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A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
(French: Un homme et une femme) is a 1966 French film written and directed by Claude Lelouch
Claude Lelouch
and starring Anouk Aimée and Jean-Louis Trintignant. Written by Lelouch and Pierre Uytterhoeven, the film is about a young widow and widower who meet by chance at their children's boarding school and whose budding relationship is complicated by the memories of their deceased spouses.[2] The film is notable for its lush photography, which features frequent segues between full color, black-and-white, and sepia-toned shots, and for its memorable musical score by Francis Lai. A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
had a total of 4,272,000 admissions in France and was also the 6th highest-grossing film of the year.[3] In the United States, the film earned $14,000,000.[1] The film won several awards, including the Palme d'Or
Palme d'Or
at the 1966 Cannes Film Festival,[4] two Golden Globe Awards
Golden Globe Awards
for Best Foreign Language Film and Best Actress - Drama (for Aimée), and two Academy Awards
Academy Awards
for Best Foreign Language Film and Best Original Screenplay.[5][6] A sequel, A Man and a Woman: 20 Years Later (Un Homme et une Femme, 20 Ans Déjà) was released in 1986.

Contents

1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production

3.1 Story and script 3.2 Casting 3.3 Filming

4 Reception

4.1 Box Office 4.2 Critical response 4.3 Awards and nominations

5 Soundtrack

5.1 Track listing 5.2 Chart positions

6 See also 7 References 8 External links

Plot[edit] A young widow, Anne Gauthier (Anouk Aimée), is raising her daughter Françoise (Souad Amidou) alone following the death of her husband (Pierre Barouh) who worked as a stuntman and who died in a movie set accident that she witnessed. Still working as a film script supervisor, Anne divides her time between her home in Paris
Paris
and Deauville
Deauville
in northern France where her daughter attends boarding school. A young widower, Jean-Louis (Jean-Louis Trintignant), is raising his son Antoine (Antoine Sire) alone following the death of his wife Valerie (Valerie Lagrange) who committed suicide after Jean-Louis was in a near fatal crash during the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Still working as a race car driver, Jean-Louis divides his time between Paris
Paris
and Deauville
Deauville
where his son also attends boarding school. One day Anne and Jean-Louis meet at the Deauville
Deauville
boarding school after Anne misses the last train back to Paris. Jean-Louis offers her a lift and the two become acquainted during the drive home, enjoying each other's company. When he drops her off, he asks if she would like to drive up together the following weekend, and she gives him her phone number. After a busy week at the track preparing for the next race, Jean-Louis calls and they meet early Sunday morning and drive to Deauville
Deauville
in the rain. Clearly attracted to each other, they enjoy a pleasant Sunday lunch with their children who get along well. Later that afternoon they go for a boat ride followed by a walk on the beach at sunset. Jean-Louis spends the following week preparing for and driving in the Monte Carlo Rally
Monte Carlo Rally
in southeast France. Every day, Anne closely follows news reports of the race, which takes place in poor weather conditions along the icy roads of the French Riviera. Of the 273 cars that started the race, only 42 were able to finish, including Jean Louis's white Mustang, number 145. Watching the television coverage of the conclusion of the race, Anne sends Jean-Louis a telegram that reads, "Bravo! I love you. Anne." That night at a dinner for the drivers at the Monte Carlo Casino, Jean-Louis receives the telegram and leaves immediately. He jumps into the other Mustang (number 184) used during the race and drives through the night to Paris, telling himself that when a woman sends a telegram like that, you go to her no matter what. Along the way he imagines what their reunion will be like. At her Paris
Paris
apartment, Jean-Louis learns that Anne is in Deauville, so he continues north. Jean-Louis finally arrives in Deauville
Deauville
and finds Anne and the two children playing on the beach. When they see each other, they run into each other's arms and embrace. After dropping their children off at the boarding school, Jean-Louis and Anne drive into town where they rent a room and begin to make love with passionate tenderness. While they are in each other's arms, however, Jean-Louis senses that something is not right. Anne's memories of her deceased husband are still with her and she feels uncomfortable continuing. Anne says it would be best for her to take the train back to Paris
Paris
alone. After dropping her off at the station, Jean-Louis drives home alone, unable to understand her feelings. On the train Anne can only think of Jean-Louis and their time together. Meanwhile, Jean-Louis drives south through the French countryside to the Paris
Paris
train station, just as her train is arriving. As she leaves the train, she spots Jean-Louis and is surprised, hesitates briefly, and then walks toward him and they embrace. Cast[edit]

