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Tun Dato' Sri Haji Abdullah bin Haji Ahmad Badawi (US:  pronunciation (help·info) /ˈæbdulə ˈæhməd bəˈdɑːwiː/; Arabic: عبد الله بن حاجّ أحمد بدوي‎ ʿAbdullāh ibn ḥaajj Aḥmad Badawī; born 26 November 1939) is a Malaysian politician who served as Prime Minister of Malaysia
Malaysia
from 2003 to 2009. He was also the President of the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO), the largest political party in Malaysia, and led the governing Barisan Nasional
Barisan Nasional
parliamentary coalition. He is informally known as Pak Lah, Pak meaning 'Uncle', while Lah is taken from his name 'Abdullah'. He is also referred to as the "Father of Human Capital Development" (Bapa Pembangunan Modal Insan). After Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim
Anwar Ibrahim
was dismissed, Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad
Mahathir Mohamad
appointed Abdullah as Deputy Prime Minister in 1999. Abdullah went on to succeed Mahathir as Prime Minister in 2003. In the 2004 general election, Abdullah scored a significant victory. In the 2008 general election, Barisan Nasional
Barisan Nasional
won a slim majority of seats but lost its two-thirds majority and also lost 5 states to Opposition Pact. He stepped down in favour of his successor, Najib Razak, during the UMNO
UMNO
General Assembly held on 1 April 2009. On 3 April 2009, he was succeeded by Najib Razak
Najib Razak
as prime minister.[1] Abdullah was then conferred the title 'Tun' by King Mizan Zainal Abidin for his service to the nation.[2] He was also a Member of Parliament for Kepala Batas from 1978 to 2013. Currently, he serves as the Chancellor of Universiti Teknologi Petronas (UTP).

Contents

1 Background and early life 2 Political career 3 Premiership

3.1 First term 3.2 Economic policies 3.3 50 years of nationhood 3.4 Second term

4 Transfer of power 5 Family 6 Poetry 7 Controversies

7.1 Brother 7.2 Son-in-law 7.3 Secularism 7.4 Iraq Oil-for-Food Scandal 7.5 Nuclear Proliferation 7.6 Concerns and disputes by Mahathir Mohamad
Mahathir Mohamad
and UMNO 7.7 Vote of no confidence to Abdullah Badawi in Parliament

