Superior Ligament Of The Incus
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Superior Ligament Of The Incus
The superior ligament of the incus is a fibrous band that crosses from the body of the incus to the roof of the tympanic cavity just posterior to the superior ligament of the malleus The malleus, or hammer, is a hammer-shaped small bone or ossicle of the middle ear. It connects with the incus, and is attached to the inner surface of the eardrum. The word is Latin for 'hammer' or 'mallet'. It transmits the sound vibrations f .... Ear Ligaments {{ligament-stub ...
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Incus
The ''incus'' (plural incudes) or anvil is a bone in the middle ear. The anvil-shaped small bone is one of three ossicles in the middle ear. The ''incus'' receives vibrations from the ''malleus'', to which it is connected laterally, and transmits these to the ''stapes'' medially. The ''incus'' is so-called because of its resemblance to an anvil ( la, Incus). Structure The incus is the second of the ossicles, three bones in the middle ear which act to transmit sound. It is shaped like an anvil, and has a long and short crus extending from the body, which articulates with the malleus. The short crus attaches to the posterior ligament of the incus. The long crus articulates with the stirrup at the lenticular process. The superior ligament of the incus attaches at the body of the incus to the roof of the tympanic cavity. Function Vibrations in the middle ear are received via the tympanic membrane. The malleus, resting on the membrane, conveys vibrations to the incus. This in tu ...
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Malleus
The malleus, or hammer, is a hammer-shaped small bone or ossicle of the middle ear. It connects with the incus, and is attached to the inner surface of the eardrum. The word is Latin for 'hammer' or 'mallet'. It transmits the sound vibrations from the eardrum to the '' incus'' (anvil). Structure The malleus is a bone situated in the middle ear. It is the first of the three ossicles, and attached to the tympanic membrane. The head of the malleus is the large protruding section, which attaches to the incus. The head connects to the neck of malleus. The bone continues as the handle (or manubrium) of malleus, which connects to the tympanic membrane. Between the neck and handle of the malleus, lateral and anterior processes emerge from the bone. The bone is oriented so that the head is superior and the handle is inferior. Development Embryologically, the malleus is derived from the first pharyngeal arch along with the '' incus''. It grows from Meckel's cartilage. Function The m ...
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Tympanic Cavity
The tympanic cavity is a small cavity surrounding the bones of the middle ear. Within it sit the ossicles, three small bones that transmit vibrations used in the detection of sound. Structure On its lateral surface, it abuts the external auditory meatus ear canal from which it is separated by the tympanic membrane (eardrum). Walls The tympanic cavity is bounded by: * Facing the inner ear, the medial wall (or ''labyrinthic wall'', ''labyrinthine wall'') is vertical, and has the oval window and round window, the promontory, and the prominence of the facial canal. * Facing the outer ear, the lateral wall (or ''membranous wall''), is formed mainly by the tympanic membrane, partly by the ring of bone into which this membrane is inserted. This ring of bone is incomplete at its upper part, forming a notch (notch of Rivinus), close to which are three small apertures: the "iter chordæ posterius", the petrotympanic fissure, and the "iter chordæ anterius". The iter chordæ posterius ( ...
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