29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot
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The 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot was an
infantry Infantry is an army specialization whose military personnel, personnel engage in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and armored warfare, armored forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantrymen or infanteer, i ...

infantry
regiment of the
British Army The British Army is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' us ...
, raised in 1694. Under the
Childers Reforms The Childers Reforms of 1881 reorganised the infantry Infantry is an army specialization whose military personnel, personnel engage in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and armored warfare, armored forces. ...
it amalgamated with the
36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot The 36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, raised in 1701. Under the Childers Reforms it amalgamated with the 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot to form the Worcestershire Regiment in 1881. Its l ...
to become the 1st Battalion, the
Worcestershire Regiment The Worcestershire Regiment was a Line infantry, line infantry regiment in the British Army, formed in 1881 under the Childers Reforms by the amalgamation of the 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot and the 36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot. ...
in 1881.


History


Formation in 1694 to end of the 18th Century

The regiment was formed on 16 February 1694 during the
Nine Years War The Nine Years' War (1688–1697), often called the War of the Grand Alliance or the War of the League of Augsburg, was a conflict between France France (), officially the French Republic (french: link=no, République française), is a ...
by
Colonel Thomas Farrington Colonel (; abbreviated as Col., Col or COL) is a senior military Officer (armed forces), officer rank used in many countries. It is also used in some police forces and paramilitary organizations. Historically, in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuri ...
as Thomas Farrington's Regiment of Foot. Disbanded after the 1697
Treaty of Ryswick The Peace of Ryswick, or Rijswijk, was a series of treaties signed in the Dutch city of Rijswijk Rijswijk ( , ), formerly known as Ryswick ( ) in English, is a town and municipality in the Western Netherlands, in the province of South Holland. I ...
, it was reformed in 1702 when the
War of the Spanish Succession The War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714) was an early-18th-century European war, triggered by the death in November 1700 of the childless Charles II of Spain. It established the principle that dynastic rights were secondary to maintaini ...
began; while intended for the
West Indies The West Indies are a subregion A subregion is a part of a larger region In geography Geography (from Greek: , ''geographia'', literally "earth description") is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, features, in ...
, a notoriously unhealthy posting, Farringdon's protests meant instead it joined
Marlborough Marlborough may refer to: Places United Kingdom * Marlborough, Wiltshire, England ** Marlborough College, public school * Malborough, village in Devon, England * Marlborough School, Woodstock in Oxfordshire, England * The Marlborough Science Acade ...

Marlborough
's army in
Flanders Flanders (, ; Dutch Dutch commonly refers to: * Something of, from, or related to the Netherlands * Dutch people () * Dutch language () *Dutch language , spoken in Belgium (also referred as ''flemish'') Dutch may also refer to:" Castle * ...

Flanders
in 1704. Too late for the
Blenheim
Blenheim
campaign, it fought at the
Battle of Ramillies A battle is an occurrence of combat in warfare between opposing military units of any number or size. A war usually consists of multiple battles. In general, a battle is a military engagement that is well defined in duration, area, and force c ...
in May 1706 and the siege of
Ostend Ostend ( nl, Oostende, ; french: link=no, Ostende ; german: link=no, Ostende ; vls, Ostende) is a coastal city and municipality A municipality is usually a single administrative division Administrative division, administrative unitAr ...
in June. Lord Mark Kerr became Colonel when Farringdon died in October 1712, but with the war winding down, it became part of the
Gibraltar ) , anthem = "God Save the Queen" , song = "Gibraltar Anthem" , image_map = Gibraltar location in Europe.svg , map_alt = Location of Gibraltar in Europe , map_caption = United Kingdom shown in pale green , mapsize = 290px , image_map2 = ...

Gibraltar
garrison. It remained there for the next 30 years, including the
Siege of Gibraltar There have been fourteen recorded sieges of Gibraltar. Although the peninsula of Gibraltar ) , anthem = "God Save the Queen" , song = "Gibraltar Anthem" , image_map = Gibraltar location in Europe.svg , map_alt = Location of Gibraltar ...
during the 1727-1729 Anglo-Spanish War. During the 1740-1748
War of the Austrian Succession The War of the Austrian Succession () was the last Great Power conflict with the House of Bourbon, Bourbon-Habsburg Monarchy, Habsburg dynastic conflict at its heart. It occurred from 1740 to 1748 and marked the rise of Kingdom of Prussia, Prus ...
, it was based in
British North America British North America comprised the British Empire The British Empire was composed of the dominions, Crown colony, colonies, protectorates, League of Nations mandate, mandates, and other Dependent territory, territories ruled or admini ...
and helped capture the
French North American
French North American
stronghold of Louisbourg in October 1745. In 1746, 27 soldiers died in the Port-la-Joye Massacre, in part because they were unarmed. In response, officers were ordered to carry
sword A sword is an edged, bladed weapon intended for manual cutting or thrusting. Its blade, longer than a knife A knife (plural knives; from Old Norse Old Norse, Old Nordic, or Old Scandinavian is a stage of development of North Ge ...