8 Election result 9 Honours and awards 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External links

Background and early life[edit] Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
was born in Bayan Lepas, Penang
Penang
to a prominent religious family. Badawi's paternal grandfather, Syeikh Abdullah Badawi Fahim, was of Hadrami descent.[3] Syeikh Abdullah was a well-respected religious leader and nationalist, was one of the founding members of Hizbul Muslimin, later known as PAS. After independence, Syeikh Abdullah became the first mufti of Penang
Penang
after Independence.[4] His father, Ahmad Badawi, was a prominent religious figure and UMNO
UMNO
member. His mother, Kailan Haji Hassan passed away in Kuala Lumpur at the age of 80 on 2 February 2004.[5] His maternal grandfather, Ha Su-chiang (traditional Chinese: 哈蘇璋; simplified Chinese: 哈苏璋; pinyin: hā sūzhāng; Wade–Giles: Ha Su-chang) (also known as Hassan Salleh), was a Utsul
Utsul
Muslim who came from Sanya in Hainan.[6][7][8][9][10] Badawi is a former student of Bukit Mertajam High School. He studied at MBS (Methodist Boy's School) Penang
Penang
for his 6th form. Badawi obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in Islamic Studies
Islamic Studies
from the University of Malaya
University of Malaya
in 1964.[11] Political career[edit] After graduating from the University of Malaya, he joined the Malaysian Administrative and Diplomatic Corps (the formal term for the civil service). He served as Director of Youth at the Ministry of Youth and Sport as well as Secretary of the National Operations Council (MAGERAN). He resigned in 1978 to become the member of parliament for his constituency of Kepala Batas in northern Seberang Perai (which had also been represented by his father). Early during Mahathir's tenure as prime minister, a bitter dispute erupted within the ruling UMNO
UMNO
party and it was divided into two camps, which were colloquially known as 'Team A', comprising Mahathir loyalists, and 'Team B', which supported former Minister of Finance Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah
Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah
and former Deputy Prime Minister Musa Hitam. Mahathir prevailed, leading to the exclusion of Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah from the newly established UMNO
UMNO
(Baru) or New UMNO. Abdullah was a close supporter of his political mentor Musa Hitam in Team B and as a result, he was sacked from his post of Minister of Defence in the Cabinet. He did not join the Semangat 46
Semangat 46
(Spirit 46) party which was set up by Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah. Semangat 46
Semangat 46
is now defunct. When UMNO
UMNO
(Baru) was formed in February 1988, Mahathir, the UMNO President and Prime Minister, brought Abdullah into the pro tem committee of UMNO
UMNO
(Baru) as the vice-president. In 1990, Abdullah retained his seat as vice-president. During the Cabinet reshuffle in 1991, Mahathir brought him back into the Cabinet as Foreign Minister. He held this post until November 1999, when Syed Hamid Albar
Syed Hamid Albar
succeeded him. Even though he lost his vice presidency in the 1993 UMNO elections, he remained in the Cabinet and was appointed Minister of Foreign Affairs. Prior to 1998, he also served as Minister in the Prime Minister's Department, Minister of Education, Minister of Defence, and Minister of Foreign Affairs. He completed his probation when he was appointed Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia
Prime Minister of Malaysia
and Minister of Home Affairs following the dismissal of Anwar Ibrahim. Premiership[edit] First term[edit] Upon coming into power as prime minister, Abdullah Badawi promised to clamp down on corruption, thus empowering anti-corruption agencies and providing more avenues for the public to expose corrupt practices. He also arrested several public figures from the Mahathir era for corruption, a move which was widely applauded by the public. He advocated an interpretation of Islam known as Islam Hadhari, which advocates the intercompatibility between Islam and economic and technological development. His administration emphasised a revival of the Malaysian agricultural sector. In the 2004 general election, Abdullah Badawi's first as prime minister, he delivered a landslide victory for his party's coalition Barisan Nasional
Barisan Nasional
(of which UMNO
UMNO
is the dominant party) by winning 198 out of 220 seats in parliament and wresting control of the Terengganu state government from the Islamist opposition Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party (PAS), as well as coming close to capturing the traditional PAS stronghold of Kelantan. The victory was widely regarded as an approval of his vision of moderate Islam over religious fundamentalism as well as support for his anti-corruption policies. Former Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim, upon his release from prison in September 2004, publicly credited Abdullah Badawi for not interfering with the court's overturning of his sodomy conviction. On 10 September 2004, Abdullah Badawi, as Finance Minister, presented his maiden budget, which was seen by many as maintenance-oriented as opposed to the growth policies emphasised by Mahathir. Abdullah Badawi also focused on Malaysia's internal security after the increase in corrupt practices, such as bribery, in the Law enforcement in Malaysia. Abdullah Badawi is unofficially known as Pak Lah (Malay diminutive for 'Uncle Abdullah'). The Malaysian government issued a statement that the prime minister should not be referred to by this nickname in official articles and in newsprint; however, the nickname was still used informally. In fact, Abdullah Badawi often used that nickname to refer to himself during public gatherings. Abdullah Badawi was heavily involved in foreign policy making. He was the chairman of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference since the start of his premiership in 2003. As of 2005, he was the chairman of the ASEAN. He also served as chairman of the Non-Aligned Movement
Non-Aligned Movement
from October 2003 until September 2006. Economic policies[edit] Abdullah Badawi declared an end to the economic legacy and grandiose projects of his predecessor, Mahathir Mohamad, during the 57th UMNO General Assembly. He told delegates that he would not pursue the economic strategies adopted two decades ago by Mahathir. He said that in the past, wealth was generated not by innovation and creativity, but by foreign investment, government contracts, and privatisation. Agriculture and biotechnology are some of the highlighted issues in 9MP that the government believes such sectors are still able to generate wealth for many Malaysians, especially those in rural areas. In late 2005, Badawi successfully led Malaysia
Malaysia
into a historic free trade agreement with Japan enabling the two countries to scrap tariffs on essentially all industrial goods and most agricultural, forestry and fishery products within a decade.[12] Under the Abdullah Badawi administration, the country is moving down to a value chain economy by developing its inherent strengths in agriculture without losing its existing manufacturing base.[13] However, Abdullah has been criticised as to his handling of the sudden hikes in the price of petrol and electricity through the restructuring of government subsidies, especially as it is detrimental to Malaysia's position as a traditional exporter. 50 years of nationhood[edit] On 31 August 2007, Abdullah Badawi shouted 'Merdeka!' during the midnight celebrations of Malaysia's 50 years of nationhood. The celebrations were held at Merdeka
Merdeka
Square, Kuala Lumpur, where thousands of people had congregated. This was a symbolic gesture which emulated the actions of Malaya's first prime minister, the late Tunku Abdul Rahman, when the latter declared independence from the British in 1957.[14] Second term[edit] Abdullah Badawi won a second term as prime minister by winning the 12th General Election, held in March 2008, with a reduced majority. He also lost four additional states to the opposition (Kedah, Penang, Perak
Perak
and Selangor). Although his party, Barisan Nasional, suffered a major setback, Abdullah Badawi vowed to fulfill the promises in his manifesto amid calls from Mahathir, the opposition and even among UMNO members for him to resign. However, his deputy, Najib Razak, and others in his party voiced unreserved support for his leadership.[15] It took a while before open dissent started brewing at grassroots levels, with petition and campaigns being launched to ask for his resignation.[16] He was sworn in for a second term as prime minister on 10 March 2008.[17] Badawi unveiled a streamlined 68-member Cabinet on 18 March 2008, dropping half the ministers in his previous administration and keeping the crucial finance portfolio for himself.[18] Abdullah faced a political crisis not only from the onslaught of the Opposition which gained much ground by taking the richest and most important states ( Selangor
Selangor
and Penang, which incidentally is the hometown of Abdullah Badawi). He also faced growing discontent from within his own ranks in the UMNO
UMNO
party. Mukhriz Mahathir, the son of the former premier, openly called for him to step down. The UMNO
UMNO
Youth chief, Hishammuddin, did not take any action against Mukhriz and dismissed it as a personal opinion. Abdullah was under heavy pressure to step down after many within his UMNO
UMNO
party including former Prime Minister Dr. Mahathir Mohammad openly asked him to take full responsibility on the dismal performance during the 12th General Election in March 2008. He initiated two significant changes in the system after the general election by declaring the Anti Corruption Agency (ACA) to be fully independent and initiated judicial reform proceedings in the aftermath of the V.K. Lingam Royal Commission of Inquiry. Regarding the live telecast in Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
(the first time since after the 12th General Election),[19] Abdullah said he was ashamed at what had transpired in the Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
on 30 April 2008 (Wednesday) and agreed that live telecast of the proceedings should be scrapped. He said what happened was just "too much." "I felt ashamed if people watched television and saw what was happening in our Dewan. In my heart, I also felt that all this happened because there was a live broadcast at that time," said the Prime Minister. There were many ideas from the government MPs and opposition MPs. Some MPs suggested that the live telecast should not be scrapped to let the people know what was really happening in the Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
and judge the MPs in conducting the people's voice in the parliament. The live telecast of the proceedings is to be continued to show that there is transparency and to let the people know how the MPs are behaving and debating. On 19 May 2008, the dispute between Mahathir and Abdullah reached a "shocking" stage when Dr Mahathir, who had served as UMNO
UMNO
President for 22 years, announced that he was quitting the party after having lost confidence in Abdullah Badawi's leadership, and that he would only rejoin the party after Abdullah had stepped down as UMNO President and Prime Minister. On 15 September 2008, Abdullah's cabinet Minister in Prime Minister Department Senator Datuk Zaid Ibrahim submitted his resignation letter to the Prime Minister. He tendered his resignation as a protest to the government's action in detaining a blogger, a member of parliament and a reporter under the Internal Security Act. Abdullah later accepted his resignation. Transfer of power[edit] On 10 July 2008, Abdullah announced he would step down as UMNO President and Prime Minister in June 2009. Abdullah Badawi handed his resignation letter to the Yang di-Pertuan Agong on 2 April 2009. The Deputy Prime Minister, Najib, was sworn in as the Prime Minister the following day. Abdullah was then conferred with a "Tun" title by the King.[20] Nevertheless, shortly before he resigned, Najib gave promises to Abdullah that his constituency in Kepala Batas would continue to receive development funds, where he would continue to serve as its Member of Parliament.[21][22] Family[edit]

