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The Info List - AIM-92 Stinger


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The AIM-92 Stinger or ATAS (Air To Air Stinger) is an air-to-air missile developed from the shoulder-launched FIM-92 Stinger
FIM-92 Stinger
system, for use on helicopters such as the AH-64 Apache, Eurocopter Tiger
Eurocopter Tiger
and also UAVs such as the MQ-1 Predator. The missile itself is identical to the shoulder-launched Stinger.

Contents

1 Development 2 Operational history 3 Models

3.1 Block I 3.2 Block II

4 General characteristics 5 References

Development[edit] The US Army has used the ATAS variant on its OH-58D Kiowa Warrior and UH-60 Black Hawk
UH-60 Black Hawk
helicopters in the air-to-air role. In a 19 November 1996 demonstration, a Stinger (ATAS) Block-1 missile was launched from an OH-58D piloted by CPT Bob Blanchett at Yuma Proving Ground and successfully destroyed a QUH-1 drone helicopter deploying countermeasures at a range greater than 4,500 meters. All Air-to-Air Stinger (ATAS) Block II missiles will be modified existing Stinger RMP missiles (FIM-92C). Block II will incorporate various improvements including a new staring IR focal plane array seeker, a new battery, and advanced signal processing capabilities. The seeker permits engagements of helicopters in clutter out to the 8 km maximum physical range of the missile, also improved accuracy and IRCCM capabilities, and will provide a full night capability. The Block II missile also supports seeker slaving (steering the missile's seeker off-axis before launch to lock onto targets). This was first demonstrated on 6 November 1997 at Yuma. ATAL is an upgrade to the Air-to-Air Stinger launcher fielded on the OH-58D Kiowa Warrior and Blackhawk helicopters. In mid 2000, tests were carried out with the ATAL system mounted on the AH-64 Apache Longbow helicopter. Nine missiles were fired, eight of which scored direct hits against simulated hovering helicopter targets in a clutter environment. The missiles were launched with the Longbow helicopter traveling at speeds from hovering to 136 knots, side slips up to 30 knots, partial power descents, pull-up maneuvers, hovering pedal turns, push-over maneuvers, and a 22-degree bank. Operational history[edit] An Iraqi MiG-25
MiG-25
shot down a Predator drone
Predator drone
performing reconnaissance over the no fly zone in Iraq on 23 December 2002. Predators had been armed with Stingers, and were being used to "bait" Iraqi fighter planes, then run. In this incident, the Predator didn't run, but instead fired one of the Stingers after the MiG engaged with its own missiles. The Stinger's heat-seeker probably became "distracted" by the MiG's missile and so missed the MiG, and the Predator was destroyed. This was the first time in history a conventional aircraft and a drone had engaged in combat.[1] Models[edit] There are 2 variants of AIM-92[2] Block I[edit] The Air-to Air Stinger [ATAS] is an adaptation of the man portable Stinger System. It is a light weight missile designed to engage low altitude targets. A major milestone in the improvement of the Air-to-Air Stinger (ATAS) Block-1 missile was demonstrated on 19 November 1996 at Yuma Proving Ground, AZ. An OH-58D piloted by CPT Bob Blanchett, US Army Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM), successfully acquired, tracked, engaged, and destroyed a QUH-1 drone helicopter deploying countermeasures at a range greater than 4500 meters. This firing also demonstrated the capabilities of the improved missile to successfully engage a target without the requirement for super- elevation. Block II[edit] All Air-to-Air Stinger (ATAS) Block II missiles will be modified existing Stinger RMP missiles. The Block II retrofit program will add the Block I modifications plus incorporate a starring IR focal plane array seeker, a new battery, and advanced signal processing capabilities. The new seeker will permit engagements of helicopters in clutter out to the kinematic range of the missile. The missile and launcher will be 1760 compatible. The Block II program will also extend shelf life, improve accuracy and IRCCM capabilities, and will provide a full night capability. General characteristics[edit] As FIM-92 Stinger[3]

