February 25 (eastern Orthodox Liturgics)
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February 25 (eastern Orthodox Liturgics)
February 24 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - February 26 All fixed commemorations below are observed on March 10 (March 9 on leap years) by Eastern Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar. For February 25th, Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar commemorate the Saints listed on ''February 12''. Saints * Martyr Alexander, at Marcianopolis in Thracia (c. 305)February 25 / March 10
Orthodox Calendar (Pravoslavie.ru).
Συναξαριστής.
25 Φεβρουαρίου
'' Ecclesia.gr. (H Εκκλησια τησ Ελλαδοσ).
* Martyr Anthony, by being burned alive. * Saint Theodore,
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Tarasius Of Constantinople
Saint Tarasios (also Saint Tarasius; el, Ἅγιος Ταράσιος; c. 730 – 25 February 806) was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 25 December 784 until his death on 25 February 806. Background Tarasios was born and raised in the city of Constantinople. A son of a high-ranking judge, Tarasios was related to important families, including that of the later Patriarch Photios the Great. Tarasios had embarked on a career in the secular administration and had attained the rank of senator, eventually becoming imperial secretary (''asekretis'') to the Emperor Constantine VI and his mother, the Empress Irene. Originally he embraced Iconoclasm, but later repented, resigned his post, and retired to a monastery, taking the Great Schema (monastic habit). Since he exhibited both Iconodule sympathies and the willingness to follow imperial commands when they were not contrary to the faith, he was selected as Patriarch of Constantinople by the Empress Irene in 784, even thou ...
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Abbey Of Saint Gall
The Abbey of Saint Gall (german: Abtei St. Gallen) is a dissolved abbey (747–1805) in a Catholic religious complex in the city of St. Gallen in Switzerland. The Carolingian-era monastery existed from 719, founded by Saint Othmar on the spot where Gallus had erected his hermitage. It became an independent principality between 9th and 13th centuries, and was for many centuries one of the chief Benedictine abbeys in Europe. The library of the Abbey is one of the oldest monastic libraries in the world. The city of St. Gallen originated as an adjoining settlement of the abbey. The abbey was secularized around 1800, and in 1848 its former church became a Cathedral. Since 1983 the abbey precinct has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site. History Foundation Around 612 Gallus, according to tradition an Irish monk and disciple and companion of Saint Columbanus, established a hermitage on the site that would become the monastery. He lived in his cell until his death in 646, and wa ...
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May 1 (Eastern Orthodox Liturgics)
April 30 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics), Apr. 30 - Eastern Orthodox Church calendar - May 2 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics), May 2. All fixed Synaxarium, commemorations below celebrated on May 14 by Eastern Orthodox Church, Orthodox Churches on the Julian Calendar, Old Calendar. For May 1st, Orthodox Churches on the Old Calendar commemorate the Saints listed on April 18 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics), April 18. Saints * ''Prophet Jeremiah'' (c. 655 – 586 BC) * Martyr Philosophos at Alexandria (252)May 1/14
Orthodox Calendar (ORTHOCHRISTIAN.COM)
* Martyr Sabbas * Venerable Hieromartyr Batas of Nisibis (Bata the Persian) (c. 364) * ''Venerable Saint Isidora, Isidora the Foolishness for Christ, Fool-for-Christ, of Tabennisi, Egypt'' (c. 365) * New Monk-martyr Romanus of Raqqa (780) * St. Michael, ...
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Translation (relic)
In Christianity, the translation of relics is the removal of holy objects from one locality to another (usually a higher-status location); usually only the movement of the remains of the saint's body would be treated so formally, with secondary relics such as items of clothing treated with less ceremony. Translations could be accompanied by many acts, including all-night vigils and processions, often involving entire communities. The solemn translation (in Latin, ''translatio'') of relics is not treated as the outward recognition of sanctity. Rather, miracles confirmed a saint's sanctity, as evinced by the fact that when, in the twelfth century, the Papacy attempted to make sanctification an official process; many collections of miracles were written in the hope of providing proof of the saint-in-question's status. In the early Middle Ages, however, solemn translation marked the moment at which, the saint's miracles having been recognized, the relic was moved by a bishop or abbot ...