Anouk Aimée
Anouk Aimée
as Anne Gauthier Jean-Louis Trintignant
Jean-Louis Trintignant
as Jean-Louis Duroc Pierre Barouh
Pierre Barouh
as Pierre Gauthier Valérie Lagrange as Valerie Duroc Antoine Sire as Antoine Duroc Souad Amidou as Françoise Gauthier Henri Chemin as Jean Louis' co-driver Yane Barry as Jean Louis' mistress Paul Le Person as Petrol pump attendant Simone Paris
Paris
as Head Mistress Gerard Sire as Radio commentator Gérard Larrousse
Gérard Larrousse
as Rally driver Jean Collomb as the servor Clive Roberts as Rally driver[7]

Production[edit] Story and script[edit] According to director Claude Lelouch, the story originated from an experience following his disappointment trying to get a distribution deal for his film Les Grands Moments. As was his habit during troubling times, he went for a long drive and ended up on the shore at Deauville
Deauville
at 2:00 am. After a few hours sleep in the car, he was awakened by the sunrise and saw a woman walking on the beach with her daughter and a dog. This sparked his creativity which led to the story and script which he co-wrote with Pierre Uytterhoeven within a month.[8] Casting[edit] A key casting decision for Lelouch was Jean-Louis Trintignant.

I think Jean-Louis is the actor who taught me how to direct actors. We really brought each other a lot. He changed his method of acting while working with me, and I began to truly understand what directing actors was all about, working with him. I think the relationship between a director and actor is the same relationship as in a love story between two people. One cannot direct an actor if you do not love him or her. And he cannot be good if he or she does not love you in turn.[9]

For the female lead, Trintignant asked Lelouch who his ideal woman would be, and Lelouch indicated Anouk Aimée, who had appeared in Fellini's La Dolce Vita
La Dolce Vita
(1960) and
(1962). Trintignant happened to be a close friend of hers and told him to call her. When he did, she accepted without reading the script. Although early disagreements and the low-budget skeleton crew caused initial tension between the director and actress, they quickly resolved their differences and the two went on to become close friends.[8] Filming[edit] Once the script was drafted, the film was made relatively quickly, with one month of preproduction work, three weeks of principal photography, and three weeks editing.[8] Due to budget constraints, he used an older handheld camera that was not soundproof, so blankets were frequently employed to dampen the camera noise.[8] Lelouch is considered a pioneer in mixing different film stocks: black-and-white with color, and 35mm with 16mm and super 8. For years film critics debated the symbolism of the mixed film stocks, but Lelouch acknowledged that the primary reason was that he was running out of money, and black and white stock was cheaper.[9] His original plan involved shooting strictly in black and white, but when an American distributor offered him $40,000 to film in color, he filmed the outdoor sequences in color, and the indoor scenes in black and white.[8] The music soundtrack was recorded prior to filming, and Lelouch would play the music on the set to inspire the actors.[8] Lelouch encouraged his actors to improvise some of the dialogue, and several key scenes were improvised. The climactic scene at a train station was not scripted at the time of shooting, and Aimée did not know that director Lelouch had decided on the two main characters reuniting at the end. The look of surprise on Aimée's face is genuine.[10] Reception[edit] Box Office[edit] The film earned $3 million in the US and $4 million internationally during its initial theatrical release.[11] It was the sixth most popular movie at the French box office in 1966, after La Grande Vadrouille, Dr Zhivago, Is Paris
Paris
Burning?, A Fistful of Dollars and Lost Command.[12] Critical response[edit] Upon its theatrical release in the United States, A Man and a Woman received mostly positive reviews. In his review in The New York Times, Bosley Crowther wrote, "For a first-rate demonstration of the artfulness of a cameraman and the skill at putting together handsome pictures and a strongly sentimental musical score, there is nothing around any better than Claude Lelouch's A Man and a Woman."[13] Crowther lauded the "beautiful and sometimes breath-taking exposition of visual imagery intended to excite the emotions" and praised the director for his ability to create something unique from the commonplace:

