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Joe Keeble
Joseph Bailey Keeble (August 29, 1909 – April 27, 1984) was an American football back who played one season with the Cleveland Rams of the National Football League. He played college football at the University of California, Los Angeles. He first enrolled at Holtville High School in Holtville, California before transferring to Oneonta Military Academy in South Pasadena, California. Keeble was also a member of the Westwood Cubs, Chicago Cardinals and Pittsburgh Americans. College career Keeble joined the UCLA Bruins in 1930 and played football and basketball for them. He lettered for the Bruins from 1931 to 1933. He earned First Team All-PCC honors as a fullback in 1932. Professional career Keeble played for the Westwood Cubs from 1934 to 1936. He signed with the Chicago Cardinals in 1935 but did not appear in a game for the team. He played for the Pittsburgh Americans of the American Football League in 1936. Keeble played in seven games, starting two, for the Cleveland Rams duri ...
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Back (American Football)
{{unreferenced|date=September 2019 In American football, a back is a player who plays off of the line of scrimmage (as opposed to a lineman). Historically, the term "back" was used to describe multiple positions on offense and defense, although more descriptive and specific position naming is now common. Thus, "back" can refer to positions including: *Cornerback, a member of the defensive team that primary defends wide receivers *Defensive back, a member of the defensive team who take positions somewhat back from the line of scrimmage *Dimeback, a cornerback or safety who serves as the sixth defensive back *Fullback, one of the two running back positions, along with the halfback *Halfback, one of the two running back positions, along with the fullback *H-back, an offensive position that lines up similarly to a tight end, but is set back from the line of scrimmage *Linebacker, a member of the defensive team that is positioned approximately three to five yards behind the line of scrimma ...
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The Observer (La Grande)
''The Observer'', established in 1896, is a newspaper that serves Union and Wallowa counties in the U.S. state of Oregon. Its headquarters are in La Grande, the seat of Union County. ''The Observer'' circulates Monday, Wednesday and Friday afternoons to more than 10,000 people. EO Media Group based in Salem, Oregon, publishes the newspaper. Staff and management ''The Observer'' management team includes Publisher Karrine Brogoitti and Regional Publisher Christopher Rush. ''The Observer'' has 13 employees and 15 newspaper carriers. History In 2012, the newspaper reduced its frequency from five days a week to three days a week, publishing issues on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. In June 2019, EO Media Group purchased ''The Observer'' and ''Baker City Herald'' after Western Communications Inc. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in January. Lawyers for Western Communications told the bankruptcy court the plan was to sell the property and buildings, according to court recor ...
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Pittsburgh Americans Players
Pittsburgh ( ) is a city in the state of Pennsylvania in the United States and the county seat of Allegheny County. An estimated population of about 300,286 residents live within the city limits as of 2019, making it the 66th-largest city in the U.S. and the second-most populous city in Pennsylvania, behind Philadelphia. The Pittsburgh metropolitan area is the anchor of Western Pennsylvania; its population of 2.32 million is the largest in both the Ohio Valley and Appalachia, the second-largest in Pennsylvania, and the 27th-largest in the U.S. Pittsburgh is located in the southwest of the state, at the confluence of the Allegheny River and the Monongahela River, forming the Ohio River. Pittsburgh is known both as "the Steel City" for its more than 300 steel-related businesses and as the "City of Bridges" for its 446 bridges. The city features 30 skyscrapers, two inclined railways, a pre-revolutionary fortification and the Point State Park at the confluence of the rivers. The cit ...
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Cleveland Rams Players
Cleveland ( ), officially the City of Cleveland, is a major city in the U.S. state of Ohio, and the county seat of Cuyahoga County. It is located along the southern shore of Lake Erie, across the U.S. maritime border with Canada and approximately west of the Ohio-Pennsylvania state border. The largest city on Lake Erie, Cleveland anchors the Greater Cleveland Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and the Cleveland–Akron–Canton Combined Statistical Area (CSA). The CSA is the most populous combined statistical area in Ohio and the 18th largest in the United States, with an estimated population of 3,586,918 in 2019. The city proper, with an estimated 2019 population of 381,009, ranks as the 53rd-largest city in the U.S., as a larger portion of the metropolitan population lives outside the central city. The seven-county metropolitan Cleveland economy, which includes Akron, is the largest in the state. Cleveland was founded in 1796 near the mouth of the Cuyahoga River by General ...