Badawi with his wife, Jeanne Abdullah

On 20 October 2005, Abdullah Badawi's wife, Endon Mahmood, died of breast cancer. Endon discovered the disease in 2003 while her twin sister Noraini, who had earlier been diagnosed with the same illness, died in January 2003. She received treatment in the United States and returned to Malaysia
Malaysia
18 days before her death. She is buried at a Muslim cemetery, at Taman Selatan, Precinct 20, Putrajaya. On 6 June 2007, the Prime Minister's office announced Abdullah Badawi's marriage to Jeanne Abdullah. On 9 June, a private ceremony was conducted at the Prime Minister's residence, Seri Perdana, and attended by close relatives. Jeanne was formerly married to the younger brother of Abdullah Badawi's late wife. She was also a manager at the Seri Perdana residential complex and has two children from her previous marriage.[23] Poetry[edit] Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
is known also as a poet. His poem I Seek Eternal Peace was translated into more than 80 languages and published as a book. Ahmad Badawi. Ku Cari Damai Abadi. I Seek Eternal Peace. In 80 Languages. Editor Assoc. Professor Dr. Victor Pogadaev. Kuala Lumpur: Penerbit Universiti Malaya, 2008 Controversies[edit]

American president George W. Bush
George W. Bush
meets with Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi of Malaysia
Malaysia
during Bush's visit to New York City for the United Nations General Assembly, 18 September 2006.

