HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff


picture info

Alsatian Language
Alsatian ( gsw-als|Elsässisch or "Alsatian German"; Lorraine Franconian: ''Elsässerdeitsch''; french: Alsacien; german: Elsässisch or ) refers to the Alemannic German dialects spoken in most of Alsace, a formerly disputed region in eastern France that has passed between French and German control five times since 1681. Language family Alsatian is closely related to other nearby Alemannic dialects, such as Swiss German, Swabian, and Markgräflerisch as well as Kaiserstühlerisch. It is often confused with Lorraine Franconian, a more distantly related Franconian dialect spoken in the northwest corner of Alsace and in neighbouring Lorraine. Like other dialects and languages, Alsatian has also been influenced by outside sources. Words of Yiddish origin can be found in Alsatian, and modern conversational Alsatian includes adaptations of French words and English words, especially concerning new technologies. Many speakers of Alsatian could, if necessary, write in reasonable standa ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

France
France (), officially the French Republic (french: link=no|République française), is a country primarily located in Western Europe, consisting of metropolitan France and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. France borders Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland, Monaco and Italy to the east, Andorra and Spain to the south, as well as the Netherlands, Suriname and Brazil in the Americas. The country's eighteen integral regions (five of which are situated overseas) span a combined area of and a total population of 67.4 million (). France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

French Language
French ( or ) is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the Latin spoken in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French. French is an official language in 29 countries across multiple continents, most of which are members of the ''Organisation internationale de la Francophonie'' (OIF), ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



