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The Admiralty, originally known as the Office of the Admiralty
Admiralty
and Marine Affairs,[1] was the government department[2][3] responsible for the command of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
first in the Kingdom of England, second in the Kingdom of Great Britain, and from 1801 to 1964,[4] the United Kingdom and former British Empire. Originally exercised by a single person, the Lord High Admiral
Admiral
(1385–1628), the Admiralty
Admiralty
was, from the early 18th century onwards, almost invariably put "in commission" and exercised by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, who sat on the Board of Admiralty. In 1964, the functions of the Admiralty
Admiralty
were transferred to a new Admiralty
Admiralty
Board, which is a committee of the tri-service Defence Council of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and part of the Navy Department[5] of the Ministry of Defence. The new Admiralty
Admiralty
Board meets only twice a year, and the day-to-day running of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
is controlled by a Navy Board
Navy Board
(not to be confused with the historic Navy Board
Navy Board
described later in this article). It is common for the various authorities now in charge of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
to be referred to as simply The Admiralty. The title of Lord High Admiral
Admiral
of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
was vested in the monarch from 1964 to 2011. The title was awarded to Philip, Duke of Edinburgh by Queen Elizabeth II
Queen Elizabeth II
on his 90th birthday.[6] There also continues to be a Vice- Admiral
Admiral
of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and a Rear- Admiral
Admiral
of the United Kingdom, both of which are honorary offices.

Contents

1 Function and organization

1.1 History 1.2 Board of Admiralty 1.3 Organization 1.4 Senior command

2 Admiralty
Admiralty
Buildings

2.1 The Admiralty 2.2 Admiralty
Admiralty
House 2.3 Admiralty
Admiralty
Extension 2.4 Admiralty
Admiralty
Arch 2.5 The Admiralty
Admiralty
Citadel

3 "Admiralty" as a metonym for "sea power" 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 Further reading 7 External links

Function and organization[edit] History[edit]

Flag of the Lord High Admiral

The office of Admiral
Admiral
of England
England
(or Lord Admiral
Admiral
and later Lord High Admiral) was created around 1400 although there had already been Admirals of the Northern and Western Seas. In 1546, King Henry VIII established the Council of the Marine, later to become the Navy Board, to oversee administrative affairs of the naval service. Operational control of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
remained the responsibility of the Lord High Admiral, who was one of the nine Great Officers of State. In 1628, Charles I put the office of Lord High Admiral
Admiral
into commission and control of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
passed to a committee in the form of the Board of Admiralty. The office of Lord High Admiral
Admiral
passed a number of times in and out of commission until 1709 after which the office was almost permanently in commission (the last Lord High Admiral
Admiral
being the future King William IV in the early 19th century). In 1831, the first Navy Board
Navy Board
was abolished as a separate entity, and its duties and responsibilities were given over to the Admiralty. In 1964, the Admiralty
Admiralty
along with the War Office
War Office
and the Air Ministry as separate departments of state were abolished, and re-emerged under one single new Ministry of Defence. Within the expanded Ministry of Defence are the new Admiralty
Admiralty
Board which has a separate (second) Navy Board responsible for the day-to-day running of the Royal Navy., the Army Board
Army Board
and the Air Force Board, each headed by the Secretary of State for Defence. Board of Admiralty[edit]

Board of admiralty about 1810.