Mr. Lelouch, who was his own script writer as well as director and cameraman, has a rare skill at photographing clichés so that they sparkle and glow with poetry and at generating a sense of inspiration in behavior that is wholly trivial.[13]

The review in Variety noted the performances of the lead actors: "Anouk Aimee has a mature beauty and an ability to project an inner quality that helps stave off the obvious banality of her character, and this goes too for the perceptive Jean-Louis Trintignant
Jean-Louis Trintignant
as the man."[14] On the review aggregator web site Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds a 77% positive rating from top film critics based on 13 reviews, and an 88% positive audience rating based on 5,386 reviews.[15] The film was selected for screening as part of the Cannes Classics section at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival.[16] Awards and nominations[edit]

1966 Cannes Film Festival
1966 Cannes Film Festival
Palme d'Or
Palme d'Or
(Claude Lelouch) – Won 1967 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film – Won 1967 Academy Award for Best Writing (Claude Lelouch, Pierre Uytterhoeven) – Won 1967 Academy Award Nomination for Best Actress in a Leading Role (Anouk Aimée) 1967 Academy Award Nomination for Best Director (Claude Lelouch) 1967 Blue Ribbon Award for Best Foreign Language Film (Claude Lelouch) – Won 1967 Cinema Writers Circle Award for Best Foreign Film – Won 1967 Directors Guild of America
Directors Guild of America
Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement (Claude Lelouch) – Won 1967 Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign-Language Foreign Film – Won 1967 Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture Actress (Anouk Aimée) – Won 1967 Golden Globe Award Nomination for Best Motion Picture Director (Claude Lelouch) 1967 Golden Globe Award Nomination for Best Original Score (Francis Lai) 1967 Golden Globe Award Nomination for Best Original Song in a Motion Picture (Francis Lai, Pierre Barouh) 1967 Italian National Syndicate of Film Journalists Silver Ribbon for Best Director, Foreign Film (Claude Lelouch) – Won 1967 Laurel Award Nomination for Female Dramatic Performance (Anouk Aimée) 1967 National Board of Review of Motion Pictures
National Board of Review of Motion Pictures
Award for Top Foreign Film – Won 1968 BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actress (Anouk Aimée) – Won 1968 BAFTA Award Nomination for Best Film (Claude Lelouch) 1968 Mexican Cinema Journalists Silver Goddess Award for Best Foreign Actress (Anouk Aimée) – Won[17]

Soundtrack[edit]

A Man and a Woman

Soundtrack album by Francis Lai

Released 1966

Genre Pop, Jazz

Label United Artists

The soundtrack was written by Francis Lai and earned "Best Original Score" nominations at both the BAFTA Awards
BAFTA Awards
and Golden Globe Awards
Golden Globe Awards
in 1967. The film's theme song, with music by Francis Lai and lyrics by Pierre Barouh, was also nominated for "Best Original Song in a Motion Picture" at the Golden Globe Awards.[17] In Finland it has become one of the most easily recognizable TV advertisement themes, having been used for decades by the cruiseferry brand Silja Line. Pierre Barouh, who plays the deceased husband in the film, also sings the songs in the soundtrack. In a sequence of the film, he makes a brief reappearance singing "Samba Saravah", a French version with lyrics by Barouh himself of the Brazilian song "Samba da Benção" written by Baden Powell with original lyrics by Vinicius de Moraes.[18] The song "Aujourd'hui C'est Toi" is used as the theme for the BBC's Panorama current affairs program, plus Rede Globo's Jornal Hoje midday newscast, and YLE's Ajankohtainen kakkonen
Ajankohtainen kakkonen
weekly current affairs television program in Finland on TV2 from 1969 to 2015. Harry James recorded a version of the film's theme song on his album For Listening And Dancing, released in 1981 on Reader's Digest RD4A 213. Track listing[edit]