After moves to charge prominent figures such as Eric Chia and the then Land and Co-operative Development Minister, Kasitah Gaddam, with corruption, Abdullah Badawi's administration's efforts to combat corruption allegedly became less transparent. It was noted by the Economist that little progress has been made on curbing corruption. Malaysia
Malaysia
Cleaning up? Economist.com Brother[edit] Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
has been criticised for allowing his brother Fahim Ibrahim Badawi to buy 51 percent of the government-controlled MAS Catering Sdn Bhd. Fahim later sold this stake to Lufthansa's LSG Skychef at a huge profit.Home Son-in-law[edit] Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
has been criticised for allowing his son-in-law, Khairy Jamaluddin, to become unduly influential in UMNO
UMNO
politics.[24] Secularism[edit] In 2007 Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
first called Malaysia
Malaysia
an Islamic state. Earlier that month he had made another statement, saying Malaysia
Malaysia
was neither a theocratic or secular state.[25] A similar statement was made by Prime Minister on 12 March 2009, where he stated Malaysia
Malaysia
was a "negara Islam".[26] The Malaysian Chinese Association (MCA), a political group representing Malaysian Chinese, expressed reservations over this announcement. The MCA's position is that Malaysia
Malaysia
is a fully secular state, and that the law transcends religion.[27] Iraq Oil-for-Food Scandal[edit] Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
has been criticised for endorsing his relatives who were involved in abuses related to the Iraqi Oil-for-Food Programme.[28] Nuclear Proliferation[edit] Main article: Scomi Precision Engineering Nuclear Scandal Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
has been criticised after one of his son's companies was found to be producing components for centrifuges purported to be intended for use in Libya's secret uranium enrichment program. Concerns and disputes by Mahathir Mohamad
Mahathir Mohamad
and UMNO[edit] In 2005, it was alleged that under Abdullah Badawi's administration, there had been a significant increase in cases of cronyism regarding the distribution of import permits for foreign-manufactured vehicles. Then Prime Minister Mahathir had called for an investigation of the issue. Later, Mahathir Mohamad
Mahathir Mohamad
criticised Abdullah for cancelling a number of development projects that the former had started, such as the construction of a bridge to replace the causeway linking Malaysia and Singapore.[29] Vote of no confidence to Abdullah Badawi in Parliament[edit] In June 2008, the Sabah Progressive Party, a member of the 14-party ruling Barisan Nasional
Barisan Nasional
coalition, said its two legislators in the federal parliament will move or back a motion of no-confidence against Abdullah. Malaysia
Malaysia
has never experienced a serious no-confidence vote before and it is unclear what is the next step if, in the unlikely event, Abdullah loses the vote; whether a snap election is held, or whether the King dissolves parliament, or whether a new leader is given the opportunity to form a new government. No Malaysian Prime Minister has ever faced a vote of no-confidence presented by a member of his own coalition before. The Barisan Nasional
Barisan Nasional
has 140 lawmakers in the 222-member Parliament, enough to defeat any vote against Abdullah who is also president of the UMNO. Nevertheless, the motion was rejected by the Speaker on the basis that there were no grounds for the motion to be put forward. Election result[edit]

Parliament of Malaysia[30][31]

Year Constituency

Votes Pct Opponent(s) Votes Pct Ballots cast Majority Turnout

1978 Kepala Batas

Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
(UMNO) 12,645 62.41%

Musa Mohd. Yatim (PAS) 7,616 37.59%

5,029 Unknown

1982

Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
(UMNO) 16,759 68.51%

Mohamad Sabu (PAS) 4,115 16.82% 25,277 12,644 80.29%

Khoo Siew Hoe (DAP) 3,589 14.67%

1986

Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
(UMNO) 15,463 69.33%

Ahmad Hasan Salahuddin (PAS) 6,841 30.67% 22,900 8,622 75.81%

1990

Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
(UMNO) 17,025 70.35%

Ahmad Awang (S46) 7,174 29.65% 24,931 9,851 80.25%

1995

Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
(UMNO) 22,521 82.77%

Naser Mohd Radzi (S46) 4,687 17.23% 28,301 17,834 78.39%

1999

Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
(UMNO) 19,985 69.40%

Abd Khalid Rasid (PAS) 8,810 30.60% 29,413 11,175 81.22%

2004

Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
(UMNO) 25,403 77.72%

Abd Khalid Rasid (PAS) 7,281 22.28% 33,356 18,122 84.19%

2008

Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
(UMNO) 23,445 65.78%

Subri Md Arshad (PAS) 12,199 34.22% 36,328 11,246 84.45%

Honours and awards[edit]

