltut,[citation needed] Grand Sheikh of Al-Azhar, issued in 1959 a Fatwa, declaring that Al-Azhar recognizes Shi'ism as a valid branch of Islam Abdel-Halim Mahmoud,[citation needed] Grand Sheikh of Al-Azhar, introduced the study of Sufism
Sufism
as a science through his writings and lectures on the matter Ahmed Subhy Mansour,[citation needed] Islamic scholar, cleric, and founder of the Quranists, who was exiled from Egypt, and lives in the United States as a political refugee Taha Jabir Alalwani, President of Cordoba University
University
(Ashburn, VA, USA), former Chairman of the Fiqh
Fiqh
Council of North America, and the President of the International Institute of Islamic Thought in Herndon, Virginia
Virginia
(USA).[41] Abdurrahman Wahid,[citation needed] Former President of Indonesia Muhammad
Muhammad
Sayyid Tantawy,[citation needed] former Grand Imam of Al-Azhar (17 March 1996 to 10 March 2010) Muhammad
Muhammad
Metwally Al Shaarawy[citation needed] is an Egyptian Muslim jurist Maumoon Abdul Gayoom, Former President of The Republic of Maldives. Abdulla Saeed, Former Chief Justice, and Justice Supreme Court of The Republic of Maldives.[42] Abdulla Mohamed, Chief Judge, Criminal Court of The Republic of Maldives.[42] Hashim Salamat, Founder of Moro Islamic Leberation Front in the Philippines. Fathulla Jameel, Former Foreign Minister of Maldives. Burhanuddin Rabbani, Former Soviet–Afghan War
Soviet–Afghan War
Mujahideen leader and president of Afghanistan Muhammad
Muhammad
Jameel Didi Maldives Author and writer Nik Abdul Aziz Nik Mat
Nik Abdul Aziz Nik Mat
Mursyidul Am (Spiritual Leader) of the Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party
Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party
(PAS) and former Menteri Besar
Menteri Besar
(Chief Minister) of the Malaysian state of Kelantan Abdul Hadi Awang
Abdul Hadi Awang
President of the Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party
Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party
(PAS) and former Menteri Besar
Menteri Besar
(Chief Minister) of the Malaysian state of Terengganu Prof Dato'Dr Mohd Fakhrudin Abdul Mukti (Ambassador of Malaysia to Egypt, 2010-2013) Omar Maute
Omar Maute
Leader of Maute terrorist organization in Marawi, Philippines. Ossama Youssef Founder and CEO of Diwan Videos Panakkad Shihab Thangal
Panakkad Shihab Thangal
A Muslim
Muslim
religious leader, politician and Islamic scholar from the Indian state of Kerala. Qazi to hundreds of mahals in Kerala, President IUML Kerala 1975-2009

See also[edit]

Egypt
Egypt
portal Islam
Islam
portal University
University
portal

List of Presidents of Al-Azhar University List of universities in Egypt

References[edit]

^ Delman, Edward (February 26, 2015). "An Anti-ISIS Summit in Mecca". The Atlantic.  ^ Brown, Nathan J. (September 2011). Post-Revolutionary al-Azhar (PDF). Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. p. 4. Retrieved 4 April 2015.  ^ Roy, Olivier (2004). Globalized Islam: The Search for a New Ummah. Columbia University
University
Press. pp. 92–3. Retrieved 4 April 2015. In Egypt
Egypt
the number of teaching institutes dependent on Al-Azhar University
University
increased from 1855 in 1986-7 to 4314 in 1995-6.  ^ a b "Al-Azhar University". Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Online. Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 2015-08-19.  ^ a b Skovgaard-Petersen, Jakob. "al-Azhar, modern period." Encyclopaedia of Islam, THREE. Edited by: Gudrun Krämer, Denis Matringe, John Nawas and Everett Rowson. Brill, 2010, retrieved 20/03/2010:

Al-Azhar, the historic centre of higher Islamic learning in Cairo, has undergone significant change since the late 19th century, with new regulations and reforms resulting in an expanded role for the university. 1. From madrasa to university