Length: 1.52 m (59.8 in.) Diameter: 70 mm (2.8 in.) Wingspan: 140 mm (5.5 in.) Launch weight: 16 kg Guidance: Fire-and-forget passive infrared seeker for Block I and Fire-and-forget passive IR focal plane array seeker in Block II version[2] Warhead: 3 kg HE blast fragmentation Propulsion: Dual thrust solid fuel rocket motor Speed: Mach 2.2 (750 m/s) Range: 8 km

References[edit]

^ CBS News report of the dogfight ^ a b http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ground/stinger.htm ^ http://fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/land/stinger.htm

v t e

1962 United States Tri-Service missile and drone designation system

1–50

MGM-1 RIM-2 MIM-3 AIM-4 MGM-5 RGM-6 AIM-7/RIM-7 RIM-8 AIM-9 CIM-10 PGM-11 AGM-12 CGM-13/MGM-13 MIM-14 RGM-15 CGM-16 PGM-17 MGM-18 PGM-19 ADM-20 MGM-21 AGM-22 MIM-23 RIM-24 HGM-25A/LGM-25C AIM-26 UGM-27 AGM-28 MGM-29 LGM-30 MGM-31 MGM-32 MQM-33 AQM-34 AQM-35 MQM-36 AQM-37 AQM-38 MQM-39 MQM-40 AQM-41 MQM-42 FIM-43 UUM-44 AGM-45 MIM-46 AIM-47 AGM-48 XLIM-49 LIM-49 RIM-50

51–100

MGM-51 MGM-52 AGM-53 AIM-54 RIM-55 PQM-56 MQM-57 MQM-58 RGM-59 AQM-60 MQM-61 AGM-62 AGM-63 AGM-64 AGM-65 RIM-66 RIM-67 AIM-68 AGM-69 LEM-70 BGM-71 MIM-72 UGM-73 BQM-74 BGM-75 AGM-76 FGM-77 AGM-78 AGM-79 AGM-80 AQM-81 AIM-82 AGM-83 AGM-84/RGM-84/UGM-84 AGM-84E AGM-84E/H/K RIM-85 AGM-86 AGM-87 AGM-88 UGM-89 BQM-90 AQM-91 FIM-92/AIM-92 XQM-93 YQM-94 AIM-95 UGM-96 AIM-97 YQM-98 LIM-99 LIM-100

101–150

RIM-101 PQM-102 AQM-103 MIM-104 MQM-105 BQM-106 MQM-107 BQM-108 BGM-109/AGM-109/RGM-109/UGM-109 BGM-110 BQM-111 AGM-112 RIM-113 AGM-114 MIM-115 RIM-116 FQM-117 LGM-118 AGM-119 AIM-120 CQM-121/CGM-121 AGM-122 AGM-123 AGM-124 RUM-125/UUM-125 BQM-126 AQM-127 AQM-128 AGM-129 AGM-130 AGM-131 AIM-132 UGM-133 MGM-134 ASM-135 AGM-136 AGM-137 CEM-138 RUM-139 MGM-140 ADM-141 AGM-142 MQM-143 ADM-144 BQM-145 MIM-146 BQM-147 FGM-148 PQM-149 PQM-150

151–

FQM-151 AIM-152 AGM-153 AGM-154 BQM-155 RIM-156 MGM-157 AGM-158A/B/AGM-158C AGM-159 ADM-160 RIM-161 RIM-162 GQM-163 MGM-164 RGM-165 MGM-166 BQM-167 MGM-168 AGM-169 MQM-170 MQM-171 FGM-172 GQM-173 RIM-174 MQM-175 AGM-176 BQM-177 MQM-178 AGM-179 AGM-180 AGM-181

Undesignated

Aequare ASALM Brazo Common Missile Ground-Based Interceptor Have Dash Kinetic Energy Interceptor MA-31 NCADE NLOS Pershing II Senior Prom Sprint Wagtail

See also: United States tri-service rocket designations post-1962 Drones designat

.