Ahli Mangku Negara (1971) Kesatria Mangku Negara (1974) Darjah Johan Negeri (1979) Darjah Yang Mulia Pangkuan Negeri (1981) The Kwangha Medal (South Korea, 1983) Grand Cordan of the Order of the Sacred Treasure
Order of the Sacred Treasure
(Japan, 1991) Grand Cross of the Order of Merit (Chile, 1994) First Class of the Most Exalted Order of the White Elephant
Order of the White Elephant
(Thailand, 1994) Darjah Gemilang Pangkuan Negeri (1997) First Class of Order of Democratic People's Republic of Korea Friendship (North Korea, 1997) Seri Panglima Darjah Kinabalu (1999) Darjah Kebesaran Sultan Ahmad Shah Pahang Yang Amat DiMulia (1999) Darjah Kebesaran Seri Paduka Mahkota Selangor
Selangor
(2000) Darjah Seri Paduka Negeri Sembilan (2000) Darjah Setia Tuanku Syed Sirajuddin Jamallulail (2001) Darjah Seri Paduka Sultan Azlan Shah (2003) Datuk Patinggi Bintang Kenyalang (2003) Darjah Kerabat Johor Yang Amat Dihormati Pangkat Pertama (2004) Darjah Utama Negeri Melaka (2004) Order of José Marti
Order of José Marti
(Cuba, 2004) Darjah Seri Utama Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin
Mizan Zainal Abidin
(2005) Bintang Republik Indonesia Adipradana (Indonesia, 2007)  Malaysia : Honorary Grand Commander of the Order of the Defender of the Realm (2009)[32] Seri Utama Mahkota Wilayah (2010)

References[edit]

^ "New Malaysian PM sworn in", Al Jazeera. Archived 15 February 2011 at WebCite. ^ "Exit PM Pak Lah, enter Tun Abdullah". Archived 15 February 2011 at WebCite. ^ Noor, Elina, Noor, Ismail. Pak Lah: A Sense of Accountability–An Insight Into Effective Stewardship, Utusan Publications & Distributors, 2003, ISBN 978-967-61-1492-1. ^ "Case of three Abdullah Badawi's at launching of Institute", The Star, 13 February 2008. Archived 15 February 2011 at WebCite. ^ "Pak Lah's mother dies at 78". The Star Online. 3 February 2004.  ^ Backman, Michael. Asia Future Shock: Business Crisis and Opportunity in the Coming Years, Palgrave Macmillan, 2008, ISBN 978-0-230-00677-5, p. 133. ^ PM meets relatives from China, The Star Online, 22 December 2003. ^ " UMNO
UMNO
man and that 'immigrants' remark suspended"[permanent dead link]. ^ http://radaris.asia/p/Su/Chiang/ ^ "Chinese/Native intermarriage in Austronesian Asia". ^ "Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi: Full Biography". Archived from the original on 12 March 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2012.  ^ "Badawi administration signs FTA with Japan in 2006". Archived 15 February 2011 at WebCite. ^ "Govt to adopt new economic strategies". Archived 15 February 2011 at WebCite. ^ "BBC NEWS, Malaysia
Malaysia
marks 50 years as nation". Archived 15 February 2011 at WebCite. ^ Annie Freeda Cruez and V. Vasudevan.""PM gets backing from BN, Umno supreme councils"". Archived from the original on 16 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-11. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) , New Straits Times, 11 March 2008. ^ "M'sian PM defiant despite fading prospects", AFP AsiaOne News. ^ ""Malaysian prime minister sworn in for second term"". Archived from the original on 13 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-13. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) , Associated Press (International Herald Tribune), 10 March 2008. ^ "" Malaysia
Malaysia
PM announces new Cabinet"". Archived from the original on 23 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-23. , CNN, 18 March 2008. ^ "Live Telecast of Parliament Malaysia" on YouTube, 30 April 2008."Archived copy". Archived from the original on 15 February 2011. Retrieved 2011-02-15.  . ^ Najib sworn in, Tunship for Abdullah and wife, 2009/04/03, New Straits Times Online[dead link] ^ Abdullah’s boon to Kepala Batas folk ^ 2 April 2009, The Star (Malaysia)
The Star (Malaysia)
"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 15 February 2011. Retrieved 8 February 2016.  ^ "Prime Minister To Wed Jeanne Abdullah
Jeanne Abdullah
Badawi Saturday". Bernama. 6 June 2007. Archived from the original on 27 June 2007.  ^ Goh, Melissa (18 November 2006). Khairy says he does not influence government decisions. Channel News Asia. Archived 4 November 2007 at the Wayback Machine. ^ http://www.wluml.org/node/4006 ^ http://www.thenutgraph.com/mca-malaysia-is-a-secular-state/ ^ http://www.thenutgraph.com/mca-malaysia-is-a-secular-state/ ^ Asia Times Archived 15 February 2011 at WebCite ^ The velvet gloves come off Malaysia
Malaysia
Today Archived 16 December 2007 at the Wayback Machine. ^ "Keputusan Pilihan Raya Umum Parlimen/Dewan Undangan Negeri" (in Malay). Election Commission of Malaysia. Retrieved 4 February 2017. CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link) Percentage figures based on total turnout. ^ " Malaysia
Malaysia
General Election". undiinfo Malaysian Election Data. Malaysiakini. Retrieved 4 February 2017.  Results only available from the 2004 election. ^ "Semakan Penerima Darjah Kebesaran, Bintang dan Pingat Persekutuan". 