When the office of Lord High Admiral
Admiral
was in commission, as it was for most of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, until it reverted to the Crown, it was exercised by a Board of Admiralty, officially known as the Commissioners for Exercising the Office of Lord High Admiral
Admiral
of the United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, &c. (alternatively of England, Great Britain or the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Ireland depending on the period). The Board of Admiralty
The Board of Admiralty
consisted of a number of Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Lords Commissioners were always a mixture of admirals, known as Naval Lords or Sea Lords and Civil Lords, normally politicians. The quorum of the Board was two commissioners and a secretary. The president of the Board was known as the First Lord of the Admiralty, who was a member of the Cabinet. After 1806, the First Lord of the Admiralty
Admiralty
was always a civilian while the professional head of the navy came to be (and is still today) known as the First Sea Lord. Organization[edit] Further information: Admiralty
Admiralty
in the 16th century, Admiralty
Admiralty
in the 17th century, Admiralty
Admiralty
in the 18th century, Admiralty
Admiralty
in the 19th century, and Admiralty
Admiralty
in the 20th century The first real concerted effort to professionally organize the Admiralty
Admiralty
was started by Henry VIII, this management approach would continue in force in the Royal navy until to 1832. In this organization a dual system operated the Lord High Admiral
Admiral
(from 1546) then Commissioners of the Admiralty
Admiralty
(from 1628) exercised the function of general control (military administration) of the Navy and they were usually responsible for the conduct of any war, while the actual supply lines, support and services were managed by four principal officers, namely, the Treasurer, Comptroller, Surveyor and Clerk of the Acts, responsible individually for finance, supervision of accounts, Shipbuilding
Shipbuilding
and maintenance of ships, and record of business. These principal officers came to be known as the Navy Board responsible for 'civil administration' of the navy, from 1546 to 1832. This structure of administering the navy lasted for 285 years, however, the supply system was often inefficient and corrupt its deficiencies were due as much to its limitations of the times they operated in. The various functions within the Admiralty
Admiralty
were not coordinated effectively and lacked inter-dependency with each other, with the result that in 1832 Sir James Graham
Sir James Graham
abolished the Navy Board and merged its functions within the Board of Admiralty's that at the time also had distinct advantages, however it failed to retain the principle of distinctions between the Admiralty
Admiralty
and supply and a lot of bureaucracy followed with the merger. In 1860 saw big growth in the development of technical crafts, the expansion of more admiralty branches that really began with age of steam that would have an enormous influence on the navy and naval thought. Between 1860 and 1908 there was no real study of strategy and of staff work conducted within the naval service; it was practically ignored. All the Navy's talent flowed to the great technical universities. This school of thought for the next 50 years was exclusively technically based. The first serious attempt to introduce a sole management body to administer the naval service manifested itself in the creation of the Admiralty Navy War Council
Admiralty Navy War Council
in 1909.[7] It was believed by officials within the Admiralty
Admiralty
at this time that the running of war was quite a simple matter for any flag officer who required no formal training. However, this mentality would be severely questioned with the advent of the Agadir crisis, when the Admiralty's war plans were heavily criticized. Following this, a new advisory body called the Admiralty War Staff
Admiralty War Staff
was then instituted in 1912, headed by the Chief of the War Staff who was responsible for administering three new sub-divisions responsible for operations, intelligence and mobilisation. The new War Staff had hardly found its feet and it continually struggled with the opposition to its existence by senior officers they were categorically opposed to a staff. The deficiencies of the system within this department of state could be seen in the conduct of the Dardanelles campaign. There were no mechanisms in place to answer the big strategic questions. In 1914 a Trade Division was created. In 1916, Sir John Jellicoe
Sir John Jellicoe
came to the Admiralty, he re-organized the war staff as following: Chief of War Staff, Operations, Intelligence, Signal Section, Mobilisation, Trade. It was not until 1917 that the admiralty department was again properly reorganized and began to function as a professional military staff. In May that 1917, the term " Admiralty
Admiralty
War Staff" was renamed and that department and its functional role were superseded by a new "Admiralty Naval Staff" in addition the newly created office of Chief of the Naval Staff was merged in the office of the First Sea Lord. Also appointed was a new post that of Deputy Chief of the Naval Staff
Deputy Chief of the Naval Staff
and an Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff who were all given seats on the Board of Admiralty. For the first time gave the naval staff direct representation on the board with the presence of three senior naval senior members on the board it ensured the necessary authority to carry through any operation of war. The Deputy Chief of Naval Staff would direct all operations and movements of the fleet, while the Assistant Chief of Naval Staff would be responsible for mercantile movements and anti-submarine operations. The office of Controller would be re-established to deal with all questions relating to supply on September 6, 1917 a Deputy First Sea Lord, was added to the Board who would administer operations abroad and deal with questions of foreign policy. In October 1917 the development of the staff was carried one step further by the creation of two sub-committees of the Board – the Operations Committee and the Maintenance Committee. The First Lord was chairman of both committees, and the Operations Committee consisted of the First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff., the Deputy First Sea Lord, Assistant Chief of Naval Staff, and Fifth Sea Lord. The Maintenance Committee consisted of the Deputy First Sea Lord. (representing the operations committee), Second Sea Lord. (personnel), Third Sea Lord. (material), Fourth Sea Lord. (transport and stores), Civil Lord, Controller and Financial Secretary. Full operational control of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
was finally handed over to the Chief of Naval Staff by an order in Council, effective October 1917, under which he became responsible for the issuing of orders affecting all war operations directly to the fleet. It also empowered the C.N.S to issue orders in their own name as opposed to them previously being issued by the Permanent Secretary to the Admiralty
Permanent Secretary to the Admiralty
in the name of the Board. This structure would remain in place until the department was abolished in 1964; post 1964 the operational control and this system still remains in place with the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
today. For the organisational structure of the admiralty department and how it developed through the centuries see the following articles below. Senior command[edit] Note: civilian is denoted (+) military is denoted (++) Minister of State for the Department of Admiralty, President of the Board of Admiralty
Board of Admiralty
and Senior Government Adviser for Naval Affairs

Office of the First Lord of the Admiralty
First Lord of the Admiralty
(+) --------------Office of the Naval Secretary
Naval Secretary
(++)

Board of Admiralty
Board of Admiralty
(+ and ++)

Navy Board, (+) independent from 1546 it became subordinate to, yet autonomous of the Board of Admiralty
Board of Admiralty
from 1628 to 1832.