Un homme et une femme (A Man and a Woman) performed by Nicole Croisille and Pierre Barouh
Pierre Barouh
(2:40) Samba Saravah by Pierre Barouh
Pierre Barouh
(4:30) Aujourd'hui c'est toi (Today It's You) by Nicole Croisille (2:06) Un homme et une femme (A Man and a Woman) (2:37) Plus fort que nous (Stronger Than Us) (3:15) Aujourd'hui c'est toi (Today It's You) (2:35) A l'ombre de nous (In Our Shadow) by Pierre Barouh
Pierre Barouh
(4:55) Plus fort que nous (Stronger Than Us) by Nicole Croisille and Pierre Barouh (3:43) A 200 a l'heure (124 Miles An Hour) (2:30)[19][20]

Chart positions[edit]

Year Chart Position

1968 Australian Kent Music Report
Kent Music Report
Albums Chart 1

Preceded by Disraeli Gears
Disraeli Gears
by Cream Australian Kent Music Report
Kent Music Report
number-one album 13 April 1968 – 14 June 1968 29 June 1968 – 26 July 1968 Succeeded by Blooming Hits by Paul Mauriat and His Orchestra

See also[edit]

List of submissions to the 39th Academy Awards
Academy Awards
for Best Foreign Language Film List of French submissions for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film

References[edit]

^ a b "A Man and a Woman, Box Office Information". The Numbers. Retrieved March 30, 2012.  ^ "A Man and a Woman". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved March 30, 2012.  ^ "Un homme et une femme". JP's Box Office. Retrieved March 30, 2012.  ^ "Un homme et une femme". Festival de Cannes. Archived from the original on August 7, 2012. Retrieved March 31, 2012.  ^ "The 39th Academy Awards
Academy Awards
(1967) Nominees and Winners". The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved March 31, 2012.  ^ " Golden Globe Awards
Golden Globe Awards
for 1967". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved April 1, 2012.  ^ "Full cast and crew for A Man and a Woman". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved March 30, 2012.  ^ a b c d e f Claude Lelouch
Claude Lelouch
(Director) (1994). A Man and a Woman: 37 Years Later (DVD). Burbank: Warner Brothers.  ^ a b Simon, Alex. "Claude Lelouch". The Hollywood Interview. Retrieved March 31, 2012.  ^ Erickson, Hal. "A Man and a Woman". Allmovie. Retrieved March 31, 2012.  ^ Tino Balio, United Artists: The Company That Changed the Film Industry, University of Wisconsin Press, 1987 p. 231 ^ "French Box Office 1966". Box Office Story.  ^ a b Crowther, Bosley (July 13, 1966). "French and Frankly Romantic". The New York Times. Retrieved April 1, 2012.  ^ "Un Homme et une Femme". Variety. December 31, 1965. Retrieved April 1, 2012.  ^ "A Man and a Woman". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved April 1, 2012.  ^ "Cannes Classics 2016". Cannes Film Festival. 20 April 2016. Retrieved 21 April 2016.  ^ a b "Awards for A Man and a Woman". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved March 31, 2012.  ^ Barouh, Pierre (November 3, 2005). "A lifelong ambassador of Brazil". RFI Music. Archived from the original on February 10, 2012. Retrieved March 31, 2012.  ^ "A Man And A Woman (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)". Discogs. Retrieved March 30, 2012.  ^ "Soundtracks for A Man and a Woman". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved March 30, 2012. 

External links[edit]

A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
on IMDb A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
at AllMovie A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
at Rotten Tomatoes

v t e

Films directed by Claude Lelouch

Le propre de l'homme In the Affirmative La femme spectacle 24 heures d'amant ...pour un maillot jaune The Grand Moments Une fille et des fusils A Man and a Woman Live for Life 13 jours en France Love Is a Funny Thing Life Love Death Le voyou Smic Smac Smoc L'aventure, c'est l'aventure La bonne année And Now My Love Mariage Cat and Mouse C'était un rendez-vous The Good and the Bad If I Had to Do It All Over Again Another Man, Another Chance Robert et Robert Us Two The Ones and the Others Edith and Marcel Long Live Life Partir, revenir Attention bandits! A Man and a Woman: 20 Years Later Itinéraire d'un enfant gâté There Were Days... and Moons The Beautiful Story All That... for This?! Les Misérables Men, Women: A User's Manual Chance or Coincidence One 4 All And Now... Ladies and Gentlemen Les parisiens Le courage d'aimer Crossed Tracks What War May Bring D'un film à l'autre Salaud, on t'aime Un plus une Chacun sa vie et son intime conviction

v t e

French submissions for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film

1948–1960

Monsieur Vincent
Monsieur Vincent
(1948) The Walls of Malapaga (1950) Forbidden Games
Forbidden Games
(1952) Gervaise (1956) Gates of Paris
Paris
(1957) My Uncle (1958) Black Orpheus
Black Orpheus
(1959) La Vérité (1960)

