Carpi (people)
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Carpi (people)
The Carpi or Carpiani were an ancient people that resided in the eastern parts of modern Romania Romania ( ; ro, România ) is a country at the crossroads of Central Central is an adjective usually referring to being in the center (other), center of some place or (mathematical) object. Central may also refer to: Directions ... in the historical region of Moldavia Moldavia ( ro, Moldova, or , literally "The Moldavian Country"; in Romanian Cyrillic alphabet, Romanian Cyrillic: or ; chu, Землѧ Молдавскаѧ; el, Ἡγεμονία τῆς Μολδαβίας) is a historical region and forme ... from no later than c. AD 140 and until at least AD 318. The ethnic affiliation of the Carpi remains disputed, as there is no direct evidence in the surviving ancient literary sources. A strong body of modern scholarly opinion considers that the Carpi were a tribe of the Dacian nation. Other scholars have linked the Carpi to a variety of ethnic groups, ...
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Roman Province Of Dacia (106 - 271 AD)
Roman Dacia ( ; also known as Dacia Traiana, "Trajan Dacia", or Dacia Felix, "Fertile/Happy Dacia") was a Roman province, province of the Roman Empire from 106 to 271–275 AD. Its territory consisted of what are now the regions of Oltenia, Transylvania and Banat (today all in Romania, except the last one which is split between Romania, Hungary, and Serbia). During Roman rule, it was organized as an imperial province on the borders of the empire. It is estimated that the population of Roman Dacia ranged from 650,000 to 1,200,000. It was conquered by Trajan (98–117) after Trajan's Dacian Wars, two campaigns that devastated the Dacian Kingdom of Decebalus. However, the Romans did not occupy its entirety; Crișana, Maramureș, and most of Moldavia remained under the Free Dacians. After its integration into the empire, Roman Dacia saw constant administrative division. In 119, it was divided into two departments: Dacia Superior ("Upper Dacia") and Dacia Inferior ("Lower Dacia"; ...
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Cosmographia Claudii Ptolomaei Alexandrini - 1467 - Sarmatia And Taurica
''Cosmographia'' (Latin language, Latin, from Ancient Greek, Greek κόσμος, "world, universe", and γραφή, "representation") may refer to: Written works *''Cosmographia'', an alternative name for Ptolemy's ''Geography (Ptolemy), Geographia'' *''Cosmographia'', a late antique or early medieval geographical work by Julius Honorius *''Cosmographia'', an early medieval geographical work feigned to record the travels of one Aethicus Ister *''Ravenna Cosmography'', a seventh- or eighth-century work by an anonymous of Ravenna *Cosmographia (Bernardus Silvestris), ''Cosmographia'' (Bernardus Silvestris), a twelfth-century allegory by Bernardus Silvestris *''Cosmographia'', a fifteenth-century work by the German geographer Nicolaus Germanus *''Cosmographia'', an alternative title of Petrus Apianus' sixteenth-century ''Cosmographicus liber'' *Cosmographia (Sebastian Münster), ''Cosmographia'' (Sebastian Münster), a sixteenth-century work by the German geographer Sebastian Münster * ...
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