Military Head of the Navy Council/Naval War Staff/Naval Staff and Chief Naval Adviser on the Board of Admiralty
Board of Admiralty
to the First Lord

Office of the First Sea Lord
First Sea Lord
and Chief of Naval Staff (++)

Admiralty
Admiralty
Navy War Council, (1909–1912), (++) Admiralty
Admiralty
War Staff, (1912–1917), (++) Admiralty
Admiralty
Naval Staff, (1917–1964), (++)

Board of Admiralty, Navy Council and Naval Staff military members responsible for all Admiralty
Admiralty
staff divisions and departments

Office of the Second Sea Lord
Second Sea Lord
(++) Office of the Third Sea Lord
Third Sea Lord
(++) Office of the Fourth Sea Lord
Fourth Sea Lord
(++) Office of Fifth Sea Lord
Fifth Sea Lord
(++)

Office of Deputy Chief of the Naval Staff
Deputy Chief of the Naval Staff
(++)

Office of Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (++) Office of the Vice Chief of the Naval Staff

Mobilisation and Intelligence Departments (++) Naval Staff Divisions (++) War Staff Divisions (++)

Office of the Deputy First Sea Lord
First Sea Lord
(++)

Board of Admiralty
Board of Admiralty
members responsible other civil functions of the Department of Admiralty

Office of the Civil Lord of the Admiralty
Admiralty
(+)

Office of the Additional Civil Lord of the Admiralty
Additional Civil Lord of the Admiralty
(+)

Office of the Permanent Secretary to the Admiralty
Permanent Secretary to the Admiralty
(+) Office of the Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty (+)

Admiralty
Admiralty
Buildings[edit]

The Admiralty
Admiralty
complex in 1794. The colours indicate departments or residences for the several Lords of the Admiralty. The pale coloured extension behind the small courtyard, on the left is Admiralty
Admiralty
House.

The Admiralty
Admiralty
complex lies between Whitehall, Horse Guards Parade
Horse Guards Parade
and The Mall and includes five inter-connected buildings. Since the Admiralty
Admiralty
no longer exists as a department, these buildings are now used by separate government departments: The Admiralty[edit] The oldest building was long known simply as The Admiralty; it is now known officially as the Ripley Building, a three-storey U-shaped brick building designed by Thomas Ripley and completed in 1726. Alexander Pope implied the architecture is rather dull, lacking either the vigour of the baroque style, fading from fashion at the time, or the austere grandeur of the Palladian
Palladian
style just coming into vogue. It is mainly notable for being perhaps the first purpose-built office building in Great Britain. It contained the Admiralty
Admiralty
board room, which is still used by the Admiralty, other state rooms, offices and apartments for the Lords of the Admiralty. Robert Adam
Robert Adam
designed the screen, which was added to the entrance front in 1788. The Ripley Building is currently occupied by the Department for International Development.

Old Admiralty
Admiralty
(Ripley Building) in 1760 before addition of the Adam screen

Old Admiralty
Admiralty
(Ripley Building) c. 1790 after addition of the Adam screen

Old Admiralty
Admiralty
(Ripley Building) c. 1830

Admiralty
Admiralty
House[edit] Admiralty
Admiralty
House is a moderately proportioned mansion to the south of the Ripley Building, built in the late 18th century as the residence of the First Lord of the Admiralty
First Lord of the Admiralty
from 1788. It served that purpose until 1964. Winston Churchill
Winston Churchill
was one of its occupants in 1911-15 and 1939-40. It lacks its own entrance from Whitehall
Whitehall
and is entered through the Ripley Courtyard or Ripley Building. It is a three-storey building in yellow brick with neoclassical interiors. Its rear facade faces directly onto Horse Guards Parade. The architect was Samuel Pepys Cockerell. The ground floor comprises meeting rooms for the Cabinet Office and the upper floors are three ministerial residences. Admiralty
Admiralty
Extension[edit]

The Admiralty
Admiralty
Extension (which is also one of the two buildings which are sometimes referred to as the "Old Admiralty") dates from the turn of the 20th century.

