Fick's Laws Of Diffusion
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Fick's Laws Of Diffusion
Fick's laws of diffusion describe diffusion File:DiffusionMicroMacro.gif, 250px, Diffusion from a microscopic and macroscopic point of view. Initially, there are solute molecules on the left side of a barrier (purple line) and none on the right. The barrier is removed, and the solute diff ... and were derived by Adolf Fick Adolf Eugen Fick (3 September 1829 – 21 August 1901) was a German-born physician A physician (American English), medical practitioner (English in the Commonwealth of Nations, Commonwealth English), medical doctor, or simply doctor, is ... in 1855. They can be used to solve for the diffusion coefficient Diffusivity, mass diffusivity or diffusion coefficient is a proportionality constant between the molar flux due to molecular diffusion and the gradient in the concentration of the species (or the driving force for diffusion). Diffusivity is encou ..., . Fick's first law can be used to derive his second law which in turn is identical to the dif ...
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Cardiac Output
Cardiac output (CO), also known as heart output denoted by the symbols Q, or \dot Q_ , is a term used in cardiac physiologyCardiac physiology or heart function is the study of healthy, unimpaired function of the heart: involving blood flow; Cardiac muscle, myocardium structure; the electrical conduction system of the heart; the cardiac cycle and cardiac output and how th ... that describes the volume of blood being pumped by the heart, by the left and right Ventricle (heart), ventricle, per unit time. Cardiac output (CO) is the product of the heart rate (HR), i.e. the number of heartbeats per minute (bpm), and the stroke volume (SV), which is the volume of blood pumped from the ventricle per beat; thus, CO = HR × SV. Values for cardiac output are usually denoted as L/min. For a healthy person weighing 70 kg, the cardiac output at rest averages about 5 L/min; assuming a heart rate of 70 beats/min, the stroke volume would be approximately 70 ml. Because cardiac output is re ...
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Viscosity
The viscosity of a fluid is a measure of its drag (physics), resistance to deformation at a given rate. For liquids, it corresponds to the informal concept of "thickness": for example, syrup has a higher viscosity than water. Viscosity can be conceptualized as quantifying the internal friction, frictional force that arises between adjacent layers of fluid that are in relative motion. For instance, when a viscous fluid is forced through a tube, it flows more quickly near the tube's axis than near its walls. In such a case, experiments show that some stress (physics), stress (such as a pressure difference between the two ends of the tube) is needed to sustain the flow through the tube. This is because a force is required to overcome the friction between the layers of the fluid which are in relative motion. So for a tube with a constant rate of flow, the strength of the compensating force is proportional to the fluid's viscosity. A fluid that has no resistance to shear stress is ...
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Heat Kernel
In the mathematical Mathematics (from Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is approximately 10.7 ... study of heat conduction Thermal conduction is the transfer of internal energy by microscopic collisions of particles and movement of electrons within a body. The colliding particles, which include molecules, atoms and electrons, transfer disorganized microscopic kinetic an ... and diffusion File:DiffusionMicroMacro.gif, 250px, Diffusion from a microscopic and macroscopic point of view. Initially, there are solute molecules on the left side of a barrier (purple line) and none on the right. The barrier is removed, and the solute diff ..., a heat kernel is the fundamental solution Fundamental may refer to: * Foundation of reality * Fundamental frequency, as in music or phonetics, often referred to as simply a "f ...
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