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Vanderbilt Family
The Vanderbilt family
Vanderbilt family
is an American family of Dutch origin that was prominent during the Gilded Age. Their success began with the shipping and railroad empires of Cornelius Vanderbilt, and the family expanded into various other areas of industry and philanthropy. Cornelius Vanderbilt's descendants went on to build grand mansions on Fifth Avenue in New York City, luxurious "summer cottages" in Newport, Rhode Island, the palatial Biltmore House
Biltmore House
in Asheville, North Carolina, and various other opulent homes. The Vanderbilts were once the wealthiest family in America. Cornelius Vanderbilt was the richest American until his death in 1877. After that, his son William acquired his father's fortune, and was the richest American until his death in 1885
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Interstate Commerce
The Commerce
Commerce
Clause describes an enumerated power listed in the United States Constitution (Article I, Section 8, Clause 3). The clause states that the United States Congress
United States Congress
shall have power "To regulate Commerce
Commerce
with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes." Courts and commentators have tended to discuss each of these three areas of commerce as a separate power granted to Congress.[1] It is common to see the individual components of the Commerce
Commerce
Clause referred to under specific terms: the Foreign Commerce Clause, the Interstate Commerce
Commerce
Clause,[2] and the Indian Commerce Clause. Dispute exists within the courts as to the range of powers granted to Congress by the Commerce
Commerce
Clause
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Indentured Servant
An indentured servant or indentured laborer is an employee (indenturee) within a system of unfree labor who is bound by a signed or forced contract (indenture) to work for a particular employer for a fixed time. The contract often lets the employer sell the labor of an indenturee to a third party. Indenturees usually enter into an indenture for a specific payment or other benefit, or to meet a legal obligation, such as debt bondage. On completion of the contract, indentured servants were given their freedom, and occasionally plots of land
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Utrecht (province)
Utrecht
Utrecht
(Dutch pronunciation: [ˈytrɛxt] ( listen)) is a province of the Netherlands. It is located in the centre of the country, bordering the Eemmeer
Eemmeer
in the north, the province of Gelderland
Gelderland
in the east, the river Rhine
Rhine
and Lek in the south, the province of South Holland
South Holland
in the west and the province of North Holland in the north-west. With an area of approximately 1,400 square kilometres (540 sq mi), it is the smallest of the twelve provinces
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Wolphert Gerretse
Wolfert Gerritse Van Couwenhoven (1 May 1579 – 1662[citation needed]), also known as Wolphert Gerretse van Kouwenhoven and Wolphert Gerretse, was an original patentee, director of bouweries (farms), and a founder of the New Netherland
New Netherland
colony.[1]His mark.He also founded the first European settlement on Long Island, called New Amersfoort,[2] and was a Schepen of New Amsterdam
New Amsterdam
in 1654
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New Amsterdam
New Amsterdam
New Amsterdam
(Dutch: Nieuw Amsterdam) was a 17th-century Dutch settlement established at the southern tip of Manhattan Island
Manhattan Island
that served as the seat of the colonial government in New Netherland. The factorij became a settlement outside Fort Amsterdam. The fort was situated on the strategic southern tip of the island of Manhattan and was meant to defend the fur trade operations of the Dutch West India Company in the North River (Hudson River). In 1624, it became a provincial extension of the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
and was designated as the capital of the province in 1625. By 1655, the population of New Netherland
New Netherland
had grown to 2,000 people, with 1,500 living in New Amsterdam
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Manhattan
Coordinates: 40°47′25″N 73°57′35″W / 40.79028°N 73.95972°W / 40.79028; -73.95972Manhattan New York CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateView from Midtown Manhattan facing south toward Lower ManhattanFlagEtymology: Lenape: Manna-hata (island of many hills)Nickname(s): The City[1]Location of Manhattan, shown in red, in New York CityCoordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′39″W / 40.72833°N 73.99417°W / 40.72833; -73.99417Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New York (Coterminous)City  New YorkSettled 1624Government • Type Borough (New York City) • Borough President Gale Brewer
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Nederland's Patriciaat