French Fifth Republic
The Fifth Republic (french: Cinquième République) is France's current republican system of government. It was established by Charles de Gaulle under the Constitution of the Fifth Republic on 4 October 1958.. The Fifth Republic emerged from the collapse of the Fourth Republic, replacing the former parliamentary republic with a semi-presidential (or dual-executive) system that split powers between a prime minister as head of government and a president as head of state. De Gaulle, who was the first French president elected under the Fifth Republic in December 1958, believed in a strong head of state, which he described as embodying ("the spirit of the nation"). The Fifth Republic is France's third-longest-lasting political regime, after the hereditary and feudal monarchies of the Ancien Régime (Late Middle Ages – 1792) and the parliamentary Third Republic (1870–1940). The Fifth Republic will overtake the Third Republic as the second-longest-lasting regime and the longest-la ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Rue Du Sauvage
''Ruta graveolens'' . ''strong smelling rue'' commonly known as rue, common rue or herb-of-grace, is a species of ''Ruta'' grown as an ornamental plant and herb. It is native to the Balkan Peninsula. It is now grown throughout the world in gardens, especially for its bluish leaves, and sometimes for its tolerance of hot and dry soil conditions. It is also cultivated as a medicinal herb, as a condiment, and to a lesser extent as an insect repellent. Etymology The specific epithet ''graveolens'' refers to the strong-smelling leaves.J. D. Douglas and Merrill C. Tenney Uses Traditional use In the ancient Roman world, the naturalists Pedanius Dioscorides and Pliny the Elder recommended that rue be combined with the poisonous shrub oleander to be drunk as an antidote to poisonous snake bites. The ''Tacuinum Sanitatis'', a medieval handbook on wellness, lists these properties of rue: *''Nature:'' Warm and dry in the third degree. *''Optimum:'' That which is grown near a fig t ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Cairn
A cairn is a man-made pile (or stack) of stones. The word ''cairn'' comes from the gd|càrn (plural ). Cairns have been and are used for a broad variety of purposes, from prehistoric times to the present. In modern times, cairns are often erected as landmarks, a use they have had since ancient times. However, since prehistory, they have also been built and used as burial monuments; for defense and hunting; for ceremonial purposes, sometimes relating to astronomy; to locate buried items, such as caches of food or objects; and to mark trails, among other purposes. Cairns are used as trail markers in many parts of the world, in uplands, on moorland, on mountaintops, near waterways and on sea cliffs, as well as in barren deserts and tundras. They vary in size from small stone markers to entire artificial hills, and in complexity from loose conical rock piles to delicately balanced sculptures and elaborate feats of megalithic engineering. Cairns may be painted or otherwise ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Mulhouse
Mulhouse (; Alsatian: or , ; ; meaning ''mill house'') is a subprefecture of the Haut-Rhin department in the Grand Est region of Eastern France, close to the Swiss and German borders. With a population of 108,942 in 2018 in the commune and 246,692 inhabitants in 2017 in the urban unit, it is the largest city in Haut-Rhin and second largest in Alsace after Strasbourg. Mulhouse is the principal commune of the 39 communes which make up the of (m2A, population 272,712). Mulhouse is famous for its museums, especially the (also known as the , 'National Museum of the Automobile') and the (also known as , 'French Museum of the Railway'), respectively the largest automobile and railway museums in the world. An industrial town nicknamed "the French Manchester", Mulhouse is also the main seat of the Upper Alsace University, where the secretariat of the European Physical Society is found. Administration Mulhouse is the chief city of an arrondissement of the Haut-Rhin department, of whi ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Strasbourg
Strasbourg (, , ; gsw|label=Bas Rhin Alsatian|Strossburi , gsw|label=Haut Rhin Alsatian|Strossburig ; german: Straßburg lat|Argentoratum) is the prefecture and largest city of the Grand Est region of Eastern France and the official seat of the European Parliament. Located at the border with Germany in the historic region of Alsace, it is the prefecture of the Bas-Rhin department. In 2018, the city proper had 284,677 inhabitants and both the Eurométropole de Strasbourg (Greater Strasbourg) and the Arrondissement of Strasbourg had 500,510 inhabitants. Strasbourg's metropolitan area had a population of 790,087 in 2017 (not counting the section across the border in Germany), making it the ninth-largest metro area in France and home to 13% of the Grand Est region's inhabitants. The transnational Eurodistrict Strasbourg-Ortenau had a population of 958,421 inhabitants. Strasbourg is one of the ''de facto'' four main capitals of the European Union (alongside Brussels, Luxembourg ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Markgräflerland
Markgräflerland () is a region in the southwest of Germany, in the south of the German federal state of Baden-Württemberg, located between the Breisgau in the north and the Black Forest in the east; adjacent to west with France and in the south with Switzerland. History and geography The name translates to ''Margraves' Land'', in reference to the Margraves of Baden. They ruled the area from the 12th century as a margraviate of the Holy Roman Empire until its elevation to the Grand Duchy of Baden in 1806, following the Empire's dissolution. Markgräflerland is the combination of three lordships: Badenweiler, Rötteln and Sausenburg. In 1556 the Markgraf (Margrave) became Protestant following the actions of the German monk Martin Luther. The river Rhine marks the frontier to France in the west and Switzerland in the south. Markgräflerland is considered to be part of the transnational metropolitan area that includes Freiburg, Basel, and Mulhouse. This region of Germany, also c ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Switzerland