1961–1980

Last Year at Marienbad
Last Year at Marienbad
(1961) Sundays and Cybele
Sundays and Cybele
(1962) The Fire Within
The Fire Within
(1963) The Umbrellas of Cherbourg
The Umbrellas of Cherbourg
(1964) Pierrot le Fou
Pierrot le Fou
(1965) A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
(1966) Live for Life (1967) Stolen Kisses
Stolen Kisses
(1968) My Night with Maud (1969) Hoa-Binh (1970) Ramparts of Clay (1971) The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
(1972) Day for Night (1973) Lacombe, Lucien
Lacombe, Lucien
(1974) India Song
India Song
(1975) Cousin, cousine (1976) Madame Rosa
Madame Rosa
(1977) Get Out Your Handkerchiefs
Get Out Your Handkerchiefs
(1978) A Simple Story (1979) The Last Metro
The Last Metro
(1980)

1981–2000

Diva (1981) Coup de Torchon (1982) Entre Nous (1983) So Long, Stooge
So Long, Stooge
(1984) Three Men and a Cradle (1985) Betty Blue
Betty Blue
(1986) Au revoir, les enfants (1987) La Lectrice (1988) Camille Claudel (1989) Cyrano de Bergerac (1990) Van Gogh (1991) Indochine (1992) Germinal (1993) Wild Reeds
Wild Reeds
(1994) French Twist (1995) Ridicule
Ridicule
(1996) Western (1997) The Dreamlife of Angels
The Dreamlife of Angels
(1998) East/West
East/West
(1999) The Taste of Others
The Taste of Others
(2000)

2001–present

Amélie
Amélie
(2001) 8 Women
8 Women
(2002) Bon Voyage (2003) The Chorus (2004) Joyeux Noël
Joyeux Noël
(2005) Avenue Montaigne (2006) Persepolis (2007) The Class (2008) A Prophet
A Prophet
(2009) Of Gods and Men (2010) Declaration of War (2011) The Intouchables
The Intouchables
(2012) Renoir (2013) Saint Laurent (2014) Mustang (2015) Elle (2016) BPM (Beats per Minute)
BPM (Beats per Minute)
(2017)

v t e

Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film

1947–1955 (Honorary)

1947: Shoeshine – Vittorio De Sica 1948: Monsieur Vincent
Monsieur Vincent
– Maurice Cloche 1949: Bicycle Thieves
Bicycle Thieves
– Vittorio De Sica 1950: The Walls of Malapaga – René Clément 1951: Rashomon
Rashomon
– Akira Kurosawa 1952: Forbidden Games
Forbidden Games
– René Clément 1953: No Award 1954: Gate of Hell – Teinosuke Kinugasa 1955: Samurai, The Legend of Musashi – Hiroshi Inagaki

1956–1975

1956: La Strada
La Strada
– Federico Fellini 1957: Nights of Cabiria
Nights of Cabiria
– Federico Fellini 1958: My Uncle – Jacques Tati 1959: Black Orpheus
Black Orpheus
– Marcel Camus 1960: The Virgin Spring
The Virgin Spring
– Ingmar Bergman 1961: Through a Glass Darkly – Ingmar Bergman 1962: Sundays and Cybele
Sundays and Cybele
– Serge Bourguignon 1963:
– Federico Fellini 1964: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
– Vittorio De Sica 1965: The Shop on Main Street
The Shop on Main Street
Ján Kadár & Elmar Klos 1966: A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
– Claude Lelouch 1967: Closely Watched Trains
Closely Watched Trains
– Jiří Menzel 1968: War and Peace – Sergei Bondarchuk 1969: Z – Costa-Gavras 1970: Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
– Elio Petri 1971: The Garden of the Finzi Continis – Vittorio De Sica 1972: The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
– Luis Buñuel 1973: Day for Night – François Truffaut 1974: Amarcord
Amarcord
– Federico Fellini 1975: Dersu Uzala – Akira Kurosawa