Further reading[edit]

Bridget Welsh & James Chin (ed) Awakenings: The Abdullah Badawi Years in Malaysia
Malaysia
(KL: SIRD 2013)

External links[edit]

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Abdullah Ahmad Badawi

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Abdullah Badawi.

Official Website of the Government of Malaysia Profile: Abdullah Ahmad Badawi, BBC News, 8 October 2008 The loyal Abdullah wins his rival Anwar's job thesundaily.com, Full statement from PM Abdullah Ahmad Badawi Video of discussion with Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
at the Asia Society, New York 10/19/2009 " Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi
collected news and commentary". The New York Times. 

Political offices

Preceded by Sulaiman Daud Minister of Education 1984–1986 Succeeded by Anwar Ibrahim

Preceded by Mahathir Mohamad Minister of Defence 1986–1987 Succeeded by Najib Razak

Preceded by Abu Hassan Omar Minister of Foreign Affairs 1991–1999 Succeeded by Syed Hamid Albar

Preceded by Mahathir Mohamad Minister of Home Affairs 1999–2004 Succeeded by Azmi Khalid

Minister of Finance 2003–2008 Succeeded by Najib Razak

Preceded by Najib Razak Minister of Defence 2008–2009 Succeeded by Ahmad Zahid Hamidi

Preceded by Anwar Ibrahim Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia 1999–2003 Succeeded by Najib Razak

Preceded by Mahathir Mohamad Prime Minister of Malaysia 2003–2009

Party political offices

Preceded by Anwar Ibrahim Deputy President of the United Malays National Organisation 1999–2003 Succeeded by Najib Razak

Preceded by Mahathir Mohamad President of United Malays National Organisation 2003–2009

Diplomatic posts

Preceded by Mahathir Mohamad Secretary General of the Non-Aligned Movement 2003–2006 Succeeded by Fidel Castro

Preceded by Khamtai Siphandon Chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations 2005 Succeeded by Gloria Macapagal Arroyo

v t e

Prime Ministers of Malaysia

Abdul Rahman Abdul Razak Hussein Hussein Onn Mahathir Mohamad Abdullah Ahmad Badawi Najib Razak

v t e

Deputy Prime Ministers of Malaysia

Abdul Razak Hussein Ismail Abdul Rahman Hussein Onn Mahathir Mohamad Musa Hitam Ghafar Baba Anwar Ibrahim Abdullah Ahmad Badawi Najib Razak Muhyiddin Yassin Ahmad Zahid Hamidi

v t e

Secretaries-General of the Non-Aligned Movement

Tito Nasser Kaunda Boumédienne Gopallawa Jayewardene F. Castro Reddy Singh Mugabe Drnovšek Jović Mesić Kostić Ćosić Suharto Samper Pastrana Mandela Mbeki Mahathir Abdullah F. Castro R. Castro Mubarak Tantawi Morsi Ahmadinejad Rouhani Maduro

v t e

First Mahathir cabinet
First Mahathir cabinet
(1981–1982)

Prime Minister: Mahathir Mohamad

Musa Hitam Lee San Choon Ong Kee Hui Ghazali Shafie Aishah Ghani Tengku Ahmad Rithauddeen Tengku Ismail Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah Chong Hon Nyan Shariff Ahmad Mohamed Rahmat Richard Ho Ung Hun Paul Leong Khee Seong Abdul Manan Othman Leo Moggie Irok Neo Yee Pan Samy Vellu Mokhtar Hashim Rafidah Aziz Sulaiman Daud Pengiran Othman Pengiran Rauf Sanusi Junid Abdullah Ahmad Badawi Mohamed Nasir

v t e

Second Mahathir cabinet
Second Mahathir cabinet
(1982–1986)

Prime Minister: Mahathir Mohamad

Musa Hitam Abdul Ghafar Baba Lee San Choon Ghazali Shafie Aishah Ghani Tengku Ahmad Rithauddeen Tengku Ismail Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah Chong Hon Nyan Paul Leong Khee Seong Abdul Manan Othman Leo Moggie Irok Neo Yee Pan Samy Vellu Mokhtar Hashim Rafidah Aziz Sulaiman Daud Pengiran Othman Pengiran Rauf Sanusi Junid Abdullah Ahmad Badawi Rais Yatim Mak Hon Kam Mohd. Adib Mohd. Adam Stephen Yong Kuet Tze Shahrir Abdul Samad Anwar Ibrahim James Peter Ongkili Abu Hassan Omar Mohd Khalil Yaakob Daim Zainuddin Ling Liong Sik Chan Siang Sun Lee Kim Sai Mohamed Nasir

v t e

Third Mahathir cabinet
Third Mahathir cabinet
(1986–1990)

