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Trebbiano
Trebbiano is an Italian wine grape, one of the most widely planted grape varieties in the world. It gives good yields, but tends to yield undistinguished wine. It can be fresh and fruity, but does not keep long. Also known as ugni blanc, it has many other names reflecting a family of local subtypes, particularly in Italy and France.Robinson, Jancis ''Vines, Grapes & Wines'' Mitchell Beazley 1986 Its high acidity makes it important in Cognac and Armagnac productions. History Trebbiano may have originated in the Eastern Mediterranean, and was known in Italy in Roman times. A subtype was recognized in Bologna in the thirteenth century, and as Ugni blanc made its way to France, possibly during the Papal retreat to Avignon in the fourteenth century. Pedigree An Italian study published in 2008 using DNA typing showed a close genetic relationship between Garganega on the one hand and Trebbiano and several other grape varieties on the other hand. It is therefore possible that Gargan ...
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List Of Italian Grape Varieties
References Supplemental references used for chart *J. Robinson, J. Harding and J. Vouillamoz ''Wine Grapes - A complete guide to 1,368 vine varieties, including their origins and flavours'' pgs XXVIII-XXX Allen Lane 2012 {{DEFAULTSORT:Italian grape varieties, List of Category:Italian wine * Category:Wine-related lists Grape ...
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Garganega
Garganega (, ; meaning "from Gargano") is a variety of white Italian wine grape widely grown in the Veneto region of North East Italy, particularly in the provinces of Verona and Vicenza. It is Italy's 6th most widely planted white grape. It forms the basis of Venetian white wine Soave and is also a major portion of the blend used to make Gambellara. J. Robinson (ed) ''"The Oxford Companion to Wine"'' Third Edition pg 297 Oxford University Press 2006 DNA typing studies in 2003 and 2008 have confirmed that the Grecanico Dorato (Grecanico) grape of Sicily is identical to Garganega. Already before these studies, ampelographers believed the grapes to be related due to the similarities of clusters, berries and leaf characteristics. Oz Clarke ''Encyclopedia of Grapes'' pg 91 Harcourt Books 2001 Wine regions In the Soave region, Garganega is the primary grape and can compose anywhere from 70 to 100% of the blend with Trebbiano and Chardonnay being its usual blending partners. In t ...
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Balsamic Vinegar
Balsamic vinegar ( it|aceto balsamico) is a very dark, concentrated, and intensely flavoured vinegar originating in Italy, made wholly or partially from grape must. Grape must is freshly crushed grape juice with all the skins, seeds and stems. The term ''aceto balsamico'' is unregulated, but there are three protected balsamic vinegars: ''Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Modena DOP'' (Traditional Balsamic Vinegar of Modena), ''Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia DOP'' (Traditional Balsamic Vinegar of Reggio Emilia), and ''Aceto Balsamico di Modena IGP'' (Balsamic Vinegar of Modena). The two traditional balsamic vinegars are made the same way from reduced grape must aged for several years in a series of wooden barrels, and are produced exclusively in either the province of Modena or Reggio Emilia. The names of these two vinegars are protected by the European Union's Protected Designation of Origin, while the usually less expensive Balsamic Vinegar of Modena (''Aceto Balsami ...
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Alionza
Alionza is a white Italian wine grape variety that is grown in the Emilia-Romagna region of north central Italy, where it has a long history of being used since the 14th century as both a table grape and blending grape for wine production. While sometimes confused with the Greek wine grape Sklava, DNA analysis in the early 21st century has suggested, instead, that Alionza may be closely related to the Tuscan wine grape Trebbiano.J. Robinson, J. Harding and J. Vouillamoz ''Wine Grapes - A complete guide to 1,368 vine varieties, including their origins and flavours'' pgs 35-36 Allen Lane 2012 History Alionza has been growing in the provinces of Bologna and Modena of Emilia-Romagna since at least the early 14th century, when it was documented in Italian agricultural writer Pietro de' Crescenzi's ''Ruralia commoda'' treatise. At once point the grape was also widely grown in the Lombardy wine regions of Brescia and Mantova but today is quite rare. Historically, the grape has often bee ...