Nederland's Patriciaat, informally known as Het Blauwe Boekje (the blue book), is a book series published annually since 1910, containing the genealogies of important Dutch patrician non-noble families. It is published by the Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG) in The Hague. The Publication Commission of the CBG determines which families are included. The publication was modelled after the Genealogisches Handbuch bürgerlicher Familien. To be eligible for entry, families must have played an active and important role in Dutch society, fulfilling high positions in the government, in prestigious commissions and in other prominent public posts for over six generations or 150 years. The longer a family has been listed in the Blue Book, the higher its esteem
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Staten Island, New York
Staten Island
Staten Island
/ˌstætən ˈaɪlənd/ is the southernmost of the five boroughs of New York City
New York City
in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. Located in the southwest portion of the city, Staten Island
Staten Island
is the southernmost part of both the city and state of New York, with Conference House Park located at the southern tip of the island.[2] The borough is separated from New Jersey
New Jersey
by the Arthur Kill
Arthur Kill
and the Kill Van Kull, and from the rest of New York by New York Bay. With a 2017 Census-estimated population of 479,458[1] Staten Island
Staten Island
is the least populated of the boroughs but is the third-largest in land area at 58.5 sq mi (152 km2)
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Republic Of Salé
The Republic of Salé
Salé
was a short-lived city state at Salé
Salé
(modern Morocco), during the 17th Century. Located at the mouth of the Bou Regreg river, it was founded by Moriscos
Moriscos
from the town of Hornachos, in Western Spain. Moriscos
Moriscos
were the descendants of Muslims who were nominally converted to Christianity, and were subject to mass deportation during the Spanish Inquisition
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List Of Richest Americans In History
Virtually all sources agree on John D. Rockefeller
John D. Rockefeller
being the richest American in history, although these sources appear to define riches as an individual's wealth as a share of contemporary GDP. This method of comparing individuals' wealth across time is disputed. Economic blogger Scott Sumner, for example, notes Rockefeller was worth $1.4 billion dollars when he died, which is about $24 billion in 2018 dollars. Meanwhile Bill Gates
Bill Gates
was worth nearly $150 billion 2018 dollars in 1999[1]. Second richest in terms of wealth over contemporary GDP is disputed, with various sources listing Andrew Carnegie, Cornelius Vanderbilt, John Jacob Astor
John Jacob Astor
IV, Bill Gates
Bill Gates
or Henry Ford. Most sources agree on Carnegie
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Asheville, North Carolina
Asheville is a city and the county seat of Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States.[6] It is the largest city in Western North Carolina, and the 12th-most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of North Carolina. The city's population was 89,121 according to the 2016 estimates.[7] It is the principal city in the four-county Asheville metropolitan area, with a population of 424,858 in 2010.[8] Asheville is home to the National Centers For Environmental Information (NCEI), the world's largest active archive of environmental data. Many tourists come to Asheville for its breweries and restaurants
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Jan Janszoon
Jan Janszoon
Jan Janszoon
van Haarlem, commonly known as Murat Reis the Younger (c. 1570 – c. 1641), was a Dutch pirate who "turned Turk" after being captured by a Moorish state in 1618. He began serving as a Barbary pirate, one of the most famous of the 17th-century " Salé
Salé
Rovers". Together with other corsairs, he helped establish the independent Republic of Salé
Republic of Salé
at the city of that name, serving as the first President and Grand Admiral
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor
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Fifth Avenue
Route map: Google Template:Attached KML/Fifth Avenue KML is from WikidataFifth AvenueThe Museum Mile section of Fifth Avenue
Fifth Avenue
at the Metropolitan Museum of Art at 81st StreetOther name(s) Museum MileOwner City of New YorkMaintained by NYCDOTLength 6.2 mi[1][2] (10.0 km)Location Manhattan, New York CitySouth end Washington Square North in Greenwich VillageMajor junctions
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Berbers
Berbers
Berbers
or Amazighs (Berber languages: ⵉⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵏ Imaziɣen; singular: ⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖ Amaziɣ / Amazigh) are an ethnic group indigenous to North Africa, primarily inhabiting the Maghreb. They are distributed in an area stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Siwa Oasis
Siwa Oasis
in Egypt, and from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the Niger
Niger
River in West Africa. Historically, they spoke Berber languages, which together form the Berber branch of the Afroasiatic family. Since the Muslim conquest
Muslim conquest
of North Africa
North Africa
in the seventh century, a large number of Berbers
Berbers
inhabiting the Maghreb
Maghreb
(Tamazgha) have in varying degrees used as lingua franca the other languages spoken in North Africa
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