1976–2000

1976: Black and White in Color
Black and White in Color
– Jean-Jacques Annaud 1977: Madame Rosa
Madame Rosa
– Moshé Mizrahi 1978: Get Out Your Handkerchiefs
Get Out Your Handkerchiefs
– Bertrand Blier 1979: The Tin Drum – Volker Schlöndorff 1980: Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears
Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears
– Vladimir Menshov 1981: Mephisto – István Szabó 1982: Volver a Empezar ('To Begin Again') – José Luis Garci 1983: Fanny and Alexander
Fanny and Alexander
– Ingmar Bergman 1984: Dangerous Moves
Dangerous Moves
– Richard Dembo 1985: The Official Story
The Official Story
– Luis Puenzo 1986: The Assault – Fons Rademakers 1987: Babette's Feast – Gabriel Axel 1988: Pelle the Conqueror
Pelle the Conqueror
– Bille August 1989: Cinema Paradiso – Giuseppe Tornatore 1990: Journey of Hope – Xavier Koller 1991: Mediterraneo – Gabriele Salvatores 1992: Indochine – Régis Wargnier 1993: Belle Époque – Fernando Trueba 1994: Burnt by the Sun
Burnt by the Sun
– Nikita Mikhalkov 1995: Antonia's Line
Antonia's Line
– Marleen Gorris 1996: Kolya
Kolya
– Jan Svěrák 1997: Character – Mike van Diem 1998: Life Is Beautiful
Life Is Beautiful
– Roberto Benigni 1999: All About My Mother
All About My Mother
– Pedro Almodóvar 2000: Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
– Ang Lee

2001–present

2001: No Man's Land – Danis Tanović 2002: Nowhere in Africa – Caroline Link 2003: The Barbarian Invasions
The Barbarian Invasions
– Denys Arcand 2004: The Sea Inside
The Sea Inside
– Alejandro Amenábar 2005: Tsotsi
Tsotsi
– Gavin Hood 2006: The Lives of Others
The Lives of Others
– Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck 2007: The Counterfeiters – Stefan Ruzowitzky 2008: Departures – Yōjirō Takita 2009: The Secret in Their Eyes
The Secret in Their Eyes
– Juan J. Campanella 2010: In a Better World
In a Better World
– Susanne Bier 2011: A Separation – Asghar Farhadi 2012: Amour – Michael Haneke 2013: The Great Beauty
The Great Beauty
– Paolo Sorrentino 2014: Ida – Paweł Pawlikowski 2015: Son of Saul
Son of Saul
– László Nemes 2016: The Salesman – Asghar Farhadi 2017: A Fantastic Woman
A Fantastic Woman
– Sebastián Lelio

v t e

Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film

Foreign Film – Foreign Language 1965–1972

Juliet of the Spirits (1965) A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
(1966) Live for Life (1967) War and Peace (1968) Z (1969) Rider on the Rain
Rider on the Rain
(1970) The Policeman
The Policeman
(1971) The Emigrants (1972) The New Land
The New Land
(1972)

Foreign Film 1973–1985

The Pedestrian (1973) Scenes from a Marriage
Scenes from a Marriage
(1974) Lies My Father Told Me
Lies My Father Told Me
(1975) Face to Face (1976) A Special Day
A Special Day
(1977) Autumn Sonata
Autumn Sonata
(1978) La Cage aux Folles (1979) Tess (1980) Chariots of Fire
Chariots of Fire
(1981) Gandhi (1982) Fanny and Alexander
Fanny and Alexander
(1983) A Passage to India (1984) The Official Story
The Official Story
(1985)