sword
s and side arms even off duty, leading to the nickname, the ''Ever Sworded.'' The regiment remained in North America after the 1748
Treaty of Aix-la-ChapelleThere were three Treaties of Aix-la-Chapelle. Although "Aix-la-Chapelle", the French name of the German city of Aachen, is an exonym now rarely used in English, the name Treaty of Aachen is rarely used. *Pax Nicephori, also sometimes called Treaty of ...
returned Louisbourg to France; in 1749, it helped establish the town of
Halifax, Nova Scotia Halifax (Miꞌkmaq The Miꞌkmaq (also ''Mi'gmaq'', ''Lnu'', ''Miꞌkmaw'' or ''Miꞌgmaw''; ; ) are a First Nations people of the Indigenous peoples of the Northeastern Woodlands, Northeastern Woodlands, indigenous to the areas now known as C ...
during
Father Le Loutre's War Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755), also known as the Indian War, the Micmac War and the Anglo-Micmac War, took place between King George's War and the French and Indian War in Acadia and Nova Scotia. On one side of the conflict, the Kingdom ...
. A significant organisational change occurred in 1751; previously, regiments were considered the property of their
Colonel Colonel (; abbreviated as Col., Col or COL) is a senior military officer An officer is a person who has a position of authority In the fields of sociology Sociology is the study of society, human social behaviour, patterns of social rel ...
, changed names when transferred from one to another and were disbanded as soon as possible. As part of a package of reforms driven by the increasing professionalisation of the military, each regiment was now assigned a number, based on precedence or seniority in the Army list; Colonel
Peregrine Hopson Peregrine Thomas Hopson (5 June 1696 – 27 February 1759) was a British British may refer to: Peoples, culture, and language * British people, nationals or natives of the United Kingdom, British Overseas Territories, and Crown Dependencies. ...
's Regiment became the 29th Regiment of Foot. George Boscawen replaced Hopson as Colonel in 1752 and his brother, Admiral
Edward Boscawen Admiral of the Blue Edward Boscawen, Privy Council of the United Kingdom, PC (19 August 171110 January 1761) was a British Admiral in the Royal Navy and Member of Parliament for the Ancient borough, borough of Truro, Cornwall. He is known princi ...

Edward Boscawen
presented him with 10 black youths taken in the
1759 Invasion of Guadeloupe
1759 Invasion of Guadeloupe
. They were employed as regimental drummers, a tradition that continued until 1843. Together with the
14th Regiment of Foot 14 (fourteen) is a natural number following 13 (number), 13 and succeeded by 15 (number), 15. In relation to the word "four" (4), 14 is spelled "fourteen". In mathematics * Fourteen is a composite number. * In hexadecimal, fourteen is repre ...
, the 29th was posted to
Boston Boston (, ), officially the City of Boston, is the capital city, capital and List of municipalities in Massachusetts, most populous city of the Commonwealth (U.S. state), Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States and 21st List of Unit ...

Boston
in 1768. On 5 March 1770, members of the
Grenadier A grenadier ( , ; derived from the word ''grenade A grenade is an explosive weapon An explosive weapon generally uses to project and/or from a point of . Explosive weapons may be subdivided by their method of manufacture into explosive ...

Grenadier
company under Captain Thomas Preston were involved in the
Boston Massacre The Boston Massacre was a confrontation on March 5, 1770, in which British soldiers shot and killed several people while being harassed by a mob in Boston Boston (, ), officially the City of Boston, is the and city of the of in the ...

Boston Massacre
, when five colonists died during a riot in front of the Boston customs house. The 29th was later dubbed the ''Vein Openers,'' for allegedly drawing first blood in the
American Revolution The American Revolution was an ideological and political revolution which occurred in colonial North America between 1765 and 1783. The Americans in the Thirteen Colonies The Thirteen Colonies, also known as the Thirteen British Colo ...
. Those involved were tried for murder, defended by
John Adams John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman, attorney, diplomat A diplomat (from grc, δίπλωμα; romanized Romanization or romanisation, in linguistics Linguistics is the scientific study of ...