This is the largest of the Admiralty
Admiralty
Buildings. It was begun in the late 19th century and redesigned while the construction was in progress to accommodate the extra offices needed by the naval arms race with the German Empire. It is a red brick building with white stone, detailing in the Queen Anne style with French influences. It has been used by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
from the 1960s to 2016. The Department for Education
Department for Education
planned to move into the building in September 2017 following the Foreign and Commonwealth Office's decision to leave the building and consolidate its London
London
staff into one building on King Charles Street. Admiralty
Admiralty
Arch[edit]

Admiralty
Admiralty
Arch

Admiralty Arch
Admiralty Arch
is linked to the Old Admiralty
Admiralty
Building by a bridge and is part of the ceremonial route from Trafalgar Square to Buckingham Palace. The Admiralty
Admiralty
Citadel[edit] This is a squat, windowless World War II
World War II
fortress north west of Horse Guards Parade, now covered in ivy. See Military citadels under London for further details. "Admiralty" as a metonym for "sea power"[edit]

Bomb proof citadel constructed 1940 for Admiralty
Admiralty
headquarters

In some cases, the term admiralty is used in a wider sense, as meaning sea power or rule over the seas, rather than in strict reference to the institution exercising such power. For example, the well-known lines from Kipling's Song of the Dead:

If blood be the price of admiralty, Lord God, we ha' paid in full![8]

See also[edit]

Admiralty
Admiralty
administration Admiralty
Admiralty
chart Admiralty
Admiralty
Peak List of Lords High Admiral List of the First Lords of the Admiralty List of Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty Lord High Admiral
Admiral
of Scotland St Boniface's Catholic College

Footnotes[edit]

^ Knighton, C. S.; Loades, David; Loades, Professor of History David (Apr 29, 2016). Elizabethan Naval Administration. Routledge. p. 8. ISBN 9781317145035.  ^ Hamilton, C. I. (Feb 3, 2011). The Making of the Modern Admiralty: British Naval Policy-Making, 1805–1927. Cambridge University Press. p. 56. ISBN 9781139496544.  ^ Defence, Ministry of (2004). The Government's expenditure plans 2004–05 to 2005–06. London: Stationery Office. p. 8. ISBN 9780101621229.  ^ Lawrence, Nicholas Blake, Richard (2005). The illustrated companion to Nelson's navy (Paperback ed.). Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books. p. 8. ISBN 9780811732758.  ^ Archives, The National. "Admiralty, and Ministry of Defence, Navy Department: Correspondence and Papers". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. National Archives, 1660–1976, ADM 1. Retrieved 3 March 2017.  ^ "New title for Duke of Edinburgh as he turns 90, who remains the incumbent". BBC news. BBC. 10 June 2011. Retrieved 10 June 2011.  ^ Kennedy, Paul (Apr 24, 2014). The War Plans of the Great Powers (RLE The First World War): 1880–1914. Routledge. p. 128. ISBN 9781317702528.  ^ Kipling, Rudyard (2015). Stories and Poems. Oxford University Press. p. 471. ISBN 9780198723431. 

Further reading[edit] The Building

Bradley, Simon, and Nikolaus Pevsner. London
London
6: Westminster (from the Buildings of England
England
series). New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press, 2003. ISBN 0-300-09595-3. C. Hussey, " Admiralty
Admiralty
Building, Whitehall", Country Life, 17 and 24 November 1923, pp. 684–692, 718–726.

The Office

Daniel A. Baugh, Naval Administration in the Age of Walpole (Princeton, 1965). Sir John Barrow, An Autobiographical Memoir of Sir John Barrow, Bart., Late of the Admiralty
Admiralty
(London, 1847). John Ehrman, The Navy in the War of William III: Its State and Direction (Cambridge, 1953). C. I. Hamilton, The Making of the Modern Admiralty: British Naval Policy-Making 1805–1927 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011). C. I. Hamilton, "Selections from the Phinn Committee of Inquiry of October–November 1853 into the State of the Office of Secretary to the Admiralty, in The Naval Miscellany, volume V, edited by N. A. M. Rodger, (London: Navy Records Society, London, 1984). C. S. Knighton, Pepys and the Navy (Stroud: Sutton Publishing, 2003). Christopher Lloyd, Mr Barrow of the Admiralty
Admiralty
(London, 1970). Malcolm H. Murfett, The First Sea Lords: From Fisher to Mountbatten (Westport: Praeger, 1995). Lady Murray, The Making of a Civil Servant: Sir Oswyn Murray, Secretary of the Admiralty
Admiralty
1917–1936 (London, 1940). N.A.M. Rodger, The Admiralty
Admiralty
(Lavenham, 1979) J.C. Sainty, Admiralty
Admiralty
Officials, 1660–1870 (London, 1975) Sir Charles Walker, Thirty-Six Years at the Admiralty
Admiralty
(London, 1933)

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Admiralty, Royal Navy.

