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Women In Dance
The important place of women in dance can be traced back to the very origins of civilization. Cave paintings, Egyptian frescos, Indian statuettes, ancient Greek and Roman art and records of court traditions in China and Japan all testify to the important role women played in ritual and religious dancing from the start. In the Middle Ages, what has become known as ballet had its beginnings in Italian court festivals when women frequently played the parts of men. It was however in late 17th-century France that the Paris Opera produced the first celebrated ballerinas. While women began to dominate the ballet scene in the 18th century, it was with the advent of Romantic ballet in the 19th century that they became the undisputed centre of attraction with stars playing the leading roles in the works of Marius Petipa, appearing in theatres across Europe from Milan's La Scala
La Scala
to the Mariinsky Theatre
Mariinsky Theatre
in Saint Petersburg
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Dance And Dancers In Ancient Egypt
Dancing
Dancing
played a vital role in the lives of the ancient Egyptians. The trf was a dance performed by a pair of men during the Old Kingdom. Dance groups were accessible to perform at dinner parties, banquets, lodging houses, and even religious temples. Some women from wealthy harems were trained in music and dance. They danced for royalty accompanied by female musicians playing on guitars, lyres and harps. However, no well-bred Egyptian would dance in public, because that was the privilege of the lower classes
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Isis
Isis
Isis
was a major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world. Isis
Isis
was first mentioned in the Old Kingdom
Old Kingdom
(c. 2686–2181 BCE) as one of the main characters of the Osiris
Osiris
myth, in which she resurrects her slain husband, the divine king Osiris, and produces and protects his heir, Horus. She was believed to help the dead enter the afterlife as she had helped Osiris, and she was considered the divine mother of the pharaoh, who was likened to Horus. Her maternal aid was invoked in healing spells to benefit ordinary people. Originally, she played a limited role in royal rituals and temple rites, although she was more prominent in funerary practices and magical texts. In the first millennium BCE, Osiris
Osiris
and Isis
Isis
became the most widely worshipped of Egyptian deities
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Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
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Tang Dynasty
The Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
or the Tang Empire
Empire
(/tɑːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 唐朝[a]) was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty
Sui dynasty
and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture.[5] Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty, and the Tang capital at Chang'an
Chang'an
(present-day Xi'an) was the most populous city in the world. The dynasty was founded by the Lǐ family (李), who seized power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire
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Delos
The island of Delos
Delos
(/ˈdiːlɒs/; Greek: Δήλος [ˈðilos]; Attic: Δῆλος, Doric: Δᾶλος), near Mykonos, near the centre of the Cyclades
Cyclades
archipelago, is one of the most important mythological, historical and archaeological sites in Greece
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Apollo
Apollo
Apollo
(Attic, Ionic, and Homeric
Homeric
Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (GEN Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Arcadocypriot: Ἀπείλων, Apeilōn; Aeolic: Ἄπλουν, Aploun; Latin: Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo
Apollo
has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo
Apollo
is the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis
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Terpsichore
In Greek mythology, Terpsichore
Terpsichore
(/tərpˈsɪkəriː/; Τερψιχόρη) "delight in dancing" was one of the nine Muses
Muses
and goddess of dance and chorus.[1] She lends her name to the word "terpsichorean" which means "of or relating to dance". She is usually depicted sitting down, holding a lyre, accompanying the ballerinas' choirs with her music. Her name comes from the Greek words τέρπω ("delight") and χoρός ("dance")
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Muse
The Muses
Muses
(/ˈmjuːzɪz/; Ancient Greek: Μοῦσαι, Moũsai) are the inspirational goddesses of literature, science, and the arts in Greek mythology. They were considered the source of the knowledge embodied in the poetry, lyric songs, and myths that were related orally for centuries in these ancient cultures
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Greek Chorus