John Adams
, a future
President of the United States The president of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state A head of state (or chief of state) is the public persona A persona (plural personae or personas), depending on the context, can refer to either the public image of ...

President of the United States
; two soldiers, Hugh Montgomery and Matthew Kilroy were found guilty of
manslaughter Manslaughter is a common law In law, common law (also known as judicial precedent or judge-made law, or case law) is the body of law created by judges and similar quasi-judicial tribunals by virtue of being stated in written opinions. ''Black ...
and branded on the thumb. Preston and the others were found not guilty and following the trial, the regiment moved to British-controlled
Florida Florida is a U.S. state, state located in the Southeastern United States, Southeastern region of the United States. Florida is bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the northwest by Alabama, to the north by Georgia (U.S. state), Geor ...

Florida
in 1771, then to England in 1773. During the American Revolutionary War in 1775, the Americans tried to capture Quebec City; they were forced to retreat but the 29th arrived in Quebec in June 1776 to reinforce British forces in what is now modern Canada. The Light infantry, Light and Grenadier#Grenadier companies, Grenadier companies were detached to join the 1777 Saratoga campaign, and fought at the Battle of Hubbardton on 7 July under Brigadier Simon Fraser of Balnain, Simon Fraser. Following defeat in the Battles of Saratoga, these companies surrendered with the rest of John Burgoyne, Burgoyne's force in October 1777. The other eight remained in Canada, fighting in a number of raids and small battles along the Vermont and New York (state), New York state frontiers. On 31 August 1782, the unit was renamed the 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot by a royal warrant giving county titles to all regiments that did not already have a special title. This was an attempt to improve recruitment, but no depot was established in the county and recruits were liable to serve in any regiment. The regiment returned to England after the Anglo-French War (1778–1783), Anglo-French War ended in 1783; in 1791, it was given the regimental march known as 'The Royal Windsor,' allegedly composed by Princess Augusta Sophia of the United Kingdom, Princess Augusta, with the help of William Cathcart, 1st Earl Cathcart, Lord William Cathcart. The French Revolutionary Wars broke out in 1792 and in 1794, members of the 29th took part in the British naval victory known as the Glorious First of June, serving as marines on HMS Brunswick (1790), HMS ''Brunswick'' and HMS Ramillies (1785), ''Ramillies''. The regiment was awarded a naval crown for its participation in the battle, during which the ''Brunswick'' sank the French ship French ship Vengeur du Peuple, ''Le Vengeur du Peuple'' and disabled the ''French ship Annibal, Achille''. At the end of December 1794, a battalion of 21 officers and 640 men, formed from those in the 29th who were not detached to warships, embarked on the troopship ''Maria'' for the Caribbean island of Grenada, where discontent would lead to an insurrection in the coming months, known as Fédon's Rebellion or the Brigand's War. On their return to England in July 1796, the battalion had been reduced by battle casualties and disease to 5 officers and 87 men. It later fought in a more conventional role at Battle of Alkmaar (1799), Alkmaar in October 1799, during the Anglo-Russian invasion of Holland.


19th Century

In 1808, the 29th joined Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, Wellington's army engaged in the 1807-1814 Peninsular War in Spain and Portugal. At Battle of Roliça, Roliça on 17 August, it suffered heavy losses assaulting an entrenched French position, which was taken only after a prolonged defence; at Battle of Vimeiro, Vimeiro four days later, it held off an attack by Antoine François Brenier de Montmorand, Brenier's Brigade, allowing two other British battalions to first regroup, then repulse the attack. After the Battle of Grijó in May, it was engaged at Battle of Talavera, Talavera in July; on 27th, with two other battalions, it attacked French positions on the hill called Cerro de Medellín (Spain), Medellin. This was taken by the evening and then held throughout the next day, despite a series of French attacks and artillery bombardment; two French colours were captured in a bayonet charge that drove the French regiments from the field. At the Battle of Albuera on 16 May 1811, it suffered heavy losses, including Ensigns Edward Furnace and Richard Vance killed saving the regimental Colours, standards and guidons, colours. After this, it returned to England to refit and recruit more men. In 1814, the 29th returned to Nova Scotia during the War of 1812 but did not see action; it was recalled to Europe in 1815 to face Napoleon during the Hundred Days campaign but arrived shortly after the Battle of Waterloo. Transferred to Bengal in 1842, during the First Anglo-Sikh War the regiment fought at the Battle of Ferozeshah in December 1845 and the Battle of Sobraon on 10 February 1846.Everard, p. 451 At Sobraon, two battalions of Indian Sepoys twice unsuccessfully assaulted the Sikh Earthworks (engineering), earthworks before finally breaking through on the third assault: the regiment's commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Charles Taylor was killed in the assault. The regiment fought at the Battle of Chillianwala in January 1849 and the Battle of Gujrat in February 1849 during the Second Anglo-Sikh War. A large detachment from the regiment helped to keep the Grand Trunk Road open between Kabul and Bangladesh during the Indian Rebellion of 1857, Indian Rebellion.