The Admiralty
Admiralty
at the Survey of London
London
online

v t e

Admiralty
Admiralty
Department

Direction and control of Admiralty
Admiralty
and Naval affairs

Office of First Lord of the Admiralty
First Lord of the Admiralty
and President of the Board of Admiralty Lord High Admirals Council

Boards and offices under the First Lord

Board of Admiralty Navy Board Office of the Naval Secretary Office of the First Naval Lord Office of the First Sea Lord Office of the Senior Naval Lord Office of the Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty Office of the Permanent Secretary to the Admiralty Office of the Private Secretary to the First Lord of the Admiralty

Direction of Admirals Naval/Sea Lords War and Naval Staff

Office of the Senior Naval Lord Office of the First Naval Lord Office of the First Sea Lord

Secretariat and staff under the First Sea Lord

Office of the Naval Assistant to the First Sea Lord Office of the Additional Naval Assistant to the First Sea Lord Office of the Hydrographer of the Navy Offices of the Sea Lords Admiralty
Admiralty
Navy War Council Admiralty
Admiralty
War Staff Admiralty
Admiralty
Naval Staff

Operational planning, policy strategy, tactical doctrine requirements

Admiralty
Admiralty
Navy War Council Admiralty
Admiralty
War Staff Admiralty
Admiralty
Naval Staff

Divisions and sections under the War and Naval Staff

Administrative Planning Division Air Division Anti-Submarine Division Anti-Submarine and Warfare Division Anti-U-boat Division Air Warfare Division Air Warfare and Fly Training Division Air Warfare and Training Division Communications Division Convoy Section Economic Warfare Division Gunnery and Anti-Aircraft Warfare Division Gunnery Division Gunnery and Torpedo Division Historical Section Local Defence Division Division Mercantile Movements Division Naval Air Division Naval Air Organisation and Training Division Naval Artillery and Torpedos Division Navigation Division Navigation and Direction Division Minesweeping Division Mobilisation Division Naval Intelligence Division Operations Division Operations Division
Operations Division
(Home) Operations Division
Operations Division
(Foreign) Operations Division
Operations Division
(Mining) Plans Division Plans Division Q Press Division Requirements and Organisation (Combined Operations) Division Service Conditions and Fleet Supply Duties Division Signal Division Signal Section Standardisation Division Tactical Division Tactical and Weapons Policy Division Torpedo Division Torpedo, Anti-Submarine and Minewarfare Division Trade Division Trade and Operations Division Training Division Training and Staff Duties Division Tactical and Staff Duties Division Undersurface Warfare Division

Offices of the Sea Lords

Office of the Second Sea Lord Office of the Third Sea Lord Office of the Fourth Sea Lord Office of the Fifth Sea Lord