^ "AME Info, 26 September 2005". AME Info. Archived from the original on 19 April 2010. Retrieved 2010-03-21.  ^ ITEP press release, 10 October 2006 ^ Halm, Heinz. The Fatimids
Fatimids
and their Traditions of Learning. London: The Institute of Ismaili
Ismaili
Studies and I.B. Tauris. 1997. ^ a b Shorter Shi'ite Encyclopaedia, By: Hasan al-Amin, http://www.imamreza.net/old/eng/imamreza.php?id=574 ^ Alatas, Syed Farid (2006). "From Ja¯mi`ah to University: Multiculturalism and Christian– Muslim
Muslim
Dialogue". Current Sociology. 54 (1): 112–32. doi:10.1177/0011392106058837.  ^ Goddard, Hugh (2000). A History of Christian- Muslim
Muslim
Relations. Edinburgh University
University
Press. p. 99. ISBN 0-7486-1009-X.  ^ Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
p.37 1993 edition ISBN 0-85229-571-5 ^ [1], End of the Fatimid
Fatimid
Caliphate ^ Necipogulu, Gulru (1996). Muqarnas, Volume 13. Brill Publishers. p. 56. ISBN 90-04-10633-2.  ^ Jomier, J. "al- Azhar (al-Ḏj̲āmiʿ al-Azhar)." Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition. Edited by: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel and W. P. Heinrichs. Brill, 2010, retrieved 20/03/2010:

This great mosque, the 'brilliant one'...is one of the principal mosques of present-day Cairo. This seat of learning...regained all its activity—Sunnī from now on—during the reign of Sultan Baybars...Al-Azhar at the beginning of the 19th century could well have been called a religious university; what it was not was a complete university giving instruction in those modern disciplines essential to the awakening of the country.

^ Jadaliyya: "The Identity of Al-Azhar and Its Doctrine" by Ibrahim El-Houdaiby July 29, 2012 ^ Islamopedia: "Al-Azhar’s relations with other Sunni
Sunni
groups" ^ Carnegie Endowment for International Peace" "Salafis and Sufis in Egypt" by Jonathon Brown December 2011, p 12 ^ Oltermann, Philip (2017-06-25). "Liberal Berlin mosque to stay open despite fatwa from Egypt". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-07-16.  ^ a b c d e Hani Nasira and Saeid al-Sonny, Al Aribiya: "Senior scholars and the new Egyptian constitution", Al Arabiya, January 10, 2013 ^ a b Nathan J. Brown, "Egypt’s new mufti", Foreign Policy, February 12, 2013 ^ a b Issandr El Amrani, "Goodbye Pope, Hello Mufti", New York Times], February 13, 2013 ^ "Egypt's new Grand Mufti
Grand Mufti
elected for first time ever", Ahram Online, February 11, 2013 ^ "The Grand Imams of Al-Azhar". Archived from the original on 19 June 2006. Retrieved 2006-06-24.  ^ al-Azhar Verdict on the Shia – Shi'ite Encyclopedia v2.0, Al-islam ^ "allheadlinenews". Feedsyndicate. 2007-10-10. Archived from the original on 2010-10-01. Retrieved 2010-03-21.  ^ aljazeera.net (Arabic Online) ^ "International Herald Tribune". International Herald Tribune. 2009-03-29. Retrieved 2010-03-21.  ^ Shia Rights Watch: Egypt: For the people or against the people? ^ Al-Monitor: Iranian cleric calls out Egypt's Al-Azhar for anti-Shiite activities ^ a b c "EGYPT: Human Rights Abuses by Armed Groups". amnesty.org. Amnesty International. September 1998. Retrieved 2 December 2015.  ^ a b Miller, Judith. God Has Ninety-Nine Names: Reporting from a Militant Middle East. Simon and Schuster. p. 26.  ^ de Baets, Antoon. Censorship of Historical Thought: A World Guide, 1945-2000. Greenwood Publishing. p. 196. In December 1992 Foda's collected works were banned  ^ Bar, Shmuel (2008). Warrant for Terror: The Fatwas of Radical Islam and the Duty to Jihad. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 16, footnote 8.  ^ de Waal, Alex (2004). Islamism and Its Enemies in the Horn of Africa. C. Hurst & Co. p. 60.  ^ Darwish, Nonie (2008). Cruel and Usual Punishment: The Terrifying Global Implications of Islamic Law. Thomas Nelson. p. 144.  ^ Brown, Nathan J. (1997). The Rule of Law in the Arab World: Courts in Egypt
Egypt
and the Gulf. Cambridge University
University
Press. p. 99.  ^ http://www.rissc.jo/docs/0A-FullVersion-LowRes.pdf ^ "Serving Dawoodi Bohras Worldwide". Mumineen.org. 2010-03-04. Archived from the original on 18 March 2010. Retrieved 2010-03-21.  ^ David D. Laitin, Politics, Language, and Thought: The Somali Experience, ( University
University
Of Chicago Press: 1977), p. 102 ^ "Cordoba University". Cordoba University. Archived from the original on 13 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-03-21.  ^ a b Supreme Court of the Government of the Maldives Archived 2010-09-10 at the Wayback Machine.