Amalgamations

In 1873 a practical system of recruiting areas based on counties was instituted. The 29th Sub-District, consisting of the counties of Herefordshire and Worcestershire was created, with headquarters at Norton Barracks, three miles from the city of Worcester, England, Worcester. The barracks became the depot for the regiment along with the
36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot The 36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, raised in 1701. Under the Childers Reforms it amalgamated with the 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot to form the Worcestershire Regiment in 1881. Its l ...
and the militia of the two counties. On 1 July 1881 the
Childers Reforms The Childers Reforms of 1881 reorganised the infantry Infantry is an army specialization whose military personnel, personnel engage in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and armored warfare, armored forces. ...
came into effect and the regiment became the 1st Battalion, the
Worcestershire Regiment The Worcestershire Regiment was a Line infantry, line infantry regiment in the British Army, formed in 1881 under the Childers Reforms by the amalgamation of the 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot and the 36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot. ...
, while the 36th became the 2nd battalion.


Garter Star badge

The regimental badge of the regiment and later of the Worcestershire Regiment show the influence of the Coldstream Guards on the regiment. The Coldstream Guards and the 29th are the only two regiments to have the elongated star and garter of the Order of the Garter as their regimental badge with its motto "Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense" translated "Shame be to him who evil thinks" earning a third nickname The Guards of the Line.


Battle honours

Battle honours won by the regiment were: * ''Peninsula War'': Battle of Roliça, Roliça, Battle of Vimeiro, Vimeiro, Battle of Talavera, Talavera, Battle of Albuera, Albuhera, Peninsula * ''First Anglo-Sikh War'': Battle of Ferozeshah, Ferozeshah, Battle of Sobraon, Sobraon * ''Second Anglo-Sikh War'': Battle of Chillianwala, Chillianwala, Battle of Gujrat, Goojerat, Punjab * Battle of Ramillies, Ramillies (''awarded to successor regiment, 1882'') * Glorious First of June, Ushant (''awarded to successor regiment, 1909'')


Regimental Colonels

Colonels of the Regiment were: *1694–1698: Lt-Gen. Thomas Farrington (British Army officer), Thomas Farrington *''regiment disbanded 1698'' *''regiment reformed 1702'' *1702–1712: Lt-Gen. Thomas Farrington (British Army officer), Thomas Farrington *1712–1725: Gen. Lord Mark Kerr (governor), Lord Mark Kerr *1725–1731: Col. Henry Disney *1731–1733: Gen. William Anne Keppel, 2nd Earl of Albemarle, KG, KB *1733–1739: Lt-Gen. George Reade *1739–1748: Maj-Gen. Francis Fuller (British Army officer), Francis Fuller *1748–1752: Maj-Gen. Peregrine Thomas Hopson ;29th Regiment of Foot - (1751) *1752–1761: Lt-Gen. Hon. George Boscawen *1761–1769: Lt-Gen. George Forbes, 4th Earl of Granard (Viscount Forbes) *1769–1783: Lt-Gen. William Evelyn (British Army officer), William Evelyn ;29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot *1783–1788: Lt-Gen. William Tryon *1788–1792: Gen. Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl of Harrington, GCH *1792–1797: Gen. William Cathcart, 1st Earl Cathcart, KT *1797–1828: Gen. Gordon Forbes (British Army officer), Gordon Forbes *1828–1850: F.M. Sir John Byng, 1st Earl of Strafford, GCB, GCH *1850–1863: Gen. Sir Ulysses Burgh, 2nd Baron Downes, GCB *1863–1868: Gen. Sir James Simpson (British Army officer), James Simpson, GCB *1868–1881: Gen. John Longfield, CB


See also

*List of Regiments of Foot *List of British Army regiments (1881) *History of the British Army


References


Sources

* * * * *


Further reading

* *


External links

* * {{DEFAULTSORT:29th (Worcestershire) Regiment Of Foot Worcestershire Regiment Infantry regiments of the British Army Military units and formations in Worcestershire Military units and formations established in 1694 Regiments of the British Army in the American Revolutionary War Military units and formations disestablished in 1881 Boston Massacre 1694 establishments in England