Admiralty
Admiralty
civil units under the Sea Lords

Admiralty
Admiralty
Area Cash Offices Admiralty
Admiralty
Central Dockyard Laboratory Admiralty
Admiralty
Central Metallurgical Laboratory Admiralty
Admiralty
Civilian Shore Wireless Service Admiralty
Admiralty
Compass Observatory Admiralty
Admiralty
Constabulary Admiralty
Admiralty
Experiment Works Admiralty
Admiralty
Gunnery Establishment Admiralty
Admiralty
Interview Board Admiralty
Admiralty
Labour Department Admiralty
Admiralty
Mine Design Department Admiralty
Admiralty
Mining Establishment Admiralty
Admiralty
Naval Aircraft Materials Laboratory Admiralty
Admiralty
Regional Offices Admiralty
Admiralty
Research Laboratory Admiralty
Admiralty
Signal Establishment Admiralty
Admiralty
Signals and Radar Establishment Admiralty
Admiralty
Surface Weapons Establishment Admiralty
Admiralty
Surveying Service Admiralty
Admiralty
Torpedo Experimental Establishment Admiralty
Admiralty
Underwater Weapons Establishment Architectural and Engineering Works Department Air Equipment and Naval Photography Department Air Department Air Materiel Department Air Personnel Department Amphibious Warfare Headquarters Armament Supply Department Board of Invention and Research Board of Longitude Boom Defence Department Boom Defence and Marine Salvage Department Britannia Royal Naval College Chemical Board Chemical Department Civil Catering Department Civil Engineer in Chiefs Department Coastguard and Reserves Branch Combined Operations Headquarters Commissioner for Property and Income-tax for the Naval Department Compass Department Contract and Purchase Department Council of Naval Education Dental Examining Board Department of Radio Equipment Department of the Accountant-General of the Navy Department of Aeronautical and Engineering Research Department of Miscellaneous Weapons Development Department of Naval Assistant (Foreign) to Second Sea Lord Department of Naval Education Operational Research Department of Personal Services and Officer Appointments Department of Physical Research Department of Physical Training & Sports Department of Radio Equipment Department of Research Programmes and Planning Department of Superintendent of de-magnetisation Department of the Admiral
Admiral
of the Training Service Department of the Chief Inspector of Naval Ordnance Department of the Chief of Naval Information Department of the Chief Scientist Department of the Civil Engineer-in-Chief Department of the Comptroller of Steam Machinery Department of the Comptroller for Victualling and Transport Services Department of the Controller of the Navy Department of the Controller-General of Merchant Shipbuilding Department of the Controller for Navy Pay Department of the Deputy Controller for Auxiliary Shipbuilding Department of the Deputy Controller for Dockyards and Shipbuilding Department of the Director Contract-Built Ships Department of the Director-General Aircraft Department of the Director-General of Manpower Department of the Director-General, Supply and Secretariat Branch Department of the Director of Aircraft Maintenance and Repair Department of the Director of Contract Labour Department of the Director of Dockyards Department of the Director of Electrical Engineering Department of the Director of Manning Department of the Director of Merchant Shipbuilding Department of the Director of Merchant Shipbuilding
Shipbuilding
and Repairs Department of the Director of Merchant Ship Repairs Department of the Director of Naval Construction Department of the Director of Naval Equipment Department of the Director of Naval Recruiting Department of the Director of Naval Weather Service Department of the Director of Personal Services Department of the Director of Physical Training and Sports Department of the Director of Torpedoes and Mining Department of the Director of Transports Department of the Director of Underwater Weapons Department of the Director of Unexploded Bombs Department of the Director of Warship Production Department of the Director of Welfare and Service Conditions Department of the Director of Wreck Dispersal Department of the Flag Officer Sea Training Department of the Engineer in Chief Department of the Paymaster Director-General Department of the Inspector of Anti-Aircraft Weapons Department of the Inspector of Dockyard Expense Accounts Department of the Inspector-General of Naval Hospitals and Fleets Department of the Medical Director-General of the Navy Department of the Physician of the Navy Department of the Physician General of the Navy Department of the Storekeeper-General of the Navy Department of the Surveyor of Buildings Department of the Surveyor of Dockyards Dockyards and Fleet Maintenance Department Dockyards Branch Dockyard Expense Accounts Department Dockyard Schools Electrical Engineering Department Engineer Branch Engineering Department Experimental Department Fire Control Group Greenwich Hospital Department Inspector of Telegraphs Inspector of Repairs Medical Consultative Board Medical Examining Board Historical Section Hydrographic Department Marine Pay Office Materials and Priority Department Medical Consultative Board Medical Department Medical Examining Board Movements Department Nautical Almanac Office Naval Artillery and Torpedo Department Naval Engineering College Naval Equipment Department Naval Historical Branch Naval Construction Department Naval Intelligence Department Naval Medical Service Naval Law Division Naval Mobilisation Department Naval Ordnance Department Naval Ordnance Inspection Department Naval Ordnance Stores Department Naval Publicity Department Naval Reserve Department Naval Security Department Naval Stores Department Naval Training Department Naval Works Department Navy, Army and Air Force Institute Navy and Army Canteen Board Navy Works Department Navigation Department Observatory at the Cape of Good Hope Office of the Admiral
Admiral
Commanding Coast Guard and Reserves Office of the Admiral
Admiral
Commanding, Reserves Office of the Admiral
Admiral
Superintendent, Chatham Office of the Admiral-Superintendent, Devonport Office of the Admiral-Superintendent, Malta Office of the Admiral-Superintendent of Naval Reserves Office of the Admiral-Superintendent, Pembroke Office of the Admiral-Superintendent, Plymouth Office of the Admiral-Superintendent, Portsmouth Office of the Admiral-Superintendent, Rosyth Office of the Admiralty
Admiralty
Chemist Office of the Adviser on the Naval Construction to the Board of Admiralty Office of the Assistant Controller Office of the Assistant Controller Research and Development Office of the Clerk of the Journals Office of the Deputy Controller of Navy Office of the Deputy Controller Production Office of the Director Woman’s Royal Naval Nursing Service Office of Extra Naval Assistant to Second Sea Lord Office of the Inspector Gun Mountings Office of the Keeper of Records Office of the Senior Psychologist of the Navy Office of the Translator of French and Spanish Languages Office of the Vice Controller Air Office of the Vice Controller of the Navy Organisation and Methods Department Packet Service Regional Organisation for Merchant Shipbuilding
Shipbuilding
and Repairs Royal Corps of Naval Constructors Royal Flying Corps Royal Marines
Royal Marines
Office Royal Marines
Royal Marines
Pay Office Office of the Chaplain of the Fleet Royal Naval Academy Royal Naval Aircraft Workshops Royal Naval Air Service Royal Naval Air Stations Royal Naval Armaments Depot Royal Naval Cordite Factories Royal Naval Propellant Factory Royal Naval College, Dartmouth Royal Naval College, Greenwich Royal Naval College, Keyham Royal Naval College, Osborne Royal Naval Engineering College Royal Naval Film Corporation Royal Naval Hospital Royal Naval Medical Depot Royal Naval Minewatching Service Royal Naval Mine Depot Royal Naval Patrol Service Royal Naval Scientific Service Royal Naval Sick Quarters Royal Naval Torpedo Depot Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Royal Naval War College Royal Naval War College, Portsmouth Royal Navy
Royal Navy
Dockyard Royal Navy
Royal Navy
Medical Service Royal Navy
Royal Navy
Shore Signal Service Royal Observatory, Greenwich Royal School of Naval Architecture Salvage Department School of Mathematics and Naval Construction Scientific Research and Experiment Department Sea Transport Department Ship Department Ship Design Department Signal Department Signal School Statistics Department Steam Department Superintendent of De-magnetisation Torpedoes and Mining Department Transport Department Undersurface Warfare Department Victualling Department Volunteer Boys and Cadet Corps Weapons Department Wireless Telegraphy Board

