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Wattle And Daub
Wattle and daub
Wattle and daub
is a composite building material used for making walls, in which a woven lattice of wooden strips called wattle is daubed with a sticky material usually made of some combination of wet soil, clay, sand, animal dung and straw. Wattle and daub
Wattle and daub
has been used for at least 6,000 years and is still an important construction material in many parts of the world
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Clay Panel
Clay
Clay
panel (also known as clay board, clay wallboard, clay building board, clay building panel) is a panel made of clay with some additives. The clay is mixed with sand, water, and fiber, typically wood fiber, and sometimes other additives like starch.[1] Most often this means employing the use of high-cellulose waste fibres. To improve the breaking resistance clay boards are often embedded in a hessian skin on the backside or similar embeddings. Clay
Clay
board is an alternative to gypsum plasterboard. It is suitable for drywall applications for interior walls and ceilings. It can be applied to either timber or metal studwork. Usually the application of clay boards is completed with clay finishing plaster.[2]Contents1 Constructional properties 2 Processing 3 Applications 4 See also 5 ReferencesConstructional properties[edit] The boards have fire retardant properties and medium levels of acoustic insulation
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Lincolnshire
Coordinates: 53°4′N 0°11′W / 53.067°N 0.183°W / 53.067; -0.183LincolnshireCountyFlagMotto: Land and God Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
in EnglandSovereign state United KingdomCountry EnglandRegion East Midlands Yorkshire and the Humber
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Species
In biology, a species is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank, as well as a unit of biodiversity, but it has proven difficult to find a satisfactory definition. Scientists and conservationists need a species definition which allows them to work, regardless of the theoretical difficulties. If as Linnaeus
Linnaeus
thought, species were fixed, there would be no problem, but evolutionary processes cause species to change continually, and to grade into one another. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which two individuals can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction. While this definition is often adequate, when looked at more closely it is problematic. For example, with hybridisation, in a species complex of hundreds of similar microspecies, or in a ring species, the boundaries between closely related species become unclear
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Casuarina
See text Fruit
Fruit
of C. equisetifolia Casuarina
Casuarina
sp. at the Muséum de Toulouse, France. Casuarina
Casuarina
is a genus of 17 tree species in the family Casuarinaceae, native to Australia, the Indian subcontinent, southeast Asia, and islands of the western Pacific Ocean. It was once treated as the sole genus in the family, but has been split into three genera (see: Casuarinaceae).[1][2] Casuarina equisetifolia
Casuarina equisetifolia
at Chikhaldara, India.They are evergreen shrubs and trees growing to 35 m (115 ft) tall. The foliage consists of slender, much-branched green to grey-green twigs bearing minute scale-leaves in whorls of 5–20. The apetalous flowers are produced in small catkin-like inflorescences. Most species are dioecious, but a few are monoecious
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Callitris
See textSynonyms[2]Frenela Mirb. Cyparissia Hoffmanns. Octoclinis F. Muell. Leichhardtia T. Steph. ex Gordon Nothocallitris A. V. Bobrov & Melikyan Neocallitropsis Florin[1] Callitris
Callitris
is a genus of coniferous trees in the Cupressaceae
Cupressaceae
(cypress family). There are 16 recognized species in the genus, of which 13 are native to Australia
Australia
and the other three (C. neocaledonica, C. sulcata) native to New Caledonia.[2] Traditionally, the most widely used common name is cypress-pine,[3] a name shared by some species of the closely related genus Actinostrobus.[4]Contents1 Description 2 Taxonomy2.1 Species 2.2 Doubtful names3 Human use 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] They are small to medium-sized trees or large shrubs, reaching 5–25 m (16–82 ft) tall (to 40 m (130 ft) in C. macleayana)
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South Australia
South Australia
Australia
(abbreviated as SA) is a state in the southern central part of Australia. It covers some of the most arid parts of the country. With a total land area of 983,482 square kilometres (379,725 sq mi), it is the fourth-largest of Australia's states and territories by area, and fifth largest by population. It has a total of 1.7 million people, and its population is the most highly centralised of any state in Australia, with more than 75 percent of South Australians
South Australians
living in the capital, Adelaide, or its environs
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Close Studding
Close studding
Close studding
is a form of timber work used in timber-framed buildings in which vertical timbers (studs) are set close together, dividing the wall into narrow panels. Rather than being a structural feature, the primary aim of close studding is to produce an impressive front.[1] Close studding
Close studding
first appeared in England in the 13th century and was commonly used there from the mid-15th century until the end of the 17th century. It was also common in France from the 15th century.Contents1 Description 2 History and usage 3 Variations 4 Selected examples4.1 Churches 4.2 Inns and cafés 4.3 Private houses 4.4 Public halls5 See also 6 Notes and references6.1 SourcesDescription[edit] Close studding