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Manzoni Rosa
Incrocio Manzoni or Manzoni grapes is a family of grape varieties named after Professor Luigi Manzoni (1888-1968) of Italy's oldest school of oenology located in Conegliano, in the Veneto region. Manzoni created the new grape varieties by selecting, crossing and grafting vines from various vineyards during the 1920s and 1930s. The family includes both white and red grape varieties. Although most Manzonis are grown in northeastern Italy, they are mainly grown in the Piave area of Province of Treviso and are only now starting to be sold commercially in Europe and the United States.J. Robinson, J. Harding and J. Vouillamoz ''Wine Grapes - A complete guide to 1,368 vine varieties, including their origins and flavours'' pgs 469-471, 594-595 Allen Lane 2012 Naming convention The name Incrocio is Italian for ''crossing'' with the second part of the name usually being the last name of the grape breeder. These means that not every Incrocio grape variety are Manzoni grapes with varieties su ...
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Armagnac (drink)
350px|A 1956 armagnac—Baronne Jacques de Saint-Pastou Armagnac (, ) is a distinctive kind of brandy produced in the Armagnac region in Gascony, southwest France. It is distilled from wine usually made from a blend of grapes including Baco 22A, Colombard, Folle blanche and Ugni blanc, traditionally using column stills rather than the pot stills used in the production of cognac, which is made only from ugni blanc grapes. The resulting spirit is then aged in oak barrels before release. Production is overseen by the Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité (INAO) and the Bureau National Interprofessionel de l'Armagnac (BNIA). Armagnac was one of the first areas in France to begin distilling spirits, but the overall volume of production is far smaller than cognac production and therefore is less known outside Europe. In addition, it is for the most part made and sold by small producers, whereas cognac production is dominated by big-name brands, especially Courvoisier (owned by B ...
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Cognac (drink)
Cognac ( , also , ) is a variety of brandy named after the commune of Cognac, France. It is produced in the surrounding wine-growing region in the departments of Charente and Charente-Maritime. Cognac production falls under French appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) designation, with production methods and naming required to meet certain legal requirements. Among the specified grapes, Ugni blanc, known locally as Saint-Émilion, is most widely used. The brandy must be twice distilled in copper pot stills and aged at least two years in French oak barrels from Limousin or Tronçais. Cognac matures in the same way as whiskies and wines barrel age, and most cognacs spend considerably longer "on the wood" than the minimum legal requirement. Production process Cognac is a type of brandy, and after the distillation and during the aging process, is also called ''eau de vie''. It is produced by twice distilling grape produced in any of the designated growing regions. Grapes The wh ...
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Armagnac (brandy)
350px|A 1956 armagnac—Baronne Jacques de Saint-Pastou Armagnac (, ) is a distinctive kind of brandy produced in the Armagnac region in Gascony, southwest France. It is distilled from wine usually made from a blend of grapes including Baco 22A, Colombard, Folle blanche and Ugni blanc, traditionally using column stills rather than the pot stills used in the production of cognac, which is made only from ugni blanc grapes. The resulting spirit is then aged in oak barrels before release. Production is overseen by the Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité (INAO) and the Bureau National Interprofessionel de l'Armagnac (BNIA). Armagnac was one of the first areas in France to begin distilling spirits, but the overall volume of production is far smaller than cognac production and therefore is less known outside Europe. In addition, it is for the most part made and sold by small producers, whereas cognac production is dominated by big-name brands, especially Courvoisier (owned by B ...
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Gewürztraminer
Gewürztraminer () is an aromatic wine grape variety, used in white wines, and performs best in cooler climates. In English, it is sometimes referred to colloquially as Gewürz (; although this is never the case in German, because "Gewürz" means "herb" or "spice"), and in English and French it is written (without the umlaut). Gewürztraminer is a variety with a pink to red skin colour, which makes it a "white wine grape" as opposed to the blue to black-skinned varieties commonly referred to as "red wine grapes". The variety has high natural sugar and the wines are white and usually off-dry, with a flamboyant bouquet of lychees. Indeed, Gewürztraminer and lychees share the same aroma compounds. Dry Gewürztraminers may also have aromas of roses, passion fruit and floral notes. It is not uncommon to notice some ''spritz'' (fine bubbles on the inside of the glass). Gewürztraminer's sweetness may offset the spice in Southeast Asian cuisine. Etymology The German name Gewürztram ...