Distribution of the Fleet

Office of the Permanent Secretary to the Admiralty Office of the First Naval Lord Office of the First Sea Lord Admiralty
Admiralty
Naval Staff

Military units distributed under the Admiralty

1st Fleet 2nd Fleet 3rd Fleet Africa Station Atlantic Fleet Australia Station Cape of Good Hope Station Cape and West Africa Station Battle Cruiser Fleet Battle Cruiser Force Caspian Flotilla Channel Fleet Channel Squadron Coastal Forces Coast of Ireland Station Cork Station Coast of Scotland
Scotland
Command China Command Dover Command Downs Station East Indies Fleet East Indies Station East Indies and China Station Eastern Fleet Far Eastern Fleet Grand Fleet Gibraltar Command Gibraltar and Mediterranean Approaches Command Harwich Force Home Fleet Jamaica Station Leeward Islands Station Lisbon Station Mediterranean Fleet Newfoundland Station New Zealand Division New Zealand Naval Forces Nore Command North America and West Indies Station North Atlantic Command North Sea Fleet Orkneys and Shetlands Command Pacific Fleet Pacific Station Patrols Command Plymouth Command Portsmouth Command Queenstown Station Royal East African Navy Royal Indian Navy Royal Navy
Royal Navy
Submarine Service Rosyth Command Reserve Fleet Scotland
Scotland
and Northern Ireland South Atlantic Command South Atlantic and Pacific Station South America Station South East Coast of America Station West Africa Squadron West Africa Station Western Approaches Command West Indies Station Western Squadron

Direction of Naval Finance

Department of the Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty

Departments under Secretary

Department of the Civil Lord of the Admiralty Accountant-General's Department Comptroller of the Navy Department of the Surveyor of the Navy

Direction of Naval Administration and the Admiralty
Admiralty
Secretariat

Department of the Permanent Secretary

Branches and offices under Permanent Secretary

Admiralty
Admiralty
Central Copying Branch Admiralty
Admiralty
Central Registry Branch Admiralty
Admiralty
Record Office Admiralty
Admiralty
Library Admiralty
Admiralty
Secretariat Air Branch Civil Branch Legal Branch Military Branch Naval Branch Ship Branch

Civil Administration

Department of the Civil Lord of the Admiralty, Department of the Additional Civil Lord of the Admiralty

Departments under Civil Administration

Accountant-General's Department Contract and Purchase Department Department of the Director of Contract Labour Department of the Surveyor of Buildings Director of Works' Department Greenwich Hospital Department Works Loan Department

Legal

Judicial Department

Legal under Judicial Department

Admiralty
Admiralty
court High Court of Admiralty Office of the Judge of the High Court of Admiralty High Court of Justice Office of the Judge Advocate of the Fleet Office of the Chief Naval Judge Advocate Office of the Marshall High Court of the Admiralty Office of the Admiralty
Admiralty
Advocate Office of the Admiralty
Admiralty
Proctor Office of the Receiver of Droits High Court of Admiralty Office of the Registrar High Court of the Admiralty Office of the Solicitor for the Affairs of the Admiralty Office of the Solicitor to the Admiralty
Admiralty
and Navy Office of the Counsel to the Admiralty Court of Admiralty
Admiralty
for the Cinque Ports King's Bench Division (Admiralty) Queens's Bench Division (Admiralty) Probate, Divorce and Admiralty
Admiralty
Division Vice Admiralty
Admiralty
courts Colonial Courts of Admiralty

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 Her Majesty's Naval Service