Further reading[edit]

Witte, Griff (March 3, 2012). "At al-Azhar Mosque, struggle over Islam roils a revered Egyptian institution". The Washington Post. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Al-Azhar University.

Al-Azhar University
University
(Arabic) Al-Azhar Portal History and organization of Al-Azhar (English) New Grand Sheikh at Al-Azhar University: Fighting Extremism in A Suit and Tie

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Universities In Egypt

Public institutions

Ain Shams University Alexandria University Assiut University Aswan University Al-Azhar University Banha University Beni-Suef University Damanhour University Cairo
Cairo
University Egypt-Japan University
University
of Science
Science
and Technology Fayoum University Helwan University Kafrelsheikh University Mansoura University Military Technical College Minya University Menoufia University Port Said University Sadat Academy for Management Sciences Sohag University South Valley University Suez Canal University Tanta
Tanta
University University
University
of Sadat City Zagazig University

Private institutions

Ahram Canadian University The American University
University
in Cairo Arab Academy for Science
Science
and Technology and Maritime Transport Arab Open University British University
University
in Egypt Canadian International College Egyptian Russian University El Asher University El Shorouk Academy French University
University
in Egypt Future University
University
in Egypt German University
University
in Cairo Heliopolis University Higher Technological Institute Misr International University Misr University
University
for Science
Science
and Technology Modern Academy In Maadi Modern Sciences and Arts University Nahda University Nile University October 6 University Pharos University
University
in Alexandria Sinai University Thebes Academy