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Vitis Vinifera
''Vitis vinifera'', the common grape vine, is a species of ''Vitis'', native to the Mediterranean region, Central Europe, and southwestern Asia, from Morocco and Portugal north to southern Germany and east to northern Iran.Euro+Med Plantbase Project''Vitis vinifera'' There are currently between 5,000 and 10,000 varieties of ''Vitis vinifera'' grapes though only a few are of commercial significance for wine and table grape production.Wine & Spirits Education Trust ''"Wine and Spirits: Understanding Wine Quality"'' pgs 2-5, Second Revised Edition (2012), London, It is a liana growing to in length, with flaky bark. The leaves are alternate, palmately lobed, long and broad. The fruit is a berry, known as a grape; in the wild species it is diameter and ripens dark purple to blackish with a pale wax bloom; in cultivated plants it is usually much larger, up to long, and can be green, red, or purple (black). The species typically occurs in humid forests and streamsides. The wild gra ...
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Hatria Picena
Atri ( ; Latin: Adria, Atria, Hadria, or Hatria) is a ''comune'' in the Province of Teramo in the Abruzzo region of Italy. Atri is the setting of the poem ''The Bell of Atri'' by American writer Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Its name is the origin of the name of the Emperor Hadrian. History Ancient Adria was a city of Picenum, situated about from the Adriatic Sea, between the rivers Vomanus (modern Vomano) and Matrinus (modern Piomba). According to the Antonine Itinerary, it was distant 15 Roman miles from Castrum Novum (modern Giulianova) and 14 from Teate (modern Chieti). It has been supposed, with much probability, to be of Etruscan origin, and a colony from the more celebrated city of the name, now Adria in the Veneto region, though there is no historical evidence of the fact. The first certain historical notice of Adria is the establishment of a Roman colony there about 282 BCE. In the early part of the Second Punic War (217 BCE) its territory was ravaged by Hannibal; but notwit ...
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Atri, Abruzzo
Atri ( ; Latin: Adria, Atria, Hadria, or Hatria) is a ''comune'' in the Province of Teramo in the Abruzzo region of Italy. Atri is the setting of the poem ''The Bell of Atri'' by American writer Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Its name is the origin of the name of the Emperor Hadrian. History Ancient Adria was a city of Picenum, situated about from the Adriatic Sea, between the rivers Vomanus (modern Vomano) and Matrinus (modern Piomba). According to the Antonine Itinerary, it was distant 15 Roman miles from Castrum Novum (modern Giulianova) and 14 from Teate (modern Chieti). It has been supposed, with much probability, to be of Etruscan origin, and a colony from the more celebrated city of the name, now Adria in the Veneto region, though there is no historical evidence of the fact. The first certain historical notice of Adria is the establishment of a Roman colony there about 282 BCE. In the early part of the Second Punic War (217 BCE) its territory was ravaged by Hannibal; but notwit ...
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Eauze
Eauze (; Gascon: ''Eusa'') is a commune in the Gers department in southwestern France. History Located in the heart of south-west France, 130 kilometers from the Spanish border, Eauze is originally a proto-Basque city that became Roman. It was the capital of the Roman province of Novempopulania until the eighth century. Its Latin name, Elusa, is identical to that of a titular see of Palaestina Tertia, suffragan of Petra. Geography Eauze is twinned with Ampuero (Spain). Climate The weather is typical of the southwestern French climate, characterized by an oceanic influence and high temperatures in summer. The annual sunshine is around 2,000 hours. In winter, frosts can be large and reach a minimum early morning temperature of -5 °C. On the other hand, summers are favorable to the strong heat and the proximity of the ocean accentuates the temperatures felt which regularly reach 35 to 38 °C. In spring and autumn, temperatures range from 12 to 27 °C. Sites of intere ...
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Spanish Wine
Spanish wine () includes red, white, and sparkling wines produced throughout the country. Located on the Iberian Peninsula, Spain has over 1.2 million hectares (2.9 million acres) planted in wine grapes, making it the most widely planted wine-producing nation,K. MacNeil ''The Wine Bible'' pg 410-422 Workman Publishing 2001 but the second largest producer of wine in the world, behind Italy and ahead of France and the United States. This is due, in part, to the very low yields and wide spacing of the old vines planted on the dry, infertile soil found in some of the Spanish wine regions. The country is ninth in worldwide consumption with Spaniards drinking, on average, 21.6 litres (5.7 US gal) per person a year. The country has an abundance of native grape varieties, with over 400 varieties planted throughout Spain, though 88 percent of the country's wine production is from only 20 grapes — including the reds Tempranillo, Bobal, Garnacha, and Monastrell; the whites Al ...
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