Yardley, PA
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Yardley, PA
Yardley is a borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Yardley borders the Delaware River and Ewing, New Jersey to its east and Lower Makefield Township to its north, west, and south. The United States Post Office assigns many addresses in Lower Makefield Township the preferred city of "Yardley", although they are outside the borough. The population was 2,434 at the 2010 census. Yardley is part of the Delaware Valley metropolitan area. Geography Yardley is located at (40.241508, -74.836325). According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of , of which is land and (9.90%) is water. The Delaware Canal and its towpath bisect the borough from northwest to southeast. Access points to the canal are located at Edgewater Avenue, Afton Avenue, Fuld Avenue, College Avenue and South Canal Street. The Yardley station, a SEPTA Regional Rail station, is located on Main Street. Demographics As of the 2010 census, the borough was 89.7% Non-Hispanic White, 3.5% Black o ...
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List Of Towns And Boroughs In Pennsylvania
This is a list of towns and boroughs in Pennsylvania. Listed first is the one incorporated town in Pennsylvania, Bloomsburg. Despite being officially recognized as a town, it is subject to the Pennsylvania Borough Code. A list of all 956 boroughs incorporated in the state under the Borough Code follows. Boroughs and towns are subject to the Borough Code, and, unlike other forms of incorporated municipalities in Pennsylvania, are not classified according to population. Boroughs designated in the table below with a dagger (†) are home rule municipalities and are also found in the List of Pennsylvania municipalities and counties with home rule charters, optional charters, or optional plans. The state classifies these as boroughs for certain purposes, even though they do not operate under the Borough Code in Pennsylvania Law and may not contain the word "Borough" in their corporate names. In addition, two boroughs, Quakertown and Weatherly, have adopted optional plans, which all ...
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2010 United States Census
The United States census of 2010 was the twenty-third United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million people as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000. Introduction As required by the United States Constitution, the U.S. census has been conducted every 10 years since 1790. The 2000 U.S. census was the previous census completed. Participation in the U.S. census is required by law of persons living in the United States in Title 13 of the Unit ...
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Marriage
Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a culturally and often legally recognized union between people called spouses. It establishes rights and obligations between them, as well as between them and their children, and between them and their in-laws. It is considered a cultural universal, but the definition of marriage varies between cultures and religions, and over time. Typically, it is an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. A marriage ceremony is called a wedding. Individuals may marry for several reasons, including legal, social, libidinal, emotional, financial, spiritual, and religious purposes. Whom they marry may be influenced by gender, socially determined rules of incest, prescriptive marriage rules, parental choice, and individual desire. In some areas of the world, arrang ...
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Race (United States Census)
Race and ethnicity in the United States census, defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the United States Census Bureau, are the self-identified categories of race or races and ethnicity chosen by residents, with which they most closely identify, and indicate whether they are of Hispanic or Latino origin (the only categories for ethnicity). The racial categories represent a social-political construct for the race or races that respondents consider themselves to be and, "generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country." OMB defines the concept of race as outlined for the U.S. census as not "scientific or anthropological" and takes into account "social and cultural characteristics as well as ancestry", using "appropriate scientific methodologies" that are not "primarily biological or genetic in reference." The race categories include both racial and national-origin groups. Race and ethnicity are considered separate and dis ...
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Pacific Islander (U
Pacific Islanders, Pasifika, Pasefika, or rarely Pacificers are the peoples of the Pacific Islands. As an ethnic/racial term, it is used to describe the original peoples—inhabitants and diasporas—of any of the three major subregions of Oceania ( Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia). Melanesians include the Fijians ( Fiji), Kanaks ( New Caledonia), Ni-Vanuatu ( Vanuatu), Papua New Guineans ( Papua New Guinea), Solomon Islanders (Solomon Islands), and West Papuans ( Indonesia's West Papua). Micronesians include the Carolinians ( Northern Mariana Islands), Chamorros ( Guam), Chuukese ( Chuuk), I-Kiribati ( Kiribati), Kosraeans (Kosrae), Marshallese ( Marshall Islands), Palauans ( Palau), Pohnpeians ( Pohnpei), and Yapese (Yap). Polynesians include the New Zealand Māori ( New Zealand), Native Hawaiians ( Hawaii), Rapa Nui ( Easter Island), Samoans ( Samoa and American Samoa), Tahitians ( Tahiti), Tokelauans (Tokelau), Niueans ( Niue), Cook Islands M ...