Prime Minister: Mahathir Mohamad

Abdul Ghafar Baba Ling Liong Sik Samy Vellu Lim Keng Yaik Tengku Ahmad Rithauddeen Tengku Ismail Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah Leo Moggie Irok Rafidah Aziz Sulaiman Daud Sanusi Junid Abdullah Ahmad Badawi Rais Yatim Stephen Yong Kuet Tze Shahrir Abdul Samad Anwar Ibrahim Abu Hassan Omar Daim Zainuddin Chan Siang Sun Lee Kim Sai Najib Razak Abdul Ajib Ahmad Kasitah Gaddam Ng Cheng Kiat Mohamed Rahmat Sabbaruddin Chik Napsiah Omar Mohamed Yusof Mohamed Noor Mustaffa Mohammad Lim Ah Lek

v t e

Fourth Mahathir cabinet
Fourth Mahathir cabinet
(1990–1995)

Prime Minister: Mahathir Mohamad

Abdul Ghafar Baba Anwar Ibrahim Ling Liong Sik Samy Vellu Lim Keng Yaik Leo Moggie Irok Rafidah Aziz Sulaiman Daud Sanusi Junid Abu Hassan Omar Daim Zainuddin Lee Kim Sai Najib Razak Mohamed Rahmat Sabbaruddin Chik Napsiah Omar Mohamed Yusof Mohamed Noor Lim Ah Lek Abang Abu Bakar Abang Mustapha Law Hieng Ding Ting Chew Peh Sakaran Dandai Syed Hamid Albar Abdullah Ahmad Badawi Abdul Ghani Othman Osu Sukam Bernard Giluk Dompok Annuar Musa

v t e

Fifth Mahathir cabinet
Fifth Mahathir cabinet
(1995–1999)

Prime Minister: Mahathir Mohamad

Anwar Ibrahim Abdullah Ahmad Badawi Ling Liong Sik Samy Vellu Lim Keng Yaik Daim Zainuddin Leo Moggie Irok Rafidah Aziz Sulaiman Daud Abu Hassan Omar Najib Razak Mohamed Rahmat Sabbaruddin Chik Lim Ah Lek Abang Abu Bakar Abang Mustapha Law Hieng Ding Ting Chew Peh Syed Hamid Albar Annuar Musa Osu Sukam Muhyiddin Yassin Zaleha Ismail Chua Jui Meng Abdul Hamid Othman Mustapa Mohamed Chong Kah Kiat Megat Junid Megat Ayub Tajol Rosli Mohd Ghazali Siti Zaharah Sulaiman Abdul Kadir Sheikh Fadzir Mohd Khalil Yaakob Kasitah Gaddam

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Sixth Mahathir cabinet
Sixth Mahathir cabinet
(1999–2003)

Prime Minister: Mahathir Mohamad

Abdullah Ahmad Badawi Ling Liong Sik Samy Vellu Lim Keng Yaik Daim Zainuddin Leo Moggie Irok Rafidah Aziz Najib Razak Law Hieng Ding Syed Hamid Albar Muhyiddin Yassin Chua Jui Meng Siti Zaharah Sulaiman Mohd Khalil Yaakob Abdul Kadir Sheikh Fadzir Fong Chan Onn Ong Ka Ting Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz Azmi Khalid Hishammuddin Hussein Bernard Giluk Dompok Rais Yatim Mohd Effendi Norwawi Shahrizat Abdul Jalil Jamaluddin Jarjis Chan Kong Choy Abdul Hamid Zainal Abidin Kasitah Gaddam Musa Mohamad Tengku Adnan Tengku Mansor Pandikar Amin Mulia

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First Abdullah cabinet
First Abdullah cabinet
(2003–2004)

Prime Minister: Abdullah Ahmad Badawi

Najib Razak Ong Ka Ting Samy Vellu Lim Keng Yaik Leo Moggie Irok Rafidah Aziz Law Hieng Ding Syed Hamid Albar Muhyiddin Yassin Chua Jui Meng Siti Zaharah Sulaiman Mohd Khalil Yaakob Abdul Kadir Sheikh Fadzir Fong Chan Onn Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz Azmi Khalid Hishammuddin Hussein Bernard Giluk Dompok Rais Yatim Mohd Effendi Norwawi Shahrizat Abdul Jalil Jamaluddin Jarjis Chan Kong Choy Kasitah Gaddam Musa Mohamad Abdul Hamid Zainal Abidin Tengku Adnan Tengku Mansor

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Second Abdullah cabinet
Second Abdullah cabinet
(2004–2008)