A Greek chorus, or simply chorus (Greek: χορός, khoros) in the context of Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
tragedy, comedy, satyr plays, and modern works inspired by them, is a homogeneous, non-individualised group of performers, who comment with a collective voice on the dramatic action.[1] The chorus consisted of between 12 and 50 players, who variously danced, sang or spoke their lines in unison and sometimes wore masks.Contents1 Etymology 2 Dramatic function 3 Choral structure and size 4 Stage management 5 Decline in antiquity 6 Modern choruses 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEtymology[edit] Historian H. D. F
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Dionysus
Dionysus
Dionysus
(/daɪ.əˈnaɪsəs/; Greek: Διόνυσος Dionysos) is the god of the grape harvest, winemaking and wine, of ritual madness, fertility,[2][3] theatre and religious ecstasy in ancient Greek religion and myth. Wine
Wine
played an important role in Greek culture, and the cult of Dionysus
Dionysus
was the main religious focus for its unrestrained consumption.[4] His worship became firmly established in the seventh century BC.[5] He may have been worshipped as early as c. 1500–1100 BC by Mycenean Greeks;[6][7] traces of Dionysian-type cult have also been found in ancient Minoan Crete.[8] His origins are uncertain, and his cults took many forms; some are described by ancient sources as Thracian, others as Greek.[9][10][11] In some cults, he arrives from the east, as an Asiatic foreigner; in others, from Ethiopia
Ethiopia
in the South
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Osiris
Osiris
Osiris
(/oʊˈsaɪrɪs/, from Egyptian wsjr, Coptic ⲟⲩⲥⲓⲣⲉ)[1][2] is an Egyptian god, identified as the god of the afterlife, the underworld, and the dead, but more appropriately as the god of transition, resurrection, and regeneration. He was classically depicted as a green-skinned deity with a pharaoh's beard, partially mummy-wrapped at the legs, wearing a distinctive crown with two large ostrich feathers at either side, and holding a symbolic crook and flail
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Indus Valley
The Indus River
Indus River
(also called the Sindhū or Abāsīn) is one of the longest rivers in Asia. Originating in the Tibetan Plateau
Tibetan Plateau
in the vicinity of Lake Manasarovar
Lake Manasarovar
(China), the river runs a course through the Ladakh
Ladakh
region of Jammu and Kashmir
Jammu and Kashmir
(India), towards Gilgit-Baltistan
Gilgit-Baltistan
and the Hindukush ranges, and then flows in a southerly direction along the entire length of Pakistan
Pakistan
to merge into the Arabian Sea
Arabian Sea
near the port city of Karachi
Karachi
in Sindh.[1][2] It is the longest river and national river of Pakistan.[3] The river has a total drainage area exceeding 1,165,000 km2 (450,000 sq mi)
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Maenad
In Greek mythology, maenads (/ˈmiːnædz/; Ancient Greek: μαινάδες [maiˈnades]) were the female followers of Dionysus and the most significant members of the Thiasus, the god's retinue. Their name literally translates as "raving ones". Maenads were known as Bassarids, Bacchae /ˈbækiː/ or Bacchantes /ˈbækənts, bəˈkænts, -ˈkɑːnts/ in Roman mythology
Roman mythology
after the penchant of the equivalent Roman god, Bacchus, to wear a bassaris or fox-skin. Often the maenads were portrayed as inspired by Dionysus
Dionysus
into a state of ecstatic frenzy through a combination of dancing and intoxication.[1] During these rites, the maenads would dress in fawn skins and carry a thyrsus, a long stick wrapped in ivy or vine leaves and tipped with a pine cone
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Miriam
Miriam
Miriam
(מִרְיָם‬) is described in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
as the daughter of Amram and Yocheved, and the sister of Moses
Moses
and Aaron. She was a prophet and first appears in the Book of Exodus. Miriam
Miriam
the prophetessContents1 Pedigree and uniqueness 2 Siblings and spouse 3 Meanings of the name 4 Other names 5 Role in Pharaoh’s Decree 6 Reverses “Amram’s Decree” 7 Role in the birth of Moses 8 Saves Moses 9 At the Song of the Sea 10 Miriam
Miriam
and Tzipora, Nu
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Crossing The Red Sea
The Crossing of the Red Sea
Red Sea
(Hebrew: קריעת ים סוף Kriat Yam Suph - Crossing of the Red Sea
Red Sea
or Sea of Reeds[1]) is part of the biblical narrative of the Exodus, the escape of the Israelites, led by Moses, from the pursuing Egyptians
Egyptians
in the Book of Exodus.[2] This story is also mentioned in the Quran
Quran
in Surah 26: Al-Shu'ara' (The Poets) in verses 60-67.[3] According to the Exodus account, Moses
Moses
held out his staff and the Red Sea was parted by God. The Israelites
Israelites
walked on the exposed dry ground and crossed the sea, followed by the Egyptian army
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