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Heidenheim, Bavaria
Heidenheim () is a municipality in the Weißenburg-Gunzenhausen district, in Bavaria, Germany. Heidenheim is an old German market town, which resides in the administrative region of Middle Franconia in the middle of Bavaria. It belongs to the rural district called Weißenburg-Gunzenhausen. It is the administrative center of the local region called Hahnenkamm. Geography Heidenheim is located in the administration region West Middle Franconia (Westmittelfranken). Following local subdistricts belong to Heidenheim: Degersheim, Hechlingen am See, Hohentrüdingen. History Heidenheim was first mentioned in the year 742. During that time the double monastery of Heidenheim am Hahnenkamm (housing monks and nuns), was founded by Saint Willibald and was later led by Saint Walpurga who became abbess after his death. Secular power was represented by the Earl of Truhendingen (Altentrühdingen), later Duke of Bavaria, burgrave of Nuremberg (Hohenzollern). After that, Heidenheim belonged to the ...
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Saint Walpurga
Walpurga or Walburga ( ang, Wealdburg, la, Valpurga, Walpurga, Walpurgis, sv, Valborg; c. AD 71025 February 777 or 779), also spelled Valderburg or Guibor, was an Anglo-Saxon missionary to the Frankish Empire. She was canonized on 1 May c. 870 by Pope Adrian II. Saint Walpurgis Night (or "Sankt Walpurgisnacht") is the name for the eve of her feast day in the Medieval period, which coincided with May Day; her feast is no longer celebrated on that day, but the name is still used for May Eve. Early life Walpurga was born in the county of Devonshire, England, into a local aristocratic family. She was the daughter of Richard the Pilgrim, an underking of the West Saxons, and of Wuna of Wessex, and had two brothers, Willibald and Winibald. Religious career In 721 Richard set out on a pilgrimage to Rome with his two sons. Before leaving he entrusted Walburga, then 11 years old, to the abbess of the double monastery at Wimborne Abbey in Dorset. She had been there but a year, wh ...
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John O'Hanlon (writer)
John Canon O'Hanlon MRIA (30 April 1821 – 15 May 1905) was an Irish Catholic priest, scholar and writer who also published poetry and illustrations, and involved himself in Irish politics. He is best known as a folklorist and a hagiographer, and in particular for his comprehensive ''Lives of the Irish Saints''. Life O'Hanlon was born in Stradbally, Laois. His parents were Edward and Honor Hanlon. He attended the Preston School in Ballyroan and then entered Carlow College to study for the priesthood. Before he completed his studies, however, he emigrated in 1842 with members of his family, initially to Quebec, but ultimately to Missouri in the United States of America (a migration perhaps occasioned by the death of his father). The family settled in Millwood in northeast Missouri. O'Hanlon was admitted to the diocesan college in St. Louis, completed his studies, and was ordained in 1847. He was then assigned a mission in the diocese of St. Louis, where he ministered until 185 ...
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Maubeuge Abbey
Maubeuge Abbey (french: Abbaye de Maubeuge) was a women's monastery in Maubeuge, in the County of Hainaut, now northern France, close to the modern border with Belgium. It is best known today as the abbey founded by St. Aldegonde, still a popular figure of devotion in the region. It is thought to have possibly been where the young Jan Gossaert, a Renaissance-era painter known as Jan Mabuse, was educated, claimed by some to have been a native of the town of Maubeuge, which grew up around the abbey. History Initially founded as a double monastery, that is, a community of both men and women, this abbey was founded in 661 for the care of the sick by the young Aldegonde, who was abbess there until her death in 684, and was also buried there. She was succeeded as abbess by her two nieces, first Aldetrudis and then Madelberte. The abbey soon became a Benedictine monastery solely of nuns. St. Amalberga of Maubeuge became a member of the community later in the eighth century. Maubeuge ...
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Æthelberht Of Kent
Æthelberht (; also Æthelbert, Aethelberht, Aethelbert or Ethelbert; ang, Æðelberht ; 550 – 24 February 616) was King of Kent from about 589 until his death. The eighth-century monk Bede, in his ''Ecclesiastical History of the English People'', lists him as the third king to hold ''imperium'' over other Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. In the late ninth century ''Anglo-Saxon Chronicle'', he is referred to as a ''bretwalda'', or "Britain-ruler". He was the first English king to convert to Christianity. Æthelberht was the son of Eormenric, succeeding him as king, according to the ''Chronicle''. He married Bertha, the Christian daughter of Charibert I, king of the Franks, thus building an alliance with the most powerful state in contemporary Western Europe; the marriage probably took place before he came to the throne. Bertha's influence may have led to Pope Gregory I's decision to send Augustine as a missionary from Rome. Augustine landed on the Isle of Thanet in east Kent in ...
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