v t e

Al-Azhar

Al-Azhar Mosque

Grand Imam of Al-Azhar

Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Kharashi (?–1690) Ibrahim al-Barmawi (1690–1694) Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Nasharti (1694–1708) Abd al-Baqi al-Qalini (1708–?) Muhammad
Muhammad
Shanan (?–1721) Ibrahim al-Fayyumi (1721–1725) Abdullah al-Shubrawi (1725–1758) Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Hiffnawi (1758–1767) Abd al-Rauf al-Sajini (1767–) Ahmed al-Damanhuri (1768–1778) Ahmed al-Arusi (1778–1793) Abdullah al-Sharqawi (1793–1812) Muhammed al-Shanawani (1812–1818) Muhammed al-Arusi (1818–1829) Ahmed al-Damhuji (1829–1830) Hasan al-Attar (1830–1834) Hasan al-Quwaysini (1834–1838) Ahmed al-Sa'im al-Safti (1838–1847) Ibrahim al-Bajuri (1847–1860) Mustafa al-Arusi (1864–1870) Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Mahdi (1870–1882) Shams al-Din Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Imbabi (1882–1896) Hassunah al-Nawawi (1896–1900) Abd al-Rahman al-Qutb al-Nawawi (1900–1900) Salim al-Bishri (1900–1904) Ali
Ali
al-Biblawi (1904–1905) Abd al-Rahman al-Shirbini (1905–1909) Hassanuh al-Nawawi (1909–1909) Salim al-Bishri (1909–1917) Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Jizawi (1917–1927) Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Maraghi (1927–1929) Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Zawahiri (1929–1935) Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Maraghi (1935–1945) Mustafa Abd al-Rizq (1945–1947) Muhammad
Muhammad
Ma'mun al-Shinnawi (1948–1950) Abd al-Majid Salim (1950–1951) Ibrahim Hamrush (1951–1952) Abd al-Majid Salim (1952–1952) Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Khadi Husayn (1952–1954) Abd al-Rahman Taj (1954–1958) Mahmud Shaltut
Mahmud Shaltut
(1958–1963) Hassan Mamoun
Hassan Mamoun
(1963–1969) Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Fahham (1969–1973) Abdel Halim Mahmoud (1973–1978) Muhammad
Muhammad
Abd al-Rahman Bisar (1978–1982) Gad al-Haq (1982–1996) Muhammad
Muhammad
Sayyid Tantawy (1996–2010) Ahmed el-Tayeb (since 2010)

Fatwas

1959 Shia Fatwa

Al-Azhar University

People

Presidents Faculty members Alumni

Learning facilities

English Language Resource Center English Training Centre

Mosque photos University
University
photos

v t e

Islamic Cairo

Northern part

Gates

Bab al-Futuh Bāb al-Naşr Bab Zuweila

Main streets

Muizz Street Qasabah Street Share'a el Khayamiya
Khayamiya
(Tentmakers' Street)

Mosques

Al-Ashraf Mosque Al-Azhar Mosque Sultan Al-Ghuri Complex Al-Hakim Mosque Al-Hussein Mosque Al-Salih Tala'i Mosque Amir Jamal al-Din al-Ustadar Mosque Aqmar Mosque Mosque of Abu Dahab Mosque of Sultan al-Muayyad Mosque of Taghribirdi Mosque-Madrassa of Sultan Barquq Mosque-Sabil of Sulayman Agha al-Silahdar Qalawun complex

Madrasas

Al-Azhar University Khanqah of Baybars II Madrassa of Al-Nasir Muhammad Madrasa
Madrasa
and Dome
Dome
of Al-Saleh Nagm Al-Din Ayyub Mosque-Madrassa of Sultan Barquq Sabil-Kuttab of Katkhuda

Others

Al-Azhar Park Bayt Al-Suhaymi Beshtak Palace Church of the Virgin Mary Khan el-Khalili Qasaba of Radwan Bey Wakala al-Sultan Qaytbay Wikala of Al-Ghuri

Southern part

Main streets

Saliba Street

Mosques

Al-Nasir Muhammad
Muhammad
Mosque Al-Rifa'i Mosque Amir Khayrbak Funerary Complex Complex of Sultan al-Ashraf Qaytbay Juyushi Mosque Lulua Mosque Madrasa
Madrasa
of Sarghatmish Mosque and Khanqah of Shaykhu Mosque of Amir al-Maridani Mosque of Ibn Tulun Mosque of Muhammad
Muhammad
Ali Mosque of Qani-Bay Mosque of Qanibay al-Muhammadi Sayeda Aisha Mosque Sulayman Pasha Mosque

Museums

Al-Gawhara Palace Amir Taz Palace Carriage Museum Egyptian National Military Museum Gayer-Anderson Museum

Others

Amir Alin Aq Palace Bayt Al-Razzaz Palace Cairo
Cairo
Citadel Palace of Yashbak Sabil-Kuttab-Wakala of Sultan Qa'it Bay Tomb of Salar and Sangar-al-Gawli

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 129017410 ISNI: 0000 0001 2155 6022 GND: 10018559-9 SUDOC: 027786951 BNF: cb1251

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