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Native American (U
Native Americans or Native American may refer to: Ethnic groups * Indigenous peoples of the Americas, the pre-Columbian peoples of North and South America and their descendants * Native Americans in the United States * Indigenous peoples in Canada ** First Nations in Canada, Canadian indigenous peoples neither Inuit nor Métis ** Inuit, an indigenous people of the mainland and insular Bering Strait, northern coast, Labrador, Greenland, and Canadian Arctic Archipelago regions ** Métis in Canada, peoples of Canada originating from both indigenous (First Nations or Inuit) and European ancestry * Indigenous peoples of Costa Rica * Indigenous peoples of Mexico * Indigenous peoples of South America ** Indigenous peoples in Argentina ** Indigenous peoples in Bolivia ** Indigenous peoples in Brazil ** Indigenous peoples in Chile ** Indigenous peoples in Colombia ** Indigenous peoples in Ecuador ** Indigenous peoples in Peru ** Indigenous peoples in Suriname ** Indigenous pe ...
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Race (U
Race, RACE or "The Race" may refer to: * Race (biology), an informal taxonomic classification within a species, generally within a sub-species * Race (human categorization), classification of humans into groups based on physical traits, and/or social relations * Racing, a competition of speed Rapid movement * The Race (yachting race) * Mill race, millrace, or millrun, the current of water that turns a water wheel, or the channel (sluice) conducting water to or from a water wheel * Tidal race, a fast-moving tide passing through a constriction Acronyms * RACE encoding, a syntax for encoding non-ASCII characters in ASCII * Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service, in the US, established in 1952 for wartime use * Rapid amplification of cDNA ends, a technique in molecular biology * RACE (Remote Applications in Challenging Environments), a robotics development center in the UK * RACE Racing Academy and Centre of Education, a jockey and horse-racing industry training centre in Kild ...
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White (U
White is the lightest color and is achromatic (having no hue). It is the color of objects such as snow, chalk, and milk, and is the opposite of black. White objects fully reflect and scatter all the visible wavelengths of light. White on television and computer screens is created by a mixture of red, blue, and green light. The color white can be given with white pigments, especially titanium dioxide. In ancient Egypt and ancient Rome, priestesses wore white as a symbol of purity, and Romans wore white togas as symbols of citizenship. In the Middle Ages and Renaissance a white unicorn symbolized chastity, and a white lamb sacrifice and purity. It was the royal color of the kings of France, and of the monarchist movement that opposed the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War (1917–1922). Greek and Roman temples were faced with white marble, and beginning in the 18th century, with the advent of neoclassical architecture, white became the most common color of new ...
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Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring, recording and calculating information about the members of a given population. This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include censuses of agriculture, traditional culture, business, supplies, and traffic censuses. The United Nations (UN) defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every ten years. UN recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practices. The UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), in turn, defines the census of agriculture as "a statistical operation for collecting, processing and disseminating data on the structure of agriculture, covering ...
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SEPTA Regional Rail
The SEPTA Regional Rail system is a commuter rail network owned by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority and serving the Philadelphia Metropolitan area. The system has 13 branches and more than 150 active stations in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, its suburbs and satellite towns and cities. It is the fifth-busiest commuter railroad in the United States, and the busiest outside of the New York and Chicago metropolitan areas. In 2016, the Regional Rail system had an average of 132,000 daily riders and 118,800 daily riders (As of 2019). The core of the Regional Rail system is the Center City Commuter Connection, a tunnel linking three Center City stations: the above-ground upper level of 30th Street Station, the underground Suburban Station, and Jefferson Station (formerly Market East Station). All trains stop at these Center City stations; most also stop at Temple University station on the campus of Temple University in North Philadelphia. Operations are hand ...
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Yardley Station
Yardley station is a SEPTA Regional Rail station in Yardley, Pennsylvania. It is located at Main Street and Reading Avenue and serves the West Trenton Line to New Jersey. The station has off-street parking. In FY 2017, Yardley station had a weekday average of 349 boardings and 328 alightings. By August 2015, as a result of the SEPTA and CSX separation between Woodbourne and West Trenton stations, the outbound platform was removed, and all SEPTA traffic was diverted onto the Inbound track. Currently, all SEPTA service between Yardley and West Trenton operates on the Inbound track only. History The station was originally built to be part of the Bound Brook branch of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad (P&R). In 1874, it was announced that the P&R would build a line from Jenkintown station to the Delaware River where it would have a bridge to connect it to the Delaware and Bound Railroad. Station layout Yardley consists of a single high-level side platform A side platform ...
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Towpath
A towpath is a road or trail on the bank of a river, canal, or other inland waterway. The purpose of a towpath is to allow a land vehicle, beasts of burden, or a team of human pullers to tow a boat, often a barge. This mode of transport was common where sailing was impractical due to tunnels and bridges, unfavourable winds, or the narrowness of the channel. After the Industrial Revolution, towing became obsolete when engines were fitted on boats and when railway transportation superseded the slow towing method. Since then, many of these towpaths have been converted to multi-use trails. They are still named towpaths — although they are now only occasionally used for the purpose of towing boats. History Early inland waterway transport used the rivers, and while barges could use sails to assist their passage when winds were favourable or the river was wide enough to allow tacking, in many cases this was not possible, and gangs of men were used to bow-haul the boats. As riv ...
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