Foreign Language Film 1986–present

The Assault (1986) My Life as a Dog
My Life as a Dog
(1987) Pelle the Conqueror
Pelle the Conqueror
(1988) Cinema Paradiso (1989) Cyrano de Bergerac (1990) Europa Europa
Europa Europa
(1991) Indochine (1992) Farewell My Concubine (1993) Farinelli (1994) Les Misérables (1995) Kolya
Kolya
(1996) Ma vie en rose (1997) Central Station (1998) All About My Mother
All About My Mother
(1999) Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
(2000) No Man's Land (2001) Talk to Her (2002) Osama (2003) The Sea Inside
The Sea Inside
(2004) Paradise Now
Paradise Now
(2005) Letters from Iwo Jima
Letters from Iwo Jima
(2006) The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007) Waltz with Bashir
Waltz with Bashir
(2008) The White Ribbon
The White Ribbon
(2009) In a Better World
In a Better World
(2010) A Separation (2011) Amour (2012) The Great Beauty
The Great Beauty
(2013) Leviathan (2014) Son of Saul
Son of Saul
(2015) Elle (2016) In the Fade (2017)

v t e

Palme d'Or
Palme d'Or
winning films

Union Pacific (1939) Torment (Hets) (1946) The Lost Weekend (1946) The Red Meadows (1946) Brief Encounter
Brief Encounter
(1946) María Candelaria
María Candelaria
(1946) Neecha Nagar (1946) The Turning Point (1946) La Symphonie pastorale (1946) The Last Chance (1946) Men Without Wings (1946) Rome, Open City
Rome, Open City
(1946) The Third Man
The Third Man
(1949) Miss Julie (1951) Miracle in Milan
Miracle in Milan
(1951) The Tragedy of Othello: The Moor of Venice (1951) Two Cents Worth of Hope
Two Cents Worth of Hope
(1952) The Wages of Fear
The Wages of Fear
(1953) Gate of Hell (1954) Marty (1955) The Silent World
The Silent World
(1956) Friendly Persuasion (1957) The Cranes Are Flying
The Cranes Are Flying
(1958) Black Orpheus
Black Orpheus
(1959) La Dolce Vita
La Dolce Vita
(1960) The Long Absence
The Long Absence
(1961) Viridiana
Viridiana
(1961) O Pagador de Promessas
O Pagador de Promessas
(1962) The Leopard (1963) The Umbrellas of Cherbourg
The Umbrellas of Cherbourg
(1964) The Knack ...and How to Get It
The Knack ...and How to Get It
(1965) A Man and a Woman
A Man and a Woman
(1966) The Birds, the Bees and the Italians
The Birds, the Bees and the Italians
(1966) Blowup
Blowup
(1967) if.... (1969) MASH (1970) The Go-Between (1971) The Working Class Goes to Heaven
The Working Class Goes to Heaven
(1972) The Mattei Affair
The Mattei Affair
(1972) The Hireling (1973) Scarecrow (1973) The Conversation
The Conversation
(1974) Chronicle of the Years of Fire
Chronicle of the Years of Fire
(1975) Taxi Driver
Taxi Driver
(1976) Padre Padrone
Padre Padrone
(1977) The Tree of Wooden Clogs
The Tree of Wooden Clogs
(1978) Apocalypse Now
Apocalypse Now
(1979) The Tin Drum (1979) All That Jazz (1980) Kagemusha
Kagemusha
(1980) Man of Iron (1981) Missing (1982) Yol
Yol
(1982) The Ballad of Narayama (1983) Paris, Texas (1984) When Father Was Away on Business (1985) The Mission (1986) Under the Sun of Satan (1987) Pelle the Conqueror
Pelle the Conqueror
(1988) Sex, Lies, and Videotape
Sex, Lies, and Videotape
(1989) Wild at Heart (1990) Barton Fink
Barton Fink
(1991) The Best Intentions
The Best Intentions
(1992) Farewell My Concubine (1993) The Piano
The Piano
(1993) Pulp Fiction
Pulp Fiction
(1994) Underground (1995) Secrets & Lies (1996) Taste of Cherry
Taste of Cherry
(1997) The Eel (1997) Eternity and a Day
Eternity and a Day
(1998) Rosetta (1999) Dancer in the Dark
Dancer in the Dark
(2000) The Son's Room
The Son's Room
(2001) The Pianist (2002) Elephant (2003) Fahrenheit 9/11
Fahrenheit 9/11
(2004) The Child (2005) The Wind That Shakes the Barley (2006) 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days
(2007) The Class (2008) The White Ribbon
The White Ribbon
(2009) Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives
Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives
(2010) The Tree of Life (2011) Amour (2012) Blue Is the Warmest Colour
Blue Is the Warmest Colour
(2013) Winter Sleep (2014) Dheepan
Dheepan
(2015) I, Daniel Blake (2016) The S

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