Close studding
with (right) and without (left) middle rail
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Tacuinum Sanitatis
The Tacuinum (sometimes Taccuinum) Sanitatis[1] is a medieval handbook mainly on health, based on the Taqwīm as‑siḥḥah تقويم الصحة ("Maintenance of Health"), an eleventh-century Arab medical treatise by Ibn Butlan
Ibn Butlan
of Baghdad.[2] Aimed at a cultured lay audience, the text exists in several variant Latin versions, the manuscripts of which are characteristically so profusely illustrated that one student called the Tacuinum "a [300] picture book," only "nominally a medical text".[3] Though describing in detail the beneficial and harmful properties of foods and plants, it is far more than a herbal
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Cob (material)
Cob, cobb or clom (in Wales) is a natural building material made from subsoil, water, fibrous organic material (typically straw), and sometimes lime.[1] The contents of subsoil naturally vary, and if it does not contain the right mixture it can be modified with sand or clay. Cob is fireproof, resistant to seismic activity,[2] and inexpensive. It can be used to create artistic, sculptural forms, and its use has been revived in recent years by the natural building and sustainability movements. In technical building and engineering documents such as the Uniform Building Code, cob may be referred to as an "unburned clay masonry" when used in a structural context
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Ashanti People
Ashanti (/ˈæʃɑːnˈtiː/ ( listen)) are an ethnic group native to the Ashanti Region
Ashanti Region
of modern-day Ghana. The people of ashanti speak the Asante dialect
Asante dialect
of Twi
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Brazil
Coordinates: 10°S 52°W / 10°S 52°W / -10; -52Federative Republic
Republic
of Brazil República Federativa do Brasil  (Portuguese)FlagCoat of armsMotto: Ordem e Progresso  (Portuguese) (English: "Order and Progress")Anthem: "Hino Nacional Brasileiro" (English: "Brazilian National Anthem")Flag anthem: Hino à Bandeira Nacional[1] (English: "National Flag Anthem")National sealSelo Nacional do Brasil National Seal of BrazilLocation of  Brazil  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital Br
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Mississippian Culture
The Mississippian culture
Mississippian culture
was a mound-building Native American civilization archeologists date from approximately 800 CE to 1600 CE, varying regionally.[1] It was composed of a series of urban settlements and satellite villages (suburbs) linked together by a loose trading network,[2] the largest city being Cahokia, believed to be a major religious center. The civilization flourished from the southern shores of the Great Lakes at Western New York and Western Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
in what is now the Eastern Midwest, extending south-southwest into the lower Mississippi Valley and wrapping easterly around the southern foot of the Appalachians
Appalachians
barrier range into what is now the Southeastern United States.[1] The Mississippian way of life began to develop in the Mississippi River Valley (for which it is named)
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Pierrotage
Pierrotage is a half-timbered timber framing technique in which stone infill is used between posts. It was used in France and by French settlers in French Canada and Upper Louisiana.[1] See also[edit]Bousillage French architecture French colonization of the Americas New France Poteaux-en-terre Poteaux-sur-solle Ste. Genevieve, MissouriReferences[edit]^ "Pierrotage, pierotage" def. 1. Edwards, Jay Dearborn, and Nicolas Verton. A Creole lexicon architecture, landscape, people. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2004. 155. Print.This architecture-related article is a stub
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Ste. Geneviève, Missouri
Ste. Genevieve (Sainte-Geneviève with French spelling) is a city in Ste. Genevieve Township and is the county seat of Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri, United States.[7] The population was 4,410 at the 2010 census. Founded in 1735 by French Canadian colonists and settlers from east of the river, it was the first organized European settlement west of the Mississippi River in present-day Missouri.Contents1 History1.1 Le Vieux Village (Old Ste. Genevieve c. 1750) 1.2 Architecture 1.3 Culture 1.4 The "French Connection"2 Geography2.1 Nearby communities3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Government 5 Media 6 Notable people6.1 Gallery of notable people7 Historic flags of Ste
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Plasterboard
Drywall (also known as plasterboard, wallboard, gypsum panel, sheet rock, or gypsum board) is a panel made of calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum), with or without additives, typically extruded between thick sheets of facer and backer paper, utilized in the construction of interior walls and ceilings.[1] The plaster is mixed with fiber (typically paper and/or fibreglass), plasticizer, foaming agent, and various additives that can decrease mildew, increase fire resistance, and lower water absorption. Drywall construction became prevalent in North America as a speedier alternative to traditional lath and plaster.[2]Contents1 History 2 Manufacture 3 Specifications3.1 Canada and the United States 3.2 Europe 3.3 Australia and New Zealand4 Construction techniques 5 Sound control 6 Water damage and mold 7 High sulfur drywall illness and corrosion issues 8 Fire resistance8.1 Type X drywall 8.2 Type C drywall9 North American market9.1 Types availab
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