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American Men's Basketball Players
American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States ** Americans, citizens and nationals of the United States of America ** American ancestry, people who self-identify their ancestry as "American" ** American English, the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States ** Native Americans in the United States, indigenous peoples of the United States * American, something of, from, or related to the Americas ** Indigenous peoples of the Americas * American (word), for analysis and history of the meanings in various contexts Organizations * American Airlines * American Recordings (record label), a record label previously known as Def American * American University, in Washington, D.C. Sports teams * Allen Americans, a minor league hockey team * Baltimore Americans, the name of two soccer teams, one from 1939 to 1942 and one from 1942 to 1948 * Boston Red Sox, a baseball team ...
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American Football Halfbacks
American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States ** Americans, citizens and nationals of the United States of America ** American ancestry, people who self-identify their ancestry as "American" ** American English, the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States ** Native Americans in the United States, indigenous peoples of the United States * American, something of, from, or related to the Americas ** Indigenous peoples of the Americas * American (word), for analysis and history of the meanings in various contexts Organizations * American Airlines * American Recordings (record label), a record label previously known as Def American * American University, in Washington, D.C. Sports teams * Allen Americans, a minor league hockey team * Baltimore Americans, the name of two soccer teams, one from 1939 to 1942 and one from 1942 to 1948 * Boston Red Sox, a baseball team ...
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American Football Fullbacks
American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States ** Americans, citizens and nationals of the United States of America ** American ancestry, people who self-identify their ancestry as "American" ** American English, the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States ** Native Americans in the United States, indigenous peoples of the United States * American, something of, from, or related to the Americas ** Indigenous peoples of the Americas * American (word), for analysis and history of the meanings in various contexts Organizations * American Airlines * American Recordings (record label), a record label previously known as Def American * American University, in Washington, D.C. Sports teams * Allen Americans, a minor league hockey team * Baltimore Americans, the name of two soccer teams, one from 1939 to 1942 and one from 1942 to 1948 * Boston Red Sox, a baseball team ...
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1984 Deaths
Events January * January 1 ** Brunei becomes a completely independent state. ** The Bell System in the United States is broken up. * January 7 – Brunei becomes the sixth member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). * January 10 ** The United States and the Vatican (Holy See) restore full diplomatic relations. ** The Victoria Agreement is signed–institutionalising the Indian Ocean Commission. * January 22 – The Los Angeles Raiders defeat the Washington Redskins, 38–9, to win Super Bowl XVIII in Tampa, Florida. ** The game's broadcaster, CBS, runs Apple Computer's iconic 1984 advertisement for the Macintosh personal computer. Apple places the Macintosh on sale in the United States two days later. * January 25 — President Reagan announces in his State of the Union Address that the United States will begin development of a permanently crewed space station and invite international space agencies to the project — a concept initially known as Space Stati ...
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1909 Births
Nineteen or 19 may refer to: * 19 (number), the natural number following 18 and preceding 20 * one of the years 19 BC, AD 19, 1919, 2019 Films * ''19'' (film), a 2001 Japanese film * ''Nineteen'' (film), a 1987 science fiction film Music * 19 (band), a Japanese pop music duo Albums * ''19'' (Adele album), 2008 * ''19'' (Evan Yo album), 2006 * ''19'' (Alsou album), 2003 * ''19'' (MHD album), 2018 * ''19'' (Kool A.D. album), 2013 * ''Number Nineteen'', a 1971 album by American jazz pianist Mal Waldron * ''XIX'' (EP), a 2019 EP by 1the9 Songs * "19" (song), a 1985 song by British musician Paul Hardcastle. * "Nineteen" (song), a 2007 song by American singer Billy Ray Cyrus. * "Nineteen", a song by Tegan and Sara from the 2007 album ''The Con''. * "XIX" (song), a 2014 song by Slipknot. * 19, a 2001 song by Pencey Prep Places * Nineteen, Kentucky See also * COVID-19, an infectious disease * Mecklenburg XIX, a class of German steam locomotives * Renault 19, a French automobile ...
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Madera, California
Madera (Spanish for ''wood''), is a city in California and the county seat of Madera County. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 61,416. According to a July 1, 2019 estimate by the US Census Bureau, the city's population is 65,860. Located in the San Joaquin Valley, Madera is the principal city of thMadera Metropolitan Statistical Area which is part of thFresno-Madera-Hanford Combined Statistical Area The city is also home to the Madera Unified School District. History The town was named after the Spanish term for lumber. The town was laid out by the California Lumber Company in 1876. From 1876 to 1931, a 63-mile water flume carried lumber from the mountains to Madera where the lumber was shipped by train. The first post office at Madera opened in 1877. On May 16, 1893 Madera County officially became a County of the State of California and the town incorporated as a City of Madera on March 27, 1907. One of the city's first African Americans to hold an ...