Prime Minister: Abdullah Ahmad Badawi

Najib Razak Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz Abdullah Md Zin Mustapa Mohamed Mohd Radzi Sheikh Ahmad Maximus Johnity Ongkili Bernard Giluk Dompok Mohd Effendi Norwawi Nor Mohamed Yakcop Azmi Khalid Rafidah Aziz Hishammuddin Hussein Adenan Satem Mohd Isa Abdul Samad Shahrizat Abdul Jalil Zulhasnan Rafique Chan Kong Choy Muhyiddin Yassin Chua Soi Lek Ong Ka Ting Leo Michael Toyad Tengku Adnan Tengku Mansor Rais Yatim Syed Hamid Albar Shafie Salleh Fong Chan Onn Shafie Apdal Mohamed Khaled Nordin Abdul Aziz Shamsuddin Samy Vellu Jamaluddin Jarjis Lim Keng Yaik Peter Chin Fah Kui Azalina Othman Said Abdul Kadir Sheikh Fadzir Zainuddin Maidin

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Third Abdullah cabinet
Third Abdullah cabinet
(2008–2009)

Prime Minister: Abdullah Ahmad Badawi

Najib Razak Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz Ahmad Zahid Hamidi Amirsham Abdul Aziz Zaid Ibrahim Bernard Giluk Dompok Nor Mohamed Yakcop Syed Hamid Albar Muhyiddin Yassin Hishammuddin Hussein Douglas Uggah Embas Zulhasnan Rafique Ong Tee Keat Mustapa Mohamed Liow Tiong Lai Azalina Othman Said Shafie Apdal Ong Ka Chuan Rais Yatim Mohamed Khaled Nordin Subramaniam Sathasivam Shahrir Abdul Samad Noh Omar Muhammad Muhammad Taib Mohd Zin Mohamed Maximus Johnity Ongkili Shaziman Abu Mansor Peter Chin Fah Kui Ng Yen Yen Ismail Sabri Yaakob Ahmad Shabery Cheek

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Grand Commanders of the Order of the Defender of the Realm

Grand Commanders

1958: Tunku Kurshiah 1958: Tunku Ismail 1958: Tunku Munawir 1958: Tengku Yahya Petra 1958: Leong Yew Koh 1958: Raja Uda Raja Muhammad 1958: Tan Cheng Lock 1959: Abdul Razak Hussein 1959: Henry Lee Hau Shik 1959: Tengku Budriah 1964: Abang Haji Openg 1964: Mustapha Harun 1967: Pengiran Ahmad Raffae 1968: Syed Sheh Shahabudin 1970: Syed Sheh Hassan Barakbah 1970: Tuanku Bujang Tuanku Othman 1970: Sharifah Rodziah Syed Alwi Barakbah 1972: Abdul Aziz Abdul Majid 1975: Fuad Stephens 1976: Sardon Jubir 1976: Syed Zahiruddin 1977: Mohd Hamdan Abdullah 1978: Abang Muhammad Salahuddin 1978: Ahmad Koroh 1979: Mohamad Adnan Robert 1981: Hussein Onn 1982: Abdul Rahman Ya'kub 1982: Awang Hassan 1987: Tunku Ibrahim Ismail 1989: Ahmad Zaidi Adruce 1989: Hamdan Sheikh Tahir 1989: Mohammad Said Keruak 1989: Syed Ahmad Syed Mahmud Shahabuddin 1996: Sakaran Dandai 2003: Ahmadshah Abdullah 2003: Mahathir Mohamad 2004: Mohd Khalil Yaakob 2009: Abdullah Ahmad Badawi 2011: Juhar Mahiruddin 2014: Abdul Taib Mahmud

Honorary Grand Commanders

1958: Lim Yew Hock 1959: Djuanda Kartawidjaja 1962: Thanom Kittikachorn 1962: Thanat Khoman 1963: Yusof Ishak 1963: Norodom Monineath 1964: Prapas Charusathien 1964: Wan Waithayakon 1964: Dhani Nivat 1965: Zein al-Sharaf Talal 1965: Muna al-Hussein 1965: Muhammad bin Talal 1965: Hassan bin Talal 1965: Firyal 1965: Hussein bin Nassir 1965: Wasfi al-Tal 1965: Abdel Hakim Amer 1965: Zakaria Mohieddin 1965: Anwar Sadat 1965: Hussein el-Shafei 1965: Hassan Ibrahim 1965: Ali Sabri 1971: Souvanna Phouma 1975: Kukrit Pramoj 1979: Kriangsak Chamanan 1982: Fahd bin Abdulaziz Al Saud 1984: Elena Ceaușescu 1984: Prem Tinsulanonda 1989: Jefri Bolkiah 2000: Maha Vajiralongkorn 2000: Sultan bin Abdulaziz
Sultan bin Abdulaziz
Al Saud 2001: Khalifa bin Salman Al Khalifa 2003: Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud 2003: Marcello Pera 2003: Pier Ferdinando Casini 2005: Victoria 2010: Moza bint Nasser 2012: Naruhito 2012: Masako

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 119263608 LCCN: n89120654 ISNI: 0000 0001 1497 5050 GN

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