Leadership

Secretary of State for Defence Minister of State for the Armed Forces Chief of the Naval Staff and First Sea Lord Deputy Chief of the Naval Staff
Deputy Chief of the Naval Staff
and Second Sea Lord Fleet Commander Commander, Allied Maritime Command Commandant General Royal Marines Judge Advocate General of the Armed Forces Warrant Officer of the Naval Service Corps Regimental Sergeant Major 5-star admirals

Components

Royal Navy

Surface fleet Fleet Air Arm Submarine Service Royal Navy
Royal Navy
Medical Service Nursing Service (QARNNS) Chaplaincy Service Navy Police

Royal Marines

3 Commando Brigade Special
Special
Boat Service Marines Band Service

Royal Naval Reserve

Royal Marines
Royal Marines
Reserve

Naval Careers Service

History and future

Admiralty
Admiralty
in the 16th century Admiralty
Admiralty
in the 17th century Admiralty
Admiralty
in the 18th century Customs and traditions Historic forces and commands Future of the Royal Navy History of the Royal Navy History of the Royal Marines HMS Belfast (C35) National Maritime Museum National Museum of the Royal Navy Naval Historical Branch

Operating forces

Navy Command UK Maritime Forces UK Amphibious Forces Current forces and commands

Fleet

British fleet Royal Fleet Auxiliary Current deployments Historic fleets

Ships

Aircraft carriers Escort carriers Seaplane carriers Amphibious warfare ships Battlecruisers Battleships Pre-dreadnought battleships Bomb vessels Corvette and sloop Cruisers Destroyers Fireships Frigates Gun-brigs Gunboat and gunvessels Hospital ships Ironclads Mine countermeasure vessels Monitors Ironclads Patrol vessels Royal yachts Ships of the line Submarines Support ships Survey vessels Historic ships names

Administration

Defence Council Admiralty
Admiralty
Board Navy Board Navy Command

Senior officers

Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Aviation & Carriers) Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Capability) Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Personnel) Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Policy) Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Ships) Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Submarines) Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Support) Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Training) Chaplain of the Fleet Chief of Material (Fleet) Controller of the Navy Commandant General Royal Marines Commander Operations Commander UK Amphibious Forces Commander UK Maritime Forces Commodore, Naval Staff Commodore, Regional Forces Commodore RFA Flag Officer, Training and Recruitment Flag Officer, Reserves Flag Officer Scotland
Scotland
and Northern Ireland Flag Officer Sea Training Head of Royal Navy
Royal Navy
Communications Naval Secretary Rear-Admiral, Fleet Air Arm Rear Admiral
Admiral
Submarines

Personnel and training

Admiralty
Admiralty
Interview Board Britannia Royal Naval College Commando Training Centre Royal Marines Defence Academy of the United Kingdom HMS Raleigh HMS Sultan Royal Corps of Naval Constructors Chaplain of the Fleet Royal Navy
Royal Navy
Submarine School Sea Training

Equipment

Uniforms Officer rank insignia Ratings rank insignia

Former components

Naval Intelligence Division Naval Recruitment Training Agency Royal Corps of Naval Constructors Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service Royal Naval Academy Royal Naval Auxiliary Service Royal Naval College, Greenwich Royal Naval Air Service Royal Naval Supply and Transport Service Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Royal School of Naval Architecture Women's Royal Naval Service

Former administration

Admiralty Admiralty
Admiralty
Naval Staff Admiralty
Admiralty
War Staff Admiralty
Admiralty
Navy War Council Board of Admiralty Navy Board Sick and Hurt Board Transport Board Victualling Board

Former leadership

Secretary of State Lord High Admiral First Lord of the Admiralty Chief of the Admiralty
Admiralty
War Staff Commander-in-Chief Fleet Commander-in-Chief, Naval Home Command Deputy First Sea Lord Deputy Chief of the Naval Staff Third Sea Lord Fourth Sea Lord Fifth Sea Lord Vice Chief of the Naval Staff Judge Advocate of the Fleet Chief Naval Judge Advocate

category

v t e

Great Officers of State
Great Officers of State
of England
England
and Scotland

England

Lord High Steward Lord High Chancellor (of Great Britain) Lord High Treasurer Lord President of the Council Lord Privy Seal Lord Great Chamberlain Lord High Constable Earl Marshal Lord High Admiral

Scotland

Lord Chancellor Keeper of the Great Seal of Scotland Chamberlain of Scotland Lord High Treasurer
Lord High Treasurer
of Scotland Keeper of the Privy Seal of Scotland Lord Clerk Register Lord Advocate Lord Justice Clerk Lord Justice General Earl Marischal Lord Lyon King of Arms Lord High Admiral
Admiral
of Scotland

Italics indicate officers that are in commission, in a

.