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Madera High School
Madera High School is the first school and original high school in the central San Joaquin Valley city of Madera, California, serving students since 1894. The school colors are royal blue & white and its mascot is the coyote. History Madera High School's layout has been changed over the years. Originally, a brick schoolhouse served as MHS; this was destroyed in a fire in the early 1900s. In 1907 a new similarly styled brick building—nicknamed the "Main Building"—was constructed. Soon, more buildings began appearing. In 1976, the "Main Building" was demolished, because it did not meet earthquake standards; the area where it was located is now known as "The Pit" and is the hub for lunchtime activities. By 2000, the school's current layout had been completed. In 2004, the main office building was refurbished, and most of the school followed suit in 2006. The school's original colors were purple and white. In 1949, with the color purple becoming scarce after the events of ...
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1937 NFL Season
The 1937 NFL season was the 18th regular season of the National Football League. The Cleveland Rams joined the league as an expansion team. Meanwhile, the Redskins relocated from Boston to Washington, D.C. The season ended when the Redskins, led by rookie quarterback Sammy Baugh, defeated the Chicago Bears in the NFL Championship Game. Draft The 1937 NFL Draft was held on December 12, 1936 at New York City's Hotel Lincoln. With the first pick, the Philadelphia Eagles selected runningback Sam Francis from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. Major rule changes *All players are required to wear numerals on their jerseys whose color must be in sharp contrast with the jersey color. The numbers on the front must be at least while the ones on the back must be at least . *If a kickoff goes out of bounds, the ball is put in play either on the opponent's 35-yard line or 10 yards from the spot where it crossed the sideline. *The penalty for an illegal forward pass that is thrown beyond ...
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The Pittsburgh Press
''The Pittsburgh Press'' (formerly ''The Pittsburg Press'' and originally ''The Evening Penny Press'') was a major afternoon daily newspaper published in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US, from 1884 to 1992. At one time, the ''Press'' was the second largest newspaper in Pennsylvania, behind only ''The Philadelphia Inquirer''. For four years starting in 2011, the brand was revived and applied to an afternoon online edition of the ''Pittsburgh Post-Gazette''. Early history The history of the ''Press'' traces back to an effort by Thomas J. Keenan Jr. to buy ''The Pittsburg Times'' newspaper, at which he was employed as city editor. Joining Keenan in his endeavor were reporter John S. Ritenour of the Pittsburgh ''Post'', Charles W. Houston of the city clerk's office, and U.S. Representative Thomas M. Bayne. After examining the ''Times'' and finding it in a poor state, the group changed course and decided to start a new penny paper in hopes that it would flourish in a local market full of t ...
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American Football League (1936)
The American Football League (AFL) was a professional American football league that operated in 1936 and 1937. The AFL operated in direct competition with the more established National Football League (NFL) throughout its existence.Bob Carroll, Michael Gershman, David Neft, and John Thorn, ''Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League'' (HarperCollins 1999) While the American media generally ignored its operation (often relegating game coverage to "page filler" status), this second AFL was the first "home" of the Cleveland Rams, which joined the National Football League after one year in the AFL. In 1937, the Los Angeles Bulldogs, the first professional football team to play its home games on the West Coast, also became the first professional football team to win a league championship with a perfect record (no losses, no ties) – 11 years before the Cleveland Browns (AAFC) and 35 years before the Miami Dolphins (NFL) accomplished the same feat. ...
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Chicago Daily Tribune
The ''Chicago Tribune'' is a daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, United States, owned by Tribune Publishing. Founded in 1847, and formerly self-styled as the "World's Greatest Newspaper" (a slogan for which WGN radio and television are named), it remains the most-read daily newspaper of the Chicago metropolitan area and the Great Lakes region. It had the 6th highest circulation for American newspapers in 2017. In the 1850s, under Joseph Medill, the ''Chicago Tribune'' became closely associated with Illinois' favorite son, Abraham Lincoln, and with the Republican Party's progressive wing. In the 20th century under Medill's grandson, Robert R. McCormick, it achieved a reputation as a crusading paper with a decidedly more American-conservative anti-New Deal outlook, and its writing reached other markets through family and corporate relationships at the ''New York Daily News'' and the ''Washington Times-Herald.'' The 1960s saw its corporate parent owner, Tribune Company, reac ...
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