,german: Schweizer(in),french: Suisse(sse), it|svizzero/svizzera or , rm|Svizzer/Svizra |government_type = Federal semi-direct democracy under a multi-party assembly-independent directorial republic |leader_title1 = Federal Council |leader_name1 = |leader_title2 = |leader_name2 = Walter Thurnherr |legislature = Federal Assembly |upper_house = Council of States |lower_house = National Council |sovereignty_type = History |established_event1 = Foundation date |established_date1 = The original date of the Rütlischwur was 1307 (reported by Aegidius Tschudi in the 16th century) and is just one among several comparable treaties between more or less the same parties during that period. The date of the Federal Charter of 1291 was selected in 1891 for the official celebration of the "Confederacy's 600th anniversary". (traditionally 1 August 1291) |established_event2 = Peace of Westphalia |established_date2 = 24 October 1648 |established_event3 = Restoration |established_date3 = 7 Augus ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Basel
, french: link=no|Bâlois(e), it|Basilese |neighboring_municipalities= Allschwil (BL), Hégenheim (FR-68), Binningen (BL), Birsfelden (BL), Bottmingen (BL), Huningue (FR-68), Münchenstein (BL), Muttenz (BL), Reinach (BL), Riehen (BS), Saint-Louis (FR-68), Weil am Rhein (DE-BW) |twintowns = Shanghai, Miami Beach |website = www.bs.ch Basel ( , ) or Basle ( ; french: link=no|Bâle ; it|Basilea ; rm|Basilea ) is a city in northwestern Switzerland on the river Rhine. Basel is Switzerland's third-most-populous city (after Zürich and Geneva) with about 180,000 inhabitants. The official language of Basel is (the Swiss variety of Standard) German, but the main spoken language is the local Basel German dialect. Basel is commonly considered to be the cultural capital of Switzerland. Basel is famous for its many museums, ranging from the Kunstmuseum, the first collection of art accessible to the public in the world (1661) and the largest museum of art in Switzerland ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Standard German
Standard German, High German, or more precisely Standard High German (german: Standarddeutsch, , or, in Switzerland, ), is the standardized variety of the German language used in formal contexts and for communication between different dialect areas. It is a pluricentric Dachsprache with three codified (or standardised) specific regional variants: German Standard German, Austrian Standard German, and Swiss Standard German. Regarding the spelling and punctuation, a recommended standard is published by the Council for German Orthography (formed in 2004) which represents the governments of all majority and minority German-speaking countries and dependencies. Adherence is obligatory for government institutions, including schools. Regarding the pronunciation, although there is no official standards body, there is a long-standing ''de facto'' standard pronunciation (Bühnendeutsch), most commonly used in formal speech and teaching materials. It is similar to the formal German spoken in an ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Yiddish
Yiddish (, or , ''yidish'' or ''idish'', , ; , ''Yidish-Taytsh'', ) is a High German–derived language historically spoken by Ashkenazi Jews. It originated during the 9th century in Central Europe, providing the nascent Ashkenazi community with a High German-based vernacular fused with many elements taken from Hebrew (notably Mishnaic) and to some extent Aramaic; most varieties also have substantial influence from Slavic languages, and the vocabulary contains traces of influence from Romance languages.Aram Yardumian"A Tale of Two Hypotheses: Genetics and the Ethnogenesis of Ashkenazi Jewry".University of Pennsylvania. 2013. Yiddish writing uses the Hebrew alphabet. In the 1990s, there were around 1.5–2 million speakers of Yiddish, mostly Hasidic and Haredi Jews. , the Center for Applied Linguistics estimated the number of speakers to have had a worldwide peak at 11 million (prior to World War II), with the number of speakers in the United States and Canada then totaling 1 ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Lorraine (region)
Lorraine , also , , ; Lorrain: ''Louréne''; Lorraine Franconian: ''Lottringe''; german: Lothringen ; lb|Loutrengen; nl|Lotharingen is a cultural and historical region in north-eastern France, now located in the administrative region of Grand Est. Lorraine's name stems from the medieval kingdom of Lotharingia, which in turn was named for either Emperor Lothair I or King Lothair II. It later was ruled as the Duchy of Lorraine before the Kingdom of France annexed it in 1766. From 1982 until January 2016, Lorraine was an administrative region of France. In 2016, under a reorganization, it became part of the new region Grand Est. As a region in modern France, Lorraine consisted of the four departments Meurthe-et-Moselle, Meuse, Moselle and Vosges (of an historical point of view the Haute-Marne department is located in the region), containing 2,337 communes. Metz is the regional prefecture. The largest metropolitan area of Lorraine is Nancy, which had developed for centuries as the ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Franconian Languages
Franconian or Frankish is a collective term traditionally used by linguists to refer to many West Germanic varieties, most of which are spoken in what formed the historical core area of the Frankish Empire during the Early Middle Ages. Linguistically, there are no typological features that are typical for all the various dialects conventionally grouped as Franconian. As such, it forms a residual category within the larger historical West Germanic Dialect continuum rather than a homogeneous group of closely related dialects. For most of the varieties grouped under "Franconian" the diachronical connection to Old Frankish, the language spoken by the Franks, is unclear. Franconian is further divided along the lines of the Second Germanic consonant shift, with the Low Franconian group (including Dutch and Afrikaans) not participating whereas the Central Franconian (which includes Luxembourgish) subgroups did, to varying degrees. Both the term Franconian and its further delineations ar ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]